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608183 Posts in 24595 Topics by 3508 Members - Latest Member: quad73 May 28, 2017, 01:40:57 PM
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1  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Releases New and old on: May 15, 2017, 11:46:16 PM
Anyone got an idea of when

 1. Wild Honey stereo etc  complete info might be forthcoming  for summer ?   

2.  When ---if ever -- Live in Michigan concert digital downloads will get issued in UK ?   ( I find it a disgrace that UK fans have been ignored with this one )

3. When --if ever -- the touring BB might seek authority to change the licence so as to release new material ?  I believe the band's profile has suffered by the absence of new recordings. Radio coverage almost completely disappearing  IMO.
A new album is not going to increase their presence on radio - radio only wants the new stuff. How many times did you hear any TWGMTR songs on radio? Zero?
2  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Brian Wilson best of compilation on: May 12, 2017, 10:31:20 PM
I can't really see this kind of compilation happening. Brian's had only one really lasting song as a solo artist, Love and Mercy. It's the only song from his solo career he continues to perform night after night.
3  Smiley Smile Stuff / Brian Wilson Solo Albums / Re: Brian Wilson on: May 08, 2017, 11:16:57 AM
Borrowed this from my local friendly record-lending library today. The original 1988 version that is, with Dr. the most
prevalent abbreviation in the CD notes and Landy's name all over everything. I must admit it sounds great! "Melt
Away" never sounded better, although the whole album has an amazing atmosphere. "Overproduced" my Aunt Fanny...


Nice to know someone shares my opinion of this album.
4  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: In depth study of Brian's solo career? on: May 06, 2017, 10:36:19 PM
I think Brian's solo career has three phases: 1988-1998, 1999-2011, and 2012 on.

1988-1998: the very good but underproduced BW88. The acclaimed (and imho a bit overrated, but that's just me) Paley Sessions. Enter Joe Thomas, resulting in the underwhelming "Imagination". Brian is delivered form Landy, marries Melinda, but is probably still uncertain whether pursuing a solo career or trying to reconnect with the Beach Boys.

1998-2011: Carl passes, and any hope/wish of staying with the grievously diminished Beach Boys fades in Brian. Exit Joe Thomas. Brian starts the collaboration with the amazing Wondermints-plus band and, surprisingly, starts touring a lot, at least by previous standards. In the studio, what I consider his second halcyon period after 1966-1967: BWPS, TLOS, Gershwin. The sound, in this phase, is very organic and "indie-like", just as you would expect from a band where the Wondermints are so prominent.

2012 on: re-enter Joe. The temporarily reunited Beach do a great tour and a good album with a killer 4-songs finale. Brian doesn't take well the forced ending of the reunion, but makes the most of it continuing the collaboration with Al and taking on board first David then Blondie.
False start with Jeff Beck, but Brian & C insist with "external" collaborations, resulting in NPP, imho a good and generally underrated album.
In this phase, the sound has become much "slicker", unsurprisingly given Joe Thomas, and that's what seems most divisive among the fans. Some, like me, like it, others hate it to no end. Also divisive is the importance of collaborators, imho somewhat of a failed experiment; taking the songs one by one, I like them, but they are too many and by very diverse musicians, so on the whole they give the idea of a scattered album.    
Brian's focus seems to have further shifted from the studio to a volume of touring which is now "a lot" (bordering on "too much") by any standards. Let's hope for the fabled R&R album.  
I see things a little differently. From 1987 or whenever it was he started recording solo (aren't there some demos from 1985/86 in preparation for the solo album?), I see Brian as a guy who is re-engaged with recording and making new music. A lot of it isn't released (Paley sessions, Sweet Insanity), but he seems to be in the studio a lot during these years. Out of it, we get BW88, IJWMFTT, OCA, and Imagination. All are very enjoyable - in different ways.
The second phase of his solo career is when the touring begins in 99. From that point on, the focus is clearly on the old material from 1962-73. He still records, but recording is secondary to the Never Ending Touring. New songs turn up in the set list when an album is first released, but year after year, it is the old hits that he and the band perform. They've gotten a lot of mileage out of Pet Sounds and Smile, because, apparently, that's what Joe Public wants to hear.

And thats what puts the butts in the seats. And Pet Sounds allows Brian to charge more for a ticket than the NPP Tour.

But, thats par for the course for any legacy act.
Yes it is, sadly. Dave Davies from the Kinks is "touring to support his new solo album" - in quotes because he performs all of 2 songs from the new album, nothing from his previous solo discs; it's a night of 60's classics (most of which he didn't even write or sing on the records). He's been doing the same set list since he started touring on his own back in 1997/98. Insert a couple tracks from whatever the current cd is, otherwise it's the same songs, tour after tour. I remember the first time I saw the Kinks, back in 1978; they must have played over half of the songs from their current lp "Misfits". Sure, the old classics were there - Waterloo Sunset, A Well Respected Man, Lola, You Really Got Me, All Day and All of the Night - but they were still a contemporary group. 3 or 4 songs from the previous year's "Sleepwalker" album. In comparison, when I saw the Beach Boys that summer, they had already turned into an oldies act. Aside from a couple "15BO" songs, it was "Endless Summer" live.
5  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: 1988 article about Brian and Landy on: May 06, 2017, 10:26:06 PM
Timothy also wrote a very eye opening column about Brian's auto-bio in 1991. Another writer, Bill Holdship, took the pro-Landy stance, but his comments were very succinctly shut down by Mr. White.
6  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: In depth study of Brian's solo career? on: May 05, 2017, 10:37:20 PM
I think Brian's solo career has three phases: 1988-1998, 1999-2011, and 2012 on.

1988-1998: the very good but underproduced BW88. The acclaimed (and imho a bit overrated, but that's just me) Paley Sessions. Enter Joe Thomas, resulting in the underwhelming "Imagination". Brian is delivered form Landy, marries Melinda, but is probably still uncertain whether pursuing a solo career or trying to reconnect with the Beach Boys.

1998-2011: Carl passes, and any hope/wish of staying with the grievously diminished Beach Boys fades in Brian. Exit Joe Thomas. Brian starts the collaboration with the amazing Wondermints-plus band and, surprisingly, starts touring a lot, at least by previous standards. In the studio, what I consider his second halcyon period after 1966-1967: BWPS, TLOS, Gershwin. The sound, in this phase, is very organic and "indie-like", just as you would expect from a band where the Wondermints are so prominent.

2012 on: re-enter Joe. The temporarily reunited Beach do a great tour and a good album with a killer 4-songs finale. Brian doesn't take well the forced ending of the reunion, but makes the most of it continuing the collaboration with Al and taking on board first David then Blondie.
False start with Jeff Beck, but Brian & C insist with "external" collaborations, resulting in NPP, imho a good and generally underrated album.
In this phase, the sound has become much "slicker", unsurprisingly given Joe Thomas, and that's what seems most divisive among the fans. Some, like me, like it, others hate it to no end. Also divisive is the importance of collaborators, imho somewhat of a failed experiment; taking the songs one by one, I like them, but they are too many and by very diverse musicians, so on the whole they give the idea of a scattered album.    
Brian's focus seems to have further shifted from the studio to a volume of touring which is now "a lot" (bordering on "too much") by any standards. Let's hope for the fabled R&R album.  
I see things a little differently. From 1987 or whenever it was he started recording solo (aren't there some demos from 1985/86 in preparation for the solo album?), I see Brian as a guy who is re-engaged with recording and making new music. A lot of it isn't released (Paley sessions, Sweet Insanity), but he seems to be in the studio a lot during these years. Out of it, we get BW88, IJWMFTT, OCA, and Imagination. All are very enjoyable - in different ways.
The second phase of his solo career is when the touring begins in 99. From that point on, the focus is clearly on the old material from 1962-73. He still records, but recording is secondary to the Never Ending Touring. New songs turn up in the set list when an album is first released, but year after year, it is the old hits that he and the band perform. They've gotten a lot of mileage out of Pet Sounds and Smile, because, apparently, that's what Joe Public wants to hear.
7  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Mike Love One on One with AGD on: May 05, 2017, 10:24:11 PM
Although their hits were more sporadic, it is easy to forget that they played to their largest audiences during that 1980's America's Band era. The irony, I think, may be that's the era that Mike clings to the most moreso than 1962-65.
And I was one of the many going to those shows and enjoying them immensely. One comparison comes to mind: in 1987, I saw them at the fair In Puyallup, just a week after the reunited Monkees had been there. With all the hype surrounding the Monkees reunion, I expected their show to get a better reception than the Beach Boys (after all, we got to see them once every year). Nope, when the BB's stepped on stage and started singing all those classics, well, you just felt it in the crowd, everyone wanted to dance and sing along. The Monkees show was very good, but the advantage the BB's had was that great catalog of songs and those voices.
8  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: The reeeeeally long sax solo on Seems So Long Ago + sax on other '80s BB songs on: May 04, 2017, 11:47:47 PM
The sax solo on "Seems So Long Ago" might be long, but it never feels that way. It was a musical statement, no need to cut it off before it was finished. On the other hand, when McGuinn's 12 string is mixed up for the solo on "California Dreaming", I want it to continue, but instead that 80's sax (that they would recycle for Ko-Ko-Mo) takes over. Disappointing.
9  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Mike Love One on One with AGD on: May 04, 2017, 11:45:21 PM
Nice interview. He doesn't come across as a prick in this one. He can be kind and generous when he is approached the right way.
10  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: BB songs you love but other fans not so much on: May 04, 2017, 11:37:48 PM
Also gonna add Full Sail and Goin' South to that list. I've grown to really love em.

Sadly, those are my two picks for the OTHER list...the two songs that completely kill LA Light for me (so very, very boring...)

I know… I added those to this list specifically for you, Billy, because I recalled reading past posts of yours... I know that you are a fan who definitely doesn't like them! Smiley

I'm just coming to appreciate more of the Carl soft rock side lately, particularly his solo albums which I had dismissed very early on.  These LA Light album tracks were similar for me for a while, where I sort of wrote them off as being pretty meh.

I guess I try to get in the emotional headspace of somebody who was dealing with such chaos around them at the time, who was just really trying to chill the f*ck out in a very profound way after getting sober, and those songs are very indicative of that.  They sound like they came from a genuine place within Carl as an artist, even if they might seem somewhat lightweight on the surface.  

Learning about the artist's life and times in context helped me enjoy them more. For example, the "get my life in order" line seems like it was a very personal thing for him to say in 1979. Give them another listen with headphones, you might be surprised!
They're very good tracks for that late night thing, when everyone else has gone to bed, and you can cool out with some soft music.
11  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: BB songs you love but other fans not so much on: May 04, 2017, 02:43:59 PM
Livin' With a Heartache, Full Sail, Where I Belong, It's Gettin' Late
12  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Meeting Brian & Al vs Mike & Bruce on: May 04, 2017, 02:41:27 PM
I so much regret that I never got the chance to meet Carl Wilson, the one member of the Beach Boys that I've idolized since my early teen years.
I got to meet him once, 1983, after a solo show in Seattle. He was very kind, signed an album and photo for me, took time for everyone waiting backstage, even those who were a bit on the aggressive side. Wish I could have thought of something intelligent to say, but I was a fanboy...just lost in the clouds.
13  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Wild Honey LP Reissue in STEREO - 2017 on: April 29, 2017, 09:06:35 PM
I will be buying this. Wild Honey and Sunflower are my 2 favorite BB's albums, such happy music - a depressed soul like me needs all the happiness he can find.
14  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: New Brian interview 4/25 on: April 28, 2017, 02:16:40 PM
I wish Brian would do an album where he applies his magic touch to Bob Dylan songs. Beach Boys Party would obviously be the template for "Rainy Day Women #12 & 35". "Like a Rolling Stone" and "Positively 4th Street" could get the full Wrecking Crew treatment. Al would sound great singing "Blowin' in the Wind", and "Every Grain of Sand" seems to be a perfect song for Brian's mature voice.
15  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Mike Love \ on: April 28, 2017, 02:12:07 PM
There was actually a kind of funny and awkward episode on this board several years back when someone posted a video of Cowsill singing "Heroes and Villains", and somebody else noted it was pretty painful, and then Cowsill came on and posted and was actually pretty self-deprecating and honest about being open to the criticism.
Ha! Few posters said they couldn't stand his vocals. Cowsill agreed saying he sang like Kermit the Frog! Then me or smb. else added he's right, terrible voice. He was completely OK with it! Now *that's* "professional musician". He gained respect after that. 3D

Now if we could only get him to admit that while John Stamos is undoubtedly a cool guy to hang out with, he's an amateur musician and a blight on the band's legacy and the quality of live shows, then I'd have even more respect!

But I agree with what someone mentioned back when Foskett jumped ship to Mike's band; Brian should have simultaneously been trying to lure Totten and Cowsill into *his* band!

As corny as it is to have a Full(er) House actor in the lineup, I don't really mind Stamos too much. Mainly because I suppose I haven't heard him tarnish a live recording by standing out in an amateur way - although I haven't really listened to much live stuff during the Stamos era.

On one hand, because he's a BBs superfan, it's kinda cool that someone like that gets a chance to be a part of his favorite band. And since he seems like a genuinely nice dude, I can't really hate on his presence *too* much.  But yeah, ultimately if one thinks about it a little deeper, it becomes somewhat of a ridiculous joke, because it's no big secret that he's likely primarily there with a specific intent to attract a certain demographic of the audience.

What would be amazing is if Brian added Dave Coulier, Bob Saget, Mary Kate Olsen (and her much taller and older husband), and Andrea Barber to a string of BW shows, just to outdo the Stamos factor on the M&B side.
I'm surprised Mike hasn't added Mary-Kate or Ashley to the show just so he could hit on them. "Hey Little Tomboy", indeed!
16  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Kokomo Live on: April 28, 2017, 02:02:12 PM
Carl's studio vocals are what MAKE the song. Although I have to say that Mike's vocals are very good on the studio recording too, and as much as people might have issues with the song not being "BBs" enough, or too cheesy, Mike does sing well in this register. But without Carl's vocals, it's just weak sauce. Carl literally made the song.
I have a hard time hearing any other Beach Boy trying to sing Carl's vocals on ANY song. God Only Knows, Good Vibrations, Darlin', Kokomo - there's a reason that guy was special. THAT voice!
17  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Wild Honey LP Reissue in STEREO - 2017 on: April 26, 2017, 11:55:06 PM
Time for a Wild Honey 50th anniversary box set!
18  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Mike Love \ on: April 26, 2017, 11:54:03 PM
I sure hope Mike does the WIld Honey album or atleast more WH songs  in his American tour starting now and through out the whole year! Would love to see and hear that!
Yeah, Cowsill could sing those Carl leads pretty well. And let's hope Brian tours Smiley Smile when the PS tour is over. I want to see them put an empty swimming pool in front of the stage so Brian and his bandmates can get down there and replicate the vocals from "Wind Chimes".
19  Non Smiley Smile Stuff / General Music Discussion / Re: Fats Domino - official website on: April 26, 2017, 11:51:13 PM
Nice that he finally has a proper website. The PBS documentary from a couple years ago was pretty good, although I wish there had been more footage from the 60's and beyond. Even though the hits stopped in the early 60's, Fats continued to be a great live act. Saw him in 1986 and 1990, and he was as good as ever.
20  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Suicide playlist on: April 19, 2017, 11:24:19 PM
The only one of those songs I would put on a suicide playlist is Till I Die. I lean towards Phil Ochs songs for my suicide tunes - No More Songs, Jim Dean of Indiana, Rehearsals for Retirement, Chords of Fame.
21  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Endless Harmony doc interviews on: April 17, 2017, 11:51:29 PM
According to Alan Boyd in the September 1998 edition of ESQ, the other Carl interviews were taken from the Time-Life History of Rock 'n'Roll in 1993.
So that means there is probably some good footage there that we haven't seen yet. I liked EH the first time I saw it, but upon repeated viewings, I felt there was too much talk and not enough action...I mean, music (sorry, Paul Revere/Raiders fans). That's why a longer presentation would be better. Feature complete performances as much as possible. Also, I found Mike Love at his most annoying in EH. "Ultimately, I think the Beach Boys music meant so much to so many people because of the positivity - that was MY contribution! Brian was melancholy!" Gawd, someone shut him up!
22  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: 'Buddy' Wilbury on: April 12, 2017, 05:34:30 PM
Carl Perkins was the name I remember fans throwing around the most after Orbison's death, in terms of "if the band needs a replacement, that would seem most likely." I would tend to agree for lack of anybody else's name making more sense. He was obviously loved by George and also Jeff, and probably Petty as well. I don't know how much Dylan has mentioned Perkins over the years, but I can't imagine him objecting. And of course, Perkins and Orbison had been good friends and had worked together in past years.

Of course, Perkins was much more on the "rockabilly" side of things as compared to Orbison, who vacillated between rockabilly style and epic ballads. Perkins wouldn't have rounded out the band as well as Orbison had (I can't imagine Perkins singing something like "Not Alone Anymore", though he did write some good acoustic/country-ish ballads), but would have been the closest they could have gotten to Orbison. Harrison mentioned in interviews over the years that he was always fascinated with the sort of "American" quality of Dylan and Petty and felt it was a unique thing they brought that Harrison couldn't, and Perkins would have also fit this bill.

But yes, musically you could imagine Perkins fitting right in, whereas any of the Beach Boys, even Carl, didn't scream "five acoustic guitars" rockabilly status particularly.
There's a youtube video of Perkins singing Matchbox with Bob and his band circa 1993. There's a great Wilburys type song on Carl's final album, "Distance Makes No Difference With Love". Petty invited him to share the stage at some gigs in the mid 90's. Lots of history between those guys.
23  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: 'Buddy' Wilbury on: April 10, 2017, 02:44:06 PM
I could be wrong, because in public he was mostly very soft spoken, but I suspect Carl had a wacky sense of humour that would have blended with the Wilburys very well. I mean, Bob Dylan is not a guy you see laughing and smiling a lot in public, but he was definitely in on the gag with the Wilburys. Too bad Elvis Presley was not around for the gig - he and Harrison would have connected immediately, both being fans of the Pythons. That's assuming Colonel Parker was out of the way.

If you watch the "Beatles Anthology", they rather wryly point out that some years later Elvis wasn't exactly singing the praises of people like the Beatles when he was visiting with the President. Sharing a love for Monty Python I don't think would have been enough.

There's a rather snarky but funny interview Harrison did around 1995 for Australian TV to promote the "Anthology" and whatnot, and he's rather snarky about Elvis in that interview too, and one point pointing out that they "found some blood in his drug stream."

(Off topic, but this was also the interview where he was already being kind of smartass about the Beatles "reunion" tracks, saying that he hoped when he died that "someone takes all my crap demos and turns them into hit records.")

Oddly enough, Elvis' humour could be a bit snarky, too, although mostly that was in private conversation, like when he told the director of one of his movies "there were some pretty funny things in that script, i'm gonna have to read it sometime!" Another time, they were discussing a song in the film, and Elvis said he wanted the Jordanaires to sing behind him on the song. The director said "Elvis, you'll be riding down the highway on a motorcycle when you sing this song, where would the Jordanaires be?" and Elvis replied "the same damn place the music is coming from!"

A more likely Wilbury might have been Carl Perkins. George had a long running friendship with him, and Petty became friends with him in his later years. No, he wasn't a star of the magnitude of Dylan, Orbison, etc, but he was a guy they all respected and loved.
24  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: 'Buddy' Wilbury on: April 08, 2017, 12:04:25 AM
I could be wrong, because in public he was mostly very soft spoken, but I suspect Carl had a wacky sense of humour that would have blended with the Wilburys very well. I mean, Bob Dylan is not a guy you see laughing and smiling a lot in public, but he was definitely in on the gag with the Wilburys. Too bad Elvis Presley was not around for the gig - he and Harrison would have connected immediately, both being fans of the Pythons. That's assuming Colonel Parker was out of the way.
25  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Why All The Hate Concerning Album/Song Production? on: April 07, 2017, 11:58:08 PM
I was never as bothered by the 80's production touches on BB85 or BW88 as some; I was growing up when everything on the radio had that overproduced, synthy sound, so I was used to it. And like it or not, if you wanted airplay back then, you had to present your music in a way that was acceptable to programmers and the mass audience. It's true that at the same time that sound was dominant, there was a movement among some of the new wave rockers back to the basics. Stray Cats, Marshall Crenshaw, the Blasters, Los Lobos - and if you were a veteran rocker like Rick Nelson or the Everly Brothers, that might inspire you to get back to basics in your own music. But I never thought of the Beach Boys as that type of band. Their greatest creations were dense, heavily layered studio productions. In 1966, that meant having a studio full of great musicians playing together live. In 1986, that meant tracking parts separately, on synths and drum machines. Although, in the 90's, when Unplugged caught on big, I could have imagined the BB's doing a semi-live disc of stripped down performances - that's kind of what Brian did on IJWMFTT.
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