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Chocolate Shake Man
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« Reply #100 on: June 13, 2012, 10:30:12 AM »

Teaching a Detective Fiction course in the Fall so I'm starting to get prepped for that. Currently reading Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue. Next on the agenda will be a Doyle short story and an Agatha Christie novel. Actually, maybe you can take a look at my reading list I will be proposing and if any of you are detective fiction fans (I was just given the course and have no real background on the subject and have only done the most superficial research so far for the course), let me know if there is something that might be worthwhile putting on (I'm also thinking of a film, but I'm not sure which era to choose).

Poe, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841)
Doyle, “The Adventure of the Speckled Band” (1892)
Agatha Christie, The Murder at the Vicarage (1930)
Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep (1939)
Woody Allen, “The Whore of Mensa” (1974)
P.D. James, An Unsuitable Woman for The Job (1972)
Paul Auster, City of Glass (1985)
Walter Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress (1990)
Michael Chabon, The Yiddish Policeman's Union (2007)

I'm also writing a book on Mennonite autobiography too, but I might not share those texts here as I'm not sure what the interest level would be!

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« Reply #101 on: June 13, 2012, 11:48:15 AM »

Not much to add, but you could sling in some Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon, which would also be a cracking choice for your film) and you could afford a couple of Sherlock Holmes ones, as they're really short. And the rest of Paul Auster's New York Trilogy, from where City of Glass hails, is also really good.

How about, as a left field one, The Crying of Lot 49? Has elements of the detective story and would be a good example of the tropes transplanted into a completely oddball setting.

I missed out on doing my universities crime fiction course, which i am still sore about....
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« Reply #102 on: June 13, 2012, 01:13:02 PM »

At the moment: Reaching Through Time by Lurlene McDaniel
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« Reply #103 on: June 13, 2012, 02:10:59 PM »

Not much to add, but you could sling in some Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon, which would also be a cracking choice for your film) and you could afford a couple of Sherlock Holmes ones, as they're really short. And the rest of Paul Auster's New York Trilogy, from where City of Glass hails, is also really good.

How about, as a left field one, The Crying of Lot 49? Has elements of the detective story and would be a good example of the tropes transplanted into a completely oddball setting.

I missed out on doing my universities crime fiction course, which i am still sore about....

YES! I was going to mention The Maltese Falcon as well - one of the best detective stories I've read (in all fairness it's really the only detective story I've read).

@RockandRoll - have you read 'Rising Sun' by Michael Crichton - fairly good detective book as well.

Also, PBS have done an incredible job on their Sherlock Holmes TV series. I watched The Hound of the Baskerville's episode and it blew me away - really well done (good choice if you're looking for a film). I tried to find the link to the show on iTunes (I found it last night), but I can't find it today.
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Chocolate Shake Man
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« Reply #104 on: June 15, 2012, 01:47:02 PM »

Thanks for the suggestions, guys. Definitely highly considering The Maltese Falcon for a film choice - my only concern, at this point, is whether or not I will have enough to say about BOTH the Chandler novel and the Huston film but I am sure the differences in the mediums may be helpful.

I would love to do Crying of Lot 49 but it may be a difficult one for the students and I'm already hitting them with a few difficult texts. I will still consider it though.

Haven't read the Crichton book but I will add it to my "to-read" list. Thanks for the suggestion. I think the Sherlock Holmes series is on Netflix. I will check it out too!
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« Reply #105 on: July 06, 2012, 10:06:07 PM »

I've tried starting the "Sci Fi Masterpiece" Dune for about three weeks now. Cannot even understand the first page. Looking grim. Besides that i'm reading As I Lay Dying by Faulkner, and just finished up Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut.
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« Reply #106 on: July 08, 2012, 02:23:45 AM »

I love Slaughterhouse 5. What did you think of it?

Reading a biography of Robert Mitchum, by Lee Server, and my friend leant me a book called 'On A Winters Night, A Traveller' by Italo Calvino which is breaking me a little, but it's so good. Anyone else here read it?
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All roads lead to Kokomo. Exhaustive research in time travel has conclusively proven that there is no alternate universe WITHOUT Kokomo. It would've happened regardless.
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« Reply #107 on: July 08, 2012, 11:28:41 AM »

I love Slaughterhouse 5. What did you think of it?

Reading a biography of Robert Mitchum, by Lee Server, and my friend leant me a book called 'On A Winters Night, A Traveller' by Italo Calvino which is breaking me a little, but it's so good. Anyone else here read it?

Yep. I've read On A Winters Night - fantastic book. Perhaps an interesting side note: it's one of the few books that is written (sometimes) in the 2nd person rather than 1st or 3rd.
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« Reply #108 on: July 10, 2012, 03:30:54 PM »

I love Slaughterhouse 5. What did you think of it?


Loved it! I heard it was a book about war, so I picked it up. It was a very pleasant surprise.
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« Reply #109 on: July 18, 2012, 09:26:35 AM »

day 71 for me
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« Reply #110 on: July 28, 2012, 01:32:48 PM »

Checked out Catch a Wave and Heroes and Villains from the library. Can't wait to read them!
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« Reply #111 on: July 29, 2012, 08:34:09 PM »

Zone One by Colson Whitehead. Such an amazing zombie novel. Halfway though and so well written.
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« Reply #112 on: August 04, 2012, 06:58:22 PM »

This is a fun thread,

The Fate of Reason: German Philosophy from Kant to Fichte - Frederick C. Beiser
Doctor Faustus - Thomas Mann
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« Reply #113 on: August 04, 2012, 07:06:40 PM »

The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In the middle of 'Robinson Crusoe' as well.

Just finished 'One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest' - quite a fascinating read!
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« Reply #114 on: August 04, 2012, 07:19:51 PM »

The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In the middle of 'Robinson Crusoe' as well.

Just finished 'One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest' - quite a fascinating read!

I've been reading English novels all year, just got through with Tom Jones last month. I've sort of been working my way backwards from Walter Scott and Defoe is the last major novelist of the century I've been meaning to read. I can't really decide between Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders though, are you enjoying Crusoe?
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« Reply #115 on: August 04, 2012, 07:31:12 PM »

The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In the middle of 'Robinson Crusoe' as well.

Just finished 'One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest' - quite a fascinating read!

I've been reading English novels all year, just got through with Tom Jones last month. I've sort of been working my way backwards from Walter Scott and Defoe is the last major novelist of the century I've been meaning to read. I can't really decide between Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders though, are you enjoying Crusoe?

Very much! My only qualm being that Defoe uses this book to monotonously preach about Christianity*. I'm only halfway through the book, but, besides the religious aspect, it's a great and quick read! I'll definitely be picking up Moll Flanders in the future.
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« Reply #116 on: August 04, 2012, 07:41:53 PM »

The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In the middle of 'Robinson Crusoe' as well.

Just finished 'One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest' - quite a fascinating read!

I've been reading English novels all year, just got through with Tom Jones last month. I've sort of been working my way backwards from Walter Scott and Defoe is the last major novelist of the century I've been meaning to read. I can't really decide between Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders though, are you enjoying Crusoe?

Very much! My only qualm being that Defoe uses this book to monotonously preach about Christianity*. I'm only halfway through the book, but, besides the religious aspect, it's a great and quick read! I'll definitely be picking up Moll Flanders in the future.

Very cool, I guess I'll be starting with that one then. If your into those older novels, I'd really recommend Goethe. I do really enjoy things like Pamela and Tristram Shandy, but I think Goethe's Meister is the real birth of the modern novel, it cuts through a lot of the more tedious aspects of the earlier, more experimental English novels.
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« Reply #117 on: August 04, 2012, 08:22:29 PM »

Teaching a Detective Fiction course in the Fall so I'm starting to get prepped for that. Currently reading Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue. Next on the agenda will be a Doyle short story and an Agatha Christie novel. Actually, maybe you can take a look at my reading list I will be proposing and if any of you are detective fiction fans (I was just given the course and have no real background on the subject and have only done the most superficial research so far for the course), let me know if there is something that might be worthwhile putting on (I'm also thinking of a film, but I'm not sure which era to choose).

Poe, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841)
Doyle, “The Adventure of the Speckled Band” (1892)
Agatha Christie, The Murder at the Vicarage (1930)
Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep (1939)
Woody Allen, “The Whore of Mensa” (1974)
P.D. James, An Unsuitable Woman for The Job (1972)
Paul Auster, City of Glass (1985)
Walter Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress (1990)
Michael Chabon, The Yiddish Policeman's Union (2007)

I'm also writing a book on Mennonite autobiography too, but I might not share those texts here as I'm not sure what the interest level would be!


Almost any Ross MacDonald book (The Underground Man or Sleeping Beauty are two of my faves)
The Postman always rings Twice by Cain.
Tough Guys Don't Dance by Norman Mailer
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« Reply #118 on: November 21, 2014, 11:07:28 AM »

Hi all,

Today I read Chestnut Street by Maeve Binchy.  It was good and set Ireland.  What books are all of you reading?  Do any of you read Christmas books?  I do.  I am going to be careful not to be seen reading one in public. 

I am going to go to Lampy's tonight at 7:15 p.m. for dinner.  I will get the cheaper bottle of white wine tonight.  It is better to do that and be able to buy Christmas gifts for family than to buy a more expensive bottle of wine that will be finished the next night. 

Happy weekend to all!!! 
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« Reply #119 on: November 21, 2014, 11:27:20 AM »

I'm currently re-viewing Louis Althusser's On Ideology for research purposes.

As far as fiction goes, I'm reading Miriam Toews's fantastic A Complicated Kindness.

Christmas books? I'm sure I'll be reading some to my daughter in the upcoming weeks. I also like some Dickens.
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« Reply #120 on: January 11, 2015, 06:48:34 AM »

I just read that novelist Robert Stone, best known for "Dog Soldiers," has died. I've got "A Hall of Mirrors" over there on the shelf staring me down. I might give it another read.
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« Reply #121 on: January 11, 2015, 08:31:50 AM »

Currently reading a lot on semiotics and just began Roland Barthes' book Mythologies.
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« Reply #122 on: January 11, 2015, 08:41:09 AM »

Currently reading a lot on semiotics and just began Roland Barthes' book Mythologies.

Interesting. As an atheist who has in recent years spent a possibly surprising amount of time reading biblical criticism and history of Christianity (that being the religion from whence I came, family-wise), I've seen and heard the name Barthes come up a lot. Please weigh in once you've got an opinion on Mythologies, will you?
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« Reply #123 on: January 13, 2015, 11:39:40 AM »

Interesting. As an atheist who has in recent years spent a possibly surprising amount of time reading biblical criticism and history of Christianity (that being the religion from whence I came, family-wise), I've seen and heard the name Barthes come up a lot. Please weigh in once you've got an opinion on Mythologies, will you?

Thanks for the interest!

Actually, this book is more about the myths of contemporary popular culture rather than religion, though the topic may come up at some point. Thus far, I've read five essays and they have been about: wrestling, headshots of actors, how Romans are represented in films, how writers are depicted as superhumans, how royalty is depicted as superhuman.

They are great essays though, nicely filled with snark and without a great deal of pretension.
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« Reply #124 on: January 13, 2015, 02:55:36 PM »

Interesting. As an atheist who has in recent years spent a possibly surprising amount of time reading biblical criticism and history of Christianity (that being the religion from whence I came, family-wise), I've seen and heard the name Barthes come up a lot. Please weigh in once you've got an opinion on Mythologies, will you?

Thanks for the interest!

Actually, this book is more about the myths of contemporary popular culture rather than religion, though the topic may come up at some point. Thus far, I've read five essays and they have been about: wrestling, headshots of actors, how Romans are represented in films, how writers are depicted as superhumans, how royalty is depicted as superhuman.

They are great essays though, nicely filled with snark and without a great deal of pretension.

Myths are myths, to some extent! I began (but shelved out of laziness) an essay about myth in pop music. I really want to get back to it, but, well, I suck.
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