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Non Smiley Smile Stuff => General Music Discussion => Topic started by: alf wiedersehen on January 21, 2015, 07:24:18 PM



Title: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 21, 2015, 07:24:18 PM
We all know the prevailing wisdom: "the 80's were the worst, blah blah i'm a cool guy" WELL, NO. After going through massive amounts of music from the 1960's and 70's, I want somewhere else to go, and forward seems like the natural choice. Anyway, while doing some research into these couple of years, I'm discovering that the 1980's has a lot of great stuff to offer. So, I'm looking forward to talking about and discovering more from this oft-neglected decade. Now kick back, grab a Crystal Pepsi, and tell me about your favorite music from 1980-1989 - song, album, artist, whatever.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: halblaineisgood on January 21, 2015, 07:32:25 PM
Dude you can turn that crystal pepsi into a really sweet bong



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 21, 2015, 08:29:59 PM
XTC, one of my old favorites, made a lot of great records in this decade.
One that I was just listening today and really enjoy was this, English Settlement:
(http://cdn.albumoftheyear.org/album/6473-english-settlement.jpg)

The band begin to move toward a complex, detailed approach with this album, while also moving towards an acoustic, pastoral sound as well. The fist half of the album is filled with brilliant songs from both Andy and Colin, like "Senses Working Overtime" (if you don't like that song, I will fight you), "Ball and Chain", "All of a Sudden (It's Too Late), and "Jason and the Argonauts". The album is filled with complex, unique songwriting that results in what often feels like miniature adventures. Perhaps taking a few cues from Remain in Light (ooh, another 80's album!), the second half of the album has quite a bit of percussion and finds Andy exploring some political and societal themes. The album ends on a high note called "Snowman",  with interesting music, melodies, and effects that give you the feeling of frosty weather.

What comes through with this album is how good these guys were at songwriting. The music is so unique and excellently put together, tons of great melodies, riffs, bass lines, harmonies, etc. Not to mention lyrics, which are uniformly great and include lines like "People will always be tempted to wipe their feet, on anything with 'welcome' written on it" and "All of a sudden, we find that we've lost love, so please don't push or shove because, it's too late, in all your hurry you've accidentally locked the gate".  :(  This album is the product of four, talented young men brimming with ideas and a new direction to take their music in.

There, now someone else go.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ovi on January 22, 2015, 01:32:03 AM
Pixies - Come On Pilgrim (1987); Surfer Rosa (1988); Doolittle (1989)
Guns N' Roses - Appetite for Destruction (1987); Lies (1988)
Michael Jackson - Thriller (1982); Bad (1987)
Public Enemy - It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back (1988)
N.W.A - Straight Outta Compton (1988)
Run-D.M.C. - Raising Hell (1986)
Talking Heads - Remain in Light (1980)
The Clash - Sandinista! (1980)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: halblaineisgood on January 22, 2015, 02:31:40 AM
I'd appreciate the 80's a whole lot more if someone would share their Prince discography with me.  at the very least Purple Rain?

That sumbitch hasn't been on youtube for some time ..


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: the captain on January 22, 2015, 05:43:34 AM
There is (and was, and ever shall be) great music and bad music and mediocre music. The usually it has seemed that recently passed decades are the least beloved, then the nostalgia or ironic or sincere rediscovery jumpstarts their reputations again. The music, recorded, doesn't seem to notice and just goes on existing as it ever did.

80s music, especially its dance elements, certainly are in vogue again.

I'm at work and so don't have time to get into it all now, but I'll talk some 80s with y'all. I was there, aged 3.5-13.5!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Loaf on January 22, 2015, 07:12:43 AM
Paul Simon - Graceland
Peter Gabriel - So
George Harrison - Cloud 9

This were huge albums in my house and car when i was a little boy.

On cassette, of course.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 22, 2015, 07:39:53 AM
Albums:

Culture Club's first two
Talk Talk's first four
U2's first five

As for songs, two epitomize the '80s for me: Culture Club's "Time (Clock Of The Heart)" and this unfairly overlooked gem by David:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qT1Uu3USGn8



 
 


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 22, 2015, 08:38:54 AM
Albums:

Talk Talk's first four

This is one that I've discovered recently. I'm no great fan of synth pop, but I'm definitely interested in their work starting with Colour of Spring. I've listened to a couple songs, "Life's What You Make It", "Chameleon Day", and "April 5th", and like them very much. I'm definitely going to buy that album next time I find it. I'm not sure how I feel about Spirit of Eden and Laughing Stock just yet, but if I like Colour of Spring, I'll probably end up getting those two.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 22, 2015, 09:03:32 AM
Albums:

Talk Talk's first four

This is one that I've discovered recently. I'm no great fan of synth pop, but I'm definitely interested in their work starting with Colour of Spring. I've listened to a couple songs, "Life's What You Make It", "Chameleon Day", and "April 5th", and like them very much. I'm definitely going to buy that album next time I find it. I'm not sure how I feel about Spirit of Eden and Laughing Stock just yet, but if I like Colour of Spring, I'll probably end up getting those two.
Yes indeed, The Colour of Spring is the best place to start and then (if you wish) work your way backwards to the pop songs of It's My Life and the synth pop of The Party's Over and forwards to the atmospheric SOE (particularly the magnificent "Inheritance" and "I Believe In You") and the icy wastes of LS.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: halblaineisgood on January 22, 2015, 09:12:20 AM
I really, really like the song The Boys of Summer. There, I said it.



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Mike Garneau on January 22, 2015, 10:07:47 AM
My Favorite 80s LPs/Cassettes are:
Wall Of Voodoo "Call Of The West"
Meat Puppets "Mirage"
The Damned "Strawberries"
Motorhead "Another Perfect Day"
Joe Walsh "You Bought It - You Name It"
Brian Wilson "Brian Wilson"
Deep Purple "Perfect Strangers"
Rolling Stones "Tattoo You"
Dead Kennedys "Plastic Surgery Disasters"
George Harrison "Cloud Nine"
Black Sabbath "Born Again"
The Ramones "Pleasant Dreams"
Public Image Ltd. "Happy?"
Devo "New Traditionalists"
Frank Zappa "Ship Arriving Too Late To Save A Drowning Witch"
Alice Cooper "Dada"
Beach Boys "Still Cruisin'"
King Crimson "Beat"
Ozzy Osbourne "Diary Of A Madman"
Captain Sensible "Women And Captain First"
Joe Walsh "Got Any Gum?"
Stray Cats "Built For Speed"
Rush "Moving Pictures"
The Ramones "Subterranean Jungle"




Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 22, 2015, 12:33:12 PM
Albums:

Talk Talk's first four

This is one that I've discovered recently. I'm no great fan of synth pop, but I'm definitely interested in their work starting with Colour of Spring. I've listened to a couple songs, "Life's What You Make It", "Chameleon Day", and "April 5th", and like them very much. I'm definitely going to buy that album next time I find it. I'm not sure how I feel about Spirit of Eden and Laughing Stock just yet, but if I like Colour of Spring, I'll probably end up getting those two.
Yes indeed, The Colour of Spring is the best place to start and then (if you wish) work your way backwards to the pop songs of It's My Life and the synth pop of The Party's Over and forwards to the atmospheric SOE (particularly the magnificent "Inheritance" and "I Believe In You") and the icy wastes of LS.

the icy wastes... that's good John.  Describes Laughing Stock perfectly.  But.

You're both right.  Start with The Colour of Spring.  Their best album.  Then go backwards, before going forward.  Mark Hollis became so minimalist, that by the time he recorded his lone solo album he was hardly even there.  There's some great songs on the early 12" records too, that are not found on the long-players.  I have everything they did on vinyl, but on CD just the Mark Hollis solo and the Talk Talk natural history best of.  In 2007 they added a DVD to that on the import version on EMI.  You want that.  Those videos are fantastic - MTV made these cats stars.  Some of them must be up on youtube.  They also have a great live DVD:  Live At Montreux 11 July, 1986 - with "Call In the Night Boy" "My Foolish Friend" "Give It Up" "Living in Another World" and "It's My Life" as highlights.  This is The Colour of Spring tour.  They never toured again.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 22, 2015, 01:32:19 PM
Mark Hollis became so minimalist, that by the time he recorded his lone solo album he was hardly even there. 
Speaking of perfect descriptions... Someone from a Dutch TV station wanted to interview Hollis about his solo album but it was as if he had disappeared off the face of the earth. He was unfindable. He'd literally melted into the crowd.   


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on January 22, 2015, 01:44:05 PM
I'm very ignorant about the eighties but I believe all of these were ace, to name but a few:

The Cure
Prince
Pet shop boys
Smiths
Cocteau twins
Kate Bush
Josef K
Momus
Les Rita Misouko
Throwing Muses
They Might Be Giants
R.E.M
Dexys Midnight Runners
Human League
(Some) New Order
Chameleons
Pulp (Freaks LP)
Paul Simon
Leonard Cohen


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Mike Garneau on January 22, 2015, 01:45:32 PM
XTC, one of my old favorites, made a lot of great records in this decade.
One that I was just listening today and really enjoy was this, English Settlement:
(http://cdn.albumoftheyear.org/album/6473-english-settlement.jpg)

The band begin to move toward a complex, detailed approach with this album, while also moving towards an acoustic, pastoral sound as well. The fist half of the album is filled with brilliant songs from both Andy and Colin, like "Senses Working Overtime" (if you don't like that song, I will fight you), "Ball and Chain", "All of a Sudden (It's Too Late), and "Jason and the Argonauts". The album is filled with complex, unique songwriting that results in what often feels like miniature adventures. Perhaps taking a few cues from Remain in Light (ooh, another 80's album!), the second half of the album has quite a bit of percussion and finds Andy exploring some political and societal themes. The album ends on a high note called "Snowman",  with interesting music, melodies, and effects that give you the feeling of frosty weather.

What comes through with this album is how good these guys were at songwriting. The music is so unique and excellently put together, tons of great melodies, riffs, bass lines, harmonies, etc. Not to mention lyrics, which are uniformly great and give toss of lines like "People will always be tempted to wipe their feet, on anything with 'welcome' written on it" and "All of a sudden, we find that we've lost love, so please don't push or shove because, it's too late, in all your hurry you've accidentally locked the gate".  :(  This album is the product of four, talented young men brimming with ideas and a new direction to take their music in.

There, now someone else go.


Yeah I love XTC too. I forgot to include Skylarking to my list. I love 'Grass' and 'That's Really Super, Supergirl".


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: runnersdialzero on January 22, 2015, 01:47:57 PM
I really, really like the song The Boys of Summer. There, I said it.



That "You got yuh HEH combed back!" line may be my least favorite moment in music history, but I find the rest of the song to be sorta enjoyable.

P.S. I hate Don Henley and I hate The Eagles.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 22, 2015, 01:48:37 PM
When I think about what was great in the 80's music scene, I remember the (2nd) great wave of British artists, and the one that came right to mind when I read Bubbly's post last night, was Elvis Costello.  An artist still at the top of the game.  I mostly bought his singles in the 70's, but he turned for the third stretch in 1980 - leaving behind most of the field of Brits*, even his mentor Nick Lowe.  Get Happy!! was the first album I bought of his, and the first time I saw one of his tours.  Trust was even better.  Being a big fan of Country music, I was a bit surprised when he went to Nashville to record Almost Blue.  He had done some country-ish tracks before but not on this level.  Later the tracks he did in hope of getting George Jones to record an album with him did get out in the early 90's.  When Costello wasn't on tour, he was in a studio somewhere.  So right after the Nashville sessions in May 1981 that gave us Almost Blue, he started punching out demos in August - He was so prolific, when did he find the time to write?  Sessions proper began in November at AIR Studios, London for what to me is his all-time masterpiece:

(http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/list/7f164cbcaf8beb57da58539db514d3cddb2151c8.JPG)

IbMePdErRoIoAmL     July 1982

The lead-off track says it all:  Beyond Belief.  No weak tracks, and enough left-overs for some great single sides.  I'd just keep saying that one's great and that one's great, so instead here is Elvis' track notes from the 1994 CD re-issue:
http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Imperial_Bedroom_1994_liner_notes

* Not McCartney or xtc - they deserve their own posts, as Bubbly has already pointed out one of.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 22, 2015, 02:11:42 PM
When I think about what was great in the 80's music scene, I remember the (2nd) great wave of British artists, and the one that came right to mind when I read Bubbly's post last night, was Elvis Costello.  An artist still at the top of the game.  I mostly bought his singles in the 70's, but he turned for the third stretch in 1980 - leaving behind most of the field of Brits*, even his mentor Nick Lowe.  Get Happy!! was the first album I bought of his, and the first time I saw one of his tours.  Trust was even better.  Being a big fan of Country music, I was a bit surprised when he went to Nashville to record Almost Blue.  He had done some country-ish tracks before but not on this level.  Later the tracks he did in hope of getting George Jones to record an album with him did get out in the early 90's.  When Costello wasn't on tour, he was in a studio somewhere.  So right after the Nashville sessions in May 1981 that gave us Almost Blue, he started punching out demos in August - He was so prolific, when did he find the time to write?  Sessions proper began in November at AIR Studios, London for what to me is his all-time masterpiece:

(http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/list/7f164cbcaf8beb57da58539db514d3cddb2151c8.JPG)

IbMePdErRoIoAmL     July 1982

The lead-off track says it all:  Beyond Belief.  No weak tracks, and enough left-overs for some great single sides.  I'd just keep saying that one's great and that one's great, so instead here is Elvis' track notes from the 1994 CD re-issue:
http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Imperial_Bedroom_1994_liner_notes

* Not McCartney or xtc - they deserve their own posts, as Bubbly has already pointed out one of.

Thanks for this. I was hoping more people would post like this, y'know, giving some information and detailing what they like about their favorites.
Anyway, I've always been a little indifferent to the one Costello album I have, This Year's Model, but - now that I have my computer back - I'll listen to this one soon.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Add Some on January 22, 2015, 02:23:09 PM
"Hate" the Eagles?  Man!!!  That ain't gonna vaildate this thread.  That particular song...OK...but "Hate" Don...and the Eagles?  Get over it.

80s artists...or at least who chated in the 80s include loads of folks...This starts in 1980...so there'll be carry-over

Bob Seger, Billy Joel, Boz Scaggs, Bruce Cockburn, ELO, Blondie, Steely Dan, Police, Leo Sayer, Delbert McClinton, Korgis, George Harrison, Climax Blues Band, Journey, Foreigner, Beach Boys, Brian Wilson, Queen, Dan Fogelberg, Men At Work, DON HENLEY, Stray Cats, Toto, Tom Petty, Peter Gabriel, John Mellancamp, Styx, Bob Marley, Eddy Grant, Billy Idol, Yes, Genesis, 38 Special, Cars, ZZ Top, Alan Parsons Project,  Howard Jones, Eurythmics, John Fogerty, Dire Straits, Sade, The Dream Academy, Simply Red, Billy Vera and the Beaters, Wang Chung, The Pretenders, Bruce Hornsby and the Range, Level 42, Crowded House, INXS, Def Leppard, Eric Carmen, Men Without Hats, Steve Winwood, Paul Carrack, Prince, Fine Young Cannibals, Fleetwood Mac...together and separately.

That's not bad...for an entire decade and that's only the artists from the Top 30 charts.  I don't have time to check out all of the album artists too.

I will say though that as the decade progressed it became harder and harder to FIND great music and artists on the radio...and into the 90s?  Damn close to impossible.  [or at least it seemed that way] :o


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: smilethebeachboysloveyou on January 22, 2015, 03:57:37 PM
R.E.M.'s first five albums: Murmur, Reckoning, Fables of the Reconstruction, Life's Rich Pageant, Document (also the EP Chronic Town).  With the exceptions of Automatic for the People and New Adventures in Hi-fi, hardly anything else in their discography even comes close.
John Lennon/Yoko Ono: Double Fantasy and Milk and Honey.  I like the homespun quality of Lennon's songs here and prefer them to some of his more famous work in the 1970s; I like quite a few of the Ono songs as well.
George Harrison: Someone already said Cloud 9, but I'll throw the wrongly vilified Gone Troppo.  Also The Traveling Wilburys Volume One.
Stevie Wonder: Hotter Than July and Characters.  Admittedly a much less impressive decade for Stevie than the 70s was, but these are still two great albums.  In Square Circle has some pretty great music on it, too, but quite a bit of mediocre music as well.
Marvin Gaye: In Our Lifetime and Midnight Love.  The former may be my favorite Marvin Gaye album, (particularly "Love Party," dance music for the apocalypse).
Van Dyke Parks: Jump! A great blend of musical styles and one of the most effectively narrative albums I've heard.

And then, of course, the pinnacle of musical achievement, Lookin' Back with Love.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: the captain on January 22, 2015, 04:15:32 PM
Nobody here, or anywhere else for that matter, needs me to list out albums from the '80s that hit everyone's best of all time. We all have access to those lists. Maybe that is what Bubbly wants--that or at least recommendations. I'm not sure I want to give a recommendation. Instead I reminisced a little bit about that decade and how I thought about music then. Of what I loved at the time, barely of any of it remains in high esteem (by me, I mean). Graceland and Prince's stuff are probably the only things that were beloved then and now. Other things, like Waits's stuff, I came to well after the fact.

But f*** all that. Here's something else. Here's Twisted Sister's Stay Hungry.
...............
In 1980s rural Minnesota, the almost literal witch hunt for satanism in rock music felt like an obsession. For those of us listening to that purportedly satanic rock music, it was terrifying.

A prepubescent, newly fascinated connoisseur of hard rock and metal struggled in a very conservative Christian household. Songs with curse words were to be played quietly--contrary to every instinct--or through headphones. Album covers with scantily clad women had to be kept out of sight. Most of all, anything looking or sounding satanic had to be disavowed entirely. "I listen to hard rock, mom," the kid would say, "but I don't like that satanic stuff."

The problem in the American influenced by Tipper Gore, the Peters Brothers, and television journalists ready to jump on the dream story of teenage suicides inspired by satanic cults--and yes, they seemed insistent these things existed--was that "satanic" meant damn near everything more risqué than Stryper or Petra. Long hair, torn or tight clothes, men in makeup, obviously any religious imagery whatsoever, anything more reasonably categorized as fantasy (e.g., elves, wizards and the like), any sentiment questioning the merits of a Reagan-era American dream: satanic. Or at least under heavy suspicion.

When Pee-Wee's Big Adventure featured a scene that included Twisted Sister filming a video for their "Burn in Hell," I was placed in a very awkward position. Number one, even saying hell outside of the context of church was an issue in my home. One could just as well have said fucking c***. But number two, a song whose refrain threatened that you'd burn in hell, well, that was pure satanism. Simple as that. My mom didn't have to hear anything else. Not "welcome to the abandoned land. Come on in, child, take my hand. Here, there's no work or play. Only one bill to pay. There's just five words to say as you go down, down down."

Just "you're gonna burn in hell," sung by these ugly men garishly dolled up in absurd makeup and feathered or fringed costumes.

I was so f***ed.

See, by this time--1985--I knew Stay Hungry, the 1984 album on which "Burn in Hell" appeared. Like, really well. I owned the cassette several times, wearing it out from overuse. I considered it the greatest album of all time, or at least in a tight competition with Van Halen's 1984. I was 11 years old.

In the same way that KISS would affect me around the same time or soon after, Twisted Sister had the perfect formula for an adolescent boy. These were huge hooks being punched by the cornered, oppressed underdog. And what 11-year-old boy isn't a cornered, oppressed underdog?

"We've got the right to choose it. There ain't no way we'll lose it. This is our life, this is our song … you don't know us, you don't belong. We're not gonna take it. … Oh, you're so condescending. Your goal is never-ending. We don't want nothin'--not a thing--from you."

The guitar solos are familiar to me even today. Right now--right now!--I am listening to "We're Not Gonna Take It" and miming the whammy bar dives, so entirely ingrained into my psyche did they become 30 years ago. The riffs were among the first I ever learned, and they're rock solid examples of hard rock music.

Twisted Sister were not what we've long-since come to know and dismiss as hair metal. This wasn't a band conceived of by the marketing team of a major label, assembled from girlish boys whose parts could be recorded by Rod Morgenstein, Greg Bissonette, Billy Sheenan, Steve Luthaker as long as the "band" wore their tight leather pants with the banana or rolled-up sock inserted just so. Twisted Sister had by this time been working the clubs of New York for 10 years and had released a couple of albums. They weren't apart from the now-hilarious fashions of the day, but they weren't so much in it, either. More gruesome than girly, more monster than manicured.

"Stay Hungry," the leadoff and title track, rocks. Like, really rocks. A.J. Pero and Mark Mendoza drive it hard on drums and bass, respectively, the guitars really just pounding out sustained power chords atop the rushing current of rhythm … at least until the dual-guitar solo. It, and the whole album that follows, is big. Everyone knows the cartoonish mid-tempo anthems, "We're Not Gonna Take It" and "I Wanna Rock." Other songs sped past more akin to "Stay Hungry." There were gothic comics and, yes, a power ballad.

Nobody needs a track-by-track, but I mention these songs excitedly because I haven't heard them in more than 20 years. Stay Hungry went from the greatest album of all time to one of those albums I used to like in a heartbeat, not so much because of Nirvana--I hated Nirvana--but because when contemporary music chased its northwestern nirvana, I dug into the past and obsessed on the guitar gods of the '60s and '70s, then jazz, then whatever else.

But listening again now, this is a great album. Always was, always will be. I probably won't listen to it again for many more years, if ever, because it has nothing to do with me now. The adolescent anger and frustration wore themselves out a long time ago; I'm not backed into a corner and have nobody and nothing to rebel against.

But for what it is, for who needs it, this is a masterpiece.




Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 22, 2015, 04:24:25 PM
When I think about what was great in the 80's music scene, I remember the (2nd) great wave of British artists, and the one that came right to mind when I read Bubbly's post last night, was Elvis Costello.  An artist still at the top of the game.  I mostly bought his singles in the 70's, but he turned for the third stretch in 1980 - leaving behind most of the field of Brits*, even his mentor Nick Lowe.  Get Happy!! was the first album I bought of his, and the first time I saw one of his tours.  Trust was even better.  Being a big fan of Country music, I was a bit surprised when he went to Nashville to record Almost Blue.  He had done some country-ish tracks before but not on this level.  Later the tracks he did in hope of getting George Jones to record an album with him did get out in the early 90's.  When Costello wasn't on tour, he was in a studio somewhere.  So right after the Nashville sessions in May 1981 that gave us Almost Blue, he started punching out demos in August - He was so prolific, when did he find the time to write?  Sessions proper began in November at AIR Studios, London for what to me is his all-time masterpiece:

(http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/list/7f164cbcaf8beb57da58539db514d3cddb2151c8.JPG)

IbMePdErRoIoAmL     July 1982

The lead-off track says it all:  Beyond Belief.  No weak tracks, and enough left-overs for some great single sides.  I'd just keep saying that one's great and that one's great, so instead here is Elvis' track notes from the 1994 CD re-issue:
http://www.elviscostello.info/wiki/index.php/Imperial_Bedroom_1994_liner_notes

* Not McCartney or xtc - they deserve their own posts, as Bubbly has already pointed out one of.

Thanks for this. I was hoping more people would post like this, y'know, giving some information and detailing what they like about their favorites.
Anyway, I've always been a little indifferent to the one Costello album I have, This Year's Model, but - now that I have my computer back - I'll listen to this one soon.

Thank You for coming up with an idea that lets us continue on with the Listening Project thread deal.  Looks like this could go on for a bit.  Open to all that want to join in.

Note:  I noticed my link to the '94 CD notes didn't work right.  Should have taken you right to the page.  You can still find the notes by going to the link I posted, THEN click on "search for this page" - then the notes (and a bit More from other albums around the time of Imperial Bedroom) will show themselves.

Let's have fun with this.  I've already got another record in mind.  And glad you have your computer back.  Go check out the "Primrose Hill" link I sent you.  Can't put it here, cause that is not the 80's.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 22, 2015, 04:48:55 PM
Maybe that is what Bubbly wants

Yeah, I should probably make what I want for this thread clear. Basically, I feel like exploring more music from the 80's and I'd like to see what other people listen to and love from this decade. If you want to give me a list, that's fine, but I'd prefer some sort of commentary on what you actually like about it. Y'know, give me your thoughts on your picks. If you want to talk about mainstream albums, songs, or artists, then go ahead. If you want to talk about obscure, strange records, I'm all ears! I love that kind of stuff.

Basically, tell me what you like, yo. I personally plan on talking about albums that I like, both old favorites and new discoveries.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: the captain on January 22, 2015, 04:51:34 PM
My work here is done. (For now, anyway.)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: rab2591 on January 22, 2015, 05:26:26 PM
Genesis - Invisible Touch. One of the first albums I ever remember hearing (I was probably 4 or 5). I think I remember it so vividly because this album has atmosphere...it sounds like a place rather than a studio album (Electric Ladyland also has this type of feel for me, the songs create a place rather than a mood). I didn't understand any of the themes (drugs, sex, etc), but the sound really grabbed me.

Bob Dylan - Oh Mercy. Not one of his more popular albums, but one of his later albums that I really enjoy. Most of the Time (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SQbr4ISrjII) is a highlight of the album for me.

U2 - Rattle and Hum. Heartland (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UFjxntUCit8) and Angel of Harlem (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=biNvjeHYGt8) are 2 gems from the 80s that I hope are never forgotten.

AC/DC - Back in Black. One of the most perfect rock albums ever made.

Other great albums have already been mentioned, so I won't bother bringing them up again.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: runnersdialzero on January 22, 2015, 05:43:50 PM
"Hate" the Eagles?  Man!!!  That ain't gonna vaildate this thread.  That particular song...OK...but "Hate" Don...and the Eagles?  Get over it.

Haha, I don't know, man. Once in a while, especially recently, I find myself hearing or recalling some totally lame "classic rawk" song or some fairly atrocious 80s cheesefest (that's coming from someone posting on a Beach Boys messageboard), wonder who it is, Google the lyrics and I'd say over 50% of the time, it's either The Eagles or an Eagles solo project. Usually Don Henley, who also seems to like himself a bit too much, thus further distaste.

Sorry, if you get something good out of their work, I'm sincerely glad and think no less of you at all, but they're just... not for me. :'(


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Add Some on January 22, 2015, 06:55:12 PM
Cool 'Runners'.  'Sly' quote to be inserted here. > "."   You know the one I mean.   :hat


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on January 23, 2015, 05:45:09 AM
Cyndi Lauper's debut is essential listen. Take it for note, Mr. Waves. "True Colors" as of 3 yrs later is even better.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ovi on January 23, 2015, 10:27:12 AM
AC/DC - Back in Black. One of the most perfect rock albums ever made.

I would say 3 of the songs are truly great, while the other 7 passable, but rather faceless. But hey, I realize I'm in minority here.



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Dudd on January 23, 2015, 10:44:49 AM
I absolutely adore The Nightfly by Donald Fagen. A lovely nostalgic album.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8zrKnkd6ss (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8zrKnkd6ss)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: runnersdialzero on January 23, 2015, 04:18:35 PM
AC/DC - Back in Black. One of the most perfect rock albums ever made.

I would say 3 of the songs are truly great, while the other 7 passable, but rather faceless. But hey, I realize I'm in minority here.

Much more a fan of the Bon Scott era, but there's a lot of good stuff with Brian Johnson, too. There are only a two or three tracks on Back In Black which I'm kinda take-it-or-leave-it on. I guess, for me, that would exclude it from being "perfect", but it's still pretty nice.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 23, 2015, 05:25:45 PM
The Clash - Sandinista! (1980)

This is an interesting choice. What do you like about this album? I tried listening to it once during my fixation with London Calling, but I just got lost in the sprawling indulgences throughout.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on January 23, 2015, 06:12:26 PM
The first 80s songs that pop into my head that I love are:

There is a Light that Never Goes Out - The Smiths
Everybody Wants to Rule the World - Tears for Fears
Steppin' Out - Joe Jackson


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Mike Garneau on January 23, 2015, 06:26:38 PM
The Clash - Sandinista! (1980)

This is an interesting choice. What do you like about this album? I tried listening to it once during my fixation with London Calling, but I just got lost in the sprawling indulgences throughout.

I agree that Sandinista is too indulgent. I'm not too crazy about the Clash, but I like their first album for it's raw punk sound which they later dropped for the poppy/dancey/radio friendly thing. But the first Clash album is from the 70s and we're talking 80s here...
Have you listened to Wall Of Voodoo? If you like the post-punk bands of the early 80s Wall Of Voodoo is one of the best. Their sound is a unique blend of dark-wave mixed with Spanish guitar with piercing feedback. There's a Spy vs Spy vibe about their music...their songs tell stories sorta like Johnny Cash. And they're a dark band, not really a poppy band. Check out their 1982 album "Call Of The West". Their one hit, Mexican Radio, is on it.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Mike Garneau on January 23, 2015, 07:13:55 PM
AC/DC - Back in Black. One of the most perfect rock albums ever made.

I would say 3 of the songs are truly great, while the other 7 passable, but rather faceless. But hey, I realize I'm in minority here.

Much more a fan of the Bon Scott era, but there's a lot of good stuff with Brian Johnson, too. There are only a two or three tracks on Back In Black which I'm kinda take-it-or-leave-it on. I guess, for me, that would exclude it from being "perfect", but it's still pretty nice.

I prefer the Bon Scott era too. However, even though Back In Black is a great album, I prefer 1981's For Those About To Rock (We Salute You). To me it's Brian Johnson's finest with the band, featuring fast rockers like Put The Finger On You and slick tunes like Breaking The Rules. When it comes to Brian Johnson era AC/DC it's all about their 1981 album, for me anyway. After 1985 they started getting stale, Fly On The Wall and Who Made Who are nothing compared to BIB and FTATR(WSY).


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ovi on January 25, 2015, 01:41:37 AM
The Clash - Sandinista! (1980)

This is an interesting choice. What do you like about this album? I tried listening to it once during my fixation with London Calling, but I just got lost in the sprawling indulgences throughout.

I think there's a lot to love about it, many of the band's greatest and most ambitious songs are there. It is overwhelming on the first few listens, but it'll pay off if you give it time. And self-indulgent too, but I personally am a fan of this "encyclopedic" approach to albums, I'd much rather see them try everything and fail here and there then come up with a more consistent, but ultimately safe and cautious album. The Clash had the talent and versatility it takes to approach the Herculian task of the triple album and I'm glad they did it. It's a bit crazy to realize that they recorded and released 55 songs in the course of one year.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: MaryUSA on January 25, 2015, 09:26:49 AM
Hi all,

Prince
Paul McCartney
Eurthymics
Paul Simon
Oliva Newton  John
Bon Jovi
Elton John
Journey
Kokomo
Cindy Lauper
The Police
Sting
Rod Stewart
Genesis
Phil Collins
Fleetwood Mac  together and solos
Styx
Night Ranger
Van Halen
Ozzy Osbourne Crazy Trian
Def Leppard
Yes Owner of A Lonely Heart and Leave It
Pat Benetar
Madonna
Thompson Twins
Alan Parons Project
Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam






Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ovi on January 25, 2015, 09:57:42 AM
Paul McCartney
Bon Jovi
Elton John
Journey
Kokomo
Rod Stewart
Genesis
Phil Collins
Styx
Def Leppard
Yes Owner of A Lonely Heart and Leave It

NO!  ;D


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Alan Smith on January 25, 2015, 05:28:08 PM
In a bizarre twist of events, my hometown, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, somehow managed to produce many, many amazing acts including a particularly incredible band - The Go-Betweens - who technically started out in ’78, but during the 80s provided both off-beat avant-garde numbers paired with joyous pop (non)hits fuelled respectively by the creative core of Robert Forster and Grant McLennan.  Each song is the song of love, whether new found and exhilarating or lost and yearned for, relayed in intellectually primed prose, that remains accessible and relatable.

Taking their cues from Jonathan Richmond, Television, Velvet Underground and, lyrically, Dylan, the Go Betweens hightailed it to London and famously spent a lot time with The Birthday Party, who as Bubbly would know included Nick Cave and a number of musicians who formed the core of Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds.

I only got to see these guys in their original incarnation once, in 1988 - they split a few years later, with Forster and McLennan only returning with a new version of the group in ’96 - while infamy did not elude them, international super-stardom and success did for most of their career.  Around ’05, Grant and Robert, brimming with artistic credibility, kudos and acknowledged as one of Australia’s most influential groups finally nailed a deal to release their back catalogue and solo recordings which gave them both a level of financial security not hither-to forthcoming.

Grant bought a house in Spring Hill, Brisbane, and while taking a break from preparing his house in anticipation of an evening party, due to feeling unwell, he took a nap and died in his sleep from a a heart attack.  Thus the Go Betweens were bought to an end, missed always but forgotten never.

It’s hard for me to say where to start with these guys, I love it all (and why do I love it, like my love for most music, I do not know) - either go all the way back and kick off with Forster’s “Karen” -  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPErA7NZISM - or check out Grant McLennan’s Cattle and Cane - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZCbyByY-A6w - composed on Nick Cave’s guitar.  A particular favourite is from their reunion album, Friends of Rachael Worth - Surfing Magazines - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NBJYP_nfMmg .

And while your at it, check out these Kiwis and anything on New Zealand’s Flying Nun label - possibly my all time favourite song, once covered by your buddy Stephen Malkmus - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eeuy8PD0bFM - the ‘80s rule!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: krabklaw on January 26, 2015, 07:49:55 AM
Some great 80s albums on my ipod:
Prefab Sprout- From Langley Park To Memphis
Psychedelic Furs- Talk Talk Talk
China Crisis- What Price Paradise
Sade- Diamond Life
Joe Jackson- Body & Soul
XTC-Skylarking
Culture Club- Colour By Numbers
Everything But The Girl- Eden
Style Council- Our Favorite Shop
Nick Heyward- North Of A Miracle
ABC- Beauty Stab
Wendy & Lisa- Wendy & Lisa
Heaven 17- How Men Are
It Bites- Once Around The World
Level 42- Running In The Family


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 26, 2015, 10:28:10 AM
Some great 80s albums on my ipod:
Prefab Sprout- From Langley Park To Memphis
Psychedelic Furs- Talk Talk Talk
China Crisis- What Price Paradise
Sade- Diamond Life
Joe Jackson- Body & Soul
XTC-Skylarking
Culture Club- Colour By Numbers
Everything But The Girl- Eden
Style Council- Our Favorite Shop
Nick Heyward- North Of A Miracle
ABC- Beauty Stab
Wendy & Lisa- Wendy & Lisa
Heaven 17- Sunset Now
It Bites- Once Around The World
Level 42- Running In The Family
Yes indeed, Diamond Life. Bought that when it came out. (I discovered the first two Culture Club albums only last year.)

Gary Numan made some great albums in the '80s.I think Telekon was the first in that decade.

But my favourite has to be Dare! by The Human League, the ultimate filler-less album. Every track a classic. 



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: ontor pertawst on January 27, 2015, 01:16:56 PM
The Fall "Hex Enduction Hour"
The Fall "This Nation's Saving Grace"

Basically all of their 80s stuff. I really love "I Am Kurious Oranj"


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 27, 2015, 08:05:12 PM
Thanks, Alan, I'll have to check them out.
I've actually been thinking about getting those albums, Ontor, so cool picks.


Here's one that I've had an urge to listen to lately:
(http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_WqeoSmZbt6o/S-rSeUuvZuI/AAAAAAAAA4w/obempjvttIU/s1600/The_Soft_Boys-Underwater_Moonlight_(album_cover).jpg)
The Soft Boys - Underwater Moonlight

What a great album, whatta great piece of twisted rock and roll. The guitars are straight out of some maniacal Byrds song and the lyrics don't even try to make sense - in fact, Robyn Hitchcock seems to get some weird joy out of making sure they're as delirious and surreal as possible before he gets in front of a mic stand. The album starts right off with a bang, the rousing "I Wanna Destroy You" and it's aggressive guitars and harmonies really get the point across. "I Got the Hots" has a wonderfully sleazy riff and begins with unrelated, inanimate objects proclaiming their love for each other, then moving onto a wonderful B section with lovely music and melodies. "Old Pervert" and "Queen of Eyes" are perhaps the most obvious touchstones: the former is Beefheart-ian and doesn't seem like it should work, but golly does it, and the latter is like a Byrds song on acid. The band's musical sense is impeccable, and they show off one song right after another with perfect riffs and melodies, creating a fascinating version of jangly, melodic pop music that gives absolutely zero f***s as to what you think of it. It's here, it's weird, and it's up for the taking.

I'm always a little sad when it's over.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 27, 2015, 10:47:56 PM
I'm not familiar with The Go-Betweens.  It's late here to be blasting music.(1am-ish).  I'll listen soon.  I've heard some of The Fall, including Hex Enduction Hour - that sounds like something I'd picture you playing ontor.  Have they showed up on one of your soundtracks?     Bubbly's pick I'm very familiar with.  Underwater Moonlight - Loved this album the first time I heard it.  The Soft Boys were popular with me and my friends in 1980-81.  My favorite is that opener, "I Wanna Destroy You" - one of Robyn's best ever songs.  

"Kingdom of Love" - "You've been laying eggs under my skin..." makes perfect sense to me.  Hitchcock was an alien before he was an Egyptian. ;)  "I would ramble all through time and space..."  Great lyrics and I love the guitars.  I was quick to embrace this album because it had the Byrds jangle.  That has been part of my musical journey since the 60's - groups kept bringing it back.  Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers in the late 70's, while McGuinn himself was keeping it mostly in his back pocket while in McGuinn, Clark and Hillman during this period.   The Soft Boys were picking it up and throwing it back to America.  The Records were also a great early 80's band that mined this sound.  After Petty became popular, Roger pulled his twelve-string back out to play with him.

It's not all Byrds' jangle.  The title track reminds me of George Harrison, in his 80's style.  Lyrically George had been writing similar stuff since the White Album's "Savoy Truffle."  And he had Dylan to work with in the late 80's.  Hitchcock was just going even more out-there, like you say - some of it sounds Beefheart-ish.  He wanted it to sound off the wall.  But he was hoping you'd hear a Dylan connection in his lyrics.  I wonder if Harrison ever heard this - sure he did.

My other favorites are "Insanely Jealous of You" and "You'll Have to Go Sideways" - which reminded me of the Pretenders' "Space Invader" -another band getting started in 1980.

I have another Hitchcock album I love from the 80's:

Globe of Frogs (1988)  This may have had Robyn's biggest hit, "Balloon Man" and "Tropical Flesh Mandala" is a big fav.  "The Shapes between Us Turn into Animals" and "Sleeping with Your Devil Mask" also got plenty of air time at my house.

Good Pick.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ron on February 03, 2015, 09:39:47 PM
We all know the prevailing wisdom: "the 80's were the worst, blah blah i'm a cool guy" WELL, NO. After going through massive amounts of music from the 1960's and 70's, I want somewhere else to go, and forward seems like the natural choice. Anyway, while doing some research into these couple of years, I'm discovering that the 1980's has a lot of great stuff to offer. So, I'm looking forward to talking about and discovering more from this oft-neglected decade. Now kick back, grab a Crystal Pepsi, and tell me about your favorite music from 1980-1989 - song, album, artist, whatever.

I think a definite case can be made that the music (if we only talk music) from the 60's was superior than other decades, but the older I get the more appreciation I get for each succeeding decade!  So the true test would be, when we start comparing the music that came out in the 90's, is any of it any good?  Actually... yeah!  A lot of it was. 

My theory is, as time goes on, people forget about and stop playing all the sh*t music that came out in a particular time period... and focus on the good stuff, until eventually all anybody talks about is good music from that particular time.

I'm pretty mainstream so I honestly have a huge appreciation for the pop music that came out in the 80's.  Prince did most of his 'great' stuff in the 80's, hell you can listen to about any Prince album and it's good.  Also the Country music that was out in the 80's is often very 'pop' and sounds great, stuff like Kathy Mattea's "18 wheels" or Merle Haggard's "That's the Way Love Goes" or Randy Travis' "Diggin Up bones", etc.

Tears for Fears was a great band in the 80's.  If you're not familiar with U2's stuff, they had several great albums in the 80's, even their live album was awesome.  Hall & Oates did all kinds of awesome stuff in the 80's.  The Rolling Stones had some great stuff in the 80's....


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ron on February 03, 2015, 09:43:28 PM
I really, really like the song The Boys of Summer. There, I said it.



You're damn right!  It's so fucking nostalgic, I don't understand why I like it so much, it must be that damn minor key.  I was 2-12 years old in the 80's, I wasn't dating anybody or anything so it makes no sense that that song should affect me the way it does, but it DOES!  It really reminds me of my first love (which came later), even though we never played that song or listened to Don Henley. 

It's a testament to the song; and essentially, it's just a pop song.  There's nothing particularly mind blowing about it, other than the feel!  Ask a jazz guy, though, and he'll tell you the feel is everything!

"I can Seeeeee you!  Your brown skin shinin' in the sun!  You got your hair pulled back... Sun glasses on, baby!"

Oh my god.  Amazing!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ron on February 03, 2015, 09:55:04 PM
I noticed later you asked for people to explain why they like what they say they like.  So i'll expound on a song or whatever.

Tears for Fears - Everybody Wants to Rule the World .  This was mentioned above by someone else as well, and in my opinion it's really got that 80's thing going for it.  It has that kind of shimmering sound that brit pop did for awhile there with the jangly guitar lead.... awesome, driving, simple drum beat.  I love how the guy doubles up the little fill every 16 bars or whatever... then gives it to us harder right before the chorus!

...and, that's what takes it over the top.  When most people write a song, they save the money shot for the end of the song.  Not Tears for Fears.  they go back... and back... and back... and back to the same well, and the sh*t never gets old.  So you get a short little verse

"Welcome to your life.  There's no turning back.  Even while you sleep.  You will find us...."

and then it's straight into the money shot, that incredible melody, that awesome hook

"Acting On Our Best Behavior, Turn Your Back on Mother Nature! Every Body Wants To Rule The World!"

and then it gets back to just the beat.... and they're basically saying "What?  What did we do?  Oh, you want more of that??"

So they tease you a little more with another verse. 

"It's My Own Design.  It's my Own Remorse.  Help me To Decide! Help Me Make The...."

and BAM!  They hit you with the good sh*t again!  It's like Ridilin, Crack, and Heroin all in 1 shot!

"Most Of Freedom! And Of Pleasure! Noth Ing Ev Er Lasts For Ev Er!  Ev Ry Bah Dee Ones To Ruuu Tha Worrrrrrrllllllddddddd"


And On, And On, And On.  The Drummer keeps doing that little fill.... they keep hitting that little melody... it's just amazing.  It's harder tha Metallica ever thought about being, I mean that's some hard, hard stuff.  It hits you right in the chest where it's supposed to.


That's why I like it.







Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ron on February 03, 2015, 10:08:05 PM
Hall & Oates - I Can't Go For That (No Can Do)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bgRmYf6EYM


These guys should be a complete joke, just look at them.  However, they're really, really good.... you just have to open your ears, and the sh*t blows you away.  It's not that they're geniuses or something, but the music just moves you. 

One of my hobbies is I restore or repair jukeboxes.  I'm serious.  I bought a box off a guy about a year ago, and it was already full of records.  This record was in it.  I like to crank up the bass on these jukeboxes so you can feel it, literally.  I mean literally, you can feel the floor shaking a little bit!

So I'd heard this song before, but never on a jukebox, so I turned that sh*t up and selected this song.  That damn bassline was making the lights dim, I'm telling you I could feel it man! It was like it was 1983 and I was in a bar with a hot chick and this jukebox blasting this song out. 

I probably listened to it 10 times in a row that first time.  Everything about it is mesmerizing, I love the bridge , over and over "Iii..... I'll do anything... do almost anything that you want me to...." 

Infectious. 

Hall & Oates are money, believe that. 


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: halblaineisgood on February 03, 2015, 10:44:24 PM
Roy Orbison's last album was pretty good.
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/db/Mystery_Girl_-_Roy_Orbison.jpg)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: krabklaw on February 04, 2015, 07:56:50 PM
Hall & Oates - I Can't Go For That (No Can Do)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bgRmYf6EYM


These guys should be a complete joke, just look at them.  However, they're really, really good.... you just have to open your ears, and the sh*t blows you away.  It's not that they're geniuses or something, but the music just moves you. 

One of my hobbies is I restore or repair jukeboxes.  I'm serious.  I bought a box off a guy about a year ago, and it was already full of records.  This record was in it.  I like to crank up the bass on these jukeboxes so you can feel it, literally.  I mean literally, you can feel the floor shaking a little bit!

So I'd heard this song before, but never on a jukebox, so I turned that sh*t up and selected this song.  That damn bassline was making the lights dim, I'm telling you I could feel it man! It was like it was 1983 and I was in a bar with a hot chick and this jukebox blasting this song out. 

I probably listened to it 10 times in a row that first time.  Everything about it is mesmerizing, I love the bridge , over and over "Iii..... I'll do anything... do almost anything that you want me to...." 

Infectious. 

Hall & Oates are money, believe that. 

All their best albums are from the 70s, but I'm happy for them that they were able to break through big in the 80s and make a lot of money. They toured hard and deserved it.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Wild-Honey on February 05, 2015, 03:50:38 AM
I was a teenager in the 80's so the music obviously had an impact and I have a soft spot for it (70's still favourite era though).
Some albums I owned:
Huey Lewis and the News - Sports
Madonna - Like a Virgin
Australian Crawl - The Boys Light Up, Sirocco
Bruce Springsteen - Born in the USA
Lou Reed  - New Sensations
AC/DC - Back in Black
Michael Jackson - Thriller.
Madness - Complete Madness

Songs:
She Blinded me with Science - Thomas Dolby
To Be or Not to Be - Mel Brooks

Too, too many to list. Lots of one hit wonders.  I loved The Nolans album :)!   And The Village People's You Can't Stop the Music.  I was 11 and had a crush on the construction worker  Hahah!  I still get teased by my family about that.



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on February 05, 2015, 04:38:33 AM
Hall & Oates - I Can't Go For That (No Can Do)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bgRmYf6EYM


These guys should be a complete joke, just look at them.  However, they're really, really good.... you just have to open your ears, and the sh*t blows you away.  It's not that they're geniuses or something, but the music just moves you. 

One of my hobbies is I restore or repair jukeboxes.  I'm serious.  I bought a box off a guy about a year ago, and it was already full of records.  This record was in it.  I like to crank up the bass on these jukeboxes so you can feel it, literally.  I mean literally, you can feel the floor shaking a little bit!

So I'd heard this song before, but never on a jukebox, so I turned that sh*t up and selected this song.  That damn bassline was making the lights dim, I'm telling you I could feel it man! It was like it was 1983 and I was in a bar with a hot chick and this jukebox blasting this song out. 

I probably listened to it 10 times in a row that first time.  Everything about it is mesmerizing, I love the bridge , over and over "Iii..... I'll do anything... do almost anything that you want me to...." 

Infectious. 

Hall & Oates are money, believe that. 
Ron, are you familiar with the stuff Hall did with Robert Fripp? I've never liked H & O but this really knocks me out, Frippertronics and all:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=235nPzFOXSY


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Mike Garneau on February 05, 2015, 08:10:31 AM
Hall & Oates - I Can't Go For That (No Can Do)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bgRmYf6EYM


These guys should be a complete joke, just look at them.  However, they're really, really good.... you just have to open your ears, and the sh*t blows you away.  It's not that they're geniuses or something, but the music just moves you. 

One of my hobbies is I restore or repair jukeboxes.  I'm serious.  I bought a box off a guy about a year ago, and it was already full of records.  This record was in it.  I like to crank up the bass on these jukeboxes so you can feel it, literally.  I mean literally, you can feel the floor shaking a little bit!

So I'd heard this song before, but never on a jukebox, so I turned that sh*t up and selected this song.  That damn bassline was making the lights dim, I'm telling you I could feel it man! It was like it was 1983 and I was in a bar with a hot chick and this jukebox blasting this song out. 

I probably listened to it 10 times in a row that first time.  Everything about it is mesmerizing, I love the bridge , over and over "Iii..... I'll do anything... do almost anything that you want me to...." 

Infectious. 

Hall & Oates are money, believe that. 
Ron, are you familiar with the stuff Hall did with Robert Fripp? I've never liked H & O but this really knocks me out, Frippertronics and all:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=235nPzFOXSY

Holy moly! I didn't know that Fripp worked with Hall. I just listened to the song and I think it's incredible! And did anybody else notice that Daryl is doing the Crimson King hand salute in that picture?


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on February 05, 2015, 02:56:07 PM
And did anybody else notice that Daryl is doing the Crimson King hand salute in that picture?

(https://longshotsblues.files.wordpress.com/2013/01/in-the-court-of-the-crimson-king-69.jpg)


(http://mediad.publicbroadcasting.net/p/kmuw/files/201410/11.3_hall.jpg)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Mike Garneau on February 05, 2015, 04:30:19 PM
Another good album from the 80s was King Crimson 'Beat'. Prog New Wave. 'Neal And Jack And Me' is a great track.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CJ6TriAsBE


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ron on February 05, 2015, 09:20:39 PM
Hall & Oates - I Can't Go For That (No Can Do)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bgRmYf6EYM


These guys should be a complete joke, just look at them.  However, they're really, really good.... you just have to open your ears, and the sh*t blows you away.  It's not that they're geniuses or something, but the music just moves you. 

One of my hobbies is I restore or repair jukeboxes.  I'm serious.  I bought a box off a guy about a year ago, and it was already full of records.  This record was in it.  I like to crank up the bass on these jukeboxes so you can feel it, literally.  I mean literally, you can feel the floor shaking a little bit!

So I'd heard this song before, but never on a jukebox, so I turned that sh*t up and selected this song.  That damn bassline was making the lights dim, I'm telling you I could feel it man! It was like it was 1983 and I was in a bar with a hot chick and this jukebox blasting this song out. 

I probably listened to it 10 times in a row that first time.  Everything about it is mesmerizing, I love the bridge , over and over "Iii..... I'll do anything... do almost anything that you want me to...." 

Infectious. 

Hall & Oates are money, believe that. 
Ron, are you familiar with the stuff Hall did with Robert Fripp? I've never liked H & O but this really knocks me out, Frippertronics and all:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=235nPzFOXSY

No i'm not familiar with most of his stuff... I wish I had the time to get into all the great music I've missed out on, I don't think a lifetime's long enough to hear all the great stuff out there.  I checked out the song, that's pretty good stuff. 





Another cool single from the 80's is The Kink's "Come Dancing"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AEeH5OkjeIY

It's such an interesting subject matter, I like the calliope sounding organ too.  The story behind the song is amazing too...


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on February 11, 2015, 10:54:19 AM
Another good album from the 80s was King Crimson 'Beat'. Prog New Wave. 'Neal And Jack And Me' is a great track.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CJ6TriAsBE
Yes indeed. I love the trilogy as a whole. Lotsa good stuff.

Big Country was a band launched in the '80s that took my fancy for a while, especially this track:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-E4960jHfgE

 


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Mike Garneau on February 11, 2015, 11:08:50 AM
Another good album from the 80s was King Crimson 'Beat'. Prog New Wave. 'Neal And Jack And Me' is a great track.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5CJ6TriAsBE
Yes indeed. I love the trilogy as a whole. Lotsa good stuff.

Big Country was a band launched in the '80s that took my fancy for a while, especially this track:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-E4960jHfgE

That's a great 80's track with a hard hitting sound. Big Country had some good stuff.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on February 13, 2015, 12:44:44 PM
Prince's Purple Rain
(http://buzzworthy.mtv.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/101e92c008a0a58045e88010l1.jpg)

I've been a little absent from my own thread about discovery, so in an effort to keep on top of the recommendations and the albums I've been listening to, I want to get this one out of the way. So, here's what I will say: holy sh*t. This album, you guys... this album. I'm gonna go listen to it again.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: krabklaw on February 13, 2015, 11:02:46 PM
(http://buzzworthy.mtv.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/10/101e92c008a0a58045e88010l1.jpg)

I've been a little absent from my own thread about discovery, so in an effort to keep on top of the recommendations and the albums I've been listening to, I want to get this one out of the way. So, here's what I will say: holy sh*t. This album, you guys... this album. I'm gonna go listen to it again.
It's a really good album. If you like this you should also check out band members Wendy & Lisa's debut album. Prince's records were never as good after they left. That album shows why.
Honeymoon Express:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CaaTOWCLejU
Song About:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UYAXTKgpn5g


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Ron on February 14, 2015, 11:16:34 PM
I've always liked that album, strictly because Gwen Stefani always recommended it.



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on February 15, 2015, 11:43:17 PM
Okay, so I'm going through some of these recommendations. Here are my thoughts thus far:


Dexys Midnight Runners
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/457/8866457.jpg)
I picked out Searching for the Young Soul Rebels and I was actually pretty anxious to give it a listen. And then I did. It is a great album. The music itself is pretty interesting, like a mixture of New Wave and Soul that makes total sense when you hear it. I was actually surprised to hear brass being used so extensively on album from around this time, and I really liked that. The songwriting is solid, and it's just great fun to listen to. And, damn, that "Seven Days Too Long" - I just want to listen to that over and over again. I love the way the record finishes, too. I'll definitely have to look into their two other albums from the 80s.


R.E.M.'s first five albums: Murmur [...]
(http://www.musicdirect.com/images/Product/medium/LDR0056.jpg)
I've tried listening to a few of their songs on YouTube before and really none of it did much for me. They seem like a band I should like, with their jangly guitars, interesting songwriting,  and 60's sensibilities, but I just got nothing. So, anyway, I tried to be fair and give them a chance by listening to their debut. "Radio Free Europe" played and I thought "Yeah, okay, maybe I'll like this". I didn't. I found the follow up "Pilgrimage" to be just terrible and the other stuff was an absolute drag. I thought "Perfect Circle" was okay, I liked they got a little weird on "9-9", and I actually enjoyed "We Walk". But.. well, nope. I might still give Reckoning a chance, and if that doesn't work, I'm callin' it quits.


The Fall "This Nation's Saving Grace"
(http://www.audioanalogdistribution.com/en/sites/default/files/imagecache/cover_full_view/images/music/vinyles/ldf6710.jpg)
I thought this was a great album. Not really sure how to describe my experience with their music, other than the fact that I was tapping my foot the whole time I was listening. As soon as "Mansions" came on, I knew I was going to love it. I find their approach to songs interesting: once they have an idea, they are going to get all they can out of that one idea, and then also have the music subtly evolve around that idea. The lyrics and singing are definitely unique, and one example that stands out in memory is "My New House". I sorta felt that the album went on a little long towards the end, but that's a minor complaint really. Anyway, I'll definitely be listening to more of their music.


The Go-Betweens
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/987/2427987.jpg)
Thanks much, Alan! I didn't really know where to begin with these guys, but I decided to listen to 16 Lovers Lane. In fact, I'm listening to it right now. This album is just bursting at the seams with classic pop songwriting. It's so good, and much more acoustic than I was expecting. The melodies are infectious, the hooks are solid, and the lyrics are wonderful. I think I read someone calling this the Rumours of the 80's, and I think that comparison is an excellent one. If you don't like "Streets of Your Town", you're probably a terrible person. So, again, thank you, I really love this album. Now I just gotta figure out where to go from here with their discography...


Pulp (Freaks LP)
(http://music.libraryideas.com/theorchard/885/686/884/263/885686884263.jpg?token=5a56986d744f337a50635)
I liked this one a good deal. The whole album had a very dark atmosphere and there's something that always feels just a tad askew throughout. I think Jarvis Cocker's voice is a perfect match for the music and his darker lyrics, and it really brings it all together. I think you can probably tell if you're going to like this album within the first thirty seconds of "Fairground", and I was completely hooked and wanted to know what was going to come next.


Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. I'll get to more of them soon.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: halblaineisgood on February 15, 2015, 11:48:14 PM
So aside from our own personal beliefs against the practice,and the rules against sharing beach boy bootlegs, we can share music on this site can't we ? (I'd like to hear some Dexy's Midnight Runners)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Dudd on February 16, 2015, 01:03:15 AM
I tried Murmur and I remember liking "Talk About the Passion", "We Walk" and "Shaking Through" (sort of a power-poppy track), and didn't care much for the rest... not a drag, but not memorable.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Alan Smith on February 16, 2015, 01:29:58 AM



The Go-Betweens
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/987/2427987.jpg)
Thanks much, Alan! I didn't really know where to begin with these guys, but I decided to listen to 16 Lovers Lane. In fact, I'm listening to it right now. This album is just bursting at the seams with classic pop songwriting. It's so good, and much more acoustic than I was expecting. The melodies are infectious, the hooks are solid, and the lyrics are wonderful. I think I read someone calling this the Rumours of the 80's, and I think that comparison is an excellent one. If you don't like "Streets of Your Town", you're probably a terrible person. So, again, thank you, I really love this album. Now I just gotta figure out where to go from here with their discography...


Cool - thanks for listening, Bubbly; I am delighted to hear your thoughts on these guys.  I thought you might like the lyrics given their Dylan infatuation; mixed with typical Brisbane wry/dry sense of humour and uni posturings, it's just win/win/win

Due to locality, I was lucky to get across them almost chronologically - however, I suggest you next listen to Tallulah, jump all the way to the end with Ocean's Apart, then backwards to Liberty Belle and The Black Diamond Express, Spring Hill Fair, and then forward again to Friends of Rachel Worth. 

After that you get into the hard core early stuff, and their 2nd last offering (Bright Yellow/Bright Orange) that didn't find Robert Forster at his most inspired - in my cruddy opinion.

You should also check out the video for "Head Full Of Steam", as should any Prince fan.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on February 16, 2015, 01:46:22 AM
Glad you liked Dexys and Pulp. You're probably already aware that each Dexys album is famously very different from the others. As for Pulp, the next in the sequence is "Separations", of which side one is a slightly smoother "Freaks" and side two wanders into disco/house. I think both albums are oft-underrated for not being similar enough to the hit-making version of the band.

Keep listening to Prince, specifically the pop wonderlands of "Around the World in a Day" and "Parade"!

Shame you didn't like "Murmur", it's my favourite R.E.M., but if you didn't you didn't.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on February 16, 2015, 01:53:05 AM
So aside from our own personal beliefs against the practice,and the rules against sharing beach boy bootlegs, we can share music on this site can't we ? (I'd like to hear some Dexy's Midnight Runners)
No sooner said etc. My favourite of theirs, from the days when they toted horns instead of violins:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQO2wEJefjM



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Alan Smith on February 16, 2015, 02:23:27 AM
[quote author=unreleased backgrounds link=topic=19590.msg499614#msg499614 date=1424079982

Shame you didn't like "Murmur", it's my favourite R.E.M., but if you didn't you didn't.
[/quote]

Murmur's a great album - Laughing, a particular favourite of mine from that album.

I've noticed early REM can be a bit crowd splitting as the band were finding their sound, and Michael Stipe to find his voice - I'm a little bit of a guitar player and really got into Peter Buck's quite awesome playing - along with Smith's era Johnny Marr, I personally find their styles of playing quite the workout, and imagine this is part of the appeal for early REM.

Bubbly, I suggest checking out Life's Rich Pageant and Document and then go back to Fables of the Reconstruction (epic), then Reckoning.  The Chronic Town EP is a good listen and you may appreciate the original Hib-tone single cut of Radio Free Europe - it's a bit more rude , crude and livelier than the Murmur version (which I still love tho'), despite the production team being the same on both.

If you can find the time, of course - seems like your listening card is full for the next year or so  :)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Bill30022 on February 18, 2015, 10:02:28 PM
Some of my Favorite 80's recordings:

Albums
Marshall Crenshaw - Marshall Crenshaw
Irish Heartbeat - Van Morrison/Chieftans
Traveling Wilburys - Traveling Wilburys

Songs
Cherry Bomb - John Melloncamp
Perfect World - Huey Lewis
My Brave Face - Paul McCartney
Let's Groove Tonight's - EW&F
I Couldn't Say No - Robert Ellis Orell
Between a Whisper and a Scream - Elvis Costello
Mayor of Simpleton - XTC
Annie Get Your Gun - Squeeze


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on February 21, 2015, 04:54:14 PM
This was, um, an interesting batch of albums. Before I begin, I want to say thanks for the picks and that I still like all of you. Here goes:


Chameleons
(http://www.poorman.ws/121normal/resources/recordings/chameleons_script.jpg)
Y'know when those times when you eat something really rich - let's say chocolate fudge cake, for instance. So, you think "hey, I should only eat a slice of this cake", so you do. And you're like "that was good, but I should stop". But then you don't stop, and you continue eating until you feel sick and you realize you've eaten the entire cake? Okay, well, that's what this album is like. I liked it at first, but then it just kept coming at me for an hour and I couldn't wait for the sweet relief of silence. I would probably have enjoyed this much more if they had made the record a bit more concise. Despite that, this is the album I liked the most from this batch.


Smiths
(http://images.popmatters.com/news_art/t/the-queen-is-dead.jpg)
So, I tried the Queen Is Dead because that's their "legendary" album. To be honest, I've never really been a fan, but I thought I would be fair and give them a chance. And, well, I don't get it. Why do you people like this? There is literally nothing that rises above average on this entire album. The lyrics that everyone finds so heartfelt on "There Is a Light That Never Goes Out" just seem absurd to me. And Morrissey can take his dumb voice and his hollow artiness and prance right on out of my life. "Keats and Yates are on your side"? It's a reference for reference sake, it doesn't even mean anything. I dislike you, Morrissey.


Prefab Sprout- From Langley Park To Memphis
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_250/MI0001/800/MI0001800871.jpg?partner=allrovi.com)
Okay, so you said From Langley Park to Memphis, but when I did some quick reading on them, everything seemed to point towards Steve McQueen as being their best. So, that's the one I decided to go with when listening. Now, this is perfectly serviceable pop music, but that's really about all it is. It exists (at least I think it does) and that's all I can say for it. I couldn't find anything distinctive about this album. It was never terrible - well, if we don't count "Desire As" - but it never really grabbed me at any point while I was listening. Perhaps I would have liked From Langley Park to Memphis more, I dunno.


IbMePdErRoIoAmL     July 1982
(http://www.musicdirect.com/images/Product/medium/16867.jpg)
Really, this seems like an album I would like, but for some reason, I just couldn't really get into it. I actually don't have anything negative to say about this album. Elvis Costello has always been a bit of a trouble for me. He seems like someone I would enjoy, and I've tried many times before, and I will probably continue to try again. I might end up giving this another try somewhere down the line.


Style Council- Our Favorite Shop
(http://www.los40.com/musica/album/our-favourite-shop/musica-album/images%5Calbum%5C010000053561_n_imgg.jpg)
Wow, I thought this was just terrible. Paul Weller was in the Jam, you guys! He was in that band! Here, he just seems content on smashing you over the head with some hackneyed "message" songs. There's not even a hint of self-awareness anywhere on this album, and you get the feeling that he thinks he's doing the world a favor by speaking out. How many times have any of you even managed to listen to "the Stand-Up Comic's Instructions"? Egad. Now, I thought there was at least one good song on here, and that was "Down in the Seine". I wasn't paying attention the lyrics at all, but the music seemed fine. Let's be clear: that can't even be said about the entire album. There is a lot of wretched production and arrangements to be found throughout, like the absolutely baffling instrumentation on "Our Favorite Shop". Please, run away from this album if you ever find yourself near it.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on February 22, 2015, 03:30:26 AM
I think the only way to go about a self-propelled '80s musical education such as this is to be exactly as discriminating as you're being. There's only so much time we have on earth, so there's no point in getting bogged down in the oeuvres of artists we don't care for. Give everything a chance, but its certainly OK to reject stuff that may well be good for other people but just isn't going to make your life better.

Re: the Chameleons. They're new to me too, the thing that has impressed me most by them so far is their first single, "In Shreds". I started listening to them because a friend of mine has co-edited and published the singer's autobiography and got me to proof-read some of it and I found it really fascinating. So of course I had to listen to all these songs whose genesis and recording (amidst typical music industry twists and turns) had been described so vividly. I recommend the book most highly. http://mittenson.com/mark-burgess-view-from-a-hill/ (http://mittenson.com/mark-burgess-view-from-a-hill/)

You're obviously never going to be a Smiths fan but I think you're being a bit harsh on the Keats and Yeats line. It's not just a random reference, the song concerns a literary dispute between two friends. Who probably don't have any other friends, so it shows how much it sucks to be Morrissey that he can't even agree with the one friend he can get to go and look at graves with. I imagine its based on a real conversation. Its also Moz's way of aligning himself with Wilde so people will hopefully see him as Wilde's spiritual heir (gay, anglo-Irish, witty) which is very bold and self-regarding but lots of people took the hint anyway. Its nowhere near as random a reference as practically every line in "Desolation Row", for example.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on February 24, 2015, 04:11:22 PM
Well said Ian.  That first paragraph sums this thread up about right.  Josh picking albums he's never heard before from thirty or more years ago trying to find relevance (or just something new to play) today.  I'm seeing it doesn't always work out.

I listened to The Chameleons for the first time a couple of days ago - they're okay, don't remember them at all from the 80's.  I didn't follow The Smiths.  Morrissey is too full of himself for me too, then and now.  The Smiths came off like a circus sideshow.  I saw a few videos on MTV, and that was about it.  Somebody gave me their live album, but I didn't listen to it but once.  Like everybody, I thought "How Soon Is Now?" was a great track.  Johnny Marr was a good guitarist, but I don't care enough to look into what he's up to these days.

You're sorting Style Council into the same bag.  I don't.  "The Stand Up Comic's Instruction" was left off the American, and most country's version of the album.  When you listen to "Strange Fruit," what picture comes to mind?  A misguided statement anyway - not sure what Paul was thinking.  That's not even him giving "the instruction" (I read it was a real comic) - screw it, lasts less than two minutes.  Didn't hear it til years later.  It is offensive.  I gave the UK Our Favourite Shop a fresh listen this morning.  Some of the lyrics do come off as dated.  Ignore them - they're throwaway.  I don't care what he's singing when my toes are tapping to "Walls Come Tumbling Down" or "Shout to the Top"  - I'm dancing around the room.  Sounds like Gamble and Huff were brought in to produce - that's Philly Soul!  I love "Come to Milton Keynes" regardless of what he's singing about.  The only song you liked was "Down the Seine"?  You should give a second listen to "Boy Who Cried Wolf" "Luck" "Lodgers" or "With Everything to Lose" - even better, listen to the early singles from 1983 and my favorite record by them, Café Bleu (1984).  And I love all of Mick's instrumentals.  Those arrangements are not baffling - they are the instrumentation of 60's American Soul music.  Not synths either, that's a real organ - live he couldn't get the thing to stop rockin' back and forth.  Synths dominated the 80's sound, but not in Style Council.  If Mick did, it was used sparingly.  Like Talk Talk, I don't look at them as a synth group.  Mick had plenty of grooves and rave-ups up his sleeve - "Me Ship Came In!" "Mick's Up" and "Mick's Blessing" to name but a few.   Lyrically Paul was caught up in a political/socialist movement, and wouldn't move on.  By the time he did, it was as a solo artist and into the 90's.  Even he now admits it got in the way of his music.  I preferred his ranting to The Clash or Sex Pistols tho, or many other bands of the time in the UK.  I'm not all that much into politics - we had bad political leaders in 80's America too.  Same as what created the Punk/Post-Punk rants back in the 70's.  People gonna bitch when life's not good, no matter what decade we're talking about.  Dylan did it in the 60's, right?  He was doing it in the 80's too.

The Jam worked politics into their lyrics as well, and those are the tracks I liked least from them.  For me, like early xtc, The Jam was a singles band.  I liked Paul's ballads best on their records.  Paul was influenced by The Kinks and The Beatles in the 70's - much like one Andy Partridge was.  Andy took that and perfected it in the 80's.  The first Jam album I cared enough to buy was The Gift (March 1982).  Mostly because I liked "That's Entertainment" - one of the best singles from 1980.  I also got the live album and the last singles "The Bitterest Pill" and loved especially "Beat Surrender" - both really the beginning of The Style Council/Weller's  take on the Northern Soul movement that had been popular in clubs for quite a while.  Costello's take on politics was similar - fairly socialist and straight forward, like "Ship building."  Costello was getting caught up in the same political mess all of us were, and speaking up about it as best he could.  Costello was a much better lyricist than Paul, I think he said what I was feeling politically.  Partridge too, but that's not what I liked about xtc either.  Notice how xtc keeps creeping into my mind flow... they are always part of the discussion when I remember the 80's.

Like another band discussed in this thread, Dexys Midnight Runners, Northern Soul was gaining ground in the early 80's UK scene.  Horns began showing up on lots of UK records as the 80's got going.  Horns had been popular in the early 70's with bands like The Kinks, though they were not using them the same way.  Costello's records were very different to his 70's sound, save a ballad here and there.  I'd say he was all over the map style-wise, the New Wave Pop of Trust, the American influenced Get Happy, even doing straight Country.  But Costello grabbed Dexys' Horn Section when they blew apart after Searching for the Young Soul Rebels (Mick Talbot was briefly in Dexys around this time too).  Listen to Costello's Punch the Clock, the follow up to Imperial Bedroom.  Of the English groups I was listening to in 1983, xtc was one of the few that wasn't going Horns - full throttle.  Even Genesis was now using horns on many tracks.  I liked the direction Phil was pushing the band in, but many didn't.  I like all the music Genesis left us.  Phil's solo stuff not so much, it is somewhat dated, but I liked it in the 80's.  By the 90's I thought he was way too slick.  That's bad.  Those solo records sit gathering dust around here.  Should sell 'em.  But nobody wants them do they?  Phil is one of the reasons the 80's are looked back on unkindly.  Okay let's get back to what I did like.

I think what Paul put together with Mick, Dee C. Lee, Steve White, and assorted guest vocalists, was great.  I own most everything they did on vinyl - albums, singles, and EPs.  I didn't buy the Deep House record (Modernism: A New Decade) (1989) when it was finally released.  I have played (on youtube) that last concert in April 1989 - not too good, they wouldn't play the hits.  Paul had a brief fling trying to be a jam band.  But I still listen (and watch the films they made).  I have a few of their CDs and DVDs, and when the spark hits I can stick in the VHS tapes - boy does that smell of the 80's.  How many of you have VHS players?

The Style Council was born, lived and died in the 80's.  In 1989 Paul went solo, taking Steve with him.  In 1990 he woke up one morning thinking "who do I want to be today?" - A new decade a new way.  Reinvented himself yet again.  A Soul rocker with an acoustic heart, but more in the vein of Steve Winwood/Traffic.  He was a major influence on the the Brit-Pop movement.  I am a fan of his to this day.

Prefab Sprout... Well, I liked the group all the years they had Wendy.  I hardly remember Steve McQueen except for the singles - "Appetite" and "When Love Breaks Down" are both solid.  The only record I bought was From Langley Park to Memphis - that has a lot of great tracks.  "The King of Rock'N'Roll" "Cars and Girls" "Hey Manhattan" and "The Golden Calf" - maybe you should give that one a listen before completely throwing them off the bus.  Paddy was a great pure pop writer and singer.  I can see what you say about them - plenty of folks do the same thing.  Dream Academy was similar.  I recently bought their 2 CD retrospective.  For me, MTV made video a big part of what music was in the 80's.  I still prefer to have a visual while listening to music if possible.  Stepping a bit outside the 80's, the next thing I bought by Prefab Sprout was their hits package, A Life of Surprises (1992).  Both the vinyl and VHS.  They added "The Sound of Crying" and "If You Don't Love Me" (my favorite song by them).  "Carnival 2000" is also on that.  Yeah, try the hits package if you want to explore them again.

My 80's picks last Saturday night were xtc's The Big Express and Skylarking.  Then stayed in the 60's and 70's for the rest of the night:  the first two Sessions discs in the Nilsson RCA box, Procol Harum's first, and the DVD that came with the 1974 CSN&Y concert.  Those I'm saving for another thread.

Glad to see everybody listening to all the old music.  Giving it a try.  And yes, I still like all of you too.  Even if you don't like what I like.  Did I come on too strong defending Weller?  hope not.  


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: krabklaw on February 25, 2015, 12:06:33 AM
Well said Ian.  That first paragraph sums this thread up about right.  Josh picking albums he's never heard before from thirty or more years ago trying to find relevance (or just something new to play) today.  I'm seeing it doesn't always work out.

I listened to The Chameleons for the first time a couple of days ago - they're okay, don't remember them at all from the 80's.  I didn't follow The Smiths.  Morrissey is too full of himself for me too, then and now.  The Smiths came off like a circus sideshow.  I saw a few videos on MTV, and that was about it.  Somebody gave me their live album, but I didn't listen to it but once.  Like everybody, I thought "How Soon Is Now?" was a great track.  Johnny Marr was a good guitarist, but I don't care enough to look into what he's up to these days.

You're sorting Style Council into the same bag.  I don't.  "The Stand Up Comic's Instruction" was left off the American, and most country's version of the album.  When you listen to "Strange Fruit," what picture comes to mind?  A misguided statement anyway - not sure what Paul was thinking.  That's not even him giving "the instruction" (I read it was a real comic) - screw it, lasts less than two minutes.  Didn't hear it til years later.  It is offensive.  I gave the UK Our Favourite Shop a fresh listen this morning.  Some of the lyrics do come off as dated.  Ignore them - they're throwaway.  I don't care what he's singing when my toes are tapping to "Walls Come Tumbling Down" or "Shout to the Top"  - I'm dancing around the room.  Sounds like Gamble and Huff were brought in to produce - that's Philly Soul!  I love "Come to Milton Keynes" regardless of what he's singing about.  The only song you liked was "Down the Seine"?  You should give a second listen to "Boy Who Cried Wolf" "Luck" "Lodgers" or "With Everything to Lose" - even better, listen to the early singles from 1983 and my favorite record by them, Café Bleu (1984).  And I love all of Mick's instrumentals.  Those arrangements are not baffling - they are the instrumentation of 60's American Soul music.  Not synths either, that's a real organ - live he couldn't get the thing to stop rockin' back and forth.  Synths dominated the 80's sound, but not in Style Council.  If Mick did, it was used sparingly.  Like Talk Talk, I don't look at them as a synth group.  Mick had plenty of grooves and rave-ups up his sleeve - "Me Ship Came In!" "Mick's Up" and "Mick's Blessing" to name but a few.   Lyrically Paul was caught up in a political/socialist movement, and wouldn't move on.  By the time he did, it was as a solo artist and into the 90's.  Even he now admits it got in the way of his music.  I preferred his ranting to The Clash or Sex Pistols tho, or many other bands of the time in the UK.  I'm not all that much into politics - we had bad political leaders in 80's America too.  Same as what created the Punk/Post-Punk rants back in the 70's.  People gonna bitch when life's not good, no matter what decade we're talking about.  Dylan did it in the 60's, right?  He was doing it in the 80's too.

The Jam worked politics into their lyrics as well, and those are the tracks I liked least from them.  For me, like early xtc, The Jam was a singles band.  I liked Paul's ballads best on their records.  Paul was influenced by The Kinks and The Beatles in the 70's - much like one Andy Partridge was.  Andy took that and perfected it in the 80's.  The first Jam album I cared enough to buy was The Gift (March 1982).  Mostly because I liked "That's Entertainment" - one of the best singles from 1980.  I also got the live album and the last singles "The Bitterest Pill" and loved especially "Beat Surrender" - both really the beginning of The Style Council/Weller's  take on the Northern Soul movement that had been popular in clubs for quite a while.  Costello's take on politics was similar - fairly socialist and straight forward, like "Ship building."  Costello was getting caught up in the same political mess all of us were, and speaking up about it as best he could.  Costello was a much better lyricist than Paul, I think he said what I was feeling politically.  Partridge too, but that's not what I liked about xtc either.  Notice how xtc keeps creeping into my mind flow... they are always part of the discussion when I remember the 80's.

Like another band discussed in this thread, Dexys Midnight Runners, Northern Soul was gaining ground in the early 80's UK scene.  Horns began showing up on lots of UK records as the 80's got going.  Horns had been popular in the early 70's with bands like The Kinks, though they were not using them the same way.  Costello's records were very different to his 70's sound, save a ballad here and there.  I'd say he was all over the map style-wise, the New Wave Pop of Trust, the American influenced Get Happy, even doing straight Country.  But Costello grabbed Dexys' Horn Section when they blew apart after Searching for the Young Soul Rebels (Mick Talbot was briefly in Dexys around this time too).  Listen to Costello's Punch the Clock, the follow up to Imperial Bedroom.  Of the English groups I was listening to in 1983, xtc was one of the few that wasn't going Horns - full throttle.  Even Genesis was now using horns on many tracks.  I liked the direction Phil was pushing the band in, but many didn't.  I like all the music Genesis left us.  Phil's solo stuff not so much, it is somewhat dated, but I liked it in the 80's.  By the 90's I thought he was way too slick.  That's bad.  Those solo records sit gathering dust around here.  Should sell 'em.  But nobody wants them do they?  Phil is one of the reasons the 80's are looked back on unkindly.  Okay let's get back to what I did like.

I think what Paul put together with Mick, Dee C. Lee, Steve White, and assorted guest vocalists, was great.  I own most everything they did on vinyl - albums, singles, and EPs.  I didn't buy the Deep House record (Modernism: A New Decade) (1989) when it was finally released.  I have played (on youtube) that last concert in April 1989 - not too good, they wouldn't play the hits.  Paul had a brief fling trying to be a jam band.  But I still listen (and watch the films they made).  I have a few of their CDs and DVDs, and when the spark hits I can stick in the VHS tapes - boy does that smell of the 80's.  How many of you have VHS players?

The Style Council was born, lived and died in the 80's.  In 1989 Paul went solo, taking Steve with him.  In 1990 he woke up one morning thinking "who do I want to be today?" - A new decade a new way.  Reinvented himself yet again.  A Soul rocker with an acoustic heart, but more in the vein of Steve Winwood/Traffic.  He was a major influence on the the Brit-Pop movement.  I am a fan of his to this day.

Prefab Sprout... Well, I liked the group all the years they had Wendy.  I hardly remember Steve McQueen except for the singles - "Appetite" and "When Love Breaks Down" are both solid.  The only record I bought was From Langley Park to Memphis - that has a lot of great tracks.  "The King of Rock'N'Roll" "Cars and Girls" "Hey Manhattan" and "The Golden Calf" - maybe you should give that one a listen before completely throwing them off the bus.  Paddy was a great pure pop writer and singer.  I can see what you say about them - plenty of folks do the same thing.  Dream Academy was similar.  I recently bought their 2 CD retrospective.  For me, MTV made video a big part of what music was in the 80's.  I still prefer to have a visual while listening to music if possible.  Stepping a bit outside the 80's, the next thing I bought by Prefab Sprout was their hits package, A Life of Surprises (1992).  Both the vinyl and VHS.  They added "The Sound of Crying" and "If You Don't Love Me" (my favorite song by them).  "Carnival 2000" is also on that.  Yeah, try the hits package if you want to explore them again.

My 80's picks last Saturday night were xtc's The Big Express and Skylarking.  Then stayed in the 60's and 70's for the rest of the night:  the first two Sessions discs in the Nilsson RCA box, Procol Harum's first, and the DVD that came with the 1974 CSN&Y concert.  Those I'm saving for another thread.

Glad to see everybody listening to all the old music.  Giving it a try.  And yes, I still like all of you too.  Even if you don't like what I like.  Did I come on too strong defending Weller?  hope not.  


Glad to see someone coming to The Style Council's defense. Just a whole great big pile of fine pop soul that was one of the true highlights of the 80s (for me at least). I love Tears For Fears but their "Kick out the Style, bring back the Jam" line just BS. The Jam had some fine records too, but I much prefer to listen to The Style Council.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on February 25, 2015, 12:25:17 AM
No problem.  I liked Style Council more than the Jam too.  All of Paul's phases have had rewards.  I would have said more, but this thread is just for the 80's.  I don't think we have a Weller thread here.  Not that I've seen.

Glad to hear a like minded vote.   :lol  They need it I'm sure.  Paul, you here reading with us?


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Bean Bag on February 25, 2015, 07:27:09 AM
The Beach Boys really should have had a great 80s album.

The Beach Boys '85 is decent -- but only to a point.  Brian Wilson '88 is better and more original, but struggles just as much BB'85.  The common denominator could be "no Dennis."  Toss in Landy and/or Brian's bizarre mental state.  But the real issue is a sense of defeat that permeates both records.  They struggled through the 70s -- but their efforts pay off from time to time.  And when they didn't they're still interesting.  Because they were trying.

In the 80's there's the sense that we're "lucky" they even managed to show up for two projects.  Two and 1/2 if you count Still Cruisin'.  That to me is the difference.  They only showed up for class a few times, gave it a go -- to varying degrees of success -- and that's it.  There was no artistic pushing, struggling, searching and effort.  It was just -- "ok.  We're here.  Let's record a few songs.  And that's good enough."

The Beach Boys should have had a great 80s album.   :-\

(http://www.beachboysforever.com/bbpics/Beach_Boys.jpg)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on February 26, 2015, 09:22:10 PM
Porcupine, Echo & the Bunnymen
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Ww-N0J0WUeA/VLv3BwiqwFI/AAAAAAAAvbw/ZudrhMSW8DU/s553-no/1983%2B-%2BPorcupine%2B01.JPG)

Perhaps emblematic of this entire thread, I had always written off Echo & the Bunnymen as a bit of 80s cheese with a silly band name. But, I have a friend who's a big fan, so I thought I would at least give an album a listen. And now that I have, I can most assuredly say I was completely wrong. I. Really. Like. This. Album. It's hard to say exactly what I like so much about this record, but I have been playing it non-stop for the past few days. I looked them up on YouTube, rejected "Lips Like Sugar", and found a song called "the Cutter" instead. What I found was an experimental band, a singer with a remarkable voice, and some clever lyrics, namely "conquering myself/until I see another hurdle approaching/say we can, say we will/not just another drop in the ocean". The way the song evolves is great: the middle eight is a departure from the rest of the song and brings it into a new emotional territory, and the ending is the middle eight repeated, but now modified and brings the song to a wonderful finish. So, I decided to listen to the album it came from, Porcupine (duh), and found that this sort of song craft was used throughout the entire album. I don't even really know song titles, as I just let the whole album play without checking. The whole album sounds unified, yet every song is still noticeably different, and it creates something that's bigger than the sum of its parts. The last song on the album is also one that I particularly love - damn, that chorus is just killer.

Really, if you're somehow who never game them a chance, try it. Unreleased backgrounds, seeing your picks - and noticing that E&tB isn't there - I would venture a guess that they would be something you might enjoy.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on February 26, 2015, 11:00:17 PM
I enjoyed The Beach Boys of the 80's.  Great records, great concerts.  Whatever the struggles, I love the music they produced.  That's enough for me.  It was fun to be there then, just like it's fun waiting for Brian's new album now.

I would suggest one, but I'm sure Bubbly has heard it all.  Cool group.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: halblaineisgood on February 27, 2015, 04:57:31 AM
Okay, so I'm going through some of these recommendations. Here are my thoughts thus far:


Dexys Midnight Runners
(http://c3.cduniverse.ws/resized/250x500/music/457/8866457.jpg)
I picked out Searching for the Young Soul Rebels and I was actually pretty anxious to give it a listen. And then I did. It is a great album. The music itself is pretty interesting, like a mixture of New Wave and Soul that makes total sense when you hear it. I was actually surprised to hear brass being used so extensively on album from around this time, and I really liked that. The songwriting is solid, and it's just great fun to listen to. And, damn, that "Seven Days Too Long" - I just want to listen to that over and over again. I love the way the record finishes, too. I'll definitely have to look into their two other albums from the 80s.



This album kind of reminds me of listening to Reel Big Fish. I don't like that.  Not as good as Too-Rye-Ay.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on February 27, 2015, 05:45:44 AM
Porcupine, Echo & the Bunnymen
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Ww-N0J0WUeA/VLv3BwiqwFI/AAAAAAAAvbw/ZudrhMSW8DU/s553-no/1983%2B-%2BPorcupine%2B01.JPG)


Really, if you're somehow who never game them a chance, try it. Unreleased backgrounds, seeing your picks - and noticing that E&tB isn't there - I would venture a guess that they would be something you might enjoy.

I just listened to it. I always really liked The Cutter - had it on a compilation - and I probably would have checked out this album long ago if free music streaming on the net had existed sooner.

Good album. Will need to hear it more to know how much I really go for it. Quibbles on first listen: The title track bored me a bit, and on My White Devil and Fuel the vocals are so imitative of Bowie it's unbelievable. If Bowie heard them he must have thought they were taking the piss.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Alan Smith on February 27, 2015, 12:28:08 PM
Porcupine, Echo & the Bunnymen
(https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Ww-N0J0WUeA/VLv3BwiqwFI/AAAAAAAAvbw/ZudrhMSW8DU/s553-no/1983%2B-%2BPorcupine%2B01.JPG)


Really, if you're somehow who never game them a chance, try it. Unreleased backgrounds, seeing your picks - and noticing that E&tB isn't there - I would venture a guess that they would be something you might enjoy.

I just listened to it. I always really liked The Cutter - had it on a compilation - and I probably would have checked out this album long ago if free music streaming on the net had existed sooner.

Good album. Will need to hear it more to know how much I really go for it. Quibbles on first listen: The title track bored me a bit, and on My White Devil and Fuel the vocals are so imitative of Bowie it's unbelievable. If Bowie heard them he must have thought they were taking the piss.
Also check out Songs To Learn And Sing - great clutch of mustard cutters including Seven Seas ("swimming them so well") and The Killing Moon


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on February 28, 2015, 02:26:23 PM
Got the day off, so let me see if I can catch up.

the captain,  I read your "looking back on adolescence" post again this afternoon and got a chuckle.  I was too old I guess to get into the "Hair Bands" - I liked a bit of Van Halen and Kiss.  "Jump" was good.  But not David's take on "California Girls" - Carl couldn't save it.  David Lee's solo material was a zero for me.  Bon Jovi and others that have vacated my memory cells, same deal.  'Fraid Twisted Sister was too, but better than Roth.  I'm not familiar with the other songs you mentioned, but not going to try it now either.  I thought "Hair Bands" and Rap were just comedy acts between the good songs on MTV (the only place I heard or saw any of it).  I did like a couple of things the Beastie Boys did later, but Rap music to this day can't hold my attention.  Todd tried it on a few of his tracks - thought that was comedy too (and he's a hero).  Just not for my ears.  Didn't care for "Bang on the Drum all Day" - but loved everything else about The Tortured Artist Effect.  Lots of stuff from the 80's was lost on me...I didn't like the "all powerful" Springsteen, in fact nothing after Born to Run is of much interest.  Someone mentioned earlier in the thread that maybe after all these years only the best of the 80's is remembered now.  No.  I remember plenty of very bad music from the decade.

Echo and the Bunnymen.  Zero.  I agree with unreleased backgrounds.  Bowie wanna-bes.  I don't remember them being all that popular.  McCulloch's attitude over-shadowed any good music they produced.  I played some of the videos and Porcupine to see if it would change my mind.  Didn't.  Got thru "The Cutter" (okay), but if I want to hear Bowie, I'll just put that on.  Bubbly, I can see how you like them.  When I mentioned that Nick Cave sometimes had a Bowie sound, it was this same period McCulloch is copying - 1976 thru 1979.  Have you listened to the Berlin Trilogy?  The work Bowie did with Eno?  Compare the Bunnymen to Station to Station (1976) and pay close attention to Lodgers (1979).  Tracks like "Fantastic Voyage" or "Red Sails" - Bowie had a lot more power/energy in his music.  Makes Porcupine sound like a dirge.  And listen to "Repetition" for a jolt of David doing Lou.  David was my favorite of all the acts influenced by Velvet Underground.  While listening to Lodger, I was also reminded of a direct influence on Andy.  Go listen to "African Night Flight" and "Yassassin" to see what I mean.

Bowie set a whole new course in the 80's.  He was always freshening up his act.  Scary Monsters/Super Creeps (1980) was a look back on his own career.  He followed up "DJ" and "Boy's Keep Swinging" with a heart-stopping "It's No Game" - one of my favorites of any he did.  Not quite as good, Let's Dance (1983) gave us "Cat People" and "Modern Love" to only name two.  The only time I ever saw him live was The Serious Moonlight Tour.  Itself designed as a look back on his whole career.  The Tubes probably got the biggest audience of their life (close to 60,000) as the opening act.  They let them do a full set.  It was the last stop on the American leg, 17 September 1983, Oakland Coliseum.  I didn't usually go to stadium shows, tho I'd just been there the month before (20 August) for Simon and Garfunkel.  That puts them in the 80's too.  It seems like we're focusing on UK music in the thread so far, but I'm going to pick out some American music soon.

Wait.  I'm not leaving til I cover Alan's Australian group.  This morning looked into The Go-Betweens - pretty damn good!  Watched videos for "Lee Remick" (cause I love her), "Was There Anything I Could Do?" (cooks), and even better "Streets of Your Town" - this one song sounds like Prefab Sprout.  Like always, influences bounce around the globe.  Oboes seemed to show up in the 80's groups I was listening to.  Dream Academy had Kate St. John, who like Amanda and Wendy (Prefab Sprout) added greatly to the vocal mix.  "Bye Bye Pride" "Cattle and Cane" - every song I picked clicked.  So went back to read again the posts for 16 Lovers Lane (1988), then played it all the way through - so some songs got a second listen.  Impressive album, this is my kind of 80's Pop.  Do hear the Velvet's influence on Foster's tracks - "I'm All Right" and "Dive For Your Memory" - his best here on this first listen.  Grant's material is the real winner.  He has (had) a great voice.  "Love Goes On" and the two I had found earlier are just beautiful.  I also looked up Amanda on Wiki to see if I could find a track she sang lead vocals on.  I see she came into the band in 1986 after they had been going for awhile.  Couldn't, got one you know about, Alan?  They ended the 80's on a high note for sure.  I played only a couple of the later group.  Missed Amanda's presence.  I'll try one of Grant's solo albums next.             

 


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on February 28, 2015, 03:12:31 PM
Re: the Chameleons. They're new to me too, the thing that has impressed me most by them so far is their first single, "In Shreds". I started listening to them because a friend of mine has co-edited and published the singer's autobiography and got me to proof-read some of it and I found it really fascinating. So of course I had to listen to all these songs whose genesis and recording (amidst typical music industry twists and turns) had been described so vividly. I recommend the book most highly. http://mittenson.com/mark-burgess-view-from-a-hill/ (http://mittenson.com/mark-burgess-view-from-a-hill/)

Cool, I'll have to check the book out, thanks. Shame I can't get a signed copy shipped to me here in the US. I also found out that the band (Chameleon Vox) is coming near me sometime in September, so I'm hoping to go see the show. Unfortunately, it's a farewell tour, but I guess that's even more reason for me to go.

I just listened to it. I always really liked The Cutter - had it on a compilation - and I probably would have checked out this album long ago if free music streaming on the net had existed sooner.

Good album. Will need to hear it more to know how much I really go for it. Quibbles on first listen: The title track bored me a bit, and on My White Devil and Fuel the vocals are so imitative of Bowie it's unbelievable. If Bowie heard them he must have thought they were taking the piss.

I'm glad you liked it. Your other picks were close enough that I didn't think this album would be too much of a stretch for you anyway. I went back and listened to "My White Devil" ("Fuel" is a bonus track that I don't seem to have), and I can see the Bowie-ness in the singing. Although, while Bowie's probably an influence, they both already have similar accents and vocal ranges.

Some of the lyrics do come off as dated.  Ignore them - they're throwaway.  I don't care what he's singing when my toes are tapping to "Walls Come Tumbling Down" or "Shout to the Top"  - I'm dancing around the room.  Sounds like Gamble and Huff were brought in to produce - that's Philly Soul!  I love "Come to Milton Keynes" regardless of what he's singing about.  The only song you liked was "Down the Seine"?  You should give a second listen to "Boy Who Cried Wolf" "Luck" "Lodgers" or "With Everything to Lose" - even better, listen to the early singles from 1983 and my favorite record by them, Café Bleu (1984).  And I love all of Mick's instrumentals.  Those arrangements are not baffling - they are the instrumentation of 60's American Soul music.  

Well, I wasn't all that crazy about the music either. A lot of it was a very smooth R&B thing that I didn't really care for, and I didn't think the others were very interesting. When I was referring to the baffling arrangement, I was talking about "Our Favorite Shop". Whatever that strange noise that begins the song is (synth?) makes absolutely no sense with the rest of the instruments and is so distracting.

I enjoyed The Beach Boys of the 80's.  Great records, great concerts.  Whatever the struggles, I love the music they produced.  That's enough for me.  It was fun to be there then, just like it's fun waiting for Brian's new album now.

I would suggest one, but I'm sure Bubbly has heard it all.  Cool group.


Actually, I have not heard it all. I haven't really heard anything that came after BB85. I'll get to it someday.

For me, like early xtc, The Jam was a singles band.  I liked Paul's ballads best on their records.  Paul was influenced by The Kinks and The Beatles in the 70's - much like one Andy Partridge was.  Andy took that and perfected it in the 80's.  

Speaking of XTC and the Jam, Paul apparently told Andy that Sound Affects was their attempt at being XTC-ish.

Prefab Sprout... Well, I liked the group all the years they had Wendy.  I hardly remember Steve McQueen except for the singles - "Appetite" and "When Love Breaks Down" are both solid.  The only record I bought was From Langley Park to Memphis - that has a lot of great tracks.  "The King of Rock'N'Roll" "Cars and Girls" "Hey Manhattan" and "The Golden Calf" - maybe you should give that one a listen before completely throwing them off the bus.  Paddy was a great pure pop writer and singer.  I can see what you say about them - plenty of folks do the same thing.  Dream Academy was similar.  I recently bought their 2 CD retrospective.  For me, MTV made video a big part of what music was in the 80's.  I still prefer to have a visual while listening to music if possible.  Stepping a bit outside the 80's, the next thing I bought by Prefab Sprout was their hits package, A Life of Surprises (1992). Yeah, try the hits package if you want to explore them again.

I might give the other albums a chance in the future. I'm just trying to go 1 album per band currently.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on February 28, 2015, 03:22:47 PM
Echo and the Bunnymen.  Zero.  I agree with unreleased backgrounds.  Bowie wanna-bes.  I don't remember them being all that popular.  McCulloch's attitude over-shadowed any good music they produced.  I played some of the videos and Porcupine to see if it would change my mind.  Didn't.  Got thru "The Cutter" (okay), but if I want to hear Bowie, I'll just put that on.  Bubbly, I can see how you like them.  When I mentioned that Nick Cave sometimes had a Bowie sound, it was this same period McCulloch is copying - 1976 thru 1979.  Have you listened to the Berlin Trilogy?  The work Bowie did with Eno?  Compare the Bunnymen to Station to Station (1976) and pay close attention to Lodgers (1979).

Well, I don't want to put words in unreleased background's mouth, but I don't think he was calling the band Bowie imitators. Actually, he seemed to like the album. I don't really see an overwhelming influence of Bowie on them like you seem to. I think they're quite different, and yes, I have heard bits of Bowie's Berlin trilogy - Low and "Heroes". So, I haven't heard Station to Station or Lodgers yet. I don't really notice much of Bowie in Nick Cave & the Bad Seeds either, so maybe I'm missing something.

Wait.  I'm not leaving til I cover Alan's Australian group.  This morning looked into The Go-Betweens - pretty damn good!  Watched videos for "Lee Remick" (cause I love her), "Was There Anything I Could Do?" (cooks), and even better "Streets of Your Town" - this one song sounds like Prefab Sprout.  Like always, influences bounce around the globe.  Oboes seemed to show up in the 80's groups I was listening to.  Dream Academy had Kate St. John, who like Amanda and Wendy (Prefab Sprout) added greatly to the vocal mix.  "Bye Bye Pride" "Cattle and Cane" - every song I picked clicked.  So went back to read again the posts for 16 Lovers Lane (1988), then played it all the way through - so some songs got a second listen.  Impressive album, this is my kind of 80's Pop.  Do hear the Velvet's influence on Foster's tracks - "I'm All Right" and "Dive For Your Memory" - his best here on this first listen.  Grant's material is the real winner.  He has (had) a great voice.  "Love Goes On" and the two I had found earlier are just beautiful.  I also looked up Amanda on Wiki to see if I could find a track she sang lead vocals on.  I see she came into the band in 1986 after they had been going for awhile.  Couldn't, got one you know about, Alan?  They ended the 80's on a high note for sure.  I played only a couple of the later group.  Missed Amanda's presence.  I'll try one of Grant's solo albums next.             

Yes, I agree. They made a really great album with 16 Lovers Lane. I haven't listened to their other albums yet, but most of their albums are supposed to good, so I look forward to listening to more of them. Funny that you say "Streets of Your Town" is Prefab Sprout-y, as that's my favorite song on the album and I don't really care for Prefab Sprout at all. Oh, well, whaddya gonna do?


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on February 28, 2015, 03:52:37 PM
Give Prefab Sprout another listening session.  They are remembered fondly by many.  To many they were a great group.  Try the hits package:  A Life of Surprises.  Everybody has their own taste tho.  We're just discussin'.  I'm not offended when folks don't like what I like.  The music we love in our lifetime is somewhat from our own circumstances.  What we find along in the way.  It's all about discovery.  The where and the when of it.

Okay, unreleased backgrounds only said Bowie like vocals by McCulloch.  I stand by my claim then.  Vocals and music.  Give a listen to the albums I suggested, Station to Station and Lodger.  Sure unreleased backgrounds will be chiming in again soon.

I'll get back to you later on the Nick/Bowie connection, the party is about to begin.  You know...cause it's Saturday. :lol


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Alan Smith on February 28, 2015, 05:52:37 PM

Wait.  I'm not leaving til I cover Alan's Australian group.  This morning looked into The Go-Betweens - pretty damn good!  Watched videos for "Lee Remick" (cause I love her), "Was There Anything I Could Do?" (cooks), and even better "Streets of Your Town" - this one song sounds like Prefab Sprout.  Like always, influences bounce around the globe.  Oboes seemed to show up in the 80's groups I was listening to.  Dream Academy had Kate St. John, who like Amanda and Wendy (Prefab Sprout) added greatly to the vocal mix.  "Bye Bye Pride" "Cattle and Cane" - every song I picked clicked.  So went back to read again the posts for 16 Lovers Lane (1988), then played it all the way through - so some songs got a second listen.  Impressive album, this is my kind of 80's Pop.  Do hear the Velvet's influence on Foster's tracks - "I'm All Right" and "Dive For Your Memory" - his best here on this first listen.  Grant's material is the real winner.  He has (had) a great voice.  "Love Goes On" and the two I had found earlier are just beautiful.  I also looked up Amanda on Wiki to see if I could find a track she sang lead vocals on.  I see she came into the band in 1986 after they had been going for awhile.  Couldn't, got one you know about, Alan?  They ended the 80's on a high note for sure.  I played only a couple of the later group.  Missed Amanda's presence.  I'll try one of Grant's solo albums next.            
  

Hey Will - so glad you like The Go-Betweens.  It's a bit daunting, putting one's (musical taste) c*ck on the block, when there are so many aficionados on this site with such broad, but exquisite, tastes.

Unless there is some b-side that's slipped my memory and credibility, Amanda didn't get up for a GB lead.  After the band split, Amanda and Lindy went on to form Cleopatra Wong, who pumped out a couple of albums (CDs), which were not too shabby. Sadly, me and such items were departed, like several articles in my collection, during the dismantling of yet another university share house arrangement (5 bedrooms, 6 to 7 tennants, $30 a week rent, ya dig).

Here's a rather poor quality clip - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sskl9Y7aBCE - of Cleopatra Wong's first single

When Robert and Grant got the band back together, Amanda and Lindy weren't invited (band and ex-lover politics) - a shame, as Amanda may have gotten her time to shine (even more).  

For some additional Amanda action displaying her violin skills, check out this one from another oz band, The Died Pretty - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=07oZHDgPiqo

In terms of seeking out your next GB action, it will depend on the song writer you prefer - Robert's sound is a little more prominent on the earlier albums, despite Grant kicking ass with "Cattle and Cane". Grant certainly came to the fore from Tullulah.

Their last album, Here Comes A City from '05, is a great album to explore, with both writers delivering the musical and lyrical goods (espec Robert, imo).  It's now blended with the bittersweet legacy of both Grant's subsequent, much too early passing and  Robert's following decision to declare the Go-Betweens no more. (Warning tho, the '05 EMI CD is bricked to hell and breaks up like a mother if you crank it up).  There is even some Amanda-esque sax/clarinet sounds on "Lavender" (Track 7).

----------

Will, I really appreciated your thoughts on Paul Weller and the Style Council, a wonderfully delivered and though provoking perspective.  

Having said that, my own opinion is closer to Bubbly's; in that I couldn't believe the guy from the Jam was the main cheese in The Style Council. I knew about The Style Council before The Jam, having seen "Speak Like A Child" on the generic Saturday morning clip show (Speak Like A Child - a favourite, and for me a little more Jammy than the Beat Surrender, which I've never gotten my Jam head around).  

Anyway, on "discovering" Le Jam and obsessively delving into the back catalogue, wearing out the grooves on "SNAP", I found myself unable to "stand"/abide any adventures of The Style Council and shook my sorry head at Weller, now poncing/wanking away in his buttoned up Fred Perry's and slip-on Loafers, the only minor respite arriving with Walls Come Tumbling Down.  

Yes, Weller was doing a great job waving his R&B freak-flag along with his Red Wedge one, but some of the funk stylings produced at the height of the Yuppie era (ie, the Lodgers, It didn't matter) seemed to be more about immersion in the top ten rather than supporting the radical subversion he was calling for. And it seemed a shame he'd completely dropped The Beatles/The Who (except Eminence Front, which doesn't help me out here  ;D)/etc influences that bought a nice balance to his old band.

Having said that, over the years, and perhaps now removed from the Yuppie fad and anti-Thatcher politics of the 80s, I have come to further appreciate the Style Council and agree they had a great many songs up their tailored sleeve - perhaps over time, listeners like the esteemed Bubbly will come to appreciate these tunes at face value; but, feel the yhe Jam's legacy will always smear the achievements of the Style Council  ;D  

Thanks again, tho', and it did make me go off a dust off a few old but worthy LPs, gathering dust next to my wife's Communards and Fine Young Cannibals stash.



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: bossaroo on February 28, 2015, 10:11:00 PM
4 pages of 80s discussion, and no mention of Duran Duran?!!! wtf

these guys were visionary, funky, catchy... great writers and musicians.
this one especially. iconic stuff
(http://eil.com/images/main/Duran-Duran-Rio-477818.jpg)

and barely a mention of this absolute classic
(http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/list/d57644845a691f8807578e551b473654ae4281f9.jpg)

I can't stand anything they did after Pyro though...


others I quite enjoy
(http://cdn.soundpublishing.com/reverb/donaldfagen-thenightfly.jpg)

(http://img1.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20120105132503/lyricwiki/images/1/13/Men_At_Work_-_Business_As_Usual.jpg)

(http://www.tdpri.com/forum/attachments/music-your-ears/56515d1282224527-your-thursday-80s-flashback-album-go-gos-beauty-beat-cover-go-gos-beauty_and_the_beat-1981-jpg)

(http://img3.wikia.nocookie.net/__cb20091005180223/lyricwiki/images/9/96/Joe_Jackson_-_Night_And_Day.jpg)

(https://undiaundisco.files.wordpress.com/2015/02/dexys-midnight-runners.jpg)

(http://www.resident-music.com/image/cache/data/Emilys_Packshots/GratefulDead/GratefulDead_8122732822-500x500.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51cXAHeUPIL.jpg)

(http://media-cache-ec0.pinimg.com/736x/57/dd/7f/57dd7fcbb5c7e320a42847360063a3f1.jpg)

(http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/list/4c61d4a15e78164dc9ce5fe53750e28f6d4c9ec6.jpg)

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/519oKUeDWRL.jpg)

(http://991.com/newgallery/Traveling-Wilburys-Vol-1-127759.jpg)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 01, 2015, 12:18:18 PM
Marshall Crenshaw - Marshall Crenshaw
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51-K%2Bvi5IML._SY300_.jpg)
This was okay. Marshall clearly has a great love for 50s thing, particularly Buddy Holly - so much so that I'm pretty sure "Cynical Girl" is a rip-off of "Words of Love". "Mary Anne" also sounds really familiar, did someone else use that riff? I also got a really strong Everly Brothers (whom I love) vibe from "the Usual Thing", and I liked that song a great deal. My other favorite is probably the opening "There She Goes Again", and "Rockin' Around in NYC" is a fun song. In the end, I'm not a big fan but the music is perfectly fine. I think the 50s songwriting coupled with an 80s production does this album a disservice.


Globe of Frogs (1988)
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/61USr5wXqLL._SY300_.jpg)
I like Robyn Hitchcock, but I wasn't very taken by this album. Perhaps it isn't the best entrance to his solo discography. "Balloon Man" was fun and shows off his love for Syd Barrett, and I can see how it was a hit. Although, I don't think it's the best song on the album, and I think I agree with the allmusic review that "'Sleeping With Your Devil Mask,' 'Chinese Bones,' and 'Flesh Number One (Beatle Dennis)' [...] are the reasons to own this record." I did like "Tropical Flesh Mandala", too. There were things I liked, but I found some of the songs just weren't all that great. Anyway, I like Robyn, so I'll listen to some of his other solo albums later on.


Wall Of Voodoo "Call Of The West"
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/31F925HCQ8L.jpg)
Continuing this seeming trend of not-hating, not-loving... This was some pretty interesting new wave music. And, uh, well, yeah. The music and lyrics are darker than the usually happy genre, but the band also retain the musical and lyrical weirdness that you find with new wave. Actually, they do a pretty great job of matching the music to the lyrics and creating weird little vignettes. However, I don't really like the guy's voice much, so that's going to work against them. Maybe this is something I could appreciate more with each listen, but currently, it's not something I would revisit very often. "Lost Weekend" depresses me.


Josef K
(http://cdn.discogs.com/qMwPSi7lXakkbnc7PA1eX7g9U3s=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb()/discogs-images/R-461077-1421360753-4255.jpeg.jpg)
And out of the indifference I climb. At this point, I was really hoping for an album I liked, considering it's been about 8 albums in a row I either didn't care for or didn't care much about. Bless it, The Only Fun in Town delivered. I actually really this sort of spiky-guitar-weirdness that showed up a lot in the post-punk times. They're similar to another band I've discovered but haven't had the chance to listen to yet, This Heat. Unreleased backgrounds, if you haven't listened to them before, give this a shot: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0eVTeQi06c (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P0eVTeQi06c). I just turn this album on, let it play, and I'm always disappointed when it's over. Lyrics, singing, guitars - it's all great. Too bad they had such a short career.


The Colour of Spring is the best place to start
(https://www.burningshed.com/covers/large2797.jpg)
And so that's what I did. But, I feel like it's way too early for me to pass judgement on this album. It's all extremely well-crafted, often gorgeous, but I think this an album that really takes some repeated listens to fully appreciate. So, that's what I'm going to do. With that said, I really enjoy "Life's What You Make It", "April 5th", "Chameleon Day", and I thought the ending to "Time It's Time" was lovely.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 01, 2015, 08:56:37 PM
 I take this thread as suggesting *any* 80s album, not just favorites. So,,, here is sth. I found today after reading on Chris Rainbow.

     Ton Scherpenzeel - Heart of the Universe (1984)

(http://musicmp3spb.org/images/t/ton_scherpenzeel/fheart_of_t716889ea60d2723b050c40.jpg)
(http://musicmp3spb.org/images/t/ton_scherpenzeel/fheart_of_tb382f0f1ca8998d9caa23b.jpg)

Features the guy from "Camel" where Chris played the keys.
Comments to the album posted on a local site say that this will appeal to fans of "Maria, Mirabela", Romanian kids' movie of 1981. [Those guys know every obscure bit, I'll tell ya.] Whatever that means, will give it a listen. Would like to see your mini-review on this one too, Mr. Waves.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on March 06, 2015, 04:48:51 AM
That Traveling Wilburys one is a good pick.

Just remembered this one:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/10/Pete_Shelley_-_Homosapien_LP_album_cover.jpg)
Pete Shelley Homosapien
Punk singer goes synthpop shock!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on March 07, 2015, 02:05:51 PM
Give Prefab Sprout another listening session.  They are remembered fondly by many.  To many they were a great group.  Try the hits package:  A Life of Surprises.  Everybody has their own taste tho.  We're just discussin'.  I'm not offended when folks don't like what I like.  The music we love in our lifetime is somewhat from our own circumstances.  What we find along in the way.  It's all about discovery.  The where and the when of it.

Okay, unreleased backgrounds only said Bowie like vocals by McCulloch.  I stand by my claim then.  Vocals and music.  Give a listen to the albums I suggested, Station to Station and Lodger.  Sure unreleased backgrounds will be chiming in again soon.

I'll get back to you later on the Nick/Bowie connection, the party is about to begin.  You know...cause it's Saturday. :lol

Another Saturday and I'm still playing catch up.  unreleased backgrounds has now chimed in with no further info to back-up my statement about McCulloch.  I looked around and found back-up right away.  Wiki (not a great source, but is written by regular folks like us) tells a tale of how ego driven McCulloch was, saying that some song of his was the greatest song ever written, and lashing out about other, much more popular groups than his, were just crap.  I personally remember this time period.  One of them was U2, a group riding the crest of UK music at the time.  Did he think he was better than The Pretenders?  I didn't think so.  Saying you're better is not being better.  They had fans, no doubt about it, but it was his attitude and ego that turned me off.  I shouldn't have said zero.  They have some decent tracks.

Bubbly,  wanted to add some more to my Nick/Bowie connection.  Keep trying to get it clear, you know...

While we were doing Nick in the Listening Project thread I mentioned that on one of the songs from Let Love In sounded as if he had structured it to sound like Bowie.  I was only referring to just the one song, not meaning it to sound like Nick's whole career was being a copyist.   Also in that thread unreleased backgrounds made a post about how hard it is to judge music after just one or two listens.  He's right.  What I'm doing with most of my posts in these kinds of threads is making simple comparisons.  Not saying anybody's a straight rip-off.  There's always some part of the artist inside any track they write.  Me saying "sounds like" should be made more clear by just saying "influenced by" - that's usually the case.  I'm sure Nick listened to Bowie's Thin White Duke period, and probably his whole catalogue, but nothing can be absolute without Nick himself dropping by to give us the word.  Nick you here with us to answer some questions?  :lol  I really think everybody is influenced by someone.  It's the way music works to go forward.

Alan,  I was in a music shop yesterday and noticed The Go-Betweens had a nice four or five page article in MOJO's March 2015 issue.  Nice to see they are being remembered around the world.  Haven't had a chance to listen to any more tracks this week, but will do so soon enough.  I'm working at the xtc place!  But thanks for your words on Weller, The Jam and The Style Council.  I too loved all the Jam cover tracks and nods to Weller's favorite 60's groups.  I took a look at the number of songs Weller did while in both The Jam and The Style Council, counting up my favorites.  It was about equal!  The only Jam material I own on vinyl is what came out at the very end - The Gift, my favorite record by them, and Dig the New Breed, their fantastic live album.  The Jam showed their true strength live.  For the rest, like you, I have Snap and it's counterpart on CD, Gold - a 2 disc comp that covers them very well.  On VHS I have the one with stuff from the last Jam tour and all of the Style Councils' videos...wait nobody remembers VHS - scratch.  On DVD I have The Complete JAM (2002), which covers some of their concerts and TV appearances.  Also got Weller's hit parade (2006), which gives space to all three; Jam, Council and Weller's solo years (up to that point).  My comment on them doing the "Beat Surrender" 12" Single, was to point out that Weller intended, with or without his group mate's blessings, -> the way he intended to go.  He went without them.  Their replacements, to me, were better.  Especially Steve White on drums, who was the one that Paul took with him for much of his solo career.  Although I didn't follow Mick's travels after Style Council, I thought he was a real talent.  Note to Bubbly - we enjoy so much of the same music.  I just hate it that Style Council is circling your drain. ;D

On the Politics of The Style Council:  I'm not much into them, certainly not politics from another country.  I know little about the Red Wedge.  I mean I heard Weller going on about how horrible Thatcher and Her Council was, but paid it of little mind.  When anybody's lyrics are trying to get across a political message, it hardly gets thru.  I wanted to save this to post in a reply to Judd in the xtc place thread, but I'll put it here as an Example:  When I first heard "Making Plans for Nigel" I didn't know it was about a real British Council person.  The picture on the Single didn't give any clue to that.  I don't even remember anybody pointing out it was about that.  I actually thought it was just a "naughty boy" - maybe with a tip-o-the-hat to the Kinks' Schoolboys in Disgrace.  Nothing more.  I also don't hold it against anyone on how they dress.  Like Zappa said - we all have uniforms.  I thought they looked pretty sharp!  And didn't they dress about the same in The Jam?  Oh, and I hope nobody here thinks I'm a Yuppie cause I liked them.  For many years during the 80's I worked at Ma Bell (the phone company) - I'm a commoner like most of the rest of you.  I've never been what I would call rich.  The 80's were rough for a lot of us in America too.  In the late 80's I had to do a complete turn around and change careers after the Bell system broke apart.  I put myself through another round of college to become a professional gardener.  Working in the soil...very much a commoner trade.  I love flowers, trees and shrubs.

So many records are being tacked up on this thread, and I know Bubbly has another batch ready to go.  I have only heard two from his last post, so I'll try to get to those soon - need to find some listening time.  Some of the other records being posted are favorites of mine too, but I can not cover everyone of them today.  For sure have a bit more to say about Talk Talk.    From bossaroos list:  Neil's Old Ways, for me, was his strongest record of the 80's.  It was nice to see him going back to his roots, regardless of what Geffen thought.  I collected most of Neil's records of the 80's only on vinyl.  I thought he dropped off quite a bit towards the end of the decade especially, so CD comps work best for this period.  I saw him at The Bread and Roses Festival in 1980 at The Greek in Berkeley.  It was the only show he did that year, and I was right out in the sandbox (now unfortunately Gold Circle seating for top $).  Mimi had a way of talking artists into making appearances there, even when they were taking a break from the road.  Neil didn't have much of a record to promote at the time.  Hawks and Doves (1980) was 1/2 old tracks going back to 1974, and 1/2 thrown together in early 1980.  Against my better judgement (after hearing the record) I went to the Trans tour stop at the Cow Palace in San Francisco.  Much better than I expected!  It was fun, like his Rust shows and he stripped down most of the Trans' tracks, making them sound more...hmm, normal I guess would be the word.  I found things to like on all Neil's 80's releases, and I must have been one of the only people who actually liked the Shocking Pinks record.  But. As I said, by the end of the decade he left behind a set of much weaker records than his earlier 60'/70's material.  Many of the tracks were written in his prolific 70's period (easily found on bootlegs in much better versions), not just the ones on Hawks and Doves.  You Neil fans already know this I'm sure, so won't make a list.  Fagen's first solo album and Joe Jackson's Night and Day are top choices, and in my collection, vinyl and CD - I have lots of stuff by both.  I have the Wilburys' stuff on vinyl and the wonderful little set they put out with 2CDs and a very neat DVD.  I've never heard the Merle record, but I like him as an artist.  I'll pass on the others, some Singles at best.  That wasn't a very strong Stevie record.  He did have his last great record in the 80's,  but it's not that one.

Okay, it's 5pm where I am, and I am out of time.  I have a party to get ready for.  Saturday...the best day of the week.

Edit:  Sparked by writing this, the first thing I played last night was hit parade DVD disc 1.  That includes many highlights from both The Jam and Style Council, about an hour's worth each.  First time to see it in about a year.  It was nice looking back at videos from the 70's/80's.  Some of it sure looked dated, but sounded fine - I still liked all the music.  As The Jam ended and The Style Council began I thought - wasn't it the same deal as The Beatles.  Looked that way to me.  Men growing up getting married and moving on.  Must have to Paul.  I know the other guys didn't want to break-up.  Paul had already brought an organ and horns into their sound, and they seemed to accept that.  But.  They look a little uncomfortable in the "Beat Surrender" video, the first one where Paul brought in a female singer.  By the time of Style Council's third album, Paul was another example of "bringing the wife into the band" (he married Dee C Lee).  I won't keep pushing my agenda, but I like Paul's "Motown" period.

Another thing that crossed my mind while watching, is being proved by the great selections we are discussing - there was a lot of great music in the 80's.  I think it would be much more difficult to find great music from the 90's.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 08, 2015, 06:13:52 PM
I think it would be much more difficult to find great music from the 90's.

Well, we'll find out in due time.  ;)



Another week, another 5 albums. Here we go...

Stevie Wonder: Hotter Than July
(http://www.musicdirect.com/images/Product/medium/16435.jpg)
This is good, but not as good as his 70s stuff. Still good, though....
I guess I'm not really much in the mood for Stevie lately.


Van Dyke Parks: Jump!
(http://imusic.dk/gfx/item/image/751/4943674075751/van-dyke-parks-2012-jump-jpn-jmlp-compact-disc.jpg)
I was surprised by this album. I usually think of Van Dyke albums as having two things: nice arrangements and slightly annoying vocals. This album delivered on one of those two - and, thankfully, it was the arrangements one. Actually, Van Dyke's vocals are doubled throughout the great majority of the album (other than when he's not singing, o'course) and it really helps out in that area. I also found that he just sang better in general than the album of his I've listened to before, Song Cycle. I enjoyed how he looked back to pre-rock music to inform his song construction and arrangements, it makes for a unique listen. I like it.


Human League
(http://imusic.dk/gfx/item/image/425/0724358011425/human-league-2003-dare-compact-disc.jpg)
I thought this was good. I wasn't sure if I would enjoy something that was so heavily based on synths. But, hey, as it turns out, if it's good then it doesn't really matter. Also, it has "Don't You Want Me".


Psychedelic Furs- Talk Talk Talk
(http://www.vinyl180.com/acatalog/VIN180LP034b.jpg)
Y'know, this is probably good post-punk music, but I couldn't really get past the guy's voice, which I really dislike. Sorry.


Momus
(http://www.phespirit.info/momus/images/198801.jpg)
This was an interesting album. It was often pretty, but also had some really odd subject matter. He has quite a fixation on sex, although he does sing most of the lyrics with an audible smile. It's fun and I enjoyed it.



Okay, well, it's probably obvious that I'm not feeling wordy today. I'm a little burned out on listening to a constant stream of new music. Since starting this thread, I've listened to 34 albums that were new to me. While most of them were from the 80s and I posted about here, some I didn't post about, and others weren't from the 80s at all. I feel like I need a break to come to terms with all these new bands and albums, so I'll be taking a week or two off from listening to five new albums at the week's end.

Feel free to continue on.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Unreconstructed Wilsonite on March 09, 2015, 03:57:13 PM
I quite like Ark by The Animals. "The Night" is a great song from it.

If you don't mind metal or keen to check it out I'd recommend British Steel by Judas Priest, Heaven And Hell by Black Sabbath and The Number Of The Beast by Iron Maiden.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 09, 2015, 11:41:52 PM
How about bad suggestions? Never check Rod Stewart. That guy cannot do anything, talentless brat, as it were.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Unreconstructed Wilsonite on March 10, 2015, 12:14:40 AM
How about bad suggestions? Never check Rod Stewart. That guy cannot do anything, talentless brat, as it were.

His solo career is pretty sh*t. But he was brilliant with The Jeff Beck Group and the Faces.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on March 10, 2015, 03:49:28 AM

Momus

This was an interesting album. It was often pretty, but also had some really odd subject matter. He has quite a fixation on sex,

Heh, so many of the songwriters I like do, (not to mention most people I know, and me) that it seems almost par for the course.



Okay, well, it's probably obvious that I'm not feeling wordy today. I'm a little burned out on listening to a constant stream of new music.

I'm not surprised

Feel free to continue on.

OK! I can't believe I forgot these:

JONATHAN RICHMAN AND THE MODERN LOVERS: JONATHAN SINGS

JONATHAN RICHMAN AND THE MODERN LOVERS: ROCKIN' AND ROMANCE

JONATHAN RICHMAN AND THE MODERN LOVERS: MODERN LOVERS '88

First two of those produced by Andy Paley who you might have heard of.

feelsflow, there was LOTSA great stuff in the nineties! (More JONATHAN RICHMAN for starters).
I didn't say any more about Echo and the Bunnymen because Bubbly Waves correctly interpreted my remarks. You might be interested to know that they were nicknamed Ego and the Backingmen but to me what's on the records is all that matters.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 10, 2015, 08:18:33 PM
How about bad suggestions? Never check Rod Stewart. That guy cannot do anything, talentless brat, as it were.

But he was brilliant with The Jeff Beck Group and the Faces.
What to check 1st? From either band, I mean.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 10, 2015, 11:19:23 PM
Okay, well, it's probably obvious that I'm not feeling wordy today. I'm a little burned out on listening to a constant stream of new music.

I'm not surprised

I'm not sure how other people approach discovering music, but it usually starts for me when I'm interested in a new band. When that happens, I slowly work my way the band's/artist's catalogue all the way through - or at least the seemingly good parts. Most often, towards the end of the process, I find a new band that I'm interested in, and things keep moving smoothly. So, the approach I've been taking for this thread - quickly listening to one album per artist - is basically the exact opposite of how I usually go about things. It has been fun, though, and I would like to thank everyone who offered up an album that I liked (for those of you who made suggestions that I disliked, you get nothing).

JONATHAN RICHMAN AND THE MODERN LOVERS: JONATHAN SINGS

JONATHAN RICHMAN AND THE MODERN LOVERS: ROCKIN' AND ROMANCE

JONATHAN RICHMAN AND THE MODERN LOVERS: MODERN LOVERS '88

First two of those produced by Andy Paley who you might have heard of.

Why, yes, I have heard of Andy Paley. I've also heard of Jonathon Richman, thanks to the one and only Modern Lovers album. I've been meaning to check out this solo albums, although I know they're nothing like the Modern Lovers album. Still, I'm at least hoping the same sort of songwriting personality will carry over into his solo stuff. Anyway, cool, I'll have to check these out. Which one's your favorite?

I didn't say any more about Echo and the Bunnymen because Bubbly Waves correctly interpreted my remarks. You might be interested to know that they were nicknamed Ego and the Backingmen but to me what's on the records is all that matters.

Feelsflow mention of the attitude problem was actually the first time I had read anything about it. Hearing about it hasn't changed the way I feel about them, though. Someone talking themselves up doesn't detract from the actual quality of the music, although I can see how it could put some people off. But, still, it's the music we're grading, not the human being.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on March 11, 2015, 12:44:54 AM
Unreleased backgrounds,  I haven't had a chance to listen to everything on your list yet, but did queue up some Buzzcocks.  Wanted to post the clips for "Orgasm Addict" and "I Can't Control Myself" after the description of the Momus album and your reply.  But, those are 70's tunes. :)

I played some Jonathan Richman.  I saw him several times, but his music didn't grab ahold of me too much.  I'm getting in trouble around here with my opinions, but I didn't really know who he was back then, so that makes it a bit foggy to remember.  He came across as too much of a comedian to me, I like to separate the two.  I love Arlo Guthrie but think his comedy too wrecks any album it's prominent on.  Jonathan has some nice light songs, though.  Maybe if I had seen him do longer sets.  I saw him once at a two set show.  He did several songs not included in the first set.  I saw him in a festival setting.  That was better suited to keeping everyone's eyes on the stage, audiences in Dinner Clubs tend to talk during opening acts, or have dinner.

I'm also playing some clips to check if I still like some of the old stuff.  Modern English, "I Melt With You"  Split Enz, "I Got You"  Human League, "Don't You Want Me" and "(Keep Feeling) Fascination"
Falco, "Der Kommisar" - some Wang Chung and Men Without Hats, all made me feel good.

Like Bubbly with his Soft Boys pick earlier, you picked one that I liked back then, but haven't played since the late 80's.  I was looking into Pete Shelley.  I thought Homosapien was his best work.  You're right, music is all that matters, and you picked a good one here.  This kind of music was new to me, my musical taste was changing.  I was listening to mostly American music in the 70's.  I didn't hear Buzzcocks or really any of the Punk groups, other than the Ramones, until late 1978.  If I heard it, it just went unnoticed.  California's club scene was very different from the places I had been going to in New Orleans where Disco was still very popular.  I was going to Lou Rawls concerts, Soul Music, singer/songwriters, Country Rock and some of the acts Punk was trying to eliminate.  I didn't mind Disco either, some of it is good.  It's good if Marvin is doing it, right?  I had liked acts like MC5, but I didn't see Garage Rock springing back to life.  Honestly, I didn't care for the Stooges or much Hard Rock.  If I saw someone like Alice Cooper at a festival it was okay, but it didn't shake my world.  I didn't hear Velvet Underground til much later, I was getting to that in 1979 too.  If Punk Clubs were anywhere in Louisiana, I didn't know about them.  San Francisco had changed some since I was last there in 1975.  The Haight was a safe place to go again and the Mission was now an even cooler place to explore.

Into the 80's, the UK groups were the ones most people I knew wanted to check out.  Bowie and Roxy Music were very cutting edge, and the UK was putting up some strong artists, some of which I named earlier.  I don't know what made Shelley decide to do this, but it's quite a style change.  I knew people who thought he was selling out, but I didn't.  Bryan Ferry and Roxy was going into a lush and more Disco sound around this time.  Four years earlier they were just a group I sometimes heard on the radio.  I didn't think it was too different from what Todd was doing with Utopia in 1980.  Adventures in Utopia had some Disco beats incorporated into Rock.  His vocals reminded me of Howard Werth more than anyone else.  It fit into what I was playing at home.  It wasn't because I was a big fan of Buzzcocks, a lot of the Punk music sounded similar to me, fast - music at a fever pitch.  Of course this is far from Punk.  I thought it a natural next step.  I was a Genesis fan, and Peter Gabriel was leading me to the Fairlight...

I recognized Martin Rushent's name from the early 70's.  He had done great work with Fleetwood Mac and with Danny Kirwan, producing Second Chapter in 1974.  He had been changing too.  I'm pretty sure I heard Dare first, but they came out at about the same time.  Him and Shelley hit on something with these "demo" sessions.

Homosapien opens very strong.  "Homosapien" - this was the first track I heard from the album, sure I didn't connect it to his previous group.  Just something new and interesting.  And this is my favorite Shelley song.  Sounded great on a club system!  The (4:36) album version is the best.  I didn't like any of the remixes or Dub versions of any of his tracks.

"Yesterday's Not Here" - in this new disguise his vocals sounded better.  Love this track.  I'm not going to compare this to Scary Monsters/Super Creeps, but would he have gone in this direction if not for Bowie's popularity?  Euro rhythms were catching on.  I think there are good decisions all over this record.

"Keats Song" - this doesn't sound too different than something the captain might come up with.  He would probably strip it down to just piano, but I think it fits his style.

"Guess I Must Have Been In Love With Myself" - if I was a producer I'd tap Ian Hunter to do this.

"Pusher Man" - hilarious.  Is he saying "He pulled out the snuff"?  Brilliant.  I love the lyrics on this.

"Witness the Change" - this reminded me of what Gabriel was doing.

"In Love With Somebody Else" - there's something about this that reminds me of mid-60's Beatles.  Might be the chord changes.

"Love In Vain" - Just beautiful.

It would be easier to list the only two I think are weak, "I Generate A Feeling" and "I Don't Know What Love Is".

A great album.

The follow-up album, XL1 was more than half good.  "Many a Time" is close to "(Keep Feeling) Fascination" in structure.  Other favs are "Telephone Operator"   "You Know Better Than I Know"  "You and I" and "Twilight" - the title track too.  Heaven & the Sea (1986) saw him moving away from the synth sound some, more Rock was creeping back in.  Again, a strong set of songs to open the album, "Waiting For Love" and "On Your Own."  "Never Again" and "My Dreams" stood out on a weak side 2.  By this point Shelley wasn't getting air time in the clubs.

As the 80's came to a close my tastes were turning back to American music again.  Groups were breaking up - Talk Talk, The Records, Style Council, Costello broke up the Atractions.  Glad xtc were holding up a light.  McCartney and Costello were still doing top music, but with different players.  Maybe that was part of it.  McCartney reinvented himself in the late 80's.  Some of my old favorites like Laura Nyro were coming back.  Brian seemed to be getting stronger.  Todd had a great album to close the decade, Nearly Human.  I began losing touch with Shelly.  For that matter, Robyn Hitchcock after Globe of Frogs.  For some reason many of the UK artists I only got around to seeing once.  You had to pick and choose which ones were the most important.  There was a lot to choose from in a place like San Francisco.

Before I sign off, just want to thank Bubbly for coming up with this idea of an 80's thread.  I hope while you're on the break I can come up with something more than just reacting to others picks.  I want to pick a random year and talk about everything that interested me about it.

          


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on March 11, 2015, 12:52:27 AM
Well, Bubbly's already back!  He wrote and posted one while I was writing mine.  Shows me how long I worked at that last post.  How quick a couple of hours goes...
And why it's hard to get in a few words on all the picks so far.  Morning everybody.  I'm off to bed.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Unreconstructed Wilsonite on March 11, 2015, 03:09:31 AM
How about bad suggestions? Never check Rod Stewart. That guy cannot do anything, talentless brat, as it were.

But he was brilliant with The Jeff Beck Group and the Faces.
What to check 1st? From either band, I mean.

Stay With Me by the Faces is brilliant. As for The Jeff Beck Group, their debut album called Truth is worth checking out, and their cover of Jailhouse Rock from their second album is also quite good


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on March 12, 2015, 04:46:15 AM


Why, yes, I have heard of Andy Paley. I've also heard of Jonathon Richman, thanks to the one and only Modern Lovers album. I've been meaning to check out this solo albums, although I know they're nothing like the Modern Lovers album. Still, I'm at least hoping the same sort of songwriting personality will carry over into his solo stuff. Anyway, cool, I'll have to check these out. Which one's your favorite?

Jonathan Sings is my favourite. It's one of my favourite albums period, and I think lots of people share my love for it. Though Jonathan himself, contrary as he is, hates it, but he still plays lots of songs from it so it can't be the songs he dislikes.

Someone talking themselves up doesn't detract from the actual quality of the music, although I can see how it could put some people off. But, still, it's the music we're grading, not the human being.

exactly.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on March 12, 2015, 05:04:17 AM
feelsflow, I really enjoyed your thoughts on Pete Shelley's Homosapien. I haven't listened to it in so long. I'm listening to it now on Spotify- I'd never heard any of these bonus tracks before. The album always ended for me with the wistful "It's Hard Enough Knowing".

It's always funny looking at the Spotify listening stats. Lots of people (relatively) want to listen to the title track (which I heard in a club recently) but hardly anyone is listening to, say, "Guess I Must Have Been In Love With Myself" which is my favourite song on the album by far. Though I love the lyrics of the title track, which were so daring for a 1981 single.

I think he sings "stuff" not "snuff", unless he flubs the line. Snuff is very much legal. A friend of mine swears by it.

I see what you mean about "Keats' Song" being a bit Beau Mondes-y. I like the way in a futuristic sounding record you have a track dedicated to one 19th century romantic poet, sung by a man who named himself after another one. A link to the (distant) past.

XL1 made no impression on me at all but maybe I should give that one another chance.

These bonus tracks then- "Witness the Change" does sound like a b-side to me, but "Maxine", "In Love With Somebody Else" and "Love in Vain" sound really good.





Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: FFS on March 12, 2015, 04:54:59 PM
ANYTHING by New Order they released in the 80s.

Remain In Light by Talking Heads

The Stone Roses first album

Shoot Out The Lights - Richard & Linda Thompson

Hounds Of Love by Kate Bush

Spinal Tap (original soundtrack)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on March 13, 2015, 10:18:59 PM
feelsflow, I really enjoyed your thoughts on Pete Shelley's Homosapien. I haven't listened to it in so long. I'm listening to it now on Spotify- I'd never heard any of these bonus tracks before. The album always ended for me with the wistful "It's Hard Enough Knowing".

It's always funny looking at the Spotify listening stats. Lots of people (relatively) want to listen to the title track (which I heard in a club recently) but hardly anyone is listening to, say, "Guess I Must Have Been In Love With Myself" which is my favourite song on the album by far. Though I love the lyrics of the title track, which were so daring for a 1981 single.

I think he sings "stuff" not "snuff", unless he flubs the line. Snuff is very much legal. A friend of mine swears by it.

I see what you mean about "Keats' Song" being a bit Beau Mondes-y. I like the way in a futuristic sounding record you have a track dedicated to one 19th century romantic poet, sung by a man who named himself after another one. A link to the (distant) past.

XL1 made no impression on me at all but maybe I should give that one another chance.

These bonus tracks then- "Witness the Change" does sound like a b-side to me, but "Maxine", "In Love With Somebody Else" and "Love in Vain" sound really good.





Good to hear Shelly is still being played in the clubs.  Buzzcocks had a strong presence in the place I was working in 1978-79.  An import wholesale business with Italy.  The boss that ran the warehouse was from London, had a couple of his buddies with him who also worked there, so there was a British presence when we were deciding what to play.  One of them had two favorites, Buzzcocks and dire Straits.  He supported Shelly's move and we heard that too.  He was playing them on vinyl.  He's the one that had the singles, and why I remember hearing them back then - they weren't playing that kind of stuff in the clubs.  I don't remember if Homosapien even had a lyric sheet.  I looked up the words to "Pusher Man" on several of the lyrics sites, and they all say stuff and snuff.  It rhymes better than what he was really thinking of.  Here's the first verse:

I met a good man
He had some good stuff
He showed me a bag
and he pulled out the snuff
I had just one try
And that was enough
Water poured from my eyes
God stuff this rough snuff

It's not just the lyrics, it's also his delivery.  I went back today, I'm listening on Spotify too - not all of it is on youtube.  Great to hear it again.  I forgot to look at the stats, but it's like youtube.  Can't believe the low and high numbers on what people listen to.

   

     


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on March 14, 2015, 02:29:53 AM
You're right, it is snuff and you're right, it is funnier that way. Sorry, I forgot to listen out for it last time so I just went from memory.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 16, 2015, 12:03:00 PM
So, for anyone who cares - and if you don't, then scroll down to the big picture with people and words - I've decided to change the way I go about this. I've gone back and saved everyone's suggestions, but to make this manageable, I've cut down what was left and added in my own picks for the 80s, and I've created the list I want to get through for this decade. I've saved everyone's suggestions, and will get to them in the future whenever I feel like listening to something new from this decade. But for now, here's something from my final list (that none of you suggested):

The dB's Stands for Decibels
(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/_/94057331/Stands+For+Decibels+The+dBs+++H.png)

One of the most noticeable things about this band is the the two songwriters, Chris Stamey and Peter Holsapple, both talented, yet with very different songwriting personalities. As you continue to play through the album, the two opposing forces contrast and balance each other well and it becomes easier to figure out who wrote which song. While Stamey's songs are exceedingly odd and psychedelic, Holsapple's songs are always more grounded and able to reel you in after a string of Stamey's out-there experimentations. This dynamic between the writers characterizes the second song on the record, "Dynamite" (credited to both songwriters), and it gives a brief, 2:36 idea of what the two together are like: Stamey brings the weird chords, weird lyrics, weird melodies, and a focus on keyboards; Holsapple brings a focus on guitar (and along with it, riffs) and more conventional song structure.

Christ Stamey songs are filled with weird chord changes and mercurial shifts in mood and structure. In fact, Stamey has a gift for song construction, as the songs evolve and grow in different ways - it almost seems impossible to follow the structure of the gently psychedelic "She's Not Worried". This weird approach to structure carries over to "Espionage", bearing a riff resembling what you might hear from a 60s James Bond movie and probably resembles what it must be to experience hallucinogenics while doing whatever it is spies do - spying, I guess. The song reinforces this with bizarre changes throughout the song and weird drags in the melody and chords, similar to the melody and chords of "Dynamite". Perhaps the most normal song he contributes to this album "Tearjerkin'", is still dynamic, not having a clear verse/chorus/bridge, but seems to evolve as it goes along. The sections of the song where he asks you to take a photograph/off your clothes are grou with lovely melodies and harmonies. "Cycles Per Second" has a very Eastern-flavored melody and some of his most dense lyrics "Cycles per second, forging a neuronic aperture".

Peter Holsapple is more earthy, and comes off as greatly influenced by Alex Chilton. In fact, the opening song "Black and White" is sort of like "Kizza Me" in approach: frenetic and fragmented. Once the opening lines of "I, I never would hurt you, and even if I did you, you never would tell me" in Peter's higher, yet imperfect register, you can tell you're in for something great. "The Fight" doesn't seem to owe much to Alex/Big Star, but it has a great guitar groove and lyrics about domestic strife. While the verses have him putting up a tough front with propulsive guitars and melody, the brief beginning of the chorus shows a different emotional reaction, one that is hurt and saddened by what has happened. "Bad Reputation" and "Big Brown Eyes" are perhaps the two most straightforward songs on the album - well, other than that weird middle 8 that "Bad Reputation" has. The former a song about about the new girl in school who has a less than great reputation among the students, but Holsapple isn't buying it, saying "They say you got a bad reputation, I think it's their imagination, you're an angel". He does a wonderful job of managing to tap into the high-school-y love that so many other bands attempt, except he brings clever lyrics and a good idea to what can be a cliche subject. On the latter, he delivers the most plain song, earnest melodies accompany lyrics like "Every time I look into your big brown eyes, I get paralyzed" and "You give me something to take the day away."

To finish the record, both Stamey and Holsapple contribute perhaps their best songs on the record, "I'm in Love" and "Moving in Your Sleep" respectively. For his, Stamey takes what his earlier songs on the records promised - interesting melodies, harmonies, arrangements, structures, shifts - and then utilizes all of it to create this magnificent , confused love song. Then he caps it all off with that gorgeous chorus. He also delivers very Chilton-like singing on his "Anyway, it works out, it works out anyway" sections. Then, we come to the last song, and Holsapple has written the greatest Third/Sister Lovers song that wasn't on Third/Sister Lovers. The lonely guitar and piano create a downcast atmosphere and the melody is sweet, yet sad. It's difficult to tell by the lyrics, but there's something dark happening here, and you get the feeling these two people aren't healthy for each other in any way. In fact, the happiest moment in the song is when he declares that someday she may remember him. The song ends bleakly, as he pleads to be remembered.

I'm admittedly a sucker for this kind of music, but I like it. If you have ears, you should hear it.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on March 17, 2015, 11:40:15 AM
Power-Popping thru the 80's with The dB's!!

The Chilton connection is unmistakable.  So they were wearing their Alex and Big Star records out.  "Black and White" is a great opener.  I keep mentioning one of my favorite Power-Pop groups of this time, The Records.  You guys listened to them yet?  This reminds me of their sound a bit.  "Dynamite" - I have four favorites on this record.  This track is included on that list.  The way they phrase the lyrics is similar to Partridge's "Senses Working Overtime."  Your describing it as dragging the words.  I agree.  Love the organ.  It's an Ace Tone TOP-1.  Live, Peter was the only one on organ - but both of them could play one.  Maybe on the record, both were.  I only saw them once, they opened for Tom Petty - I think it was the Damn the Torpedoes tour, '81 or '82, Chris was still in the group.  They should have written more songs together.

"She's Not Worried" - fav #2.  Some of the tracks were mixed at Martin Rushent's studio, and some overdubs were added there.  I found a reference to Andy Clark adding synths to the first two albums.  Andy was hot for the moment, after doing Bowie sessions for Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps.  At first I thought it was an accordion, but on second listen, it must be a synth.

"the Fight" - for the pogoers.  Always fighting in the mosh pit.  I doubt they were listening to close for lyrical quotes!  "Espionage" - fav #3.  I think Jellyfish may have been influenced by this one, sounds like some of the stuff they did.  "Tearjerkin'" - fav #4.  For me, the first side is much stronger than the second.  The best song on side 2 is "I'm In Love."  "Moving in Your Sleep" might grow on me with a few more plays.

I gave a listen to their second album.  Favorites were "We Were Happy There" "Feel Good (today)" and "Neverland" -

I'm wondering if they are on any of the Old Grey Whistle Test DVDs.  They performed several songs on the show - "Big Brown Eyes" Ph Factor" and "Cycles Per Second."  They were not a Stiff act, but there is some connections to Nick Lowe (they did some recording at his Shepherd's Bush studio) with Roger Bechirian producing.  Roger engineered many Lowe and Costello records there.  Their first tour of the UK was called the Taking Liberties tour, Costello nicked that for the title of one of his comps.  Stiff America released a live comp from one of the shows on that tour with the dB's on two tracks called Start Swimming.  I collected Stiff Records, and used to have this... another record I had to leave behind when I moved across the country.  It looks like that was the only American release (until they were picked up by Bearsville in '84) from this short lived group.  What was your source for this Bubbly?  The youtube version wasn't mastered very well.  I might like it even more if they could get it re-mastered.  It's a good record tho.  Good pick.  What else ya' got on your new list?    


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on March 17, 2015, 12:30:42 PM
Just remembered something I have on vinyl with Chris Stamey on guitar, piano and vocals.  He probably came into the sessions with Stipe.
Give it a try, you might like it.

Golden Palominos Visions of Excess (1985):  https://youtu.be/Fwl3zZuatpA?list=PL2893B39FD85F6455 


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Dudd on March 17, 2015, 05:52:50 PM
I tagged along for some of these and Marshall Crenshaw has been my favourite so far, I think. Not really power pop as I've seen it listed in a few places, but pleasantly concise, clean-cut rock 'n' roll. I'm not terribly familiar with the work of Buddy Holly, who it looks as though Marshall is modelling himself after here, but I just found myself attracted to the nostalgic vibe of this album. "Someday Someway" was the instant standout for me - that's a lovely little pop tune - and on repeated listens I've come to really like "There She Goes Again," "The Usual Thing," and "Not For Me." I'll probably be playing this album a lot around summer, and I'm interested in trying Field Day, which from the looks of things is at least almost as good.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Alan Smith on March 18, 2015, 03:11:51 AM
[/color]The dB's!!

The Chilton connection is unmistakable.  Live, Peter was the only one on organ - but both of them could play one.  

What was your source for this Bubbly?  The youtube version wasn't mastered very well.  I might like it even more if they could get it re-mastered.  It's a good record tho.  Good pick.  What else ya' got on your new list?    

Yeah, great pick, how remiss of me not to mention them earlier (thank christ for those Smilers who have their heads screwed on).

I love their first 2 albums, although I feel the Repercussions finds Stamey managing to merge quirk and accessibility (Ask For Jill), while Holsapple's numbers, enjoyable and lyrically intriguing, lack the urgency of his  Stands for... picks.

Stamey actually played bass for Alex Chilton for a year circa '77, pretty cool for him.  The band was originally Chris Stamey and the db's, but paired it back a little after Peter joined, initially on keyboards.

I've been fortunate enough to get my hands on both albums on vinyl (x2 for each) - I also bought the Collector's Choice twofer CD from '01, which was mastered for CD by Chris Stamey himself (as were the IRS CDs if you come across them).

There are CD editions and a vinyl pressing (a comp called Amplifier) on a German label (Line), which are not as well mastered (I can vouch for the vinyl item - it's not as sharp; but just passing on the message re the Line issued CDs, don't have 'em).

Good times!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: halblaineisgood on March 19, 2015, 03:42:18 AM
(http://oi57.tinypic.com/2u8e6iu.jpg)
i am listening to a cassette, I gotta stop doing that.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 20, 2015, 12:24:37 PM
Rockpile, Seconds of Pleasure
(http://cdn.soundstagedirect.com/media/rockpile_seconds_of_pleasure.jpg)
This is a solid, fun album. Nick Lowe and Dave Edmunds were always a bit of revivalists, and they finally let it all loose here. If not for the Squeeze cover (which is pretty good), it wouldn't be that difficult to mistake this for an album from the 50s, although it's much more consistent. The band is incredibly tight (those stop-and-starts on "You Ain't Nothin' but Fine" are something to behold), and Nick Lowe has written a solid set of songs to match the relatively obscure set of covers that are also on the record. My only complaint is that I actually Lowe's originals much more than their covers, and I wish there was more of them.

Also great is the bonus EP included on the CD, Nick Lowe & Dave Edmunds Sing the Everly Brothers. They play through four Everly Brothers songs in what seems to be a live setting, and it really showcases their singing ability. One of my favorite Everly Brothers songs, "Crying in the Rain", is included on the EP and they sing the harmonies beautifully. Very impressive.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 02, 2015, 12:19:29 PM
(http://www.musicaddiction.it/wp/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/The_Cure-Pornography-50x50.jpg) The Cure, Poronography
An extremely dense, dark, and claustrophobic album. I like it.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/f/fc/PetShopBoysActually.jpg) Pet Shop Boys, Actually
Everything seemed fine and well-written, but it's not really my thing.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/db/Treasure_cover.jpg/220px-Treasure_cover.jpg) Cocteau Twins, Treasure
I loved this record. I totally dig the dream-pop thing they do and the singer is excellent. I love the weird vocal stuff she does.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/38/Madnesstheriseandfall.jpg/220px-Madnesstheriseandfall.jpg) Madness, the Rise & Fall
I did not like this. I thought there was about 3 good songs: "Primrose Hill", "Our House", and "Madness". The rest was nothing worth mentioning.

(http://991.com/gallery_50x50/419144.jpg) Love and Rockets, Earth, Sun, Moon
I don't really feel like I got a handle on this record. It mostly seemed like stuff I would like, but it never really grabbed me.

(http://revhq.com/images/covers/50/tg024.gif) Big Black, Songs About Fucking
Powerful, noisy stuff. Is there actually something good under all that noise? I'm not sure. There might be.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51S08GnOhqL._SL75_SS50_.jpg) Felt, Forever Breathes the Lonely Word
This is a great record. Not a bad moment on the whole thing. Have you ever listened to the Velvet Underground's self-titled album and thought "this could use some ever-present organ and poppier songwriting"? If you have, then this is the album for you.

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/71MejrUDo%2BL._SL1400_.jpg) Aztec Camera, High Land Hard Rain
This was another record I never really figured out. I like the jangly sound, but none of it made too big of an impression.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/dc/The_Feelies_Crazy_Rhythms.jpg) The Feelies, Crazy Rhythms
It's a fine record, but I couldn't shake the feeling that I heard all this before (the one that came to mind the most was the debut by the Modern Lovers). Still, it's good stuff and I, at least, can never have enough of this kind of music.

(http://bern.hitparade.ch/cdi/bauhaus-in_the_flat_field_a.jpg) Bauhaus, In the Flat Field
It's cool, but I struggle with Peter Murphy's voice, which I find to be cartoonish.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/NewOrderPower,Corruption%26Lies.jpg) New Order, Power, Corruption & Lies
I liked it - not the sound I was expecting from this album. I don't think the record ever rises above the opening cut, "Age of Consent", which is some blissful, jangly pop music. I LOVE "AGE OF CONSENT".

(http://www.amoeba.com/sized-images/max/50/60//uploads/albums/covers/other//018777260046.jpg) They Might Be Giants, Lincoln
I did not enjoy this at all. The music sounds like it was made in Garage Band and the singer has an unbelievably annoying voice. There are some nice things to be found, like "They'll Need a Crane" (basically only worth it for the lyrics), but it's not worth it.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/ThrowingMusesUntitled.jpg) Throwing Muses, untitled
Another great record. Kristin Hersh is a great singer and songwriter, and I love how her songs have these drastic shifts. Cool stuff.

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/500/57570585/Rita+Mitsouko+mitsouko.jpg) Les Rita Mitsouko, Rita Mitsouko
This is a fine album, but not one that really grabbed my attention.

(http://cdn.discogs.com/Rx4kgxDhsko469DtCYArGO18qj0=/fit-in/300x300/filters:strip_icc():format(jpeg):mode_rgb()/discogs-images/R-1702606-1278044345.jpeg.jpg) Rain Parade, Emergency Third Rail Power Trip
Great album. Like the Byrds, but sleepier. I love it. Check out "What's She Done to Your Mind".

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/10/Pete_Shelley_-_Homosapien_LP_album_cover.jpg) Pete Shelley, Homosapien
A shame it's not a Buzzcocks record, but Shelley still has his wonderful songwriting style intact for this album.

(http://www.clashmusic.com/sites/default/files/styles/article_feature/public/legacy/files/the-stone-roses-628.jpg) The Stone Roses, the Stone Roses
This was good. Not something I like as much as some of these others, but there's some good stuff to be found here.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/5b/Meatpuppetsii.jpg/220px-Meatpuppetsii.jpg) Meat Puppets, Meat Puppets II
This is a really cool album. It's like aggressive country-psych. I dig it.

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0000/673/MI0000673163.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) Barry Adamson, Moss Side Story
Really interesting album and idea, a fake soundtrack to a murder mystery. I didn't get to spend as much time with this album as I would have liked, but it is a riveting listen.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/4/40/Jonathan_Sings!.jpg) Jonathan Ricman and the Modern Lovers, Jonathan Sings!
Not what I was expecting really. A mellow, catchy record. I played it while cooking and had a swell time.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/9/9b/Paul_Simon_-_Graceland_(1986_CD).jpg/220px-Paul_Simon_-_Graceland_(1986_CD).jpg) Paul Simon, Graceland
Um.... what's all the fuss about? I don't get it. The a cappella bits were nice - the beginning to "Diamonds on the Soles of Her Shoes" and especially "Homeless" -  and I liked "You Can Call Me Al", although the arena-ready synth-riff blast is somewhat odd. It's fine.

(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0000/144/MI0000144326.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) The Wedding Present, George Best
Another great album. The music is made up hyperactive bass and aggressive, jangly guitars that are strummed at light-speed. The lyric side is also very interesting - I especially love the opening cut, "Everyone Thinks He Looks Daft". An incredibly petty break-up song, the singer wants you to know that everyone thinks your new boyfriend looks daft.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c7/Donald_Fagen_-_The_Nightfly.jpg) Donald Fagen, the Nightfly
What antiseptic schlock. Everything is squeaky clean and shiny and I'm gonna throw up in a bucket. If I discovered anything about myself during this time, it's that I have absolutely no time for "sophisti-pop".

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6b/Pixies-Doolittle.jpg) Pixies, Doolittle
This is a good album. Frank Black is certainly an interesting songwriter, and "Debaser" is one of the greatest things I've ever heard. Or at least that's what I think currently.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/2/27/Daddyshighway.jpg/220px-Daddyshighway.jpg) The Bats, Daddy's Highway
A lovely jangle pop album.


I love jangle pop. So sue me.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 02, 2015, 12:29:06 PM
Now that I've finished clearing out all the reviews, here's a list of everything 80s I've listened to since opening this thread (notice they're all different bands):

Hee Haw - the Birthday Party
Sixteen Tambourines - the Three O'Clock
Killing Joke - Killing Joke
Kilimajaro - the Teardrop Explodes
Skylarking - XTC
Psonic Psunspot - the Dukes of Stratosphear
Purple Rain - Prince
Eden - Everything but the Girl
Searching for the Young Soul Rebels - Dexys Midnight Runners
Murmur - REM
This Nation's Saving Grace - the Fall
16 Lovers Lane - the Go-Betweens
Freaks - Pulp
Script of the Bridge - the Chameleons
The Queen Is Dead - the Smiths
Steve McQueen - Prefab Sprout
Imperial Bedroom - Elvis Costello
Our Favorite Shop - the Style Council
Porcupine - Echo & the Bunnymen
Marshall Crenshaw - Marshall Crenshaw
Globe of Frogs - Robyn Hitchcock
Call of the West - Wall of Voodoo
The Only Fun in Town - Josef K
Colour of Spring - Talk Talk
Hotter Than July - Stevie Wonder
Jump! - Van Dyke Parks
Dare - the Human League
Talk Talk Talk - Psychedelic Furs
Tender Pervert - Momus
Songs About Fucking - Big Black
Stands for Decibels - the dB's
Seconds of Pleasure/Sing the Everly Brothers - Rockpile
Earth, Sun, Moon - Love and Rockets
Forever Breathes the Lonely Word - Felt
In the Flat Field - Bauhaus
Crazy Rhythms - the Feelies
The Rise & Fall - Madness
High Land, Hard Rain - Aztec Camera
Lincoln - They Might Be Giants
Treasure - Cocteau Twins
Rita Mitsouko - Les Rita Mitsouko
Power, Corruption & Lies - New Order
untitled - Throwing Muses
Meat Puppets II - Meat Puppets
Homosapien - Pete Shelley
Actually - Pet Shop Boys
Emergency Third Rail Power Trip - Rain Parade
The Stone Roses - the Stone Roses
George Best -the Wedding Present
Jonathan Sings! - Jonathan Richman and the Modern Lovers
Graceland - Paul Simon
Moss Side Story - Barry Adamson
Pornography - the Cure
Daddy's Highway - the Bats
Donald Fagen - the Nightfly
Pixies - Doolittle


Here are some repeat bands:

Ocean Rain - Echo & the Bunnymen
Parade - Prince
The Wonderful and Frightening Word of... - the Fall

I've also listened to Kate Bush's Hounds of Love, which is an album and artist I never got 'round to writing about, but discovered before the start of this thread.


Here are some record labels that are/were of special interest to me:
4AD
Creation
Flying Nun


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 02, 2015, 12:39:19 PM
And, with that, I consider my journey to be completed. Of course, there are always more bands and albums I want to explore (I would list them, but it's just too many), but for this thread's purposes, my goal has been accomplished. I've discovered a lot of stuff that I love and look forward to listening to more/exploring more. Thank you to everyone who contributed in some way, it was fun. I'll probably continue to use this thread to talk about music from the 80s, but that won't be for a good, long while. Bubbly needs a break.

Looking forward, I know a certain person named feelsflow has been interested in tackling a 70s appreciation thread....


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on April 02, 2015, 01:21:15 PM
Bubbly needs a break.

I should think you do! What an achievement----kudos, sir.

And now onward and upward to that '70s topic... ;=)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Please delete my account on April 02, 2015, 04:49:12 PM
My God you've been listening to a lot of albums! I'm glad you liked some of them (especially the ones that were my picks!) Just picked out a few comments to respond to:


(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/d/db/Treasure_cover.jpg/220px-Treasure_cover.jpg) Cocteau Twins, Treasure
I loved this record. I totally dig the dream-pop thing they do and the singer is excellent. I love the weird vocal stuff she does.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/38/Madnesstheriseandfall.jpg/220px-Madnesstheriseandfall.jpg) Madness, the Rise & Fall
I did not like this. I thought there was about 3 good songs: "Primrose Hill", "Our House", and "Madness". The rest was nothing worth mentioning.


(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/ThrowingMusesUntitled.jpg) Throwing Muses, untitled
Another great record. Kristin Hersh is a great singer and songwriter, and I love how her songs have these drastic shifts. Cool stuff.

(http://userserve-ak.last.fm/serve/500/57570585/Rita+Mitsouko+mitsouko.jpg) Les Rita Mitsouko, Rita Mitsouko
This is a fine album, but not one that really grabbed my attention.


(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c7/Donald_Fagen_-_The_Nightfly.jpg) Donald Fagen, the Nightfly
What antiseptic schlock. Everything is squeaky clean and shiny and I'm gonna throw up in a bucket. If I discovered anything about myself during this time, it's that I have absolutely no time for "sophisti-pop".


Great choice of Cocteaus record! Though there's plenty more what that came form.

Likewise Throwing Muses. "Hate My Way" is one of my favourite songs.

I think Madness were really a singles band. I think the greatest hits are all you need.

Maybe that's true for Les Rita Misouko too. I've only heard their greatest hits and Cool frenesie and I didn't even like all the songs on those but I thought that when they were good, they were very good. E.g. "Marcia Baila", "Les amants" and "Cool frenesie".

Don't see what's not to get about Graceland, personally. I can see that some people might not like his personality or lyrics, or disapprove of the appropriation of other cultures' music, but all the songs of that album have really strong melodies to these ears. Very varied album too.

Love the Fagen review! I got that once at a charity shop. Took a chance on it because I'd heard good things.  As soon as that first song came on, which I knew well from radio but had never previously known what it was, I was like, "oh, it's this! I don't wanna listen to this!"


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: BrianAlDaveFan on May 06, 2015, 12:51:10 AM
Albums:
Roky Erickson - "Don't Slander Me"
The Replacements - "Tim"

(The above are perfect albums, to me. This post is just for starters, but I will stand by those two albums for my whole life.)

Songs:
Fischer-Z - "So Long"
Dragon - "Rain"




Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: KDS on May 07, 2015, 11:32:29 AM
Black Sabbath - Heaven and Hell

Queensryche - Operation Mindcrime

Roger Waters - The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking

The Traveling Wilburys

Iron Maiden - Piece of Mind

Ozzy Osbourne - Diary of a Madman

Judas Priest - British Steel

Scorpions - Blackout

Yngwie Malmsteen's Rising Force

Deep Purple - Perfect Strangers

Bon Jovi - Slippery When Wet

Motley Crue - Shout at the Devil

Europe - The Final Countdown

Def Leppard - Pyromania

Robert Plant - Now and Zen

Rush - Moving Pictures

Metallica - Master of Puppets

Pink Floyd - The Final Cut

U2 - War

Bruce Springsteen - Born in the USA

KIX - Blow My Fuse

Van Halen - 5150

John Fogerty - Centerfield

AC/DC - Back in Black


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: BrianAlDaveFan on May 09, 2015, 09:40:37 PM
I definitely agree with:
Pink Floyd - The Final Cut (with all credit going to Roger Waters)
One of the greatest albums of all time, for me.

And I also like:
Roger Waters - The Pros and Cons of Hitchhiking
U2 - War
Bruce Springsteen - Born in the USA

And I applaud you on your diverse taste in music! :)



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: The Demon on May 10, 2015, 07:14:36 AM

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/38/Madnesstheriseandfall.jpg/220px-Madnesstheriseandfall.jpg) Madness, the Rise & Fall
I did not like this. I thought there was about 3 good songs: "Primrose Hill", "Our House", and "Madness". The rest was nothing worth mentioning.

I'm curious, how many times did you listen to this?  You found nothing to like in the majestic "Tomorrow's (Just Another Day)" or the wondrous, mock-glib, anti-war "Blue Skinned Beast"?  I cannot find a bad track on the album, nor among the related singles and b-sides ("House of Fun," "Don't Look Back," "Driving in My Car," "Animal Farm," "Riding on My Bike," and "Walking with Mr. Wheeze").  Even the Costello version of "Tomorrow's (Just Another Day)" is fun.  Truthfully, it's difficult to find a bad track among the first five albums.  Dismissing Madness would be like saying the Kinks only had three good songs.

Quote
(http://revhq.com/images/covers/50/tg024.gif) Big Black, Songs About Fucking
Powerful, noisy stuff. Is there actually something good under all that noise? I'm not sure. There might be.

Noisy, yes, but also very melodic.  It is no surprise that Kurt Cobain was passionate about them, or Bauhaus for that matter.  Both used noise to create melody.

Quote
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/NewOrderPower,Corruption%26Lies.jpg) New Order, Power, Corruption & Lies
I liked it - not the sound I was expecting from this album. I don't think the record ever rises above the opening cut, "Age of Consent", which is some blissful, jangly pop music. I LOVE "AGE OF CONSENT".

Their singles always seemed to have a boundless passion and urge to do something different which I think the albums, as good as they are, sometimes lack.  I would not expect blissful, jangly pop from them, though.  They do that, but it's not all they do, and you will miss some vital music.  There is more in this world than is dreamt of in your 12-string :)

Quote
(http://www.amoeba.com/sized-images/max/50/60//uploads/albums/covers/other//018777260046.jpg) They Might Be Giants, Lincoln
I did not enjoy this at all. The music sounds like it was made in Garage Band and the singer has an unbelievably annoying voice. There are some nice things to be found, like "They'll Need a Crane" (basically only worth it for the lyrics), but it's not worth it.

Their voices can be annoying at first, but their songwriting skills are very sound.  I think they might be more well-regarded if other artists covered their songs, but of course this is not so common in our post-Beatle world.  Still, I am a bit shocked to see how dismissive you are of some of these records.  Did you not find "They'll Need a Crane" to be memorable musically?  I felt they'd reached a new plateau with that, much as the Beatles did with "She Loves you," sounding more assured than before.  You hear no melody, wit, or charm in "Ana Ng," "Purple Toupee," "Where Your Eyes Don't Go," or "Piece of Dirt"?  I'll admit I did not like their music at first, but after a few listens they became quite addictive.  

Quote
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/1/10/Pete_Shelley_-_Homosapien_LP_album_cover.jpg) Pete Shelley, Homosapien
A shame it's not a Buzzcocks record, but Shelley still has his wonderful songwriting style intact for this album.

I know how you feel.  I love the record, but wish that they'd released his demos of some of these songs as part of the "Different Kind of Tension" reissue, since some of the songs were originally meant for a fourth Buzzcocks album.  That said, the song "Homosapien" actually predates the Buzzcocks.

Quote
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0000/673/MI0000673163.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) Barry Adamson, Moss Side Story
Really interesting album and idea, a fake soundtrack to a murder mystery. I didn't get to spend as much time with this album as I would have liked, but it is a riveting listen.

Thank you for the recommendation.  I love his music for the film "Lost Highway" and his playing in Magazine is certainly gripping.

Quote
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/c/c7/Donald_Fagen_-_The_Nightfly.jpg) Donald Fagen, the Nightfly
What antiseptic schlock. Everything is squeaky clean and shiny and I'm gonna throw up in a bucket. If I discovered anything about myself during this time, it's that I have absolutely no time for "sophisti-pop".

That is part of the humor, though.  Certainly he (and they--Steely Dan) enjoy these sounds enough to craft recordings with them, but it is meant to be ironic, too.  They are trying to show us how our real emotions are now contextualized through meaningless, endless fabrication and the fantasy of industry and science as endlessly progressive solutions.  Hence, "I.G. Y." or great Steely Dan songs like "The Last Mall."  Or the title of his later album, "Sunken Condos."  The cover of "Ruby Baby" is bland, though perhaps meant to show how youthful passion becomes adult complacency.  There are some really amusing, heartfelt details, though, such as the teenager being more concerned about having beer and Brubeck in his underground bunker.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: BrianAlDaveFan on June 08, 2015, 10:09:44 PM
Wall Of Voodoo at the US Festival in 1983:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tZ0H3gqwhMQ

If the cover song (or reinterpretation) they do near the beginning of their set doesn't seem enjoyable to you, see what happens if you stick with the rest of the gig. I enjoyed it a lot!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on June 11, 2015, 03:44:11 PM
I'm curious, how many times did you listen to this?  You found nothing to like in the majestic "Tomorrow's (Just Another Day)" or the wondrous, mock-glib, anti-war "Blue Skinned Beast"?  I cannot find a bad track on the album, nor among the related singles and b-sides ("House of Fun," "Don't Look Back," "Driving in My Car," "Animal Farm," "Riding on My Bike," and "Walking with Mr. Wheeze").  Even the Costello version of "Tomorrow's (Just Another Day)" is fun.  Truthfully, it's difficult to find a bad track among the first five albums.  Dismissing Madness would be like saying the Kinks only had three good songs.

I don't remember how many times I listened to it, but I know I just didn't like it. I do like the Kinks, though.


Their singles always seemed to have a boundless passion and urge to do something different which I think the albums, as good as they are, sometimes lack.  I would not expect blissful, jangly pop from them, though.  They do that, but it's not all they do, and you will miss some vital music.  There is more in this world than is dreamt of in your 12-string :)

I liked the rest of the album, as well. I was just trying to keep my reviews short and I have an overwhelming love for that song, so that's what showed up in my review, yo.


Quote
Their voices can be annoying at first, but their songwriting skills are very sound.  I think they might be more well-regarded if other artists covered their songs, but of course this is not so common in our post-Beatle world.  Still, I am a bit shocked to see how dismissive you are of some of these records.  Did you not find "They'll Need a Crane" to be memorable musically?  I felt they'd reached a new plateau with that, much as the Beatles did with "She Loves you," sounding more assured than before.  You hear no melody, wit, or charm in "Ana Ng," "Purple Toupee," "Where Your Eyes Don't Go," or "Piece of Dirt"?  I'll admit I did not like their music at first, but after a few listens they became quite addictive.

Honestly, I just didn't enjoy this album. This album is like that one guy that's insecure and is always telling everyone else "Hey, guys, I should warn you, I'm prettyyyy wacky!" And then he does something he thinks is silly and then gives everyone a face to sort of add an exclamation point to the act he just performed, and then everyone silently stares at him, slightly confused. Give it a rest, wacky guy.


Quote
That is part of the humor, though.  Certainly he (and they--Steely Dan) enjoy these sounds enough to craft recordings with them, but it is meant to be ironic, too.  They are trying to show us how our real emotions are now contextualized through meaningless, endless fabrication and the fantasy of industry and science as endlessly progressive solutions.  Hence, "I.G. Y." or great Steely Dan songs like "The Last Mall."  Or the title of his later album, "Sunken Condos."  The cover of "Ruby Baby" is bland, though perhaps meant to show how youthful passion becomes adult complacency.  There are some really amusing, heartfelt details, though, such as the teenager being more concerned about having beer and Brubeck in his underground bunker.

That may all be true, but I still don't have any desire to listen to it.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Bittersweet-Sanity on June 15, 2015, 06:45:47 AM
Visage are one of my fave synth groups ever. Some majestic songs by them:
-Whispers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMqmvAsPI4A
-Fade to Grey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeGTJOFSIgU

Lindsey Buckingham - Go Insane https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NF9fkXIqnis The whole album is good but the title track (& its video) are real awesome

Peter Gabriel's 3rd self-titled album aka 'Melt' (1980) is a masterpiece https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLCTFCmzIYpuRBqGTIo8VxqNkGn7Jk_L_b

Celestium (Gary Usher) - Sanctuary https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzgAChrxXAI

Bucks Fizz - You and Your Heart So Blue https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gutCH7QuaMs

Alan Parsons Project - Games People Play https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqVWYCxA9pY

Power Station - Communication https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEmc137DaUU

Maybe my favorite Paul McCartney song - Frozen Jap https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0b-TplCXNx4


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: BrianAlDaveFan on November 02, 2015, 08:11:52 PM
I suggest:

Artist: Pink Turns Blue
Song: I Coldly Stare Out

Visage are one of my fave synth groups ever. Some majestic songs by them:
-Whispers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMqmvAsPI4A
-Fade to Grey https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PeGTJOFSIgU

Anyone who loves a certain song by U2 owes thanks to Visage!
From wikipedia:
"In the official U2 autobiography, Bono claims that Adam Clayton was trying to work out how to play the bassline of 'Fade to Grey' and his initial attempt became 'New Year's Day', U2's first Top 10 single."



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on November 02, 2015, 09:58:44 PM
Just remembered something I have on vinyl with Chris Stamey on guitar, piano and vocals.  He probably came into the sessions with Stipe.
Give it a try, you might like it.

Golden Palominos Visions of Excess (1985):  https://youtu.be/Fwl3zZuatpA?list=PL2893B39FD85F6455 
I had forgotten all about this! And Syd Straw!
All my vinyl was stolen from summer storage at college and forgotten music keeps cropping up.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 27, 2016, 11:49:35 AM
Quote
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/NewOrderPower,Corruption%26Lies.jpg) New Order, Power, Corruption & Lies
I liked it - not the sound I was expecting from this album. I don't think the record ever rises above the opening cut, "Age of Consent", which is some blissful, jangly pop music. I LOVE "AGE OF CONSENT".

"Age of Consent" has become my favorite song by anyone.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 27, 2016, 12:46:11 PM
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/7/7e/NewOrderPower,Corruption%26Lies.jpg) New Order, Power, Corruption & Lies
I liked it - not the sound I was expecting from this album. I don't think the record ever rises above the opening cut, "Age of Consent", which is some blissful, jangly pop music. I LOVE "AGE OF CONSENT".

"Age of Consent" has become my favorite song by anyone.

Yes, excellent album. I discovered it about ten years ago. I love its mix of jangly stuff and drum machine-fuelled dance elements à la "Blue Monday". I must revisit it soon.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 21, 2016, 11:10:19 PM
I've had a strange craving for coffee today. Now that I've made some, and it's a Thursday night at 10pm, let's dive right in, shall we?

I know I've said here on this board that it's silly to define music by years and decades and whatnot, but since the creation of this thread, the 80's have really fought their way to the front of my "favorite music decades list." And it's been really rude about it, too; I think it stole the 60's lunch money. But that's fair: I was rude to the 80's for a long time. I have a friend named Tovi (you can see a picture of us together here (http://smileysmile.net/board/index.php/topic,17780.msg457898.html#msg457898)) who maintained the 80's were her favorite decade for music, and I used to ridicule her about it all the time. I always had the idea the 80's were about cheesy synths, cheesy band names, and earrings for men. But, I mean, hey, that's what the radio told me. Fuckin "Boys of Summer," "Summer of 69," "Everybody Wants to Rule the World," "Your Love" (id on't wanna lose your love 2nyt)... you get the idea.

Here's an 80's-related story that just sprung to mind: I had a class where we each brought Christmas presents, put them under a tree, and everyone grabbed the one they wanted. I knew what I was going to bring. I printed out the cover to Roadhouse, put a rubber band around it to secure it to a potato, wrapped it in saran wrap, and put in a box. I still remember the look on the recipient's face. Ah, memories.

Anyway, back to music. What the radio didn't tell me was that this time in music was diverse and thoroughly wonderful. It appears my coffee is gone. At the very start of the 80's, we had the first release by The Birthday Party: the unflinchingly morose beginnings of Nick Cave. We had the third album by Kate Bush, who started to freely experiment in the studio. There was the undeniably fun, 60's-soul-with-an-English-twist debut by Dexys Midnight Runners (let's be real, it's all about "Seven Days Too Long"). Nick Lowe and Dave Edmunds teamed up to create the 50's throwback Seconds of Pleasure. The Soft Boys released the towering, all-over-the-place Underwater Moonlight. Talking Heads let their musical prowess loose with their African-influenced Remain in Light. X entered the fold with their debut, Los Angeles. Joy Division exited the fold with Closer. XTC--a band constantly bursting at the seams with ideas--tightened up, became more focused, and released Black Sea, their rhythmic, steely update to Drums & Wires. I tend to think of those two albums being along the same lines as Rubber Soul and Revolver or Sunflower and Surf's Up. And that's all just from 1980!

The 80's would go on to give us the wonderful, jagged post-punk of Josef K; the awe-inspiring debut by The dB's; more Nick Cave-related music than one could reasonably ask for; the wiry, constantly-evolving Go-Betweens; an incredible string of albums from Prince (:(); the simultaneously forward-moving-and-backward-looking work of XTC; the continued work of post-Joy Division New Order; the crushing No Wave music of Swans, and then the refined, crushing music of Swans; the entire Paisley Underground scene (The Three O'Clock, The Bangles, Green on Red, The Long Ryders, The Rain Parade, etc.); the increasingly-Beefheartian albums of Tom Waits; the band of sad weirdos, Echo & the Bunnymen; the seemingly unceasing output of The Fall; some Minneapolis punks, The Replacements and Hüsker Dü; the creation and subsequent output of 4AD; Kate Bush letting her freak flag fly freely (alliteration, folks); the "golden age of rap," including De La Soul, Public Enemy, and A Tribe Called Quest; the nature-inspired, experimental music by Talk Talk; the unique take on love songs by The Wedding Present that have an undeniable influence on my own approach to songwriting, and just C86 as a whole for all the wonderful jangle pop; the pop vs. noise battles that take place in the songs of Sonic Youth; the whole Flying Nun thing in New Zealand; and all the beautiful, off-kilter indie music, like The Pastels.

And that's just the stuff I've listened to so far. There's still so much for me to explore.

I just wanna shout it from the roof tops, I guess: I LOVE YOU, THE 80's.



Thanks for taking the time to read my thoughts. I leave you with this parting image of Nick Cave:
(http://s31.postimg.org/3pbcs8a7v/Nick_Cave.jpg)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on April 22, 2016, 03:52:05 AM
What a heart-warming post, Bubbly. (Although it did end on a slightly sour note, hahaha.)

I recently (couple of years ago) discovered the first two albums by Culture Club----and the '80s albums by Kate Bush. Nice to see Talk Talk mentioned-----one of my favourite groups who went through an extraordinary development in that decade...     

 


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 22, 2016, 06:15:01 AM
So strange to hear of some of this being 'discovered' because it's so elemental to me. Not because of any 'coolness' but because it's my adolescent zone.
Tried the Sugarcubes? The Bad Brains? Throwing Muses first 3-4 albums?
And yes, the first two Culture Clubs were great: one area where 'alternative' and 'main stream' jived in the '80s.
I'll try to think of some lesser known '80s and post them here.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 22, 2016, 08:57:59 AM
Yeah, I've listened to Throwing Muses. They're one of the bands I forgot to mention, the others being Felt, Cocteau Twins (fits into the 4AD mention, but whatever), Meat Puppets, This Heat, the first album by Pulp, The Bats, The Pixies, The Cure, The Chameleons, Big Black, Killing Joke, and The Feelies. I think that pretty much covers all the artists whose albums I've listened to and liked.

I haven't listened to The Sugarcubes, but I do like Bjork. I'll get around to it sooner or later.

I'm not sure about Bad Brains. I pulled up their song "I Against I" on YouTube, and it was too metal-y for my tastes. Then I also saw a music video for "Rise," which was not a good song. I'm listening to their debut now, though, and it sounds pretty good so far. Do they stop making this kind of thing later on?

and culture club, well... i don't know...


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 22, 2016, 09:04:30 AM
Lonely is an Eyesore 4ad compilation?


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 23, 2016, 08:50:11 AM
Kay, Bubs. I'm trying to get a handle on what you might like. Jangly pop.
Not Bad Brains. (Funny, for 30 years I've been specifically saying 'the' Bad Brains because I always thought that was specifically their name. Now I learn it's specifically not.
Dead Can Dance? Fishbone? The Descendents? Agent Orange? The DBs? Pylon? Syd Straw? Big Audio Dynamite? The Church?
If you can give me opinions on these, then with your posted opinions above, I can start to narrow things down.
I know, of course, that everyone's taste is nuanced and complex and might seem random to others in some ways, but maybe I'll have a better idea.
My LPs were stolen from summer storage in college. I wish I could look at them.  It would help my memory.  (Edit: I just noticed I said the same a few months ago on this very page. )



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 23, 2016, 09:33:42 AM
Yeah, I've listened to Throwing Muses. They're one of the bands I forgot to mention, the others being Felt, Cocteau Twins (fits into the 4AD mention, but whatever), Meat Puppets, This Heat, the first album by Pulp, The Bats, The Pixies, The Cure, The Chameleons, Big Black, Killing Joke, and The Feelies. I think that pretty much covers all the artists whose albums I've listened to and liked.

I haven't listened to The Sugarcubes, but I do like Bjork. I'll get around to it sooner or later.

I'm not sure about Bad Brains. I pulled up their song "I Against I" on YouTube, and it was too metal-y for my tastes. Then I also saw a music video for "Rise," which was not a good song. I'm listening to their debut now, though, and it sounds pretty good so far. Do they stop making this kind of thing later on?

and culture club, well... i don't know...
Oh, and yes, Bad Brains went down hill, or up another hill, or something, fast.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 23, 2016, 10:32:34 AM
Okay, I'm going through your suggestions on YouTube. Place your betssssssssssss. Here are my first impressions:


Dead Can Dance - listened to "the carnival is over" and holy sh*t they take themselves so seriously; the subject matter and the stern looks i'm imagining on their faces is a bizarre combination

Fishbone - this sounds like hair metal ("sunless saturday"); "everyday sunshine" is kinda cheesy

Descendents - my friends like this band, but i was never really a fan; still not, it seems; they're not bad, they just don't interest me; listened to some of milo goes to college

Agent Orange - "bloodstains" is okay, but i think i prefer punk with faster tempos; actually, i'm not really sure what i look for with this kind of music, as i'm still sort of new to it; they're a maybe

The dB's - too bad you crossed them out; i'm always open to talk about how much i love them; "black and white" is a strong contender for my favorite song

Pylon - yeah, this is cool; i like this ("cool")

Syd Straw - listened to "future forties" and "think too hard" and i'm not really a fan (of her solo music, at least)

Big Audio Dynamite - according to "e=mc^2" and "the bottom line," this band is not for me

The Church - i remember listening to remote luxury and not being a big fan; re-listening now: they're okay, but they don't inspire much of a reaction from me; they're another maybe


Feel free to tell me why I'm wrong.



Just feel like mentioning Romeo Void's "Never Say Never," which I am listening to now. Has some of the coolest lyrics I know of (you know the line).


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 23, 2016, 10:55:01 AM
I'm very much not a believer in wrongness when it comes to music, except perhaps for "Starship." (eta and some solo McCartney)
I only crossed out the dBs because I saw them in your list above.
So, I'm thinking you're not likely to like what we called "hardcore" for the most part (too metally)
You don't really like earnestness. (what's the noun for earnest?)
Give me an idea what you don't like about B.A.D. please.
And that you like Romeo Void just really confuses me.
I'm going to be talking today with an old friend who is the maven of '80s 'alternative' and I'm going to have such fun using your posts as a jumping off point.
However, I have another friend who I think has taste that really jibes with yours (except he likes earnestness) and I will probe his memory as well. What fun!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 23, 2016, 11:43:21 AM
I'm very much not a believer in wrongness when it comes to music

I meant, more like, tell me what I'm missing or what you like about them.
The merits I'm failing to detect.


So, I'm thinking you're not likely to like what we called "hardcore" for the most part (too metally)

Well, I don't know if that's necessarily true. Husker Du, Flipper, Minutemen, Meat Puppets, and Bad Brains are apparently classified (http://www.allmusic.com/style/hardcore-punk-ma0000002641/artists) as "hardcore," and I like those bands (the Bad Brains debut, anyway).



You don't really like earnestness. (what's the noun for earnest?)

Once again, I don't know if that's true. Dead Can Dance are so gloomy and monotone, and the songs I've listened to are almost cartoon-y in how goth they are. Even the slightest bit of self-awareness or levity would go a long way to make them more palatable. Either you're coming in at their level, or they just seem out of reach. It's the sort of thing I imagine people listen to while casting Wicca spells. Maybe I'll light a couple of purple candles before I give them another go.



Give me an idea what you don't like about B.A.D. please.

All right, listening to their songs again. The first thing that strikes me is how is 80's their music sounds. The stereotypical production values are all over their music. I also think Mick Jones' voice worked better as part of The Clash than it does here on "The Bottom Line." My dislike for "E=MC^2" is along the same lines.  It comes a little too close to sophiti-pop, perhaps. My dislike for The Style Council is also documented somewhere on these pages.



And that you like Romeo Void just really confuses me.

I don't know if I like Romeo Void; I just like that song. I think it's cool to hear "I might like you better if we slept together" coming from a female perspective.

 

I'm going to be talking today with an old friend who is the maven of '80s 'alternative' and I'm going to have such fun using your posts as a jumping off point.
However, I have another friend who I think has taste that really jibes with yours (except he likes earnestness) and I will probe his memory as well. What fun!

Well, if they have anything to contribute, I'm open to hearing it.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 23, 2016, 12:14:54 PM
Ah, the complications of understanding other's tastes.
I put Dead Can Dance and Syd Straw - totally different music but sharing earnestness - together to guess you don't like earnestness.

So it's just some hardcore you don't like. Hmm. Can you identify qualities that define the pros and cons? Do you like Fugazi, Minor Threat?

Have you listened to Butthole Surfers?

There's an amazing band whose name at the edge of my mind, but every time I almost think of it, "Flaming Lips" pops up. I think the name has something to do with fire maybe.

For some more obvious 80s that haven't been mentioned, Concrete Blonde, The (English) Beat, The Specials, or The Jam, or the Violent Femmes (latter four late 70s, early 80s)

Vic Chesnutt is a guy I've never really gotten into, but is a sort of Alex Chilton figure for Pylon, REM, Kristin Hersh, etc.

More poppy: Dump Truck? Lloyd Cole? The Smithereens? The Sundays (a little one hit wondery)?  Has the Dream Syndicate been mentioned? The Jim Carroll Band?

The Lounge Lizards are maybe a step away, genre-wise, but I love them/him.

Berlin? Bauhaus? The The?

Do you like industrial music? Ministry, Cabaret Voltaire, Skinny Puppy?

Just spitting in the wind here.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on April 23, 2016, 12:21:15 PM
Dead Can Dance - listened to "the carnival is over" and holy sh*t they take themselves so seriously; the subject matter and the stern looks i'm imagining on their faces is a bizarre combination

My two favourite DCD albums are Spleen and Ideal and The Serpent's Egg. And then there's this track:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QyGjNphTQyw


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 23, 2016, 11:53:35 PM


There's an amazing band whose name at the edge of my mind, but every time I almost think of it, "Flaming Lips" pops up. I think the name has something to do with fire maybe.


So, I was talking over this thread with an old friend, and I got to the band whose name I was trying to remember. I reminded her of a time we'd seen this band at a place in Central Square, Cambridge. I told her the name of the band was so close but I kept thinking of The Flaming Lips instead. She said, "huh, well, we did see the Flaming Lips in Central Square in the late 80s, maybe 1990."
???
I spent about 10 years completely checked out of US adult culture; much of the time in Nicaragua, then with a little baby watching Sponge Bob and stuff. When I came back to reality, I started paying attention again and there was this really popular new band called the Flaming Lips. I never imagined they were not new at all and were  the same band that I'd seen 20 years earlier. Weird.

Anyway, more suggestions.
Mission of Burma
Love And Rockets
The Jesus and Mary Chain
Joy Division
Gang Green
Human Sexual Response
Dinosaur, Jr.
The Cramps
Killing joke





Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on April 24, 2016, 03:42:54 AM
The Jesus and Mary Chain

This:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFp7W3PoNPI


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on April 24, 2016, 12:57:09 PM
I just wanna shout it from the roof tops, I guess: I LOVE YOU, THE 80's.
Back in my religion tween years, Relient K was a big part of my life (I still think they're cool). I quite dig this song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lMOu4E915gs

Also I really enjoyed your post, and I'm sort of hoping that I can reach that point.
I, too, have been subjected to the Pandora station at work, as well as our repetitive "oldies" station that only ever seems to play Duran Duran and Eurythmics. But I guess it's also my own fault for not investigating the actual diversity of the '80s more.

Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 24, 2016, 02:16:57 PM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...

I shall do this for you. Here are some 80s albums I love with accompanying favorite songs. Click the album covers for YouTube links.
(http://www.clashmusic.com/sites/default/files/styles/article_feature/public/field/image/the%20wedding%20present.jpg?itok=L0efvxTB) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aQtqwIqnvE&ab_channel=EmanueleV.)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41R2AAXM0HL._SX300_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NC3s3Xhphs&ab_channel=FlyingNunRecords)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/69/This_Nation's_Saving_Grace.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D36kOzop6oo&ab_channel=scalagreen20)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/44/BirthdayPartyJunkyard.jpg/220px-BirthdayPartyJunkyard.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYoKqfo5jck&ab_channel=DocktorHelena311)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Dexys_Midnight_Runners_Searching_for_the_Young_Soul_Rebels.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yfZMEFt4j4&ab_channel=AineRoll%C3%B3ir)(http://nickcave.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/nc-from-her-to-eternity1-768x768.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yQwUX8yAmo&list=PL6qrs7uybcYAu3zytXVvZs-6yluceKzRT&ab_channel=NickCave&TheBadSeeds-Topic)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/eb/Hounds_of_love.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VerK4zwMRQw&ab_channel=KateBushMusic)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/3e/Dukes_of_Stratosphear_PsonicPsunspot.jpg/220px-Dukes_of_Stratosphear_PsonicPsunspot.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMGcaDYSrMM&ab_channel=VictorConMalvaviscos)(http://cdn6.bigcommerce.com/s-flwskuyr/products/113/images/309/TIM050.Dentists1600x1600__44054.1421890470.1280.1280.jpg?c=2) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hio5QbGxkdU&ab_channel=TheDentists-Topic)(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/564/MI0003564636.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zbdy8eidI0&ab_channel=My80sUnderground)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6c/Josef_K_-_The_Only_Fun_in_Town.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VzcWv8qKQw&ab_channel=DominoRecordingCo.)(https://s.mxmcdn.net/images-storage/albums8/6/7/9/6/1/8/11816976_350_350.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzahBkUPq8E&ab_channel=thinglostinfire)(http://s0.limitedrun.com/images/1122718/v600_sonic_youth_nylon.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPytYrYqDbA&ab_channel=SonicYouthTV)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51NVC5oyORL.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xxRwgEN4zU&ab_channel=1985cactus)(https://kriofskemix.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/16-lovers-lane.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJfP6G0LSEA&ab_channel=KrivStenders)(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/002/MI0003002306.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkdLtHRFU3U&ab_channel=JelleKolenbrander)(http://www.wobc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/three_oclock1.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfT73NIo_B4&ab_channel=TheThreeO%27Clock-Topic)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/913Xbj6JOyL._SY355_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G42rmPvbbU&ab_channel=ColourOfSpring)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/60/Tom_Waits_-_Rain_Dogs.png) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2Tn8w1w2_Y&ab_channel=blablabla)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/6e/XLosAngeles.jpg/220px-XLosAngeles.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQP_Q9eGKQg&ab_channel=PunkFan77)(http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/list/f29b39622917fbefdfa1933c17c920cc8e4aaf2d.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeDDQqO9kWo&ab_channel=AdamSlater)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/36/The_Replacements_-_Sorry_Ma,_Forgot_to_Take_Out_the_Trash_cover.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLb_0h7ldDM&ab_channel=GabeSick[/url)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81mtPMAsDqL._SL1425_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkdYRDvX3n4&ab_channel=NewOrderHD)

(Okay, maybe Kate Bush doesn't necessarily meet the criteria, but I will always include her music regardless.)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 24, 2016, 02:30:07 PM
I weirdly forgot one of my favorite albums which I highly recommend: Fetchin' Bones - Galaxy 500.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 24, 2016, 02:32:09 PM
And I also forgot to mention I like The Long Ryders.

And your post reminds me of Galaxie 500, who is another 80s band.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Emily on April 24, 2016, 02:42:47 PM
And I also forgot to mention I like The Long Ryders.

And your post reminds me of Galaxie 500, who is another 80s band.
Indeed, Galaxie 500 was pretty popular around the time that Galaxy 500 was released, resulting in some confusion.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on April 25, 2016, 12:37:27 AM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...

I shall do this for you. Here are some 80s albums I love with accompanying favorite songs. Click the album covers for YouTube links.
Damn son. You're like... a human Pandora station. Ha.
I appreciate this. Too bad this doesn't count as homework irl. I hope to respond more in-depthly soon.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Alex on April 25, 2016, 08:58:51 PM
And I also forgot to mention I like The Long Ryders.

And your post reminds me of Galaxie 500, who is another 80s band.

Any band that covers the Rutles is fucking awesome.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDiFk0iXMoI


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 28, 2016, 12:39:31 PM
I hope to respond more in-depthly soon.

(http://forums.stevehoffman.tv/images/smilies/whistle.gif)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: KDS on April 28, 2016, 12:56:20 PM
I was recently listening to Blue Murder's self titled album from 1989 with John Sykes, Tony Franklin, and Carmine Appice. 

Very solid hard rock album.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on April 29, 2016, 10:20:37 AM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...

I shall do this for you. Here are some 80s albums I love with accompanying favorite songs. Click the album covers for YouTube links.
(http://www.clashmusic.com/sites/default/files/styles/article_feature/public/field/image/the%20wedding%20present.jpg?itok=L0efvxTB) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aQtqwIqnvE&ab_channel=EmanueleV.)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41R2AAXM0HL._SX300_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NC3s3Xhphs&ab_channel=FlyingNunRecords)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/69/This_Nation's_Saving_Grace.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D36kOzop6oo&ab_channel=scalagreen20)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/44/BirthdayPartyJunkyard.jpg/220px-BirthdayPartyJunkyard.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYoKqfo5jck&ab_channel=DocktorHelena311)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Dexys_Midnight_Runners_Searching_for_the_Young_Soul_Rebels.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yfZMEFt4j4&ab_channel=AineRoll%C3%B3ir)(http://nickcave.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/nc-from-her-to-eternity1-768x768.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yQwUX8yAmo&list=PL6qrs7uybcYAu3zytXVvZs-6yluceKzRT&ab_channel=NickCave&TheBadSeeds-Topic)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/eb/Hounds_of_love.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VerK4zwMRQw&ab_channel=KateBushMusic)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/3e/Dukes_of_Stratosphear_PsonicPsunspot.jpg/220px-Dukes_of_Stratosphear_PsonicPsunspot.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMGcaDYSrMM&ab_channel=VictorConMalvaviscos)(http://cdn6.bigcommerce.com/s-flwskuyr/products/113/images/309/TIM050.Dentists1600x1600__44054.1421890470.1280.1280.jpg?c=2) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hio5QbGxkdU&ab_channel=TheDentists-Topic)(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/564/MI0003564636.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zbdy8eidI0&ab_channel=My80sUnderground)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6c/Josef_K_-_The_Only_Fun_in_Town.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VzcWv8qKQw&ab_channel=DominoRecordingCo.)(https://s.mxmcdn.net/images-storage/albums8/6/7/9/6/1/8/11816976_350_350.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzahBkUPq8E&ab_channel=thinglostinfire)(http://s0.limitedrun.com/images/1122718/v600_sonic_youth_nylon.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPytYrYqDbA&ab_channel=SonicYouthTV)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51NVC5oyORL.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xxRwgEN4zU&ab_channel=1985cactus)(https://kriofskemix.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/16-lovers-lane.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJfP6G0LSEA&ab_channel=KrivStenders)(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/002/MI0003002306.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkdLtHRFU3U&ab_channel=JelleKolenbrander)(http://www.wobc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/three_oclock1.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfT73NIo_B4&ab_channel=TheThreeO%27Clock-Topic)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/913Xbj6JOyL._SY355_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G42rmPvbbU&ab_channel=ColourOfSpring)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/60/Tom_Waits_-_Rain_Dogs.png) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2Tn8w1w2_Y&ab_channel=blablabla)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/6e/XLosAngeles.jpg/220px-XLosAngeles.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQP_Q9eGKQg&ab_channel=PunkFan77)(http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/list/f29b39622917fbefdfa1933c17c920cc8e4aaf2d.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeDDQqO9kWo&ab_channel=AdamSlater)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/36/The_Replacements_-_Sorry_Ma,_Forgot_to_Take_Out_the_Trash_cover.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLb_0h7ldDM&ab_channel=GabeSick[/url)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81mtPMAsDqL._SL1425_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkdYRDvX3n4&ab_channel=NewOrderHD)

(Okay, maybe Kate Bush doesn't necessarily meet the criteria, but I will always include her music regardless.)

First, let's pull your list onto this new page.  Lots of stuff there I like/love, some of them that I know have been discussed in this thread.

When I saw your the bats clip the other day, I thought you meant the old South African band from the 60's - who are still around.  I remember them a bit from long long ago.  Here's "Shabby Little Hut":  https://youtu.be/TKakjyWJthc

They have the same jangly Rickenbacker twelve-string sound you seem to love so much.  After adding in Flying Nun to the search, I found the New Zealand band from your clip "Block of Wood" (the one you sent me) - did you put that up here?  Maybe I should have checked back thru the thread...  your the bats are an 80's band, who I don't remember whatsoever.  They are very good.  Guess you found them researching the Three O'clock/Paisley Underground scene.  I played a few videos.  What I found the best is "Simpletons" (where have I heard that reference lately?) and "In the Subway" (forgot to write down the links).  They have the same jangly sound.  So, good find.

I've got to get you all to try Dream Academy.  Or have I already pushed them on this thread?  I think undercover-m might like them.  This is one of my very favorites, and was most definitely influenced by the Paisley Underground movement.  "The Love Parade":   https://youtu.be/UoQvD4rd_j0     Come on, give 'em a chance.   


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on May 01, 2016, 10:25:12 AM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...

I shall do this for you. Here are some 80s albums I love with accompanying favorite songs. Click the album covers for YouTube links.
(http://www.clashmusic.com/sites/default/files/styles/article_feature/public/field/image/the%20wedding%20present.jpg?itok=L0efvxTB) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aQtqwIqnvE&ab_channel=EmanueleV.)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Dexys_Midnight_Runners_Searching_for_the_Young_Soul_Rebels.jpg)
So I've listened to these two albums. (Or like 90% of them)
Obviously I've heard DMR's most famous song, but I bookmarked a few songs that stood out to me. Those will end up on an '80s playlist that will hopefully comprise various songs that I like.

Overall, I dig em. Not a very thorough analysis because my coffee hasn't kicked in today and i'm tired from yesterday.
I've actually seen the Replacements at a music fest before. Really good live. I anticipate listening to them soon.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on May 09, 2016, 08:52:59 PM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...
(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/002/MI0003002306.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkdLtHRFU3U&ab_channel=JelleKolenbrander)
So I can dig this. "Kingdom of Love" is also good.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on May 09, 2016, 08:54:55 PM
I'm glad you're listening to 'em, M! I spent an unacceptable amount of time on that grid.

I await more of your incredibly brief thoughts. :P


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on May 09, 2016, 09:13:48 PM
I haven't been over here in over a week.  No comments?

Not even incredibly brief thoughts?  Do we have time to grow?

Dream Academy is getting not too many youtube hits around here.

Tough crowd.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on May 09, 2016, 09:28:06 PM
Overall, I dig em.

I'm tired

So I can dig this. "Kingdom of Love" is also good.
So yeah, my commentary isn't really all that great. You might be happy to know that I'm attempting to listen to the whole albums of these, thanks to good ol' Spotify.

I hear a lot about Bob Mould from kexp's website. http://kexp.org/video/live
For that reason, I think I heard about him before I heard about Hüsker Dü (look I even put the special u's in there) (is that pronounced like it looks like otherwise?). At any rate, I listened to that link, too.
Actually, I guess the most intellectual thing I can comment on is that a handful of these bands sound a lot like what my coworker listens to: modern-day less-than-1,000-fans punk. I also didn't realize how early on punk music came about (mid/late '70s I guess? I learn new things all of the time). So I'm making connections between these bands and a lot of local pop-punk bands, which is cool. A genre I wasn't into until recently. I much prefer this sound over the Vans Warped Tour-esque punk bands, haha.

Hell, the Strokes are playing in this cafe right now, and I can vaguely hear '80s influence in them, too. Must be the guitar. Or maybe that's me stretching for insightful music commentary.

I'm also more receptive to new music/music suggestions when I'm content with life/not feeling anxious, which is not very often. But I'm listening to New Order, partially because that had the best album cover out of all of them, and also because the snippet I heard, I liked.

ALSO. I'm still un-learning the cheesy-'80s that I grew up with. The lyrics of the songs I've been listening to are so much better than the lyrics of any of the hit singles I've heard in stores, which is good.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on May 09, 2016, 09:34:05 PM
When I saw your the bats clip the other day, I thought you meant the old South African band from the 60's - who are still around.  I remember them a bit from long long ago.  Here's "Shabby Little Hut":  https://youtu.be/TKakjyWJthc

They have the same jangly Rickenbacker twelve-string sound you seem to love so much.  After adding in Flying Nun to the search, I found the New Zealand band from your clip "Block of Wood" (the one you sent me) - did you put that up here?  Maybe I should have checked back thru the thread...  your the bats are an 80's band, who I don't remember whatsoever.  They are very good.  Guess you found them researching the Three O'clock/Paisley Underground scene.  I played a few videos.  What I found the best is "Simpletons" (where have I heard that reference lately?) and "In the Subway" (forgot to write down the links).  They have the same jangly sound.  So, good find.

I've got to get you all to try Dream Academy.  Or have I already pushed them on this thread?  I think undercover-m might like them.  This is one of my very favorites, and was most definitely influenced by the Paisley Underground movement.  "The Love Parade":   https://youtu.be/UoQvD4rd_j0     Come on, give 'em a chance.   

All right, all right. Here we are:

The Bats from South Africa are all right. Reminds me of The Monkees. Anyway, I'll take The Bats from New Zealand. I don't remember how I found them exactly, but I actually talked about them previously in this very thread. I called their debut a "lovely jangle pop album." So, it seems my opinion hasn't changed much. In the grid, I posted "Made Up in Blue," which I found out isn't actually from their album, but an earlier EP. Oh, well. It's still a good song. If you ever find yourself with some extra time on your hands, Will, you should definitely check out Flying Nuns YouTube page (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGj7vE2XblTLSp06F0KCQmQ?&ab_channel=FlyingNunRecords) and explore. I don't know much about their new releases, but I sure do love their old stuff. The four I would recommend to look for first are The Bats (already covered, it seems), The Clean, The Chills, and The Verlaines.

As for Dream Academy, I've never really been a big fan. I thought I would like them, but they just don't do it for me. "The Love Parade" didn't change my mind. I dunno. I've got a live CD of theirs sitting around here somewhere I've been meaning to listen to for a while. It'll happen someday.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on May 09, 2016, 11:48:14 PM
When I saw your the bats clip the other day, I thought you meant the old South African band from the 60's - who are still around.  I remember them a bit from long long ago.  Here's "Shabby Little Hut":  https://youtu.be/TKakjyWJthc

They have the same jangly Rickenbacker twelve-string sound you seem to love so much.  After adding in Flying Nun to the search, I found the New Zealand band from your clip "Block of Wood" (the one you sent me) - did you put that up here?  Maybe I should have checked back thru the thread...  your the bats are an 80's band, who I don't remember whatsoever.  They are very good.  Guess you found them researching the Three O'clock/Paisley Underground scene.  I played a few videos.  What I found the best is "Simpletons" (where have I heard that reference lately?) and "In the Subway" (forgot to write down the links).  They have the same jangly sound.  So, good find.

I've got to get you all to try Dream Academy.  Or have I already pushed them on this thread?  I think undercover-m might like them.  This is one of my very favorites, and was most definitely influenced by the Paisley Underground movement.  "The Love Parade":   https://youtu.be/UoQvD4rd_j0     Come on, give 'em a chance.   

All right, all right. Here we are:

The Bats from South Africa are all right. Reminds me of The Monkees. Anyway, I'll take The Bats from New Zealand. I don't remember how I found them exactly, but I actually talked about them previously in this very thread. I called their debut a "lovely jangle pop album." So, it seems my opinion hasn't changed much. In the grid, I posted "Made Up in Blue," which I found out isn't actually from their album, but an earlier EP. Oh, well. It's still a good song. If you ever find yourself with some extra time on your hands, Will, you should definitely check out Flying Nuns YouTube page (https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCGj7vE2XblTLSp06F0KCQmQ?&ab_channel=FlyingNunRecords) and explore. I don't know much about their new releases, but I sure do love their old stuff. The four I would recommend to look for first are The Bats (already covered, it seems), The Clean, The Chills, and The Verlaines.

As for Dream Academy, I've never really been a big fan. I thought I would like them, but they just don't do it for me. "The Love Parade" didn't change my mind. I dunno. I've got a live CD of theirs sitting around here somewhere I've been meaning to listen to for a while. It'll happen someday.

There you go.  At least you gave them a try.  Of the other bands you mention, I have heard The Verlaines, but not in a while.  I'll give them another shot.  The Clean and The Chills - never heard of them.  But.  When I was playing the Bats the other  day I did look at some of the Flying Nun stuff.  I saw your post about buying the comps.

I can't believe I'm still up, It's nearly 3am here.  Good news - not even midnight where you are!  I stopped by another thread, the 2016 New Music, made a comment, then moved on to Alan's pick, and have been checking out The Drones.  I remember them from about 2010, when I was looking into All Tomorrow's Parties festivals, and the many, many bands that shuffled thru.  Gonna have to wait til tomorrow myself to post my notes.  See ya then. -Will


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Alan Smith on May 10, 2016, 01:17:43 AM
Death And The Maiden by The Verlaines is probably my favourite song ever.

I Love My Leather Jacket by The Chills not far behind - saw them earlier this year on a long awaited tour,
supporting their Silver Bullets LP - fantastic gig and a kickin' new album but bittersweet as Martin Phillips has descended into stage 3 HepC, the Hep due to his long time penchant for H, so he's on an yet undefined but capped timeline.

For something a little loose but enchanting, check out Circumspect Penelope or Cactus Cat by Look Blue, Go Purple.

In the 80's, the local Brisbane public radio station (4ZZZ) hosted a New Zuland show 9.30pm Monday nights, part of the soundtrack to my senior high (equivalent) years and filling the void of a certain band who didn't really deliver circa '85 and for sometime after (and arguably before!).


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on May 12, 2016, 01:30:54 PM
I've been secretly hoping you would jump in at some point with some Flying Nun talk, Alan.

I might think "Pyromaniac" is a better song than "Death and The Maiden," though.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on January 13, 2017, 06:34:28 PM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...

I shall do this for you. Here are some 80s albums I love with accompanying favorite songs. Click the album covers for YouTube links.
(http://www.clashmusic.com/sites/default/files/styles/article_feature/public/field/image/the%20wedding%20present.jpg?itok=L0efvxTB) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4aQtqwIqnvE&ab_channel=EmanueleV.)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41R2AAXM0HL._SX300_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1NC3s3Xhphs&ab_channel=FlyingNunRecords)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/69/This_Nation's_Saving_Grace.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D36kOzop6oo&ab_channel=scalagreen20)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/4/44/BirthdayPartyJunkyard.jpg/220px-BirthdayPartyJunkyard.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYoKqfo5jck&ab_channel=DocktorHelena311)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Dexys_Midnight_Runners_Searching_for_the_Young_Soul_Rebels.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yfZMEFt4j4&ab_channel=AineRoll%C3%B3ir)(http://nickcave.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/nc-from-her-to-eternity1-768x768.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yQwUX8yAmo&list=PL6qrs7uybcYAu3zytXVvZs-6yluceKzRT&ab_channel=NickCave&TheBadSeeds-Topic)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/eb/Hounds_of_love.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VerK4zwMRQw&ab_channel=KateBushMusic)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/3/3e/Dukes_of_Stratosphear_PsonicPsunspot.jpg/220px-Dukes_of_Stratosphear_PsonicPsunspot.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qMGcaDYSrMM&ab_channel=VictorConMalvaviscos)(http://cdn6.bigcommerce.com/s-flwskuyr/products/113/images/309/TIM050.Dentists1600x1600__44054.1421890470.1280.1280.jpg?c=2) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hio5QbGxkdU&ab_channel=TheDentists-Topic)(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/564/MI0003564636.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3zbdy8eidI0&ab_channel=My80sUnderground)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/6c/Josef_K_-_The_Only_Fun_in_Town.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VzcWv8qKQw&ab_channel=DominoRecordingCo.)(https://s.mxmcdn.net/images-storage/albums8/6/7/9/6/1/8/11816976_350_350.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yzahBkUPq8E&ab_channel=thinglostinfire)(http://s0.limitedrun.com/images/1122718/v600_sonic_youth_nylon.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPytYrYqDbA&ab_channel=SonicYouthTV)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51NVC5oyORL.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xxRwgEN4zU&ab_channel=1985cactus)(https://kriofskemix.files.wordpress.com/2015/03/16-lovers-lane.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UJfP6G0LSEA&ab_channel=KrivStenders)(http://cps-static.rovicorp.com/3/JPG_400/MI0003/002/MI0003002306.jpg?partner=allrovi.com) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkdLtHRFU3U&ab_channel=JelleKolenbrander)(http://www.wobc.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/three_oclock1.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cfT73NIo_B4&ab_channel=TheThreeO%27Clock-Topic)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/913Xbj6JOyL._SY355_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9G42rmPvbbU&ab_channel=ColourOfSpring)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/6/60/Tom_Waits_-_Rain_Dogs.png) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c2Tn8w1w2_Y&ab_channel=blablabla)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/6/6e/XLosAngeles.jpg/220px-XLosAngeles.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQP_Q9eGKQg&ab_channel=PunkFan77)(http://assets.rollingstone.com/assets/images/list/f29b39622917fbefdfa1933c17c920cc8e4aaf2d.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeDDQqO9kWo&ab_channel=AdamSlater)(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/3/36/The_Replacements_-_Sorry_Ma,_Forgot_to_Take_Out_the_Trash_cover.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XLb_0h7ldDM&ab_channel=GabeSick[/url)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/81mtPMAsDqL._SL1425_.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SkdYRDvX3n4&ab_channel=NewOrderHD)

(Okay, maybe Kate Bush doesn't necessarily meet the criteria, but I will always include her music regardless.)
I am a terrible human being.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Gertie J. on January 13, 2017, 10:03:15 PM
i luv the bats !!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 15, 2017, 05:42:00 AM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...

I shall do this for you. Here are some 80s albums I love with accompanying favorite songs. Click the album covers for YouTube links.
(Okay, maybe Kate Bush doesn't necessarily meet the criteria, but I will always include her music regardless.)

I am a terrible human being.

Rubbish! It's really easy to overlook posts when there are so many.

Agree with B.W. about Kate B. And that Birthday Party album is something else.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 15, 2017, 11:01:54 PM
After watching play-off football all day (and night) I feel happiness and sadness.  My favorite team, the Green Bay Packers won a hard fought game to knock out the #1 seeded Dallas Cowboys in a very close one.

Thinking of 80's music, I pick:  Sweet Dreams (Are Made of This)  https://youtu.be/qeMFqkcPYcg

My second favorite team, the Kansas City Chiefs fought hard to the end.  Losing to the Steelers by 2 points.  That's life in the football world.  Better luck next season, I will be watching with hope.

I think this one will do.  The title track to my favorite Eurythmics' album, Savage:  https://youtu.be/WXz1PCpgqm0

Hope those play in your neck of the woods, John.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 16, 2017, 12:13:54 AM
Still up.  Playing The Triffids, a band Alan and Bubs have been after me to listen to.  I'll post "Lonely Stretch" -  Can't decide if I like the album version better:  https://youtu.be/Kf8Buwamocc

Or the Peel Sessions take from 1 May 1985:  https://youtu.be/nPY9ilFxhzw



Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 16, 2017, 01:31:42 AM
Still up.  Playing The Triffids, a band Alan and Bubs have been after me to listen to.  I'll post "Lonely Stretch" -  Can't decide if I like the album version better:  https://youtu.be/Kf8Buwamocc

Or the Peel Sessions take from 1 May 1985:  https://youtu.be/nPY9ilFxhzw

Touch of the old déjà vu's here, Will. I'm sure both these have been posted before and once again I could only listen to the John Peel version. What a sound----love those drums!

As for The Eurythmics, my favourites of their are "No Fear No Hate No Pain", particularly the magical moment at 3:00. This song wouldn't be amiss on a playlist in heaven.   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8hULBsMuKBs

And "There Must Be An Angel" (another for that playlist):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xuwyPssjJc8


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on January 17, 2017, 06:17:52 PM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...

I shall do this for you. Here are some 80s albums I love with accompanying favorite songs. Click the album covers for YouTube links.
(Okay, maybe Kate Bush doesn't necessarily meet the criteria, but I will always include her music regardless.)

I am a terrible human being.

Rubbish! It's really easy to overlook posts when there are so many.

Agree with B.W. about Kate B. And that Birthday Party album is something else.
Yeah, but I feel bad that it's been so long since Josh so painstakingly made that list and that I haven't acquainted myself with most of it.

I have, by proximity, have learned to appreciate Talk Talk more; I've listened to Skylarking in the car once through, and I know a few other songs off of these albums.

I'm working on it. I think I sometimes get intimidated by large amounts of music.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 17, 2017, 11:04:26 PM
Hey Mari, you're getting around today.  Put Bubbly on the phone.  Is he moving into other Talk Talk records, or just the one?  The Colour of Spring is not enough.  I was playing their History DVD a couple of weeks ago...
You already know how we feel about xtc.

Tonight I was still in a eighties mood.  Alan mentions these a few posts up^- something I've been listening to for a while now.  Look Blue, Go Purple - "Cactus Cat":

https://youtu.be/XtmlfuEukMs

John, the cactus @3:00 is the Golden Barrel Cactus I mentioned in the mysterious pictures thread at your site.

I posted the studio version of "Circumspect Penelope" at PSF.  Here is a great live version:

https://youtu.be/gdEziDQqCgc





Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 17, 2017, 11:22:16 PM
Another artist on Bubbly's list I continue to buy more of is Tom Waits.  For Christmas I got swordfishtrombones, Frank's Wild Years and Blood Money.  We had a good time with Alice in the Listening Project thread.  He's only listing Rain Dogs.  I already have Rain Dogs, one of the first I got.  I'm close to having all his records, just filling in holes.

We were talking about The Bats earlier, too.  Still exploring their stuff.  I'm not sure if these were posted.  If they were, I'll bump them:

"North by North" - https://youtu.be/xC4SX4c50Ig

"Made Up in Blue" -  https://youtu.be/1NC3s3Xhphs


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: feelsflow on January 17, 2017, 11:43:28 PM
Another 1986 Triffids track, "Life of Crime" - https://youtu.be/VgWjy1dsQ-A

I think this sounds like early Quicksilver Messenger Service.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: Gertie J. on January 17, 2017, 11:52:15 PM
thanx for the bats !!


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 18, 2017, 01:52:03 AM
Is he moving into other Talk Talk records, or just the one?

I've been listening to Spirit of Eden. Pretty good record.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 18, 2017, 02:29:05 AM
Is he moving into other Talk Talk records, or just the one?

I've been listening to Spirit of Eden. Pretty good record.

I agree. "Inheritance" and "I Believe In You" in particular are stunningly beautiful, each in their own way. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWThDKGVZJI

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tSg2OIFum3o

Their swansong, Laughing Stock, is well worth investigating too...


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on January 18, 2017, 02:35:26 AM
John, the cactus @3:00 is the Golden Barrel Cactus I mentioned in the mysterious pictures thread at your site.

Thanks a lot, Will. I finally got round to thanking you for it over there (with a "thumbs-up", as it's nice to see someone else's name heading a topic rather than just the usual suspects, lol).   


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 18, 2017, 12:16:22 PM
Their swansong, Laughing Stock, is well worth investigating too...

I have it. After spending more time with SoE, I'll give that one a listen, too.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: alf wiedersehen on January 22, 2017, 01:49:45 PM
For whatever reason, I haven't discovered many more artists of note from this decade during my regular musical travels. I guess I don't need more artists to appreciate the 1980s, and it's possible I've been focusing more on other decades for whatever reason, but it is a shame. It might not be inaccurate to say the 80s became my favorite time for music due to creating this thread. There's so much waiting to be found if you're willing to look for it.

Speaking of which, I've been listening to The Sound's album Jeopardy, which I just found:
(http://e.snmc.io/lk/f/l/1810dd8b1c832a52ac64071de02835b0/3381713.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1kQBWSpBcQs)
Reminds me of a more straight-forward Wire.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on May 31, 2017, 12:13:30 AM
Maybe someone can suggest music to me from the '80s that doesn't sound like the stereotypical-radio-edit '80s that I just described...

I shall do this for you. Here are some 80s albums I love with accompanying favorite songs. Click the album covers for YouTube links.
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/e/e0/Dexys_Midnight_Runners_Searching_for_the_Young_Soul_Rebels.jpg) (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9yfZMEFt4j4&ab_channel=AineRoll%C3%B3ir)
I'm not sure how I got here, but I ended up listening to this album in full tonight. I might have done so last summer, but apparently I never revisited.

I'm a better listener now, or at least I'd like to think so. I'm not just hurling songs onto Spotify playlists and forgetting about them forever, and with my new schedule I'm finding quite  a bit of time to listen to full albums.

First of all, this one of those albums that has a beautiful balance of upbeat and mellow songs. I think I'm more drawn to the happier-sounding ones, at least in this moment. I can see myself using "Seven Days Too Long" and "There There My Dear" as go-to feel-good songs (everyone needs a few of those, it's emotional first-aid). I'd like to listen to this and Too Rye Aye more.

And now I find myself going from Midnight Runners to Midnight Marauders as I'm writing this, fancy that. :P

On my list of other '80s stuff I've grown to enjoy include the Soft Boys' Underwater Moonlight ("Positive Vibrations" and "I Wanna Destroy You" are great little songs), and I think I finally understand the buzz around Kate Bush. I've listened to The Sensual World a handful of times and The Dreaming once. Although I was turned off by her voice before, I have slapped my former self in the face for thinking that way. Her voice is like an instrument, and it's pretty fun to listen to what she does with it throughout her songs. I'm incredibly exhausted after work, where I'm walking neighborhood to neighborhood, door to door, trying to sign people up for clean, renewable energy and receiving a lot of disinterest and rejection. Also, my feet and legs ache afterwards. I listened to KB after a shift on the long bus ride back, and it prevented my mind from spiraling into the fatigue-induced anxiety that ensues after work. Pretty music will get to me, one way or another.

I'm not sure if my words are making sense anymore, but I hope to delve into this decade more.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on May 31, 2017, 01:29:32 AM
I think I finally understand the buzz around Kate Bush. I've listened to The Sensual World a handful of times and The Dreaming once. Although I was turned off by her voice before, I have slapped my former self in the face for thinking that way. Her voice is like an instrument, and it's pretty fun to listen to what she does with it throughout her songs. I'm incredibly exhausted after work, where I'm walking neighborhood to neighborhood, door to door, trying to sign people up for clean, renewable energy and receiving a lot of disinterest and rejection. Also, my feet and legs ache afterwards. I listened to KB after a shift on the long bus ride back, and it prevented my mind from spiraling into the fatigue-induced anxiety that ensues after work. Pretty music will get to me, one way or another.

I'm not sure if my words are making sense anymore, but I hope to delve into this decade more.

They're making sense. ;=)

It took me 35 years to come to appreciate Kate B. I suppose if all you know is "Wuthering Heights" you tend to pigeonhole her as that girl/woman with the high voice. I've since listened to all her studio albums and they are all well worth hearing. I love The Sensual World and its follow-up, The Red Shoes, an album more suitable than most for playing live (she was contemplating a tour at the time). Hounds of Love is pretty astounding too.

They say Kate provides the medicine for the parts the doctors can't reach----sounds about right to me!

This is my favourite Dexy song: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H53CIJzNohw


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on June 07, 2017, 01:15:37 AM
A tip from Mari (undercover-m):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wo1l_G8e6gY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Felt_(band)


(http://images.eil.com/large_image/FELT_IGNITE%2BTHE%2BSEVEN%2BCANNONS-316672.jpg)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on June 07, 2017, 11:50:17 PM
Gotta give credit where credit's due. I was up late, browsing my old Spotify playlists, some of which I had added songs to while chatting with Josh last summer. In one such playlist, I re-discovered "Sunlight Bathed the Golden Glow," and I ended up listening to all of Ignite the Seven Cannons and The Strange Idols Pattern and Other Short Stories that night. Stayed up a bit too late, but completely worth it.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on June 08, 2017, 01:21:42 AM
Gotta give credit where credit's due. I was up late, browsing my old Spotify playlists, some of which I had added songs to while chatting with Josh last summer. In one such playlist, I re-discovered "Sunlight Bathed the Golden Glow," and I ended up listening to all of Ignite the Seven Cannons and The Strange Idols Pattern and Other Short Stories that night. Stayed up a bit too late, but completely worth it.

Hi, Mari. I've since moved on to an all-instrumental album of theirs, Let the Snakes Crinkle Their Heads to Death. Guitarist Maurice Deebank had left by then and the sound became more organ-fuelled, courtesy of Martin Duffy (later of Primal Scream).   

(http://images.eil.com/large_image/FELT_LET%2BTHE%2BSNAKES%2BCRINKLE%2BTHEIR%2BHEADS%2BTO%2BDEATH-287864.jpg)

A lot of cool tunes in there. Next up is the other album you mention----all in due course...


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on June 16, 2017, 09:41:56 PM
this is bloody fantastic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnDTTffIGpI


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on June 17, 2017, 08:35:08 PM
It's only taken me 21 years and 10 months to realize this, but the '80s are grrrreat (even, perhaps especially, with wine).


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on June 19, 2017, 02:57:47 AM
this is bloody fantastic:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnDTTffIGpI

I've got it bookmarked, M. Thanks. I liked all the other stuff of theirs that I've heard. A most original and unfairly neglected band.

Been away. It's great to be back. :=)

Yes, wine and the '80s----a good combination. ;D


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on June 21, 2017, 02:34:48 PM
This is that other album of theirs I've just finished listening to----fantastic!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9pAdmVyRSD4

Felt: The Strange Idols Pattern and Other Short Stories (1984)


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on June 26, 2017, 12:31:38 PM
I'm in the throes of organizing a Shamen topic across at my other board.

Theirs is a fascinating story, tinged with tragedy. From 1989, this is "Transcendental":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MMqXeqaNhjo


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on June 29, 2017, 12:18:27 PM
This is for all the posters who are having trouble waiting until their copy of Sunshine Tomorrow arrives:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ErvgV4P6Fzc


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: undercover-m on July 24, 2017, 12:47:31 AM
I think I've discovered a new way to embrace music.

I've also got the munchies, what's it to you.


Title: Re: The 1980's Appreciation Lounge
Post by: JK on July 29, 2017, 01:39:18 AM
I think I've discovered a new way to embrace music.

I've also got the munchies, what's it to you.

Gotta have the munchies in these trying times, M. :smokin