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Author Topic: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge  (Read 16572 times)
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« Reply #100 on: March 11, 2015, 03:09:31 AM »

How about bad suggestions? Never check Rod Stewart. That guy cannot do anything, talentless brat, as it were.

But he was brilliant with The Jeff Beck Group and the Faces.
What to check 1st? From either band, I mean.

Stay With Me by the Faces is brilliant. As for The Jeff Beck Group, their debut album called Truth is worth checking out, and their cover of Jailhouse Rock from their second album is also quite good
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« Reply #101 on: March 12, 2015, 04:46:15 AM »



Why, yes, I have heard of Andy Paley. I've also heard of Jonathon Richman, thanks to the one and only Modern Lovers album. I've been meaning to check out this solo albums, although I know they're nothing like the Modern Lovers album. Still, I'm at least hoping the same sort of songwriting personality will carry over into his solo stuff. Anyway, cool, I'll have to check these out. Which one's your favorite?

Jonathan Sings is my favourite. It's one of my favourite albums period, and I think lots of people share my love for it. Though Jonathan himself, contrary as he is, hates it, but he still plays lots of songs from it so it can't be the songs he dislikes.

Someone talking themselves up doesn't detract from the actual quality of the music, although I can see how it could put some people off. But, still, it's the music we're grading, not the human being.

exactly.
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« Reply #102 on: March 12, 2015, 05:04:17 AM »

feelsflow, I really enjoyed your thoughts on Pete Shelley's Homosapien. I haven't listened to it in so long. I'm listening to it now on Spotify- I'd never heard any of these bonus tracks before. The album always ended for me with the wistful "It's Hard Enough Knowing".

It's always funny looking at the Spotify listening stats. Lots of people (relatively) want to listen to the title track (which I heard in a club recently) but hardly anyone is listening to, say, "Guess I Must Have Been In Love With Myself" which is my favourite song on the album by far. Though I love the lyrics of the title track, which were so daring for a 1981 single.

I think he sings "stuff" not "snuff", unless he flubs the line. Snuff is very much legal. A friend of mine swears by it.

I see what you mean about "Keats' Song" being a bit Beau Mondes-y. I like the way in a futuristic sounding record you have a track dedicated to one 19th century romantic poet, sung by a man who named himself after another one. A link to the (distant) past.

XL1 made no impression on me at all but maybe I should give that one another chance.

These bonus tracks then- "Witness the Change" does sound like a b-side to me, but "Maxine", "In Love With Somebody Else" and "Love in Vain" sound really good.



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« Reply #103 on: March 12, 2015, 04:54:59 PM »

ANYTHING by New Order they released in the 80s.

Remain In Light by Talking Heads

The Stone Roses first album

Shoot Out The Lights - Richard & Linda Thompson

Hounds Of Love by Kate Bush

Spinal Tap (original soundtrack)
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« Reply #104 on: March 13, 2015, 10:18:59 PM »

feelsflow, I really enjoyed your thoughts on Pete Shelley's Homosapien. I haven't listened to it in so long. I'm listening to it now on Spotify- I'd never heard any of these bonus tracks before. The album always ended for me with the wistful "It's Hard Enough Knowing".

It's always funny looking at the Spotify listening stats. Lots of people (relatively) want to listen to the title track (which I heard in a club recently) but hardly anyone is listening to, say, "Guess I Must Have Been In Love With Myself" which is my favourite song on the album by far. Though I love the lyrics of the title track, which were so daring for a 1981 single.

I think he sings "stuff" not "snuff", unless he flubs the line. Snuff is very much legal. A friend of mine swears by it.

I see what you mean about "Keats' Song" being a bit Beau Mondes-y. I like the way in a futuristic sounding record you have a track dedicated to one 19th century romantic poet, sung by a man who named himself after another one. A link to the (distant) past.

XL1 made no impression on me at all but maybe I should give that one another chance.

These bonus tracks then- "Witness the Change" does sound like a b-side to me, but "Maxine", "In Love With Somebody Else" and "Love in Vain" sound really good.





Good to hear Shelly is still being played in the clubs.  Buzzcocks had a strong presence in the place I was working in 1978-79.  An import wholesale business with Italy.  The boss that ran the warehouse was from London, had a couple of his buddies with him who also worked there, so there was a British presence when we were deciding what to play.  One of them had two favorites, Buzzcocks and dire Straits.  He supported Shelly's move and we heard that too.  He was playing them on vinyl.  He's the one that had the singles, and why I remember hearing them back then - they weren't playing that kind of stuff in the clubs.  I don't remember if Homosapien even had a lyric sheet.  I looked up the words to "Pusher Man" on several of the lyrics sites, and they all say stuff and snuff.  It rhymes better than what he was really thinking of.  Here's the first verse:

I met a good man
He had some good stuff
He showed me a bag
and he pulled out the snuff
I had just one try
And that was enough
Water poured from my eyes
God stuff this rough snuff

It's not just the lyrics, it's also his delivery.  I went back today, I'm listening on Spotify too - not all of it is on youtube.  Great to hear it again.  I forgot to look at the stats, but it's like youtube.  Can't believe the low and high numbers on what people listen to.

   

     
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« Reply #105 on: March 14, 2015, 02:29:53 AM »

You're right, it is snuff and you're right, it is funnier that way. Sorry, I forgot to listen out for it last time so I just went from memory.
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« Reply #106 on: March 16, 2015, 12:03:00 PM »

So, for anyone who cares - and if you don't, then scroll down to the big picture with people and words - I've decided to change the way I go about this. I've gone back and saved everyone's suggestions, but to make this manageable, I've cut down what was left and added in my own picks for the 80s, and I've created the list I want to get through for this decade. I've saved everyone's suggestions, and will get to them in the future whenever I feel like listening to something new from this decade. But for now, here's something from my final list (that none of you suggested):

The dB's Stands for Decibels


One of the most noticeable things about this band is the the two songwriters, Chris Stamey and Peter Holsapple, both talented, yet with very different songwriting personalities. As you continue to play through the album, the two opposing forces contrast and balance each other well and it becomes easier to figure out who wrote which song. While Stamey's songs are exceedingly odd and psychedelic, Holsapple's songs are always more grounded and able to reel you in after a string of Stamey's out-there experimentations. This dynamic between the writers characterizes the second song on the record, "Dynamite" (credited to both songwriters), and it gives a brief, 2:36 idea of what the two together are like: Stamey brings the weird chords, weird lyrics, weird melodies, and a focus on keyboards; Holsapple brings a focus on guitar (and along with it, riffs) and more conventional song structure.

Christ Stamey songs are filled with weird chord changes and mercurial shifts in mood and structure. In fact, Stamey has a gift for song construction, as the songs evolve and grow in different ways - it almost seems impossible to follow the structure of the gently psychedelic "She's Not Worried". This weird approach to structure carries over to "Espionage", bearing a riff resembling what you might hear from a 60s James Bond movie and probably resembles what it must be to experience hallucinogenics while doing whatever it is spies do - spying, I guess. The song reinforces this with bizarre changes throughout the song and weird drags in the melody and chords, similar to the melody and chords of "Dynamite". Perhaps the most normal song he contributes to this album "Tearjerkin'", is still dynamic, not having a clear verse/chorus/bridge, but seems to evolve as it goes along. The sections of the song where he asks you to take a photograph/off your clothes are grou with lovely melodies and harmonies. "Cycles Per Second" has a very Eastern-flavored melody and some of his most dense lyrics "Cycles per second, forging a neuronic aperture".

Peter Holsapple is more earthy, and comes off as greatly influenced by Alex Chilton. In fact, the opening song "Black and White" is sort of like "Kizza Me" in approach: frenetic and fragmented. Once the opening lines of "I, I never would hurt you, and even if I did you, you never would tell me" in Peter's higher, yet imperfect register, you can tell you're in for something great. "The Fight" doesn't seem to owe much to Alex/Big Star, but it has a great guitar groove and lyrics about domestic strife. While the verses have him putting up a tough front with propulsive guitars and melody, the brief beginning of the chorus shows a different emotional reaction, one that is hurt and saddened by what has happened. "Bad Reputation" and "Big Brown Eyes" are perhaps the two most straightforward songs on the album - well, other than that weird middle 8 that "Bad Reputation" has. The former a song about about the new girl in school who has a less than great reputation among the students, but Holsapple isn't buying it, saying "They say you got a bad reputation, I think it's their imagination, you're an angel". He does a wonderful job of managing to tap into the high-school-y love that so many other bands attempt, except he brings clever lyrics and a good idea to what can be a cliche subject. On the latter, he delivers the most plain song, earnest melodies accompany lyrics like "Every time I look into your big brown eyes, I get paralyzed" and "You give me something to take the day away."

To finish the record, both Stamey and Holsapple contribute perhaps their best songs on the record, "I'm in Love" and "Moving in Your Sleep" respectively. For his, Stamey takes what his earlier songs on the records promised - interesting melodies, harmonies, arrangements, structures, shifts - and then utilizes all of it to create this magnificent , confused love song. Then he caps it all off with that gorgeous chorus. He also delivers very Chilton-like singing on his "Anyway, it works out, it works out anyway" sections. Then, we come to the last song, and Holsapple has written the greatest Third/Sister Lovers song that wasn't on Third/Sister Lovers. The lonely guitar and piano create a downcast atmosphere and the melody is sweet, yet sad. It's difficult to tell by the lyrics, but there's something dark happening here, and you get the feeling these two people aren't healthy for each other in any way. In fact, the happiest moment in the song is when he declares that someday she may remember him. The song ends bleakly, as he pleads to be remembered.

I'm admittedly a sucker for this kind of music, but I like it. If you have ears, you should hear it.
« Last Edit: March 16, 2015, 05:30:06 PM by Bubbly Waves » Logged
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« Reply #107 on: March 17, 2015, 11:40:15 AM »

Power-Popping thru the 80's with The dB's!!

The Chilton connection is unmistakable.  So they were wearing their Alex and Big Star records out.  "Black and White" is a great opener.  I keep mentioning one of my favorite Power-Pop groups of this time, The Records.  You guys listened to them yet?  This reminds me of their sound a bit.  "Dynamite" - I have four favorites on this record.  This track is included on that list.  The way they phrase the lyrics is similar to Partridge's "Senses Working Overtime."  Your describing it as dragging the words.  I agree.  Love the organ.  It's an Ace Tone TOP-1.  Live, Peter was the only one on organ - but both of them could play one.  Maybe on the record, both were.  I only saw them once, they opened for Tom Petty - I think it was the Damn the Torpedoes tour, '81 or '82, Chris was still in the group.  They should have written more songs together.

"She's Not Worried" - fav #2.  Some of the tracks were mixed at Martin Rushent's studio, and some overdubs were added there.  I found a reference to Andy Clark adding synths to the first two albums.  Andy was hot for the moment, after doing Bowie sessions for Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps.  At first I thought it was an accordion, but on second listen, it must be a synth.

"the Fight" - for the pogoers.  Always fighting in the mosh pit.  I doubt they were listening to close for lyrical quotes!  "Espionage" - fav #3.  I think Jellyfish may have been influenced by this one, sounds like some of the stuff they did.  "Tearjerkin'" - fav #4.  For me, the first side is much stronger than the second.  The best song on side 2 is "I'm In Love."  "Moving in Your Sleep" might grow on me with a few more plays.

I gave a listen to their second album.  Favorites were "We Were Happy There" "Feel Good (today)" and "Neverland" -

I'm wondering if they are on any of the Old Grey Whistle Test DVDs.  They performed several songs on the show - "Big Brown Eyes" Ph Factor" and "Cycles Per Second."  They were not a Stiff act, but there is some connections to Nick Lowe (they did some recording at his Shepherd's Bush studio) with Roger Bechirian producing.  Roger engineered many Lowe and Costello records there.  Their first tour of the UK was called the Taking Liberties tour, Costello nicked that for the title of one of his comps.  Stiff America released a live comp from one of the shows on that tour with the dB's on two tracks called Start Swimming.  I collected Stiff Records, and used to have this... another record I had to leave behind when I moved across the country.  It looks like that was the only American release (until they were picked up by Bearsville in '84) from this short lived group.  What was your source for this Bubbly?  The youtube version wasn't mastered very well.  I might like it even more if they could get it re-mastered.  It's a good record tho.  Good pick.  What else ya' got on your new list?    
« Last Edit: March 17, 2015, 02:44:42 PM by feelsflow » Logged

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« Reply #108 on: March 17, 2015, 12:30:42 PM »

Just remembered something I have on vinyl with Chris Stamey on guitar, piano and vocals.  He probably came into the sessions with Stipe.
Give it a try, you might like it.

Golden Palominos Visions of Excess (1985):  https://youtu.be/Fwl3zZuatpA?list=PL2893B39FD85F6455 
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« Reply #109 on: March 17, 2015, 05:52:50 PM »

I tagged along for some of these and Marshall Crenshaw has been my favourite so far, I think. Not really power pop as I've seen it listed in a few places, but pleasantly concise, clean-cut rock 'n' roll. I'm not terribly familiar with the work of Buddy Holly, who it looks as though Marshall is modelling himself after here, but I just found myself attracted to the nostalgic vibe of this album. "Someday Someway" was the instant standout for me - that's a lovely little pop tune - and on repeated listens I've come to really like "There She Goes Again," "The Usual Thing," and "Not For Me." I'll probably be playing this album a lot around summer, and I'm interested in trying Field Day, which from the looks of things is at least almost as good.
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« Reply #110 on: March 18, 2015, 03:11:51 AM »

[/color]The dB's!!

The Chilton connection is unmistakable.  Live, Peter was the only one on organ - but both of them could play one.  

What was your source for this Bubbly?  The youtube version wasn't mastered very well.  I might like it even more if they could get it re-mastered.  It's a good record tho.  Good pick.  What else ya' got on your new list?    

Yeah, great pick, how remiss of me not to mention them earlier (thank christ for those Smilers who have their heads screwed on).

I love their first 2 albums, although I feel the Repercussions finds Stamey managing to merge quirk and accessibility (Ask For Jill), while Holsapple's numbers, enjoyable and lyrically intriguing, lack the urgency of his  Stands for... picks.

Stamey actually played bass for Alex Chilton for a year circa '77, pretty cool for him.  The band was originally Chris Stamey and the db's, but paired it back a little after Peter joined, initially on keyboards.

I've been fortunate enough to get my hands on both albums on vinyl (x2 for each) - I also bought the Collector's Choice twofer CD from '01, which was mastered for CD by Chris Stamey himself (as were the IRS CDs if you come across them).

There are CD editions and a vinyl pressing (a comp called Amplifier) on a German label (Line), which are not as well mastered (I can vouch for the vinyl item - it's not as sharp; but just passing on the message re the Line issued CDs, don't have 'em).

Good times!
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« Reply #111 on: March 19, 2015, 03:42:18 AM »


i am listening to a cassette, I gotta stop doing that.
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« Reply #112 on: March 20, 2015, 12:24:37 PM »

Rockpile, Seconds of Pleasure

This is a solid, fun album. Nick Lowe and Dave Edmunds were always a bit of revivalists, and they finally let it all loose here. If not for the Squeeze cover (which is pretty good), it wouldn't be that difficult to mistake this for an album from the 50s, although it's much more consistent. The band is incredibly tight (those stop-and-starts on "You Ain't Nothin' but Fine" are something to behold), and Nick Lowe has written a solid set of songs to match the relatively obscure set of covers that are also on the record. My only complaint is that I actually Lowe's originals much more than their covers, and I wish there was more of them.

Also great is the bonus EP included on the CD, Nick Lowe & Dave Edmunds Sing the Everly Brothers. They play through four Everly Brothers songs in what seems to be a live setting, and it really showcases their singing ability. One of my favorite Everly Brothers songs, "Crying in the Rain", is included on the EP and they sing the harmonies beautifully. Very impressive.
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« Reply #113 on: April 02, 2015, 12:19:29 PM »

The Cure, Poronography
An extremely dense, dark, and claustrophobic album. I like it.

Pet Shop Boys, Actually
Everything seemed fine and well-written, but it's not really my thing.

Cocteau Twins, Treasure
I loved this record. I totally dig the dream-pop thing they do and the singer is excellent. I love the weird vocal stuff she does.

Madness, the Rise & Fall
I did not like this. I thought there was about 3 good songs: "Primrose Hill", "Our House", and "Madness". The rest was nothing worth mentioning.

Love and Rockets, Earth, Sun, Moon
I don't really feel like I got a handle on this record. It mostly seemed like stuff I would like, but it never really grabbed me.

Big Black, Songs About Fucking
Powerful, noisy stuff. Is there actually something good under all that noise? I'm not sure. There might be.

Felt, Forever Breathes the Lonely Word
This is a great record. Not a bad moment on the whole thing. Have you ever listened to the Velvet Underground's self-titled album and thought "this could use some ever-present organ and poppier songwriting"? If you have, then this is the album for you.

Aztec Camera, High Land Hard Rain
This was another record I never really figured out. I like the jangly sound, but none of it made too big of an impression.

The Feelies, Crazy Rhythms
It's a fine record, but I couldn't shake the feeling that I heard all this before (the one that came to mind the most was the debut by the Modern Lovers). Still, it's good stuff and I, at least, can never have enough of this kind of music.

Bauhaus, In the Flat Field
It's cool, but I struggle with Peter Murphy's voice, which I find to be cartoonish.

New Order, Power, Corruption & Lies
I liked it - not the sound I was expecting from this album. I don't think the record ever rises above the opening cut, "Age of Consent", which is some blissful, jangly pop music. I LOVE "AGE OF CONSENT".

They Might Be Giants, Lincoln
I did not enjoy this at all. The music sounds like it was made in Garage Band and the singer has an unbelievably annoying voice. There are some nice things to be found, like "They'll Need a Crane" (basically only worth it for the lyrics), but it's not worth it.

Throwing Muses, untitled
Another great record. Kristin Hersh is a great singer and songwriter, and I love how her songs have these drastic shifts. Cool stuff.

Les Rita Mitsouko, Rita Mitsouko
This is a fine album, but not one that really grabbed my attention.

Rain Parade, Emergency Third Rail Power Trip
Great album. Like the Byrds, but sleepier. I love it. Check out "What's She Done to Your Mind".

Pete Shelley, Homosapien
A shame it's not a Buzzcocks record, but Shelley still has his wonderful songwriting style intact for this album.

The Stone Roses, the Stone Roses
This was good. Not something I like as much as some of these others, but there's some good stuff to be found here.

Meat Puppets, Meat Puppets II
This is a really cool album. It's like aggressive country-psych. I dig it.

Barry Adamson, Moss Side Story
Really interesting album and idea, a fake soundtrack to a murder mystery. I didn't get to spend as much time with this album as I would have liked, but it is a riveting listen.

Jonathan Ricman and the Modern Lovers, Jonathan Sings!
Not what I was expecting really. A mellow, catchy record. I played it while cooking and had a swell time.

Paul Simon, Graceland
Um.... what's all the fuss about? I don't get it. The a cappella bits were nice - the beginning to "Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes" and especially "Homeless" -  and I liked "You Can Call Me Al", although the arena-ready synth-riff blast is somewhat odd. It's fine.

The Wedding Present, George Best
Another great album. The music is made up hyperactive bass and aggressive, jangly guitars that are strummed at light-speed. The lyric side is also very interesting - I especially love the opening cut, "Everyone Thinks He Looks Daft". An incredibly petty break-up song, the singer wants you to know that everyone thinks your new boyfriend looks daft.

Donald Fagen, the Nightfly
What antiseptic schlock. Everything is squeaky clean and shiny and I'm gonna throw up in a bucket. If I discovered anything about myself during this time, it's that I have absolutely no time for "sophisti-pop".

Pixies, Doolittle
This is a good album. Frank Black is certainly an interesting songwriter, and "Debaser" is one of the greatest things I've ever heard. Or at least that's what I think currently.

The Bats, Daddy's Highway
A lovely jangle pop album.


I love jangle pop. So sue me.
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« Reply #114 on: April 02, 2015, 12:29:06 PM »

Now that I've finished clearing out all the reviews, here's a list of everything 80s I've listened to since opening this thread (notice they're all different bands):

Hee Haw - the Birthday Party
Sixteen Tambourines - the Three O'Clock
Killing Joke - Killing Joke
Kilimajaro - the Teardrop Explodes
Skylarking - XTC
Psonic Psunspot - the Dukes of Stratosphear
Purple Rain - Prince
Eden - Everything but the Girl
Searching for the Young Soul Rebels - Dexys Midnight Runners
Murmur - REM
This Nation's Saving Grace - the Fall
16 Lovers Lane - the Go-Betweens
Freaks - Pulp
Script of the Bridge - the Chameleons
The Queen Is Dead - the Smiths
Steve McQueen - Prefab Sprout
Imperial Bedroom - Elvis Costello
Our Favorite Shop - the Style Council
Porcupine - Echo & the Bunnymen
Marshall Crenshaw - Marshall Crenshaw
Globe of Frogs - Robyn Hitchcock
Call of the West - Wall of Voodoo
The Only Fun in Town - Josef K
Colour of Spring - Talk Talk
Hotter Than July - Stevie Wonder
Jump! - Van Dyke Parks
Dare - the Human League
Talk Talk Talk - Psychedelic Furs
Tender Pervert - Momus
Songs About Fucking - Big Black
Stands for Decibels - the dB's
Seconds of Pleasure/Sing the Everly Brothers - Rockpile
Earth, Sun, Moon - Love and Rockets
Forever Breathes the Lonely Word - Felt
In the Flat Field - Bauhaus
Crazy Rhythms - the Feelies
The Rise & Fall - Madness
High Land, Hard Rain - Aztec Camera
Lincoln - They Might Be Giants
Treasure - Cocteau Twins
Rita Mitsouko - Les Rita Mitsouko
Power, Corruption & Lies - New Order
untitled - Throwing Muses
Meat Puppets II - Meat Puppets
Homosapien - Pete Shelley
Actually - Pet Shop Boys
Emergency Third Rail Power Trip - Rain Parade
The Stone Roses - the Stone Roses
George Best -the Wedding Present
Jonathan Sings! - Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers
Graceland - Paul Simon
Moss Side Story - Barry Adamson
Pornography - the Cure
Daddy's Highway - the Bats
Donald Fagen - the Nightfly
Pixies - Doolittle


Here are some repeat bands:

Ocean Rain - Echo & the Bunnymen
Parade - Prince
The Wonderful and Frightening Word of... - the Fall

I've also listened to Kate Bush's Hounds of Love, which is an album and artist I never got 'round to writing about, but discovered before the start of this thread.


Here are some record labels that are/were of special interest to me:
4AD
Creation
Flying Nun
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« Reply #115 on: April 02, 2015, 12:39:19 PM »

And, with that, I consider my journey to be completed. Of course, there are always more bands and albums I want to explore (I would list them, but it's just too many), but for this thread's purposes, my goal has been accomplished. I've discovered a lot of stuff that I love and look forward to listening to more/exploring more. Thank you to everyone who contributed in some way, it was fun. I'll probably continue to use this thread to talk about music from the 80s, but that won't be for a good, long while. Bubbly needs a break.

Looking forward, I know a certain person named feelsflow has been interested in tackling a 70s appreciation thread....
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« Reply #116 on: April 02, 2015, 01:21:15 PM »

Bubbly needs a break.

I should think you do! What an achievement----kudos, sir.

And now onward and upward to that '70s topic... ;=)
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« Reply #117 on: April 02, 2015, 04:49:12 PM »

My God you've been listening to a lot of albums! I'm glad you liked some of them (especially the ones that were my picks!) Just picked out a few comments to respond to:


Cocteau Twins, Treasure
I loved this record. I totally dig the dream-pop thing they do and the singer is excellent. I love the weird vocal stuff she does.

Madness, the Rise & Fall
I did not like this. I thought there was about 3 good songs: "Primrose Hill", "Our House", and "Madness". The rest was nothing worth mentioning.


Throwing Muses, untitled
Another great record. Kristin Hersh is a great singer and songwriter, and I love how her songs have these drastic shifts. Cool stuff.

Les Rita Mitsouko, Rita Mitsouko
This is a fine album, but not one that really grabbed my attention.


Donald Fagen, the Nightfly
What antiseptic schlock. Everything is squeaky clean and shiny and I'm gonna throw up in a bucket. If I discovered anything about myself during this time, it's that I have absolutely no time for "sophisti-pop".


Great choice of Cocteaus record! Though there's plenty more what that came form.

Likewise Throwing Muses. "Hate My Way" is one of my favourite songs.

I think Madness were really a singles band. I think the greatest hits are all you need.

Maybe that's true for Les Rita Misouko too. I've only heard their greatest hits and Cool frenesie and I didn't even like all the songs on those but I thought that when they were good, they were very good. E.g. "Marcia Baila", "Les amants" and "Cool frenesie".

Don't see what's not to get about Graceland, personally. I can see that some people might not like his personality or lyrics, or disapprove of the appropriation of other cultures' music, but all the songs of that album have really strong melodies to these ears. Very varied album too.

Love the Fagen review! I got that once at a charity shop. Took a chance on it because I'd heard good things.  As soon as that first song came on, which I knew well from radio but had never previously known what it was, I was like, "oh, it's this! I don't wanna listen to this!"
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BrianAlDaveFan
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« Reply #118 on: May 06, 2015, 12:51:10 AM »

Albums:
Roky Erickson - "Don't Slander Me"
The Replacements - "Tim"

(The above are perfect albums, to me. This post is just for starters, but I will stand by those two albums for my whole life.)

Songs:
Fischer-Z - "So Long"
Dragon - "Rain"


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KDS
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« Reply #119 on: May 07, 2015, 11:32:29 AM »

Black Sabbath - Heaven and Hell

Queensryche - Operation Mindcrime

Roger Waters - The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking

The Traveling Wilburys

Iron Maiden - Piece of Mind

Ozzy Osbourne - Diary of a Madman

Judas Priest - British Steel

Scorpions - Blackout

Yngwie Malmsteen's Rising Force

Deep Purple - Perfect Strangers

Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet

Motley Crue - Shout at the Devil

Europe - The Final Countdown

Def Leppard - Pyromania

Robert Plant - Now and Zen

Rush - Moving Pictures

Metallica - Master of Puppets

Pink Floyd - The Final Cut

U2 - War

Bruce Springsteen - Born in the USA

KIX - Blow My Fuse

Van Halen - 5150

John Fogerty - Centerfield

AC/DC - Back in Black
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« Reply #120 on: May 09, 2015, 09:40:37 PM »

I definitely agree with:
Pink Floyd - The Final Cut (with all credit going to Roger Waters)
One of the greatest albums of all time, for me.

And I also like:
Roger Waters - The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking
U2 - War
Bruce Springsteen - Born in the USA

And I applaud you on your diverse taste in music! Smiley

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The Demon
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« Reply #121 on: May 10, 2015, 07:14:36 AM »


Madness, the Rise & Fall
I did not like this. I thought there was about 3 good songs: "Primrose Hill", "Our House", and "Madness". The rest was nothing worth mentioning.

I'm curious, how many times did you listen to this?  You found nothing to like in the majestic "Tomorrow's (Just Another Day)" or the wondrous, mock-glib, anti-war "Blue Skinned Beast"?  I cannot find a bad track on the album, nor among the related singles and b-sides ("House of Fun," "Don't Look Back," "Driving in My Car," "Animal Farm," "Riding on My Bike," and "Walking with Mr. Wheeze").  Even the Costello version of "Tomorrow's (Just Another Day)" is fun.  Truthfully, it's difficult to find a bad track among the first five albums.  Dismissing Madness would be like saying the Kinks only had three good songs.

Quote
Big Black, Songs About Fucking
Powerful, noisy stuff. Is there actually something good under all that noise? I'm not sure. There might be.

Noisy, yes, but also very melodic.  It is no surprise that Kurt Cobain was passionate about them, or Bauhaus for that matter.  Both used noise to create melody.

Quote
New Order, Power, Corruption & Lies
I liked it - not the sound I was expecting from this album. I don't think the record ever rises above the opening cut, "Age of Consent", which is some blissful, jangly pop music. I LOVE "AGE OF CONSENT".

Their singles always seemed to have a boundless passion and urge to do something different which I think the albums, as good as they are, sometimes lack.  I would not expect blissful, jangly pop from them, though.  They do that, but it's not all they do, and you will miss some vital music.  There is more in this world than is dreamt of in your 12-string Smiley

Quote
They Might Be Giants, Lincoln
I did not enjoy this at all. The music sounds like it was made in Garage Band and the singer has an unbelievably annoying voice. There are some nice things to be found, like "They'll Need a Crane" (basically only worth it for the lyrics), but it's not worth it.

Their voices can be annoying at first, but their songwriting skills are very sound.  I think they might be more well-regarded if other artists covered their songs, but of course this is not so common in our post-Beatle world.  Still, I am a bit shocked to see how dismissive you are of some of these records.  Did you not find "They'll Need a Crane" to be memorable musically?  I felt they'd reached a new plateau with that, much as the Beatles did with "She Loves you," sounding more assured than before.  You hear no melody, wit, or charm in "Ana Ng," "Purple Toupee," "Where Your Eyes Don't Go," or "Piece of Dirt"?  I'll admit I did not like their music at first, but after a few listens they became quite addictive.  

Quote
Pete Shelley, Homosapien
A shame it's not a Buzzcocks record, but Shelley still has his wonderful songwriting style intact for this album.

I know how you feel.  I love the record, but wish that they'd released his demos of some of these songs as part of the "Different Kind of Tension" reissue, since some of the songs were originally meant for a fourth Buzzcocks album.  That said, the song "Homosapien" actually predates the Buzzcocks.

Quote
Barry Adamson, Moss Side Story
Really interesting album and idea, a fake soundtrack to a murder mystery. I didn't get to spend as much time with this album as I would have liked, but it is a riveting listen.

Thank you for the recommendation.  I love his music for the film "Lost Highway" and his playing in Magazine is certainly gripping.

Quote
Donald Fagen, the Nightfly
What antiseptic schlock. Everything is squeaky clean and shiny and I'm gonna throw up in a bucket. If I discovered anything about myself during this time, it's that I have absolutely no time for "sophisti-pop".

That is part of the humor, though.  Certainly he (and they--Steely Dan) enjoy these sounds enough to craft recordings with them, but it is meant to be ironic, too.  They are trying to show us how our real emotions are now contextualized through meaningless, endless fabrication and the fantasy of industry and science as endlessly progressive solutions.  Hence, "I.G. Y." or great Steely Dan songs like "The Last Mall."  Or the title of his later album, "Sunken Condos."  The cover of "Ruby Baby" is bland, though perhaps meant to show how youthful passion becomes adult complacency.  There are some really amusing, heartfelt details, though, such as the teenager being more concerned about having beer and Brubeck in his underground bunker.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2015, 07:18:16 AM by The Demon » Logged
BrianAlDaveFan
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« Reply #122 on: June 08, 2015, 10:09:44 PM »

Wall Of Voodoo at the US Festival in 1983:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZ0H3gqwhMQ

If the cover song (or reinterpretation) they do near the beginning of their set doesn't seem enjoyable to you, see what happens if you stick with the rest of the gig. I enjoyed it a lot!
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alf wiedersehen
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« Reply #123 on: June 11, 2015, 03:44:11 PM »

I'm curious, how many times did you listen to this?  You found nothing to like in the majestic "Tomorrow's (Just Another Day)" or the wondrous, mock-glib, anti-war "Blue Skinned Beast"?  I cannot find a bad track on the album, nor among the related singles and b-sides ("House of Fun," "Don't Look Back," "Driving in My Car," "Animal Farm," "Riding on My Bike," and "Walking with Mr. Wheeze").  Even the Costello version of "Tomorrow's (Just Another Day)" is fun.  Truthfully, it's difficult to find a bad track among the first five albums.  Dismissing Madness would be like saying the Kinks only had three good songs.

I don't remember how many times I listened to it, but I know I just didn't like it. I do like the Kinks, though.


Their singles always seemed to have a boundless passion and urge to do something different which I think the albums, as good as they are, sometimes lack.  I would not expect blissful, jangly pop from them, though.  They do that, but it's not all they do, and you will miss some vital music.  There is more in this world than is dreamt of in your 12-string Smiley

I liked the rest of the album, as well. I was just trying to keep my reviews short and I have an overwhelming love for that song, so that's what showed up in my review, yo.


Quote
Their voices can be annoying at first, but their songwriting skills are very sound.  I think they might be more well-regarded if other artists covered their songs, but of course this is not so common in our post-Beatle world.  Still, I am a bit shocked to see how dismissive you are of some of these records.  Did you not find "They'll Need a Crane" to be memorable musically?  I felt they'd reached a new plateau with that, much as the Beatles did with "She Loves you," sounding more assured than before.  You hear no melody, wit, or charm in "Ana Ng," "Purple Toupee," "Where Your Eyes Don't Go," or "Piece of Dirt"?  I'll admit I did not like their music at first, but after a few listens they became quite addictive.

Honestly, I just didn't enjoy this album. This album is like that one guy that's insecure and is always telling everyone else "Hey, guys, I should warn you, I'm prettyyyy wacky!" And then he does something he thinks is silly and then gives everyone a face to sort of add an exclamation point to the act he just performed, and then everyone silently stares at him, slightly confused. Give it a rest, wacky guy.


Quote
That is part of the humor, though.  Certainly he (and they--Steely Dan) enjoy these sounds enough to craft recordings with them, but it is meant to be ironic, too.  They are trying to show us how our real emotions are now contextualized through meaningless, endless fabrication and the fantasy of industry and science as endlessly progressive solutions.  Hence, "I.G. Y." or great Steely Dan songs like "The Last Mall."  Or the title of his later album, "Sunken Condos."  The cover of "Ruby Baby" is bland, though perhaps meant to show how youthful passion becomes adult complacency.  There are some really amusing, heartfelt details, though, such as the teenager being more concerned about having beer and Brubeck in his underground bunker.

That may all be true, but I still don't have any desire to listen to it.
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« Reply #124 on: June 15, 2015, 06:45:47 AM »

Visage are one of my fave synth groups ever. Some majestic songs by them:
-Whispers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMqmvAsPI4A
-Fade to Grey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeGTJOFSIgU

Lindsey Buckingham - Go Insane https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF9fkXIqnis The whole album is good but the title track (& its video) are real awesome

Peter Gabriel's 3rd self-titled album aka 'Melt' (1980) is a masterpiece https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCTFCmzIYpuRBqGTIo8VxqNkGn7Jk_L_b

Celestium (Gary Usher) - Sanctuary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzgAChrxXAI

Bucks Fizz - You and Your Heart So Blue https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gutCH7QuaMs

Alan Parsons Project - Games People Play https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqVWYCxA9pY

Power Station - Communication https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEmc137DaUU

Maybe my favorite Paul McCartney song - Frozen Jap https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0b-TplCXNx4
« Last Edit: June 15, 2015, 06:57:18 AM by Bittersweet-Sanity » Logged

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