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Non Smiley Smile Stuff => The Sandbox => Topic started by: hypehat on April 30, 2011, 06:43:28 AM



Title: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on April 30, 2011, 06:43:28 AM
From what I've gathered, some of the members of this board are keen readers, soI thought it would be nice to have a literature thread of some sorts. So what are you reading? What's your favourite book? and so on.

at the moment, I have been wading through Lorca's 'Poet In New York'. Wonderful, if the images take a fair bit of unpacking. Which is why it's taking me so long.

Also picked up some Oscar Wilde plays the other day, as I'm about to be in The Importance Of Being Earnest and thought I'd give some more of his drama a whirl. Earnest is, of course, wonderful. Bad plot twists and everything  ;D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: pancakerecords on April 30, 2011, 07:03:01 AM
Harvard University Press just released an illustrated, uncensored edition of "The Picture of Dorian Gray".  I haven't read it yet, but I am looking forward to it.

I am currently reading Bob Mould's memoir "See A Little Light"


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: A Million Units In Jan! on April 30, 2011, 07:33:29 AM
Has anybody read 'The Godfather'? Even though it was done before the movie, I have to say, the movie is much better. One of the few instances where the movie is actually better than the book.
Right now, I'm reading 'Wicked'. I saw the musical a couple years back, and loved it. The book is much different, but it's still pretty good. If anyone here gets a chance to see it, you should. It's incredible!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on April 30, 2011, 08:20:29 AM
The Mars Trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson. Red Mars and Green Mars are incredible books. I'm on Blue Mars now and am having a tough time getting through it.....Too much politics in this one I'm afraid. But hopefully it will get better.

I just finished 'Childhood's End' by Arthur C Clarke and it is one of the finest science fiction books I have ever read.

After this I'll probably pick up some Hemingway's 'To Have And Have Not' - anyone here know if that's a good read?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: All Golden 74 on April 30, 2011, 09:04:29 AM
I'm re-reading (3rd time) 'The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch' by Philip K. Dick.  It's my favorite PDK novel (so far).  I can't believe I still haven't read 'The Divine Invasion'!  Geez, I'm a dork!  :'(


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Mike's Beard on April 30, 2011, 09:43:18 AM
Has anybody read 'The Godfather'? Even though it was done before the movie, I have to say, the movie is much better. One of the few instances where the movie is actually better than the book.
Right now, I'm reading 'Wicked'. I saw the musical a couple years back, and loved it. The book is much different, but it's still pretty good. If anyone here gets a chance to see it, you should. It's incredible!

The novel spends far too much time with a pointless sub plot about Johnny Fontania. It's telling that as famous as the Godfather movies are, most people would be hard put to name another Mario Puzo book.

BTW I'm reading the memoirs of B movie stunt man and bit part actor Gary Kent. Quite an interesting read esp his involvement with some of the biker and hippie movies of the 1960's.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: A Million Units In Jan! on April 30, 2011, 09:51:11 AM


The novel spends far too much time with a pointless sub plot about Johnny Fontania. It's telling that as famous as the Godfather movies are, most people would be hard put to name another Mario Puzo book.


And a pointless sub plot about Sonny's girlfriend Lucy. Basically these were just tossed in there so there was an excuse to talk about sex.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Jonas on April 30, 2011, 09:54:31 AM
Smiley Smile Message Board


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Andrew G. Doe on April 30, 2011, 11:08:27 AM
Smiley Smile Message Board

 ;D

Just finished an exhaustive biography of Bruce Chatwin. Rather wish I'd not read it now as, although fascinating and minutely researched, the man was basically a complete asshole who treated other people like crap and wasn't above plagiarising other's work. Still like his style, but it's a bit tarnished now.

Also reading an equally exhaustive biography of John Donne. Cracking stuff.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: bgas on April 30, 2011, 11:28:51 AM
I'm happy for now reading multiple issues of Esquire magazine


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Jonas on April 30, 2011, 11:37:42 AM
Like a proper gentleman.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: A Million Units In Jan! on April 30, 2011, 12:41:56 PM
Smiley Smile Message Board

You poor child  :'(


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SloopJohnB on April 30, 2011, 01:11:01 PM
I've just finished "Juliet, Naked" by Nick Hornby - a bestseller, and understandably so. It's quite funny, and the way internet message boards dedicated to a single artist are described is particularly accurate  :lol

I'm currently reading Charles Webb's "The Graduate". It's about time, as the movie based on the book is my favorite movie ever. So far the novel is good too, but I fear I'm too much in love with the movie to fully appreciate the book... I find myself comparing the two a bit too often. It was the same with "Memoirs of a Geisha", but in that case the book was far better than the movie.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Andrew G. Doe on April 30, 2011, 02:25:14 PM
I've just finished "Juliet, Naked" by Nick Hornby - a bestseller, and understandably so. It's quite funny, and the way internet message boards dedicated to a single artist are described is particularly accurate  :lol

Oh, hell, yes - parts of that book are painfully close to home. Hornby is an excellent writer.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on April 30, 2011, 06:00:53 PM
I need a good biography in my life. The question is, of whom. What was the Donne one you read, AGD?  Also, if there are any good ones of romantic authors, I should extremely like to know them. Although maybe not Coleridge, I've tried Biografia Literatura a couple of times and it's been too heavily psychological, in an unconvincing way.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Andrew G. Doe on May 01, 2011, 01:07:51 AM
It's called Donne: The Reformed Soul by John Stubbs.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 01, 2011, 06:10:33 AM
Thanks, I'll pick it up and put it on the pile of 'stuff i'll be able to read when my degree's over'  ;D

I guess this is the place for this, so I'll mention I also saw All's Well That Ends Well at the Globe last night (which was amazing, and I heartily recommend it), and am going to see Macbeth in a disused prison tonight! Am so excited.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: grillo on May 01, 2011, 07:23:57 AM
Currently reading:
A Life Wild and Perilous about fur trappers in the 19th century
http://www.amazon.com/Life-Wild-Perilous-Mountain-Pacific/dp/080505989X/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304259656&sr=1-1

Merchants Money and Power about the early history of Portland Or
http://www.amazon.com/Merchants-Money-Power-Establishment-1843-1913/dp/0960340831/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1304259715&sr=1-1,
Precious Dust about the world around goldrushes
http://www.amazon.com/Precious-Dust-Saga-Western-Rushes/dp/0803282478/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1304259746&sr=1-2,

Preston Falls
http://www.amazon.com/Preston-Falls-Novel-David-Gates/dp/0679756434/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1304259789&sr=1-1, reading it for the millionth time, and the only funnier book I've read was the same author's Jernigan http://www.amazon.com/Jernigan-David-Gates/dp/0679737138/ref=pd_sim_b_2.



Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Esoteric on May 01, 2011, 12:17:16 PM
The Biography of the Bible on Sacred Texts website:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/biob/index.htm

Fascinating read on a 6000 year old subject.  :)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on May 01, 2011, 03:50:30 PM
Why Nations Go to War, John Stoessinger.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: OBLiO on May 01, 2011, 04:13:33 PM
The Biography of the Bible on Sacred Texts website:

http://www.sacred-texts.com/bib/biob/index.htm

Fascinating read on a 6000 year old subject.  :)

wow. yeah that Sacred Texts site has everything. Been going there on and off for about 5 years or so.

Favorite Book: Harpo Speaks! by Harpo Marx and Rowland Barber.
Atlas Shrugged has been staring at me for about a month, but I've been distracted.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Dunderhead on May 01, 2011, 06:42:02 PM
Goethe - Wilhelm Meisters Wanderjahre


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on May 03, 2011, 08:53:43 AM
The Lost Beach Boy

V-the Novel, based on the first two mini-series.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Vega-Table Man on May 03, 2011, 09:06:56 AM
Oh, hell, yes - parts of that book are painfully close to home. Hornby is an excellent writer.

Absolutely. And Juliet, Naked in particular is a fine book. When it came out, I attended a reading/signing he did in NYC and got a chance to chat with him briefly ... He's a very gracious guy.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 03, 2011, 09:29:33 AM
Today, I am focussing heavily on Ezra Pound for my essays so not reading as such. But got delightfully sidetracked by The Cantos. Wonderful stuff.

Also read Beckett's Endgame again and had to take myself out for lunch afterwards to cheer myself up  :lol


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: All Golden 74 on May 03, 2011, 11:58:29 AM
I am focussing heavily on Ezra Pound for my essays
Good luck fella!  I did a paper on Ezry's 'Pisan Cantos' for a comparative religion class in '05.  Just about fried my brain!  ;D  Wonderful stuff, but dense(thick).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 03, 2011, 01:51:49 PM
Isn't it just! Working rather heavily on 'In A Station Of The Metro', if you know that? Won't take you long to read.  ;D

Good thing about him (and other modernists) is that there's a wealth of their letters, articles, writings, etc to pick up the slack. And he's good at criticism too, so it's nice to sift through... well, relatively speaking....


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 15, 2011, 05:05:25 PM
Time for a bump?

Been devouring Blake at the moment. Particularly The Marriage Of Heaven and Hell. And a ffew things I've got in an Romantic anthology. What have  you lot got on?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: bgas on May 15, 2011, 10:50:15 PM
Still just working my way thru Esquire.  I only really read it in the library.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on May 16, 2011, 02:31:38 PM
Just began my months-old, but yet-untouched (until last night) Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of War and Peace. I have loved all their Dostoevsky and Gogol translations, as well as their Anna Karenina, so I am excited for this version to be my first stab at this novel.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Dunderhead on May 17, 2011, 12:28:56 AM
Goethe on SMiLE?

"Dilettantes, when they have done their best, are wont to excuse themselves by saying the work is not yet finished. Of course, it can never be finished, because it was never begun properly. The master presents his work as finished after only a few strokes; polished or not, it is nevertheless complete. The cleverest dilettante gropes in uncertainty, and as the work grows, the original insecurity becomes ever more perceptible. At the very end, the initial failure is revealed, when it cannot be corrected, and so of course the work cannot be finished."


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Jay on May 17, 2011, 07:24:06 PM
I just ordered a translated copy of The Iliad by Homer. I decided it's time to broaden my influences, so to speak.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: vintagemusic on May 17, 2011, 09:01:32 PM
Just finished a novel by Martin Cruz Smith "Three Stations" It's the latest in the
Arkady Renko series, about a Russian detective. You may remember William Hurt
and Lee Marvin in the movie Gorky Park.

I am beginning Ray Davies (of The Kinks) autobiography called X RAY or something
like that. I Am about to read for the tenth time. The Stranger by Albert Camus.

I have been anticipating the final postumous novel from Michael Crichton. I also have
the lost story of Brian Wilsons masterpiece SMiLE by Domenic Priore on my nightstand


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on May 20, 2011, 09:14:11 AM
I've been reading a lot of all the print outs I've had filed away forever...I've been printing BB research/articles/lyrics/etc. out since I was in high school, around 2002, kept printing out for something to read in class in college, and still do at my work...

and I know you're thinking it's a waste, but I was aloud over 500 pages a year at HS to print out and the same goes for College and work...so it's my paper to do what I want.


As I squeezed a whole SMile file full of SMiLE FAQ's, articles, the Smile Primer, interviews, posts by Durrie Parks, etc....I've finally divided it into 2 separate files, Smile 66-67 and BWPS
Somehow everything else, from Surfin' Safari to present day printouts, has been in 1 manilla file folder...but I finally purchased more hanging file folders and a tuperware to fill hanging file folders in....I've got my Smile files done and then the first file done which consist of discography of albums, singles, unreleased albums and a couple of reviews for all the albums that were two separate articles, from Lost and Found/Surfin' Safari to Hawthorne CA...it's a really large file but it's one of my most informal and favored files to look through.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on May 20, 2011, 09:17:41 AM
I've been reading a lot of all the print outs I've had filed away forever...I've been printing BB research/articles/lyrics/etc. out since I was in high school, around 2002, kept printing out for something to read in class in college, and still do at my work...

and I know you're thinking it's a waste, but I was aloud over 500 pages a year at HS to print out and the same goes for College and work...so it's my paper to do what I want.


As I squeezed a whole SMile file full of SMiLE FAQ's, articles, the Smile Primer, interviews, posts by Durrie Parks, etc....I've finally divided it into 2 separate files, Smile 66-67 and BWPS
Somehow everything else, from Surfin' Safari to present day printouts, has been in 1 manilla file folder...but I finally purchased more hanging file folders and a tuperware to fill hanging file folders in....I've got my Smile files done and then the first file done which consist of discography of albums, singles, unreleased albums and a couple of reviews for all the albums that were two separate articles, from Lost and Found/Surfin' Safari to Hawthorne CA...it's a really large file but it's one of my most informal and favored files to look through.
I've also been reading the Ultimate Dallas reference book with information about EVERY episode and the reunions/tv-movies...it's really a great read if you're a DAllas fan


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on May 20, 2011, 09:42:55 AM
Somewhat off-topic, but I think there were a few people here that were writing some novels/books as of late. Any updates?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on May 20, 2011, 03:10:59 PM
Somewhat off-topic, but I think there were a few people here that were writing some novels/books as of late. Any updates?
I had an idea about writing a fictional piece that's similar to the story of Almost Famous but instead of the 12 year old kid, it would be me traveling with the BB to Holland, just using the knowledge I have with research through many sources...but I never developed it.


I also wanted to write a book or something with just information that puts a lot of sources together about the Beach Boys catalog, released/unreleased. Basically, I wanna go for something like "A Hard Day's Write," anyone know what I'm talking about? I'd really like to start on it this summer...Some different things stopping me being one of the major things is copyrights towards unreleased items....can someone publicize lyrics or anything I want to write about bootlegs?  Basically, write the info about it (dates & such) then give the story behind it.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Seaside Woman on May 20, 2011, 03:29:30 PM
Just finished The Lost Symbll by Dan Brown. I bought it when it was released and shelved it because of poor reviews but it was stellar.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on May 20, 2011, 03:34:28 PM
Just finished The Lost Symbll by Dan Brown. I bought it when it was released and shelved it because of poor reviews but it was stellar.

Did the same with Michael Crichton's Next - got sh*t reviews, but it turned out to be a great yarn.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on May 20, 2011, 03:35:18 PM
Somewhat off-topic, but I think there were a few people here that were writing some novels/books as of late. Any updates?
I had an idea about writing a fictional piece that's similar to the story of Almost Famous but instead of the 12 year old kid, it would be me traveling with the BB to Holland, just using the knowledge I have with research through many sources...but I never developed it.

Sounds like a good story! You should start it and see how far you can get!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 20, 2011, 04:28:35 PM
I'm just not a very good writer, which is my project ended up being abandoned. It's alright, seeing as I don't lack other artistic pursuits to keep myself busy with, and every twenty year old fancies themselves as a writer...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Jay on May 20, 2011, 08:27:03 PM
I occasionally flirt around with writing. I wrote a children's book in school about a bear who thought he was human. It was made into a "proper" hardback book. I've also written two "mini novels". One was about a murderer who joined a circus as a clown to hide his identity. It was called "The Phantom of The Circus". The other one was about two inventors. The husband was a well known and love owner of a bank. The husband had a secret though. In his private life he was an evil and cruel man who was jealous of his wife because her scientific inventions were quite successful, while his work was largely ignored. The husband decides on the perfect invention, a robot. His plans go horribly wrong though, and the robot kills his creator and builds a replica of itself. One replica quickly turns into hundreds of thousands. The President of the United States of America is assassinated, and the "leader" robot takes over. All forms of Government are overthrown by the robots, and soon human civilization as it is known is in jeopardy of being turned into a society of nothing but robots.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on May 23, 2011, 07:12:35 PM
Checked out Bill Simmons' "The Book of Basketball." It's mildly entertaining--just like one of his (basketball-related) columns, but a lot longer. In other words, loaded with pop culture references, jokes, references to his friends, and of course, basketball. Hardly great literature, but an enjoyable reprieve from more serious reading.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Paulos on June 05, 2011, 01:27:58 AM
Just finished reading The Day Of The Triffids by John Wyndham, an outstanding book in my opinion and clearly a massive influence on the zombie film genre. I really should read more classic sci-fi if it's anywhere near as good as this, any recommendations?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on June 05, 2011, 04:04:51 AM
Oh God, I'd ask my Dad if I could - he's hugely into this stuff. Off the top of my head, you need as much Asimov as is humanly possible. Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? by Phillip K. Dick, too. On an older note, The War Of The Worlds by H.G Wells is great. Although I made the mistake of picking up an old Penguin edition and it's so fragile I can't mistreat it as is my wont with books...

Now my degree is over for the year, I can get to reading the stuff I've been putting off for lack of time. In the past week I've got through In Cold Blood (freaked me out no end, for some reason. Such attention to detail), a book about folk ballads curated by Greil Marcus, Slaughterhouse 5, and am plowing diligently through To Kill a Mockingbird, which is wonderful.

Sadly, my lack of stuff to do has lead to me dusting off the novel I claimed I had abandoned upthread. Am going through it with a fine, fine toothcomb.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Andrew G. Doe on June 05, 2011, 01:16:36 PM
Reading - a biography of Wilfred Owen

Writing - OK, researching and drafting (for the last five/six years) a biography of William Beldham (Google him).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Peter Reum on June 05, 2011, 03:23:53 PM
Currently reading The Hardware of The Soul by Daniel Amen, M.D.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: pancakerecords on June 05, 2011, 05:42:32 PM
Just finished "Physics of the Future"  by Michio Kaku, halfway through Manning Marable's Malcolm X bio.  Think I'm going for some fiction next...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on June 05, 2011, 08:10:09 PM
Just finished "Physics of the Future"  by Michio Kaku, halfway through Manning Marable's Malcolm X bio.  Think I'm going for some fiction next...

How was 'Physics of the Future'? I was thinking about reading it...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: pancakerecords on June 05, 2011, 08:40:15 PM
Just finished "Physics of the Future"  by Michio Kaku, halfway through Manning Marable's Malcolm X bio.  Think I'm going for some fiction next...

How was 'Physics of the Future'? I was thinking about reading it...

Brilliant and mind-bowing I couldn't recommend it more strongly.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on June 06, 2011, 10:14:55 PM
Tonight, just finished Sara Jeannette Duncan's book, Set in Authority.

I will also be finishing up a bunch of Derek Walcott poems, including "The Schooner Flight" and a bunch from Another Life. I am also currently working through a bunch of early Canadian explorer texts compiled and edited in a large volume by Germaine Warkentin, appropriately titled Canadian Exploration Literature.

Tomorrow I begin (hopefully) Annie Swan's Elizabeth Glen, MB.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on June 09, 2011, 04:23:24 AM
How's that Canadian Explorer Book? It sounds like a fantastic set.....


My Americophile phase continues, although I have Franny & Zooey by JD Salinger and A Confederacy of Dunces vying for my attention. Which shall I settle on....


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on June 09, 2011, 05:39:46 PM
Finally back to the long set-aside War and Peace (which I had never read before, but just picked up and began reading this spring after having begun reading other Tolstoy last summer), as well as Niall Ferguson's Ascent of Money. Kind of alternating depending on my mood.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on June 14, 2011, 10:57:37 AM
High Fidelity-Nick Hornby
Have a Nice Day!-Mick Foley


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on June 14, 2011, 11:00:08 AM
Question,

I'd like your honest opinion, would starting a book like A Hard Day's Write for the BB be worth it?
I think I could do it, but wouldn't be able to site enough sources throughout the years I've been researching and reading and listening and discussing. I'd also have trouble editing songs down to at least one page or so.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: The Heartical Don on June 14, 2011, 12:05:09 PM
(http://somewhereboy.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/palefire.jpg)

(http://amybradneygeorge.files.wordpress.com/2008/07/saturday.jpg)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on June 14, 2011, 03:37:29 PM
(http://somewhereboy.files.wordpress.com/2010/03/palefire.jpg)
Maybe the only of his novels I haven't read or even bought to put on the shelf. Do let me know what you think.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on June 14, 2011, 06:28:41 PM
Question,

I'd like your honest opinion, would starting a book like A Hard Day's Write for the BB be worth it?
I think I could do it, but wouldn't be able to site enough sources throughout the years I've been researching and reading and listening and discussing. I'd also have trouble editing songs down to at least one page or so.
and the thing about writing about this music is I don't really wanna write about the hits at all...the lesser known and more creative stuff on albums is what I wanna explore.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on June 27, 2011, 07:27:19 PM
Contact - Carl Sagan

Also, I implore anyone here who is remotely interested in science fiction to read 'Childhood's End' by Arthur C Clarke.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: bgas on June 27, 2011, 08:40:46 PM
Contact - Carl Sagan

Also, I implore anyone here who is remotely interested in science fiction to read 'Childhood's End' by Arthur C Clarke.

What's it about?  Pretty sure I read it about 30-35 years back, when I was reading a lot of sci-fi. Probably have it in one of those storage boxes with the other 400 sci-fi's


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Alex on July 15, 2011, 06:10:30 AM
Recently whipped right through The Lost Beach Boy. Seems like anytime I read a BBs themed book I`m through it in a day or two...I can never put that stuff down. Now something like War and Peace would probably take me several months to get through.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on July 20, 2011, 03:24:22 PM
Contact - Carl Sagan

Also, I implore anyone here who is remotely interested in science fiction to read 'Childhood's End' by Arthur C Clarke.

What's it about?  Pretty sure I read it about 30-35 years back, when I was reading a lot of sci-fi. Probably have it in one of those storage boxes with the other 400 sci-fi's

If you were steep into sci-fi you probably read it....[SPOILER ALERT] it is about an intelligent alien race that comes to earth to help us with our next evolutionary step - these aliens read our philosophy and change our perception of religion. They come to earth with a way to look into the past. It is Clarke's finest in my opinion - but then again I haven't read all of Clarke.
_____

Just finished 'On The Road' by Kerouac and 'The Great Gatsby' by Fitzgerald. Now on to 'Walden', and soon some more Kerouac, then re-reading 'No One Here Gets Out Alive'. 'On The Road' is one of the best books I have ever read. period.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on July 20, 2011, 06:16:18 PM

Just finished 'On The Road' by Kerouac and 'The Great Gatsby' by Fitzgerald. Now on to 'Walden', and soon some more Kerouac, then re-reading 'No One Here Gets Out Alive'. 'On The Road' is one of the best books I have ever read. period.
In some lit class, or just decided to hit some classics? Anyway, two great ones there. (For the record, I hate On the Road.)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on July 20, 2011, 06:42:12 PM

Just finished 'On The Road' by Kerouac and 'The Great Gatsby' by Fitzgerald. Now on to 'Walden', and soon some more Kerouac, then re-reading 'No One Here Gets Out Alive'. 'On The Road' is one of the best books I have ever read. period.
In some lit class, or just decided to hit some classics? Anyway, two great ones there. (For the record, I hate On the Road.)

Decided to hit some classics. I skimmed over Thoreau in college, but didn't really take it seriously....I'm finding that I'm taking my studies more seriously after college lol. Gatsby was recommended to me by a friend after I told her how much I love Hemingway. Can't believe I never read it before, but now I can say I have. Great read.

As for 'On The Road' - I read the unedited scroll version - not the 1957 published edition, just fyi. Why the hate for 'On The Road'?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on July 26, 2011, 06:31:48 AM
Talking of On The Road (which I've never read), has anyone ever read Steinbeck's Travels with Charley, as mentioned you-know-where? A very laid-back read.

What am I reading? Well...

(http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS6vdbmoR52_UOWchqkLWt6UoRsJY2ZWV3TPFtCLyQItEmW8rQkGw)

I'm addicted!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on July 26, 2011, 07:23:34 AM
A few days ago I put down Walden and actually tried to read Travels With Charley.

I just couldn't get into it. Page after page I kept reading, telling myself it would be worthwhile, and the further I went in the book the more I disliked it...I stopped reading 1/3rd of the way in. It's probably a fantastic read once one gets all the way through it (some books are like that), but I was dissatisfied with the lack of dialogue and moreover the ease of his travels (up to the point where I stopped). And I really didn't read enough to be a fair judge of whether the book is good or not.

I've tried several Steinbeck novels and havent really cared for them. I'll probably go back to Travels at some point though.
_____

i'm now reading the Maltese Falcon...really good thus far. Then on to Desolation Angels, No One Here Get's Out Alive, then back to Walden.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on July 26, 2011, 08:49:16 AM
Have you tried  East Of Eden? That's Steinbecks best, imo.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on July 26, 2011, 09:14:26 AM
Have you tried  East Of Eden? That's Steinbecks best, imo.

No, but I will! Many friends of mine have also said that that is a great book.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on May 12, 2012, 01:40:57 PM
Bump.

What's everyone been reading here lately?

I've been reading some Hemingway (The Garden of Eden, To Have and Have Not). Finished Dickens' Great Expectations a few weeks ago - was quite surprised at how good it is. I started The Brother's Karamazov the other day, but I've yet to really get into it.

Also, my dislike for Steinbeck subsided a bit: I read Of Mice and Men a few months ago and found it to be one of the better books I've read.

What about everyone else here?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on May 12, 2012, 01:44:24 PM
I started The Brother's Karamazov the other day, but I've yet to really get into it.

Don't give up. It's one of my two or three favorites of all time.

Honestly I was just thinking that it's pathetic how little I've been reading of anything lately, sometimes just checking out some short stories or flipping through assorted (usually political or historical) nonfiction. I began reading Knut Hamsun's The Women at the Pump a while back, but couldn't get into it and haven't finished it. It has been by the bedside for weeks. Even months.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 12, 2012, 04:10:22 PM
Finally got round to reading Zen & The Art Of Motorcycle Maintenance, but just as I was getting into it I left it at my flat when I went to see my family. Bugger.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on May 12, 2012, 04:28:59 PM
I started The Brother's Karamazov the other day, but I've yet to really get into it.

Don't give up. It's one of my two or three favorites of all time.

Honestly I was just thinking that it's pathetic how little I've been reading of anything lately, sometimes just checking out some short stories or flipping through assorted (usually political or historical) nonfiction. I began reading Knut Hamsun's The Women at the Pump a while back, but couldn't get into it and haven't finished it. It has been by the bedside for weeks. Even months.

I'll definitely try to finish it. I've been told by several people it's one of the best books.

I too go through dry spells of reading. In fact, for most of winter I read only one book (Of Mice and Men).

@Hypehat, could you please tell me if that book is worth reading when you've finished it (Zen and the art of motorcycle maintenance)?. It keeps coming up in my Amazon recommendations but I've never bothered to purchase it.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on May 12, 2012, 04:31:11 PM
Brothers K is one of my favourites too. I agree with not giving up!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: GreatUrduPoet on May 14, 2012, 09:36:03 AM
Johnnie Allen's incredible "Born To Be A Loser"...a biography of late troubled singer/songwriter Jimmy Donley.
I'd always wondered how an artist so beloved for his 'warm and soulful' R&B and pop classics could have had
a reputation that makes cultural figures like Jerry Lee Lewis and Mike Tyson seem mellow and non-violent in
comparison. Now I think I can understand the baggage.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on May 15, 2012, 05:49:59 AM
A few days ago I put down Walden and actually tried to read Travels With Charley.

I just couldn't get into it. Page after page I kept reading, telling myself it would be worthwhile, and the further I went in the book the more I disliked it...I stopped reading 1/3rd of the way in. It's probably a fantastic read once one gets all the way through it (some books are like that), but I was dissatisfied with the lack of dialogue and moreover the ease of his travels (up to the point where I stopped). And I really didn't read enough to be a fair judge of whether the book is good or not.

I've tried several Steinbeck novels and havent really cared for them. I'll probably go back to Travels at some point though.
_____

i'm now reading the Maltese Falcon...really good thus far. Then on to Desolation Angels, No One Here Get's Out Alive, then back to Walden.
Heh, I read travels with Charley while on vacation about 8 years ago, I most certainly bought it because of the  lyric from California Saga.  ;D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on May 15, 2012, 05:56:49 AM
My girlfriend and I almost started to read Go Ask Alice a couple of weeks ago, I read it about 6 years ago, I really liked it then. She got freaked out the last time she read it and didn't enjoy it as much. I started to read it but it started depressing me because of my current situation with some certain substances. But as it turns out, a good thing came out of it. I discussed with her about how I don't wanna read it because of my current situation & how it'd depress me, and she understood which started a discussion on myself getting the help I needed....so a week later, I went to my first NA meeting (voluntarily) and I really enjoyed it and got a lot out of it. I'm going to try to make it to a meeting once a week. Been clean 9 days now, I'm very proud to say that.

And that's how a book that I only read 5 pages of the 2nd time helped me turn my life around. Heck, I might just give it away so maybe it'll help someone else.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on May 16, 2012, 11:30:59 AM
My girlfriend and I almost started to read Go Ask Alice a couple of weeks ago, I read it about 6 years ago, I really liked it then. She got freaked out the last time she read it and didn't enjoy it as much. I started to read it but it started depressing me because of my current situation with some certain substances. But as it turns out, a good thing came out of it. I discussed with her about how I don't wanna read it because of my current situation & how it'd depress me, and she understood which started a discussion on myself getting the help I needed....so a week later, I went to my first NA meeting (voluntarily) and I really enjoyed it and got a lot out of it. I'm going to try to make it to a meeting once a week. Been clean 9 days now, I'm very proud to say that.

And that's how a book that I only read 5 pages of the 2nd time helped me turn my life around. Heck, I might just give it away so maybe it'll help someone else.

Congrats!

I read Go Ask Alice my freshmen year of High School - I loved it (I was fascinated by the free-spirited culture the narrator led the reader through)....though looking back I completely ignored the whole point of the book.

Anyways, keep it up - substance abuse is no picnic, and the stronger you stay in the coming days the better off you will be. And 9 days is quite an accomplishment for any drug one is trying to quit, so again, congratulations!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 16, 2012, 05:07:38 PM
Yeah, congrats Punkinhead! Hope you stay strong.

Rab - Zen & The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance is... strange. It's concerned quite heavily with philosophy at times, and lots of hemming and hawing about the Nature of Things which makes for dense reading. The tone doesn't really endear me either, although I'm going to finish it as he's actually rather good at teasing out little narrative foreshadowing bits, although a 'plot' is by no means the actual point of the book. It might be your bag, but it's not really earning the slow and methodical route it's taking with me so far.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SMiLE Brian on May 16, 2012, 05:18:17 PM
Punkinhead, keep up the good work of getting clean.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SG7 on May 16, 2012, 06:15:50 PM
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. Such an epic and powerful book. Tolstoy paints a picture in words and every nook isn't forgotten.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on May 16, 2012, 07:06:15 PM
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. Such an epic and powerful book. Tolstoy paints a picture in words and every nook isn't forgotten.
Isn't it brilliant? I mean, obviously it is. But it is one of the few classics that, as and after you read it, you think it is underrated.

What translation are you reading? I ask because I read the Pevear and Volokhonsky one and loved it. I haven't read others of that novel by them, but there are several Dostoevsky and Gogol novels and stories I've read both from their translations and others, and for some reason, those two just strike gold with me every time. Or vice versa. Whatever.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: 1-1-wonderful on May 17, 2012, 04:50:23 AM
recently:

Underworld by Don DeLillo

The Corrections by  Jonathan Franzen



Underworld blew me away.  One of the best books i've read in a long time and The Corrections too was hard to put down.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 24, 2012, 07:27:39 AM
Rangerover A1, I LOVE Milligan. Have you listened to The Goon Show?

Friend just leant me The Count Of Monte Cristo. Can't wait to have some free time and demolish that sucker.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on May 24, 2012, 07:30:17 AM
Put down Brother's K until I can fully get into it.

Now reading 'The Songs of Distant Earth' by Arthur C Clarke.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SG7 on May 24, 2012, 09:35:25 AM
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. Such an epic and powerful book. Tolstoy paints a picture in words and every nook isn't forgotten.
Isn't it brilliant? I mean, obviously it is. But it is one of the few classics that, as and after you read it, you think it is underrated.

What translation are you reading? I ask because I read the Pevear and Volokhonsky one and loved it. I haven't read others of that novel by them, but there are several Dostoevsky and Gogol novels and stories I've read both from their translations and others, and for some reason, those two just strike gold with me every time. Or vice versa. Whatever.

Yep I am reading the Pevear and Volokhonsky one too. This is my first time reading any of their translations. I am really impressed. Almost done the book and I've been reading it since September. I'm sort of sad about this :(


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Landlocked on May 28, 2012, 02:01:36 PM
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. Such an epic and powerful book. Tolstoy paints a picture in words and every nook isn't forgotten.
Isn't it brilliant? I mean, obviously it is. But it is one of the few classics that, as and after you read it, you think it is underrated.

What translation are you reading? I ask because I read the Pevear and Volokhonsky one and loved it. I haven't read others of that novel by them, but there are several Dostoevsky and Gogol novels and stories I've read both from their translations and others, and for some reason, those two just strike gold with me every time. Or vice versa. Whatever.

Yep I am reading the Pevear and Volokhonsky one too. This is my first time reading any of their translations. I am really impressed. Almost done the book and I've been reading it since September. I'm sort of sad about this :(

Good choice. I read the PV translation of Anna Karenina and really enjoyed it. I also read their translation of Crime and Punishment, which was incredible. I have high hopes for their Brothers Karamazov which is on the shelf, waiting to be read.

Right now, I'm reading Barbara Tuchman's A Distant Mirror. A bit of a slog so far, but interesting enough to keep me from abandoning it for something better.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SG7 on May 28, 2012, 05:30:00 PM
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy. Such an epic and powerful book. Tolstoy paints a picture in words and every nook isn't forgotten.
Isn't it brilliant? I mean, obviously it is. But it is one of the few classics that, as and after you read it, you think it is underrated.

What translation are you reading? I ask because I read the Pevear and Volokhonsky one and loved it. I haven't read others of that novel by them, but there are several Dostoevsky and Gogol novels and stories I've read both from their translations and others, and for some reason, those two just strike gold with me every time. Or vice versa. Whatever.

Yep I am reading the Pevear and Volokhonsky one too. This is my first time reading any of their translations. I am really impressed. Almost done the book and I've been reading it since September. I'm sort of sad about this :(

Good choice. I read the PV translation of Anna Karenina and really enjoyed it. I also read their translation of Crime and Punishment, which was incredible. I have high hopes for their Brothers Karamazov which is on the shelf, waiting to be read.

Right now, I'm reading Barbara Tuchman's A Distant Mirror. A bit of a slog so far, but interesting enough to keep me from abandoning it for something better.

Thanks for the suggestion. I may just have to find a copy of either one of those! I have seriously fallen in love with Russian literature.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on May 28, 2012, 07:22:50 PM
I have high hopes for their Brothers Karamazov which is on the shelf, waiting to be read.

It is amazing.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Landlocked on May 28, 2012, 11:37:44 PM
I have high hopes for their Brothers Karamazov which is on the shelf, waiting to be read.

It is amazing.

That's what I hear! I may have to get their version of The Idiot, because I really didn't care for that novel. It's possible no translation could endear it to me, but it's just as possible it was simply a case of a poor translation. Ever read PV's version of that one?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Jay on May 28, 2012, 11:39:17 PM
A book.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on May 28, 2012, 11:53:57 PM
Rangerover A1, I LOVE Milligan. Have you listened to The Goon Show?

No, but I saw The Rutles sketches and I heard from various people that The Goon Show and this are similar in a way. They're wrong.

Only in that The Goon Show is better  ;) Try this, it's not one of the best but it's fairly standard, solid Goonery. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fb14Cstuc34

Also, if Eric Idle and Neil Innes did not worship the ground Milligan, Sellers, Seacombe et al walked on, I'm Mike Love's bald spot.



Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on May 29, 2012, 03:45:43 PM
I have high hopes for their Brothers Karamazov which is on the shelf, waiting to be read.

It is amazing.

That's what I hear! I may have to get their version of The Idiot, because I really didn't care for that novel. It's possible no translation could endear it to me, but it's just as possible it was simply a case of a poor translation. Ever read PV's version of that one?
I've got to come clean: after having read some of their other Dostoevsky translations, I picked that one up ... and never finished it. Got about 2/3 through and just quit. Never returned to it. So for whatever reason, be it translation of novel itself, I can't get into that.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on May 29, 2012, 05:31:20 PM
I have high hopes for their Brothers Karamazov which is on the shelf, waiting to be read.

It is amazing.

That's what I hear! I may have to get their version of The Idiot, because I really didn't care for that novel. It's possible no translation could endear it to me, but it's just as possible it was simply a case of a poor translation. Ever read PV's version of that one?
I've got to come clean: after having read some of their other Dostoevsky translations, I picked that one up ... and never finished it. Got about 2/3 through and just quit. Never returned to it. So for whatever reason, be it translation of novel itself, I can't get into that.

The Idiot is my least favourite Dostoesvsky.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on June 01, 2012, 07:15:46 PM
Perks of Being a Wallflower
A Hard Days Write
Pink Floyd FAQ


Always reading:
LLVS
BB (K. Badman)
Dallas episode guide (best book on the tv show ever)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Landlocked on June 02, 2012, 08:40:46 PM
I have high hopes for their Brothers Karamazov which is on the shelf, waiting to be read.

It is amazing.

That's what I hear! I may have to get their version of The Idiot, because I really didn't care for that novel. It's possible no translation could endear it to me, but it's just as possible it was simply a case of a poor translation. Ever read PV's version of that one?
I've got to come clean: after having read some of their other Dostoevsky translations, I picked that one up ... and never finished it. Got about 2/3 through and just quit. Never returned to it. So for whatever reason, be it translation of novel itself, I can't get into that.

The Idiot is my least favourite Dostoesvsky.

Ha! This is great news! Because if you look at any critical lists, or the lists of self-absorbed "I'm really well read, in an off-beat, hip kind of way" people on sites like Goodreads, they all list "The Idiot" as a masterpiece. I gave it two stars, considering it by far the worst piece of writing by Big D that I've read. And I've read The Gambler!  :lol :lol

It's been 6 months since I read it, but man, I still remember the gratingly annoying and vacuous characters like it was yesterday. I can understand filling your novel entirely with hideously conceited, useless characters--kind of--if you at least treat them ironically. But I didn't sense any of it. I don't read thrillers, or James Patterson novels, but would it have killed Dostoevsky to move the story along a little better? The pacing was horrendous. Just parlor scene after parlor scene of bloated, sheltered Russian aristocrats' histrionics. Bleh. I was so let down since the concept of Mishkin was so great, and because Kurosawa was inspired so much by it that he even made a film version of it. But I hated the execution. It almost makes me angry to think about it. I can remember how difficult it was to pick that book up each time I wanted to read it. Felt like it weighed a ton.

The Idiot reminds me of Sgt. Pepper's: some universally revered work that leaves me cold, plucked out of a large corpus of truly great work for reasons completely unknown to me.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SG7 on June 06, 2012, 10:33:44 AM
Now I have gotten done Tolstoy I would like to add I was so sad to end Anna but the end of it was so confusing! My one professor is right: it is like two different books at times. Now it's onto reading Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak.
 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on June 06, 2012, 10:36:31 AM
Just finishing up Groucho Marx's autobiography. Just what I needed.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Landlocked on June 06, 2012, 07:13:46 PM
Now I have gotten done Tolstoy I would like to add I was so sad to end Anna but the end of it was so confusing! My one professor is right: it is like two different books at times. Now it's onto reading Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak.
 

He's right in more ways than one. I seem to remember reading that Tolstoy didn't originally envision "AK" as having the whole Levin/Kitty subplot, but added that after beginning work on it. I think he could have gotten a whole other book out of Levin, as he was such a well fleshed out character--mainly because he was essentially Tolstoy himself, I guess  :P :P


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SG7 on June 06, 2012, 08:44:52 PM
Now I have gotten done Tolstoy I would like to add I was so sad to end Anna but the end of it was so confusing! My one professor is right: it is like two different books at times. Now it's onto reading Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak.
 

He's right in more ways than one. I seem to remember reading that Tolstoy didn't originally envision "AK" as having the whole Levin/Kitty subplot, but added that after beginning work on it. I think he could have gotten a whole other book out of Levin, as he was such a well fleshed out character--mainly because he was essentially Tolstoy himself, I guess  :P :P

I just find it funny how Levin doesn't seem very affected by Anna's end. In fact, no one really is except Vronsky!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Daniel S. on June 13, 2012, 12:29:24 AM

I'm reading "Something To Do With Death" a biography of Sergio Leone by Christopher Frayling.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on June 13, 2012, 10:30:12 AM
Teaching a Detective Fiction course in the Fall so I'm starting to get prepped for that. Currently reading Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue. Next on the agenda will be a Doyle short story and an Agatha Christie novel. Actually, maybe you can take a look at my reading list I will be proposing and if any of you are detective fiction fans (I was just given the course and have no real background on the subject and have only done the most superficial research so far for the course), let me know if there is something that might be worthwhile putting on (I'm also thinking of a film, but I'm not sure which era to choose).

Poe, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841)
Doyle, “The Adventure of the Speckled Band” (1892)
Agatha Christie, The Murder at the Vicarage (1930)
Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep (1939)
Woody Allen, “The Whore of Mensa” (1974)
P.D. James, An Unsuitable Woman for The Job (1972)
Paul Auster, City of Glass (1985)
Walter Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress (1990)
Michael Chabon, The Yiddish Policeman's Union (2007)

I'm also writing a book on Mennonite autobiography too, but I might not share those texts here as I'm not sure what the interest level would be!



Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on June 13, 2012, 11:48:15 AM
Not much to add, but you could sling in some Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon, which would also be a cracking choice for your film) and you could afford a couple of Sherlock Holmes ones, as they're really short. And the rest of Paul Auster's New York Trilogy, from where City of Glass hails, is also really good.

How about, as a left field one, The Crying of Lot 49? Has elements of the detective story and would be a good example of the tropes transplanted into a completely oddball setting.

I missed out on doing my universities crime fiction course, which i am still sore about....


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: musicismylife101 on June 13, 2012, 01:13:02 PM
At the moment: Reaching Through Time by Lurlene McDaniel


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on June 13, 2012, 02:10:59 PM
Not much to add, but you could sling in some Dashiell Hammett (The Maltese Falcon, which would also be a cracking choice for your film) and you could afford a couple of Sherlock Holmes ones, as they're really short. And the rest of Paul Auster's New York Trilogy, from where City of Glass hails, is also really good.

How about, as a left field one, The Crying of Lot 49? Has elements of the detective story and would be a good example of the tropes transplanted into a completely oddball setting.

I missed out on doing my universities crime fiction course, which i am still sore about....

YES! I was going to mention The Maltese Falcon as well - one of the best detective stories I've read (in all fairness it's really the only detective story I've read).

@RockandRoll - have you read 'Rising Sun' by Michael Crichton - fairly good detective book as well.

Also, PBS have done an incredible job on their Sherlock Holmes TV series. I watched The Hound of the Baskerville's episode and it blew me away - really well done (good choice if you're looking for a film). I tried to find the link to the show on iTunes (I found it last night), but I can't find it today.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on June 15, 2012, 01:47:02 PM
Thanks for the suggestions, guys. Definitely highly considering The Maltese Falcon for a film choice - my only concern, at this point, is whether or not I will have enough to say about BOTH the Chandler novel and the Huston film but I am sure the differences in the mediums may be helpful.

I would love to do Crying of Lot 49 but it may be a difficult one for the students and I'm already hitting them with a few difficult texts. I will still consider it though.

Haven't read the Crichton book but I will add it to my "to-read" list. Thanks for the suggestion. I think the Sherlock Holmes series is on Netflix. I will check it out too!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MyGlove on July 06, 2012, 10:06:07 PM
I've tried starting the "Sci Fi Masterpiece" Dune for about three weeks now. Cannot even understand the first page. Looking grim. Besides that i'm reading As I Lay Dying by Faulkner, and just finished up Slaughterhouse Five by Kurt Vonnegut.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: hypehat on July 08, 2012, 02:23:45 AM
I love Slaughterhouse 5. What did you think of it?

Reading a biography of Robert Mitchum, by Lee Server, and my friend leant me a book called 'On A Winters Night, A Traveller' by Italo Calvino which is breaking me a little, but it's so good. Anyone else here read it?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on July 08, 2012, 11:28:41 AM
I love Slaughterhouse 5. What did you think of it?

Reading a biography of Robert Mitchum, by Lee Server, and my friend leant me a book called 'On A Winters Night, A Traveller' by Italo Calvino which is breaking me a little, but it's so good. Anyone else here read it?

Yep. I've read On A Winters Night - fantastic book. Perhaps an interesting side note: it's one of the few books that is written (sometimes) in the 2nd person rather than 1st or 3rd.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MyGlove on July 10, 2012, 03:30:54 PM
I love Slaughterhouse 5. What did you think of it?


Loved it! I heard it was a book about war, so I picked it up. It was a very pleasant surprise.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: punkinhead on July 18, 2012, 09:26:35 AM
day 71 for me


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: musicismylife101 on July 28, 2012, 01:32:48 PM
Checked out Catch a Wave and Heroes and Villains from the library. Can't wait to read them!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SG7 on July 29, 2012, 08:34:09 PM
Zone One by Colson Whitehead. Such an amazing zombie novel. Halfway though and so well written.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Dunderhead on August 04, 2012, 06:58:22 PM
This is a fun thread,

The Fate of Reason: German Philosophy from Kant to Fichte - Frederick C. Beiser
Doctor Faustus - Thomas Mann


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on August 04, 2012, 07:06:40 PM
The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In the middle of 'Robinson Crusoe' as well.

Just finished 'One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest' - quite a fascinating read!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Dunderhead on August 04, 2012, 07:19:51 PM
The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In the middle of 'Robinson Crusoe' as well.

Just finished 'One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest' - quite a fascinating read!

I've been reading English novels all year, just got through with Tom Jones last month. I've sort of been working my way backwards from Walter Scott and Defoe is the last major novelist of the century I've been meaning to read. I can't really decide between Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders though, are you enjoying Crusoe?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on August 04, 2012, 07:31:12 PM
The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In the middle of 'Robinson Crusoe' as well.

Just finished 'One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest' - quite a fascinating read!

I've been reading English novels all year, just got through with Tom Jones last month. I've sort of been working my way backwards from Walter Scott and Defoe is the last major novelist of the century I've been meaning to read. I can't really decide between Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders though, are you enjoying Crusoe?

Very much! My only qualm being that Defoe uses this book to monotonously preach about Christianity*. I'm only halfway through the book, but, besides the religious aspect, it's a great and quick read! I'll definitely be picking up Moll Flanders in the future.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Dunderhead on August 04, 2012, 07:41:53 PM
The Beautiful and Damned - F. Scott Fitzgerald.

In the middle of 'Robinson Crusoe' as well.

Just finished 'One Flew Over The Cuckoos Nest' - quite a fascinating read!

I've been reading English novels all year, just got through with Tom Jones last month. I've sort of been working my way backwards from Walter Scott and Defoe is the last major novelist of the century I've been meaning to read. I can't really decide between Robinson Crusoe or Moll Flanders though, are you enjoying Crusoe?

Very much! My only qualm being that Defoe uses this book to monotonously preach about Christianity*. I'm only halfway through the book, but, besides the religious aspect, it's a great and quick read! I'll definitely be picking up Moll Flanders in the future.

Very cool, I guess I'll be starting with that one then. If your into those older novels, I'd really recommend Goethe. I do really enjoy things like Pamela and Tristram Shandy, but I think Goethe's Meister is the real birth of the modern novel, it cuts through a lot of the more tedious aspects of the earlier, more experimental English novels.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: grillo on August 04, 2012, 08:22:29 PM
Teaching a Detective Fiction course in the Fall so I'm starting to get prepped for that. Currently reading Poe's Murders in the Rue Morgue. Next on the agenda will be a Doyle short story and an Agatha Christie novel. Actually, maybe you can take a look at my reading list I will be proposing and if any of you are detective fiction fans (I was just given the course and have no real background on the subject and have only done the most superficial research so far for the course), let me know if there is something that might be worthwhile putting on (I'm also thinking of a film, but I'm not sure which era to choose).

Poe, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue” (1841)
Doyle, “The Adventure of the Speckled Band” (1892)
Agatha Christie, The Murder at the Vicarage (1930)
Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep (1939)
Woody Allen, “The Whore of Mensa” (1974)
P.D. James, An Unsuitable Woman for The Job (1972)
Paul Auster, City of Glass (1985)
Walter Mosley, Devil in a Blue Dress (1990)
Michael Chabon, The Yiddish Policeman's Union (2007)

I'm also writing a book on Mennonite autobiography too, but I might not share those texts here as I'm not sure what the interest level would be!


Almost any Ross MacDonald book (The Underground Man or Sleeping Beauty are two of my faves)
The Postman always rings Twice by Cain.
Tough Guys Don't Dance by Norman Mailer


Title: Books and more
Post by: MaryUSA on November 21, 2014, 11:07:28 AM
Hi all,

Today I read Chestnut Street by Maeve Binchy.  It was good and set Ireland.  What books are all of you reading?  Do any of you read Christmas books?  I do.  I am going to be careful not to be seen reading one in public. 

I am going to go to Lampy's tonight at 7:15 p.m. for dinner.  I will get the cheaper bottle of white wine tonight.  It is better to do that and be able to buy Christmas gifts for family than to buy a more expensive bottle of wine that will be finished the next night. 

Happy weekend to all!!! 


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on November 21, 2014, 11:27:20 AM
I'm currently re-viewing Louis Althusser's On Ideology for research purposes.

As far as fiction goes, I'm reading Miriam Toews's fantastic A Complicated Kindness.

Christmas books? I'm sure I'll be reading some to my daughter in the upcoming weeks. I also like some Dickens.


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: the captain on January 11, 2015, 06:48:34 AM
I just read that novelist Robert Stone, best known for "Dog Soldiers," has died. I've got "A Hall of Mirrors" over there on the shelf staring me down. I might give it another read.


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on January 11, 2015, 08:31:50 AM
Currently reading a lot on semiotics and just began Roland Barthes' book Mythologies.


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: the captain on January 11, 2015, 08:41:09 AM
Currently reading a lot on semiotics and just began Roland Barthes' book Mythologies.

Interesting. As an atheist who has in recent years spent a possibly surprising amount of time reading biblical criticism and history of Christianity (that being the religion from whence I came, family-wise), I've seen and heard the name Barthes come up a lot. Please weigh in once you've got an opinion on Mythologies, will you?


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on January 13, 2015, 11:39:40 AM
Interesting. As an atheist who has in recent years spent a possibly surprising amount of time reading biblical criticism and history of Christianity (that being the religion from whence I came, family-wise), I've seen and heard the name Barthes come up a lot. Please weigh in once you've got an opinion on Mythologies, will you?

Thanks for the interest!

Actually, this book is more about the myths of contemporary popular culture rather than religion, though the topic may come up at some point. Thus far, I've read five essays and they have been about: wrestling, headshots of actors, how Romans are represented in films, how writers are depicted as superhumans, how royalty is depicted as superhuman.

They are great essays though, nicely filled with snark and without a great deal of pretension.


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: the captain on January 13, 2015, 02:55:36 PM
Interesting. As an atheist who has in recent years spent a possibly surprising amount of time reading biblical criticism and history of Christianity (that being the religion from whence I came, family-wise), I've seen and heard the name Barthes come up a lot. Please weigh in once you've got an opinion on Mythologies, will you?

Thanks for the interest!

Actually, this book is more about the myths of contemporary popular culture rather than religion, though the topic may come up at some point. Thus far, I've read five essays and they have been about: wrestling, headshots of actors, how Romans are represented in films, how writers are depicted as superhumans, how royalty is depicted as superhuman.

They are great essays though, nicely filled with snark and without a great deal of pretension.

Myths are myths, to some extent! I began (but shelved out of laziness) an essay about myth in pop music. I really want to get back to it, but, well, I suck.


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: Mr. Verlander on January 13, 2015, 04:32:06 PM
Myth in pop music? How exactly do you mean? Stories about bands that aren't true? Or the mythology of music in general, that 'thing' that makes a kid want to plug a guitar into an amp?


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on January 13, 2015, 05:18:36 PM
Myths are myths, to some extent!

Absolutely!


Quote
I began (but shelved out of laziness) an essay about myth in pop music. I really want to get back to it, but, well, I suck.

I'd like to hear more about that. I'm doing all this reading because of a course I'm teaching this term. I'm thinking of playing some pop songs in class, including Mrs. O'Leary's Cow and Heroes and Villains, as well as other songs by General Music Discussion bands.


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: SMiLE Brian on January 13, 2015, 05:21:04 PM
Can I take your class? ;D


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on January 13, 2015, 05:32:13 PM
Can I take your class? ;D

 ;D

Unfortunately, it may be too late to sign up.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on January 13, 2015, 10:18:50 PM
I have this very huge bookcase in my basement, but never read anything from there. So, I went downstairs to check it & found this:

(http://cv01.twirpx.net/1348/1348621.jpg)A. Vertinsky* "Behind the scenes". Stories, interviews, letters, memories & biggest joy - NOTES! Now've got sth. to play.

*Vintage Russian singer and composer. This is original vinyl sticker of a song he sang that you, my friends, know as "Those Were the Days".

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ru/3/33/Vertinsky2.jpg)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Mike Garneau on January 14, 2015, 02:02:04 PM
ANIMAL: by George "The Animal" Steele (with Jim Evans)

Foreword by Cowboy Bill Watts


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on January 20, 2015, 11:42:23 PM
As usual, "Goosebumps", scary stories, as much creepy & mysterious as it can only be possible,  thank you very much. I found & never returned to the library (& frankly, not willing to do so coz I liked it, don't care if other people want to read it too) collection of Alfred Hitchcock's favorite 'horror' novels by assorted writers. Blue one (they are multi-colored, but this one contains better stories).
Generally, the horror genre might be my go-to favorite & sole read. Some of the details are really funny, altho nobody will agree with me on there. But it's great entertainment value, so to speak. Ditto horror flicks. There, I said it. Go figure. So there! :3d


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Wild-Honey on January 21, 2015, 05:53:32 AM
Some good ideas and suggestions here :)  I used to read far more than I do, I would plough through books, now not so much, had some lifey things get in the way.  Need to sort that.  I've been reading a lot of health books that are very interesting, such as Grain Brain (about how certain grains cause disease, particularly neurologically). The last fiction was Life After Life - Loved it! Also the Rosie Project (also great, warm and fuzzy).  I like older novels and my favourite author is Agatha Christie, I have all her books and a few of her pseudonym ones.  When I feel a bit down I pull out one of hers, it's like a comfy pair of slippers.  I love Arthur C Clarke too, though I haven't read all of his.  A classic I really love is Vanity Fair and Far From the Madding Crowd.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on January 21, 2015, 06:07:11 AM
Cool, I'm a fan of fiction too! I prefer her Miss Marple character, she's so smart. Have you seen the Marple series? What a great cast, love Joan Hickson; she used to play in comedies when she was relatively younger (1940s-50s). With that being said, my ever so favorite detective writer is Rex Stout. There is lots of humor in his books. Can you believe it, the man compiled all the recipes for dishes described in his novels! Very nice cookbook edition. or addition, anything fits.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Wild-Honey on January 22, 2015, 03:37:17 AM
Hi RR!! :)  Nice to see a Miss Marple fan..  Hercule is my favourite though :)   I haven't watched many of the series though as I have a very fixed idea in my mind of settings, characters etc that it undoes the book somewhat for me. Does that make sense??  I haven't read any of Rex Stout, though I have heard of Nero Wolfe.. might have to have a look.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rn57 on January 23, 2015, 12:38:47 AM
Cool, I'm a fan of fiction too! I prefer her Miss Marple character, she's so smart. Have you seen the Marple series? What a great cast, love Joan Hickson; she used to play in comedies when she was relatively younger (1940s-50s). With that being said, my ever so favorite detective writer is Rex Stout. There is lots of humor in his books. Can you believe it, the man compiled all the recipes for dishes described in his novels! Very nice cookbook edition. or addition, anything fits.

I have more books by Rex Stout than by any other writer - all of the Nero Wolfe books (except The Nero Wolfe Cookbook) and all his non-Wolfe books (except for a couple of the novels he published in the years just before the Wolfe series began). I also have John McAteer's biography of him, based on hundreds of hours of taped interviews with Wolfe. One of these days I hope that his appearance on The Dick Cavett Show (in 1973) shows up on Youtube.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on January 23, 2015, 06:42:45 AM
2Wild-Honey: you speak the truth; when I had read my favorite goosebumps - that is, "Scarecrow walks at midnight", "The mystery of abominable snowman" - & later typed in the same on imdb, discovered there are actually episodes made of these stories! I thought wow, cool, let's check it out. ...only to be disenchanted, here & now. I was like, "What is this fabrication?? Are you kidding me, crew guys?" Everything was incredibly boring, the cast was miscast, more like it. Wherein my imagined stories while I followed the adventures in the book - it was perfect! But there are exceptions, f.ex. "Coraline". The book was OK, but the cartoon, the dark vibe, animation - nothing was over-the-top & it was quaint, in a good way One of the best cartoons I ever seen, def. I mean the eyes-buttons!!! :3d

2rn57: that's great! I didn't read his 'serious' non-Wolfe stuff. Do you mind recommend me one of these? I would love to read his biography, he seems quite an interesting figure in literature. Maybe not classic 'uni' author, but still. And wow, he made an appearance on the DC show, in 1 9 7 3? That's sth.; I always found interesting seeing people from another century, albeit born at the end, in another time frame/modern society. I once saw a vid on Youtube of Lillian Gish - an actress who started in silent fillms - being interviewed as late as 80s, forget the year. Unforgettable.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rn57 on January 29, 2015, 02:30:13 PM
2Wild-Honey: you speak the truth; when I had read my favorite goosebumps - that is, "Scarecrow walks at midnight", "The mystery of abominable snowman" - & later typed in the same on imdb, discovered there are actually episodes made of these stories! I thought wow, cool, let's check it out. ...only to be disenchanted, here & now. I was like, "What is this fabrication?? Are you kidding me, crew guys?" Everything was incredibly boring, the cast was miscast, more like it. Wherein my imagined stories while I followed the adventures in the book - it was perfect! But there are exceptions, f.ex. "Coraline". The book was OK, but the cartoon, the dark vibe, animation - nothing was over-the-top & it was quaint, in a good way One of the best cartoons I ever seen, def. I mean the eyes-buttons!!! :3d

2rn57: that's great! I didn't read his 'serious' non-Wolfe stuff. Do you mind recommend me one of these? I would love to read his biography, he seems quite an interesting figure in literature. Maybe not classic 'uni' author, but still. And wow, he made an appearance on the DC show, in 1 9 7 3? That's sth.; I always found interesting seeing people from another century, albeit born at the end, in another time frame/modern society. I once saw a vid on Youtube of Lillian Gish - an actress who started in silent fillms - being interviewed as late as 80s, forget the year. Unforgettable.

Rex Stout's writing career can be divided in three parts. From 1912 until 1917 he published short stories and novelettes in magazines; these were in the style of the popular fiction of that time. He never allowed these writings to be republished in his lifetime after Nero Wolfe made him famous, but since his death they've been collected in several books which are pretty easy to find.  Or a lot of it can be read online, at this site:

http://fiction.eserver.org/short/stout/

In 1927, after he'd made money as a businessman over ten years, Stout moved to Paris to write serious fiction. He wrote four novels in this style up to 1934, all but one of them long out of print and very difficult to find.  The one that is pretty easily available is How Like A God, which was first published in 1929 - that is to say, secondhand copies of it can be found. Stout thought it was his best book that was not in the Nero Wolfe series so he allowed it to be reprinted a few times.

The Wolfe books started with Fer-De-Lance in 1934; the same year Stout published a thriller about the kidnapping of an American President, naturally called The President Vanishes, and he wrote several more thrillers and mysteries which did not feature Wolfe, up to 1941; after that his fiction was entirely about ol' Nero.



Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 18, 2015, 10:07:47 PM
Today, I finally finished one of the many books I've been reading.
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/5/58/FlowMyTearsThePolicemanSaid(1stEd).jpg/200px-FlowMyTearsThePolicemanSaid(1stEd).jpg)

Now to tackle the Picture of Dorian Gray.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on March 23, 2015, 02:06:09 PM
(http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1175704908l/547533.jpg)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on March 24, 2015, 04:18:36 AM
Now to tackle the Picture of Dorian Gray.

That's one of my favourite novels. What are your thoughts so far?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 24, 2015, 08:33:07 AM
Now to tackle the Picture of Dorian Gray.

That's one of my favourite novels. What are your thoughts so far?

That Oscar Wilde has an unbelievable wit. There are brilliant lines on every page of that book.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on March 25, 2015, 07:46:52 AM
Now to tackle the Picture of Dorian Gray.

That's one of my favourite novels. What are your thoughts so far?

That Oscar Wilde has an unbelievable wit. There are brilliant lines on every page of that book.

Absolutely. You can almost see him smirking to himself when he's writing it.

Currently, I'm re-reading Crime and Punishment which I read in high school and was the first novel that got me hooked on reading independently from school after the disaster that was Moby Dick (should probably return that one some day too). The first time around C&P took me 8 months to read, and what with my current obligations, it will probably take the same amount of time again. But now 90 pages in, I can say that it is still for me one of the most well-written stories I have encountered.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 25, 2015, 02:42:34 PM
Currently, I'm re-reading Crime and Punishment which I read in high school and was the first novel that got me hooked on reading independently from school after the disaster that was Moby Dick (should probably return that one some day too). The first time around C&P took me 8 months to read, and what with my current obligations, it will probably take the same amount of time again. But now 90 pages in, I can say that it is still for me one of the most well-written stories I have encountered.

Crime and Punishment was a book I read in high school as well. I got about about three quarters of the way through the whole thing in a few weeks and I've been stuck there for two or three years now. Still, I can confidently say it's one of my favorite books I've read. Never finished Moby Dick either...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MaryUSA on March 25, 2015, 03:04:50 PM
Hi all,

Today I read The Blackberry Pie Murder by Joanne Fluke.  It was a very good book.  Her books are known as light or cozy mysteries. 

Happy Reading!!!   :) 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Mikie on March 25, 2015, 03:21:38 PM
Hi all,

Last night I finally finished reading "The Mystery Of Cabin Island" by Franklin W. Dixon.   I can't wait to read the next Hardy Boys mystery story!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on March 25, 2015, 04:50:22 PM
Hi all,

Last night I finally finished reading "The Mystery Of Cabin Island" by Franklin W. Dixon.   I can't wait to read the next Hardy Boys mystery story!

They are good for all ages.

Crime and Punishment was a book I read in high school as well. I got about about three quarters of the way through the whole thing in a few weeks and I've been stuck there for two or three years now. Still, I can confidently say it's one of my favorite books I've read. Never finished Moby Dick either...

From what I can recall and from what I've read since, Crime and Punishment is definitely worth finishing. I hope I'm able to do it myself. Good luck!

I did finish Moby Dick but it was a slog and at the time I didn't feel it was worth it. Later, we read his short story Bartleby the Scrivener in school and I found that one equally difficult. However, I was quite young when I read it and now that I'm into all things Americana, I might appreciate Melville more. Thinking about the novel as being part of a continuum that includes people like William Carlos Williams, Chaplin, Faulkner, Robert Johnson, Ginsberg, Bob Dylan, and the Coen Brothers makes me want to re-evaluate. But who knows - maybe I'll still think it's a bore. I still recall reading those chapters of biology information with contempt and I was equally unimpressed by him consistently referring to the whale as a fish. But, hey, context is everything!


Title: Re: Books and more
Post by: hypehat on March 25, 2015, 06:10:16 PM
Myths are myths, to some extent!

Absolutely!


Quote
I began (but shelved out of laziness) an essay about myth in pop music. I really want to get back to it, but, well, I suck.

I'd like to hear more about that. I'm doing all this reading because of a course I'm teaching this term. I'm thinking of playing some pop songs in class, including Mrs. O'Leary's Cow and Heroes and Villains, as well as other songs by General Music Discussion bands.

To jump on this old point....

There are a lot of 'myths' in pop music - Elvis Presley springs to mind, and a few other rock and roll figures, but a nice way to look at the pop myth would be to look at rap music and the construction of the myth in how, for instance, the Wu-Tang Clan use the ancient or mystical to define themselves. Or Jay-Z's early albums in the context of the gangster movie, the notion of the hustler as a heroic figure.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 01, 2015, 12:33:40 AM
Rex Stout's writing career can be divided in three parts. From 1912 until 1917 he published short stories and novelettes in magazines; these were in the style of the popular fiction of that time. He never allowed these writings to be republished in his lifetime after Nero Wolfe made him famous, but since his death they've been collected in several books which are pretty easy to find.  Or a lot of it can be read online, at this site:

http://fiction.eserver.org/short/stout/

In 1927, after he'd made money as a businessman over ten years, Stout moved to Paris to write serious fiction. He wrote four novels in this style up to 1934, all but one of them long out of print and very difficult to find.  The one that is pretty easily available is How Like A God, which was first published in 1929 - that is to say, secondhand copies of it can be found. Stout thought it was his best book that was not in the Nero Wolfe series so he allowed it to be reprinted a few times.

The Wolfe books started with Fer-De-Lance in 1934; the same year Stout published a thriller about the kidnapping of an American President, naturally called The President Vanishes, and he wrote several more thrillers and mysteries which did not feature Wolfe, up to 1941; after that his fiction was entirely about ol' Nero.
Nice to meet a Stout connoiseur. Thanks for the link! now to locate the rest...

Re Dostoevsky, having read his stuff in orig., I would not say it was of any interest to me. Further on, I don't get any author that did well abroad - Nabokov, Bulgakov (silly story about dog sapiens; Master 'n' Margarita), Tolstoy, Turgenev. I usually stick to rare.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Mike Garneau on April 01, 2015, 01:55:52 PM
I just finished reading Face The Music: A Life Exposed by Paul Stanley of Kiss. Well, I've read all four member's books and this was the one I liked the least. Although very interesting in the beginning about his childhood and the early days of Wicked Lester and Kiss, his book was the nastiest when it came to trashing the other band members (yes, even worse than Gene Simmons' trash talk). And it got so incredibly boring towards the end that I was forcing myself to finish it (the stories about the lawyers and his marriage were just zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz....). I know there aren't too many Kiss fans here, and honestly I don't like anything they've done since the early 80s, and I agree that their musicianship is only so-so, but it's been interesting reading each member's books. Ace Frehley's was the best, Peter Criss' was the second best and Gene's after Peter's. Paul's last).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Bean Bag on April 01, 2015, 09:00:40 PM
I spent a little time today reading the "The What Are You Reading? Thread" on the Smiley Smile forum.  Before that, the last thing I read was the front of a Cheerios box.

Fck it.  I only looked at the pictures.  "Strawberries in my Cheerios," I thought.  "Good idea!"

And wouldn't you know it -- the picture was right!

As for what I read about Cheerios being "good for my heart" -- I thought, "how will I ever know?"  People can say anything.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on April 02, 2015, 03:18:12 AM
I spent a little time today reading the "The What Are You Reading? Thread" on the Smiley Smile forum.  Before that, the last thing I read was the front of a Cheerios box.

Fck it.  I only looked at the pictures.  "Strawberries in my Cheerios," I thought.  "Good idea!"

And wouldn't you know it -- the picture was right!

As for what I read about Cheerios being "good for my heart" -- I thought, "how will I ever know?"  People can say anything.
:lol   Nothing like a Bean Bag post to brighten one's morning.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 02, 2015, 05:15:57 AM
Nothing to read for now, but my old favorite used to be a comic series about "Duck Tales". I liked the stories that didn't make the final cut. Alongside, I was reading a Theory of Chaos. I literally ate it; there was this description about a water drop in the sink falling not inconsistently, but having its own pattern & 'schedule'. That was mind-boggling for my 13-year-old self.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Slow In Brain on April 03, 2015, 03:17:09 AM
Last two books that I have read were by David Yallop


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MaryUSA on April 03, 2015, 11:07:22 AM
Hi all,

Today I am reading Love In Blolom by Sheila Roberts. 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: halblaineisgood on April 07, 2015, 06:45:20 PM
Got the Robert Christgau memoir from the library.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Moon Dawg on April 09, 2015, 04:49:44 PM
THE INVISIBLE BRIDGE  Rick Perlstein


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Moon Dawg on April 09, 2015, 04:50:17 PM
Got the Robert Christgau memoir from the library.


 Any good?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: halblaineisgood on April 13, 2015, 08:54:17 PM
Meh. 'Bout half way throughgonna just browse the rest for explicit sexual anecdotes and call it a day .


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on April 15, 2015, 07:59:33 AM
This:

http://fridaynightboys300.blogspot.co.uk/2012/08/raymond-chandler-life.html


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 15, 2015, 03:23:35 PM
Some Bukowski stories. I don't much like Bukowski. Also a book about archaeological evidence as it relates to Judeo-Christian scriptures' accounts of history. Could some version of the exodus have happened (spoiler alert: no), and if so, when. That kind of stuff.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 02, 2015, 02:49:15 AM
(http://www.bookriver.ru/img/covers/99985.jpg) tr.: City Dwellers of the Sun. I grabbed it as a giveaway action held by the local library. A girl brought up by snowmen meets a gang of odd kids who must break the central clock in Moscow metro to prevent people of dying. There is plenty of sur, fantasy, adventure and violence. Its main target is children, but it has tough language, almost like "Master & Margarita". Some dialogs are straight philosophical. But it did won award for the Best Book'09   nomination "school literature".


Title: Books
Post by: MaryUSA on May 06, 2015, 02:25:15 PM
Hi all,

I am going to read a memior called Drunk Mom tomorrow.  Do any of you read romcne novels?  I am going to read a lot of romance over the summer.   


Title: Re: Books
Post by: Douchepool on May 06, 2015, 02:30:03 PM
Romance novels? You mean stuff like Fifty Shades of Grey?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MaryUSA on May 08, 2015, 02:44:50 PM
Hi all,

I include Fifty Shades of Grey in the list of romance books.  I haven't read it and don't intend to.  The rest of you may read it.  Tomorrow I will read a romance book by Maya Banks.  On Sunday I won't read any book due to 5.10 being Mother's Day.   


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on May 08, 2015, 03:55:08 PM
Hi all,

I include Fifty Shades of Grey in the list of romance books.  I haven't read it and don't intend to.  The rest of you may read it. 

No way. I'd rather listen to Kate Bush's 50 Words for Snow. :=)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Douchepool on May 08, 2015, 04:29:48 PM
I guess sarcasm really don't come across online...even when it's about Fifty Shades of Grey. :lol


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on May 26, 2015, 02:04:45 PM
I'm reading (and thoroughly enjoying) Ass's heroic transcription of Hamstring Hero et al.'s "wild one-word story".   


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on May 26, 2015, 03:07:21 PM
"The Fourth Revolution: The Global Race to Reinvent the State," by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge (both of The Economist).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 27, 2015, 12:29:09 AM
I'm reading (and thoroughly enjoying) Ass's heroic transcription of Hamstring Hero et al.'s "wild one-word story".   
I thought it was sheer poppycock myself. And btw, their names are Judd & Swedish Frog, if you don't recognize them. I have to tell you this so you know.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on May 27, 2015, 02:04:41 AM
I'm reading (and thoroughly enjoying) Ass's heroic transcription of Hamstring Hero et al.'s "wild one-word story".   
I thought it was sheer poppycock myself. And btw, their names are Judd & Swedish Frog, if you don't recognize them. I have to tell you this so you know.

Wasn't it Dudd? I do recognize them, but thanks anyway. Yes, it was poppycock----of the most superior kind.  ;D

I think it's good----and often hilarious. In fact I'm linking it to "my" MB, where we have our own (BB-related) multi-authored epic, salvaged from the Capitol Board when it all went pear-shaped over there.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Please delete my account on May 28, 2015, 12:23:24 AM
The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on May 28, 2015, 05:43:59 AM
"Why We Suck" by Dr. Denis Leary. 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 30, 2015, 11:02:05 PM
Wasn't it Dudd?
He's Judd. I went straight to his earlier posts & look what I found (note the Last Edit - by whom?): http://smileysmile.net/board/index.php/topic,26.msg348494.html#msg348494


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on June 13, 2015, 10:09:11 AM
"The Fourth Revolution: The Global Race to Reinvent the State," by John Micklethwait and Adrian Wooldridge (both of The Economist).

I recommend this to anyone interested in politics--not the day-to-day bullshit, but political philosophy.--regardless of your particular persuasion. It's a bit more classically liberal than I tend to be (not surprising, being by people associated with The Economist), but it's well thought out and informative, as well as persuasive at times. What I'd call its thesis statement may be this:

"[R]eformers need to embark on a grander project. The key to reviving the democratic spirit lies in reviving the spirit of limited government. The great problem of the West is not just that it has overloaded the state with obligations it cannot meet; it has overburdened democracy with expectations that cannot be fulfilled. This book has repeatedly demonstrated the truth of Plato's two great criticisms of democracy: that voters would put short-term satisfaction above long-term prudence and that politicians would try to bribe their way to power--as they have done by promising entitlements that future generations will have to pay for. A narrower state, especially one that constrained itself by various self-denying ordinances, would be a more sustainable one."

Don't let that fool you into thinking this is a libertarian tome, either. That's not the case. But it is full of interesting history, direct criticisms and praise for governments and parties around the world throughout modern history, and common sense ideas.

Best of all, it is presented coolly and rationally. That is important to me, as I tend to believe someone's intelligence seems to be inversely proportional to how many exclamation points or all-caps words s/he uses. The louder, the dumber.

Up next: "Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe," by Anne Applebaum. Then back into biblical criticism with mythicist Robert M. Price.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on June 14, 2015, 05:13:25 AM
This:  http://fridaynightboys300.blogspot.co.uk/2015/06/the-art-of-noir-by-eddie-muller-review.html

Full of superb artwork.



Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on June 27, 2015, 07:05:24 AM
I had yesterday off and wandered into a used bookstore. Hopefully I keep up the discipline to work through what I picked up.

Currently reading: aforementioned "Iron Curtain" and "Inerrant the Wind;" then the new "James, the Brother of Jesus," (a secular book of biblical criticism--not a religious study) by Robert Eisenman; and the novel "Then We Came to the End" by Joshua Ferris.

Then I also picked up some Gunter Grass, Hans Fallada, Ivan Goncharov's mid-19th century novel "Oblomov," whom and which I'd never heard of but liked the looks of, and "Policy Paradox: the Art of Political Decision Making," by Deborah Stone.

That should keep me busy this summer.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on July 27, 2015, 04:45:22 AM
"What are you reading?" The Graveyard School series, author: Tom B. Stone. Current favorite - "Abominable Snow Monster". Back in school, I used to read horror fiction, going to library to pick what's available at once so nobody else gets to read them (rest assured, lotta teens liked scary tales). Wouldn't give them back for very long. That's me. Anyway, was nice to now find the whole series online. Maybe someday I'll download it. Just in case.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on July 27, 2015, 09:01:12 AM
I had yesterday off and wandered into a used bookstore. Hopefully I keep up the discipline to work through what I picked up.

 the novel "Then We Came to the End" by Joshua Ferris.


It's a great book. Very funny and quite touching in places.

I recently finished Wizard of the Crow by Ngugi wa Thiong'o (possible Nobel laureate), a satire (or accurate depiction?) or Kenyan/African politics, which was superb, and i'm currently reading Mo Yan's Red Sorghum, set in 1930s China, a small village at war with the Japanese. I'll watch the film once i've finished the book.

And i've got Alan Moore's Watchmen lined up next on the bedside table.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on July 29, 2015, 03:27:04 AM
I'm reading new edition of comics "Calvin & Hobbes". It supersedes "Garfield" in my eyes.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Ovi on July 29, 2015, 10:41:58 AM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on July 29, 2015, 10:45:53 AM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

I'm not really sure if that's a joke or not! If so, it's a good one.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Ovi on July 29, 2015, 02:52:51 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

I'm not really sure if that's a joke or not! If so, it's a good one.

It isn't, but I didn't mean to sound arrogant either if that's how you read it. I'll write more thoughts when I finish the book, I'd like to read your thoughts on it meanwhile though.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on July 29, 2015, 03:11:25 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on July 29, 2015, 03:30:06 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

I'm not really sure if that's a joke or not! If so, it's a good one.

It isn't, but I didn't mean to sound arrogant either if that's how you read it. I'll write more thoughts when I finish the book, I'd like to read your thoughts on it meanwhile though.

I haven't actually read The Castle -- I've read The Trial, Metamorphosis, and a few other short stories.

Your comment didn't sound arrogant at all -- it's a completely understandable reaction to reading Kafka. I thought it might be a joke because Kafka always puts his characters into situations that they don't and will never fully understand. There's always something inexplicable. Kafka deprives his readers of this knowledge too. When someone uses the phrase "Kafkaeseque" that tends to be what they mean.

I have the book on my shelf and can't wait to get to it. Let me know your thoughts when you are done.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on July 29, 2015, 03:30:45 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.

This, in my opinion, is one of the greatest novels ever written. Top 5, at least, for me. Would like to hear your thoughts on it.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on August 10, 2015, 03:06:41 PM
Finished Red Sorghum, by Mo Yan. Very violent in places, but enjoyable and not overly long (330 pages).

I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.

I'm currently reading China Mieville's Kraken. A supernatural tale set in London about a cult kidnapping a giant squid from the Natural History Museum. Anyone else read any Mieville?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on August 22, 2015, 12:46:42 PM
(http://www.chitai-gorod.ru/upload/iblock/3ad/3ad0fcccb41c2a29de04aed6cff9040e.jpg)Transl: Irreplaceable way to fight off boredom anytime any place! International CLUB OF ERUDITES ... . 366 quizes for every day ... . Pt. 1 Bought it yrs ago, then it cost 55 roubles.
Besides, I got to finally read "Shogun" by James Clavell. Well what to say? I liked it. . .just as I did the mini-series with Richard Chamberlain (rmbr this long-forgotten actor?). It used to be my favorite show as a child, me & my grandma would watch it together (I equally liked "Perry Mason" but never read the book(s). some day).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on August 25, 2015, 02:09:49 PM
I saw the Shogun TV series and enjoyed it ("Fare thee well to the Barbary Merchants…"), and I have the book on my shelf but haven't gotten around to reading it yet.

I finished China Mieville's Kraken. A hugely imaginative, and very well written, science fiction novel, expanding on the Cthulhu myth and Tennyson's 'Kraken' sonnet.

I'm now reading Art Spiegelman's graphic novel Maus.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on August 26, 2015, 02:43:14 AM
(https://ia801405.us.archive.org/zipview.php?zip=/32/items/olcovers660/olcovers660-L.zip&file=6605116-L.jpg)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Alan Smith on August 26, 2015, 02:55:45 AM

I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.


If you enjoyed that, check out the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volumes (including "The Black Dossier").  It's set in the broader world of fiction - ie, Moore and artist Kevin O'Neil borrow/steal as many fictional characters as possible (from various genres and mediums), in some cases as main characters, in other cases to pad out the background - and the greatest superhero ever appears in the Century series (no spoilers here).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Fire Wind on August 26, 2015, 07:47:03 AM
Recently finished Judge Dredd: America.  Now I'm starting on the Case Files, beginning with no. 4.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on August 27, 2015, 08:49:01 AM

I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.


If you enjoyed that, check out the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volumes (including "The Black Dossier").  It's set in the broader world of fiction - ie, Moore and artist Kevin O'Neil borrow/steal as many fictional characters as possible (from various genres and mediums), in some cases as main characters, in other cases to pad out the background - and the greatest superhero ever appears in the Century series (no spoilers here).


Thanks for the tip, Alan. I had my eye on From Hell too, and I'd be curious to know what AGD thinks of it, if he's read it, being a Ripper scholar. I can imagine, as Alan Moore takes a couple of liberties with his speculation (though apparently it is meticulously researched), that it wouldn't be to Andrew's taste, but, as Al sez, "strange things happen"! :)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on September 03, 2015, 02:20:18 AM
Maus is a powerful and moving book, and highly skilled artistically. Recommended for anyone looking to see how far the "comics" medium can be stretched, to see what comics can do that novels and movies can't.

I'm diving right into MetaMaus, and it's fascinating to hear Spiegelman discuss the artistic process and see rough drafts.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Ovi on September 03, 2015, 04:18:32 AM
William S. Burroughs's Junky.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on September 03, 2015, 05:14:56 AM
William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Ovi on September 08, 2015, 06:59:39 AM
William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?

Nope, nor have I read anything else by Burroughs. But I do enjoy this a whole lot at the moment.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on September 08, 2015, 09:49:37 AM
William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?

Nope, nor have I read anything else by Burroughs. But I do enjoy this a whole lot at the moment.

I wholly recommend On the Road by Jack Kerouac, as the pinnacle of the Beat movement and writing style. It has an overbearing reputation, but it's a tremendous work. More than the stereotypes usually associated with the book (though it is also hugely fun), it is tender and melancholy at its heart, in a similar way to Junky. A lot of great Beat literature balances this extrovert/introvert aspect. Also maybe check out The Subterraneans and Tristessa by Kerouac. Burroughs actually features as a character in all 3, but most heavily in Tristessa.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Ovi on September 08, 2015, 10:04:50 AM
William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?

Nope, nor have I read anything else by Burroughs. But I do enjoy this a whole lot at the moment.

I wholly recommend On the Road by Jack Kerouac, as the pinnacle of the Beat movement and writing style. It has an overbearing reputation, but it's a tremendous work. More than the stereotypes usually associated with the book (though it is also hugely fun), it is tender and melancholy at its heart, in a similar way to Junky. A lot of great Beat literature balances this extrovert/introvert aspect. Also maybe check out The Subterraneans and Tristessa by Kerouac. Burroughs actually features as a character in all 3, but most heavily in Tristessa.

Thanks for the description. What other good Beat writers are there?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Andrew G. Doe on September 09, 2015, 03:38:24 AM

I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.


If you enjoyed that, check out the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volumes (including "The Black Dossier").  It's set in the broader world of fiction - ie, Moore and artist Kevin O'Neil borrow/steal as many fictional characters as possible (from various genres and mediums), in some cases as main characters, in other cases to pad out the background - and the greatest superhero ever appears in the Century series (no spoilers here).


Thanks for the tip, Alan. I had my eye on From Hell too, and I'd be curious to know what AGD thinks of it, if he's read it, being a Ripper scholar. I can imagine, as Alan Moore takes a couple of liberties with his speculation (though apparently it is meticulously researched), that it wouldn't be to Andrew's taste, but, as Al sez, "strange things happen"! :)

Can't help you, Sundance. I read very, very little fiction, and no Ripper fiction at all. The truth is fascinating enough...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on September 09, 2015, 05:22:48 AM
William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?

Nope, nor have I read anything else by Burroughs. But I do enjoy this a whole lot at the moment.

I wholly recommend On the Road by Jack Kerouac, as the pinnacle of the Beat movement and writing style. It has an overbearing reputation, but it's a tremendous work. More than the stereotypes usually associated with the book (though it is also hugely fun), it is tender and melancholy at its heart, in a similar way to Junky. A lot of great Beat literature balances this extrovert/introvert aspect. Also maybe check out The Subterraneans and Tristessa by Kerouac. Burroughs actually features as a character in all 3, but most heavily in Tristessa.

Thanks for the description. What other good Beat writers are there?

I like Kerouac the best. John Clellon Holmes wrote the first published Beat novel, Go, which is good. Neal Cassady's partial autobiography, The First Third. For Ginsberg's poetry, only Howl is essential. You can also find online audio recordings of him reading it. Unlike most writers, he is a superb reader of his own work. Actually, check out Kerouac's audio stuff too. he recorded a couple of LPs with 2 jazz saxophonists (Al Cohn and Zoot Sims). Memoirs by Joyce Johnson and Carolyn Cassady are great reading too. Ann Charters compiled a good compendium Beat Down to Your Soul, which collects stuff from a whole bunch of other poeple like LeRoy Jones (aka Amiri Baraka).

For Kerouac, i'd also recommend Dharma Bums, the second half of Desolation Angels, Big Sur.

The Beat writers kind of morphed into 60s writers like Leonard Cohen and Michael McClure, but mileage may vary with the later writers.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: undercover-m on September 14, 2015, 09:15:04 AM
I'm reading new edition of comics "Calvin & Hobbes". It supersedes "Garfield" in my eyes.
Oh, that was my childhood. I could read Calvin & Hobbes all day.  ^-^

Reading The Brothers Karamazov... only a little bit into the 700 pages I have to read  :-[
I've read Crime and Punishment before so I guess I kinda know what I'm getting into.
I just love love love how Dostoevsky describes his characters. It really makes you love (or hate) them.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on September 24, 2015, 09:47:48 PM
Yes, I like reading children's stuff. Here in Russia, there is a bottle of water that says "made specifically for kids". Stupid, isn't it? Like what's the diff.? Same for books labelled "for kids". I also like watching cartoons, my favorite cartoon series - "Heathcliff", "Growing up Creepie" Check em out, all fans of cartoons (reading this board for some time, thorough observation shows there are many).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Mike Garneau on October 04, 2015, 04:13:20 PM
Alice Cooper, Golf Monster


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on October 09, 2015, 12:23:17 AM
Glad to see you again, Mr. Garneau. I read the Golf thread where you said Alice was an avid golf gamer. I think it matches his image.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 09, 2015, 03:08:41 AM
I'm browsing backwards* through Philip Lambert's book Inside the Music of Brian Wilson to see if he says anything about unusual metrical behaviour in BB songs. Nothing so far----harmony seems to be his bag. 

* I'm left-handed. Backwards is easier.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on October 11, 2015, 09:48:11 PM
Pet Sematary by Stephen King. 

I've actually never read the book. 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Andrew G. Doe on October 13, 2015, 01:27:51 AM
The new Bill Bryson opus - The Road to Little Dribbling, sort of a Notes from a Small Island redux. So far, as wonderful as expected.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on October 14, 2015, 07:31:18 PM
A Human Being Died That Night by Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela. It's an incredibly profound book about evil and forgiveness that I'm rereading. But since it's stressful, I'm also intermittently reading
The Town by Faulkner and Becoming the Beach Boys by Murphy.
Nice thread!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Peter Reum on October 15, 2015, 12:19:53 AM
A bio of J. Robert Oppenheimer and Oppenheimer 's own book The Open Mind.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on October 29, 2015, 12:29:52 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.

This, in my opinion, is one of the greatest novels ever written. Top 5, at least, for me. Would like to hear your thoughts on it.

Okay, finally got around to finishing it. I sure read a great deal less when I'm around a computer.
Anyway, I'm still not really sure what to think. I feel like I'm missing so many important details.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on October 29, 2015, 02:12:13 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.

This, in my opinion, is one of the greatest novels ever written. Top 5, at least, for me. Would like to hear your thoughts on it.

Okay, finally got around to finishing it. I sure read a great deal less when I'm around a computer.
Anyway, I'm still not really sure what to think. I feel like I'm missing so many important details.

Totally understandable. It's been about five years since I read it but I'd be happy to talk about it!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on October 29, 2015, 03:32:00 PM
I sure read a great deal less when I'm around a computer.

I have that experience, too. On vacation if I'm more or less off the grid, or even just in the mood and inertia keeps me offline, I can plow through books and books. But often I waste my time, well, like right now, fucking around online, doing nothing. Read two pages, get distracted, make a few plays on Words With Friends, check this or that... I've been reading one book--which I am loving--since summer. Granted, it's a thousand pages or so, and dense, academic stuff. And granted, I've read other books and stories in the interim. But even so. Three, four, five months?

For what it's worth on Kafka, I've forgotten almost all I've ever read, including The Castle. I was going to grab it and realized I sold all my Kafka (except The Trial in one of my many attempts to clear out shelves of books I'd likely never read again. The term Kafkaesque seems to have more power with me, just as an idea, than the works of the guy himself.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Alan Smith on October 30, 2015, 12:03:55 AM

I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.


If you enjoyed that, check out the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volumes (including "The Black Dossier").  It's set in the broader world of fiction - ie, Moore and artist Kevin O'Neil borrow/steal as many fictional characters as possible (from various genres and mediums), in some cases as main characters, in other cases to pad out the background - and the greatest superhero ever appears in the Century series (no spoilers here).


Thanks for the tip, Alan. I had my eye on From Hell too, and I'd be curious to know what AGD thinks of it, if he's read it, being a Ripper scholar. I can imagine, as Alan Moore takes a couple of liberties with his speculation (though apparently it is meticulously researched), that it wouldn't be to Andrew's taste, but, as Al sez, "strange things happen"! :)

Can't help you, Sundance. I read very, very little fiction, and no Ripper fiction at all. The truth is fascinating enough...
I see Bruce Robinson (writer/director of Withnail & I, amongst other things) has plonked out a true crime ripper book that is bold enough to put forth a name.  Anyone checked it out?

On topic, I've just finished off Adrian Mole: The Capaccino Years which I put down to read The Beatles:Tune which I put down after chapter 2 to start a Dylan bio which I put down after the foreword to read Becoming the BB's.

Of slight coincidence, my wife is teaching Kafka at the moment and wants me to read up so we can discuss it or something.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: bonnie bella on October 30, 2015, 12:34:09 PM
Just finished the John Cleese autobiography, which was excellent.  Now reading the Richard Gordon 'Doctor in the House' series.  Very funny, although I wonder now where James Herriot got his inspiration.

ADG, hearing Bill Bryson has a new book out is great, I'll be getting my hands on that asap.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MaryUSA on October 30, 2015, 01:18:59 PM
Hi all,

Today I read Rouge Lawyer by John Grisham.
Tomorrow I will read Seeds of Yesterday by V. C. Andrews.



Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on November 03, 2015, 09:49:21 PM
It is now my goal to finish Crime and Punishment.


**The rest of this message is going to be about story stuff for The Sound and the Fury, so if you're going to read that book, you probably shouldn't read this message.**

Totally understandable. It's been about five years since I read it but I'd be happy to talk about it!

Okay, so here's some questions:

1. What's the significance of the graveyard at the end? Why is one side okay but not the other? Is Caddy buried there?

2. Did Benji have his name changed from something else? I feel like I remember reading something about him having a different name, but they also had an uncle named Benji and something happened, so they changed Benji's name to... well, Benjamin. The exact details are fuzzy, but I'm sure I remember reading Caddy telling him his new name is Benjamin.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on November 03, 2015, 10:46:15 PM
It is now my goal to finish Crime and Punishment.


**The rest of this message is going to be about story stuff for The Sound and the Fury, so if you're going to read that book, you probably shouldn't read this message.**

Totally understandable. It's been about five years since I read it but I'd be happy to talk about it!

Okay, so here's some questions:

1. What's the significance of the graveyard at the end? Why is one side okay but not the other? Is Caddy buried there?

2. Did Benji have his name changed from something else? I feel like I remember reading something about him having a different name, but they also had an uncle named Benji and something happened, so they changed Benji's name to... well, Benjamin. The exact details are fuzzy, but I'm sure I remember reading Caddy telling him his new name is Benjamin.
Hi Bubbly. I hope you don't mind if I jump in. I'm a big Faulkner fan. The Sound and the Fury is very confusing the first few reads.
1. I think the graveyard overall just represents loss and the decline of the Compsons and what they represented. What's actually happening at the end is not to do with the wrong side of the graveyard but the wrong side of the memorial in the square. They are driving around it in the wrong direction and it's freaking Benjamin out. Also, Caddy's not dead; just banished.
2. Benjamin's name was originally Maury, after their uncle. But once the parents learned that Benjamin was handicapped they changed his name because they considered it insulting to Maury to have a handicapped child named after him.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on November 10, 2015, 04:02:43 PM
This weekend, I started reading "Stoner," by John Williams. I had come across an article discussing it as a somewhat neglected classic that is having a resurgence. I'm enjoying it so far. Always nice to have a pleasant surprise come out of nowhere.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Mike Garneau on November 17, 2015, 05:52:16 PM
"Ripper" which is about some terrible murders that happened in my hometown of Woonsocket Rhode Island. Includes the serial killer's (very) shocking confessions. The street I live on is even mentioned in the book. Scary sh*t.....


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on November 17, 2015, 07:22:59 PM
"Ripper" which is about some terrible murders that happened in my hometown of Woonsocket Rhode Island. Includes the serial killer's (very) shocking confessions. The street I live on is even mentioned in the book. Scary sh*t.....
Hi Woonsocket! I'm homesick for New England!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on November 20, 2015, 12:16:29 AM
Book shop is my favorite type of shop. was today to grab sth. then I see "Keri Smith How to Be an Explorer of the World"- it was written in funny typeface so I read the annotation & liked it! Too bad it's too expensive. someday I'll get it. I already hid it behind the various other books in the shelf. usually works. We'll see.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Ovi on November 20, 2015, 02:56:22 AM
William S. Burroughs's Junky.

Queer now.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on November 20, 2015, 07:16:27 AM
Book shop is my favorite type of shop. was today to grab sth. then I see "Keri Smith How to Be an Explorer of the World"- it was written in funny typeface so I read the annotation & liked it! Too bad it's too expensive. someday I'll get it. I already hid it behind the various other books in the shelf. usually works. We'll see.
I wish we still had book shops.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on November 20, 2015, 07:24:25 AM
I'm behind on books. 

I just started reading The Blind Side, by Michael Lewis. 

I still have yet to see the movie.  But I picked up the book at a school carnival this summer.  Since I'm a Ravens fan, and have met Michael Oher a couple times, I figured it makes sense for me to finally read this book.

Then, I'll watch the movie.

Then, I can read Michael Oher's book, a signed copy of which has been sitting on my shelf for about 4-5 years. 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on November 20, 2015, 07:46:23 AM
I'm behind on books.  ...  has been sitting on my shelf for about 4-5 years. 

Glad I'm not the only one with that problem. The booty from my past couple of trips to the bookstore are still sitting in stacks on a table, on a shelf. I mean to read them all immediately ... I just don't.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on November 20, 2015, 07:54:40 AM
I'm behind on books.  ...  has been sitting on my shelf for about 4-5 years.  

Glad I'm not the only one with that problem. The booty from my past couple of trips to the bookstore are still sitting in stacks on a table, on a shelf. I mean to read them all immediately ... I just don't.

Everytime I get close to being caught up, I wind up getting more books.  


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on November 20, 2015, 08:11:51 AM
I'm behind on books.  ...  has been sitting on my shelf for about 4-5 years. 

Glad I'm not the only one with that problem. The booty from my past couple of trips to the bookstore are still sitting in stacks on a table, on a shelf. I mean to read them all immediately ... I just don't.
You have bookstores too? What magical planet do you all live on? Where I live it's only Barnes and Noble with the same limited best seller-pop books and read-them-already classics. I used to spend hours daily browsing bookstores, but they're all gone! The only place I've been lately with decent bookshops is New Orleans.
Even Cambridge is lacking.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on November 20, 2015, 08:16:33 AM
I'm behind on books.  ...  has been sitting on my shelf for about 4-5 years. 

Glad I'm not the only one with that problem. The booty from my past couple of trips to the bookstore are still sitting in stacks on a table, on a shelf. I mean to read them all immediately ... I just don't.
You have bookstores too? What magical planet do you all live on? Where I live it's only Barnes and Noble with the same limited best seller-pop books and read-them-already classics. I used to spend hours daily browsing bookstores, but they're all gone! The only place I've been lately with decent bookshops is New Orleans.
Even Cambridge is lacking.

Here in the Baltimore area, we have a nice used bookshop called Ukazoo.  We also have a big bookstore called Greetings and Readings which sells books as well as gifts, apparel, and greeting cards. 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on November 20, 2015, 08:24:29 AM
I'm behind on books.  ...  has been sitting on my shelf for about 4-5 years. 

Glad I'm not the only one with that problem. The booty from my past couple of trips to the bookstore are still sitting in stacks on a table, on a shelf. I mean to read them all immediately ... I just don't.
You have bookstores too? What magical planet do you all live on? Where I live it's only Barnes and Noble with the same limited best seller-pop books and read-them-already classics. I used to spend hours daily browsing bookstores, but they're all gone! The only place I've been lately with decent bookshops is New Orleans.
Even Cambridge is lacking.

Here in the Baltimore area, we have a nice used bookshop called Ukazoo.  We also have a big bookstore called Greetings and Readings which sells books as well as gifts, apparel, and greeting cards. 
Soooo jealous. Browsing online is just not the same.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on November 20, 2015, 08:28:56 AM
I'm behind on books.  ...  has been sitting on my shelf for about 4-5 years. 

Glad I'm not the only one with that problem. The booty from my past couple of trips to the bookstore are still sitting in stacks on a table, on a shelf. I mean to read them all immediately ... I just don't.
You have bookstores too? What magical planet do you all live on? Where I live it's only Barnes and Noble with the same limited best seller-pop books and read-them-already classics. I used to spend hours daily browsing bookstores, but they're all gone! The only place I've been lately with decent bookshops is New Orleans.
Even Cambridge is lacking.

Here in the Baltimore area, we have a nice used bookshop called Ukazoo.  We also have a big bookstore called Greetings and Readings which sells books as well as gifts, apparel, and greeting cards. 
Soooo jealous. Browsing online is just not the same.

Very true.  I feel the same way about CDs.  We still have some for real record stores here. 

Although I will admit, when I do browse for books at a bookshop or record store, it's usually to get ideas for my Amazon Wish List. 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on November 21, 2015, 03:28:38 PM
This weekend, I started reading "Stoner," by John Williams. I had come across an article discussing it as a somewhat neglected classic that is having a resurgence. I'm enjoying it so far. Always nice to have a pleasant surprise come out of nowhere.

Just finished this. Loved it. Highly recommended as a beautiful, easily digestible novel.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on December 07, 2015, 10:36:29 PM
Notified of the free e-book download by NoiseTrade - "Surviving Christmas" by Anne Marie Miller. We'll see. Not bad, a bit too religious but the girl is cool in my book. :3d


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on December 17, 2015, 09:24:49 PM
I get lots of notifications from NoiseTrade. I can't catch up with downloading free e-Books (though there is an option to submit $1 or 2. No thanks. :police: ). Help!  :P


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on January 07, 2016, 11:34:25 PM
After binging on Chandler over the last few months (and especially enjoying The Long Goodbye, which seems to have some Brian Wilson resoance), I'm re-reading some Ross Macdonald, starting with The Underground Man: http://fridaynightboys300.blogspot.co.uk/2016/01/ross-mcdonald-underground-man.html


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on January 08, 2016, 07:34:36 AM
Calling for recommendations. I'm in a drought at the moment. I started reading Upton Sinclair's "The Millenium" and Gunter Grass's "The Tin Drum," and haven't advanced beyond the first couple dozen pages of either. At least at the moment, neither is keeping my attention or interest.

So, anyone have any tips for a good novel or two? My favorite writers are Knut Hamsun, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Richard Ford, Albert Camus. I've enjoyed Jhumpa Lahiri, Philip Roth, FS Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Vlad Nabokov, Leo Tolstoy, Raymond Carver, Saul Bellow, Stephen Dixon, JP Sartre, John Cheever, Arthur Phillips, JM Coetzee.

Anybody got any ideas?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on January 08, 2016, 09:24:43 AM
Try Glen David Gold's Sunnyside.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on January 10, 2016, 09:53:11 AM
Thanks for the tip. I sold a dozen or so books and, while there, looked around for your suggestion, but it wasn't in stock. I'll keep an eye out, though.

I picked up I.B. Singer's "In My Father's Court," (while I had the second volume, I never had this one), Oleg Pavlov's "The Matiushin Case," and Sarah Hall's "The Beautiful Indifference."


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on January 24, 2016, 09:30:11 PM
James Hadley Chase - Strictly for Cash. Didn't finish the reading but it's interesting & adventurous.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on January 25, 2016, 06:50:47 AM
(https://ia801405.us.archive.org/zipview.php?zip=/32/items/olcovers660/olcovers660-L.zip&file=6605116-L.jpg)

Still reading this (I'm a slow reader). I hope to finish it soon.  :hat 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on February 01, 2016, 10:52:19 PM
Clotilde Landais "Stephen King As A Postmodern Author" (2012). I'm at page 60 & I like it. Interesting theories wrt "fictitious writer and doppelganger" during discussion of "The Dark Half" & "Secret Window, Secret Garden". I didn't read the books but watched the films. This is must-read for Stephen King fans.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: halblaineisgood on February 21, 2016, 10:00:35 PM
Eternal Troubadour: The Improbable Life Of Tiny Tim
(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41EErJA09nL._SX349_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)



Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on February 22, 2016, 09:48:58 AM
http://fridaynightboys300.blogspot.co.uk/2012/09/michael-chabon-telegraph-avenue.html

This, after owning it for four years. Sometimes life gets in the way.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on February 24, 2016, 11:06:47 PM
Alfred Hitchcock "Collection of short stories" (in Russian)
Agatha Christie "Miss Marple" (my favorite detective :3d)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on February 24, 2016, 11:09:32 PM
Apparently, he wasn't so tiny...  >:D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on February 25, 2016, 05:57:25 AM
Robert Lawrence Stine "Scarecrow walks at midnight". My favorite re-read in his "Goosebumps" series.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on February 25, 2016, 07:49:00 AM
Who cares about height?
::)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on February 25, 2016, 08:55:15 AM
Duck Tales comics. :3d


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on February 25, 2016, 09:58:09 AM
Calling for recommendations. I'm in a drought at the moment. I started reading Upton Sinclair's "The Millenium" and Gunter Grass's "The Tin Drum," and haven't advanced beyond the first couple dozen pages of either. At least at the moment, neither is keeping my attention or interest.

So, anyone have any tips for a good novel or two? My favorite writers are Knut Hamsun, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Richard Ford, Albert Camus. I've enjoyed Jhumpa Lahiri, Philip Roth, FS Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Vlad Nabokov, Leo Tolstoy, Raymond Carver, Saul Bellow, Stephen Dixon, JP Sartre, John Cheever, Arthur Phillips, JM Coetzee.

Anybody got any ideas?
Based on your Russian lit. enjoyment, I'd recommend Nikolai Gogol.
Based on the international aspect of your list, I'd recommend Kawabata for a start with Japanese literature or Naguib Mahfouz for Egyptian.
If you want further South African reading, you could try Nadine Gordimer or, if you like reading plays, Athol Fugard.
If you like literary criticism, Axels Castle by Edmund Wilson contains a great discussion of the movement that produced Fitzgerald and Hemingway and will lead you to several other interesting writers.
Based on your list I think you may enjoy Emile Zola or Guy de Maupassant.
My favorite Roth novels are the Zuckerman books. My favorite Nabokov is Pnin.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: 1-1-wonderful on February 25, 2016, 10:09:00 AM
The Master and Margarita by Bulgakov if not already mentioned.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on February 25, 2016, 10:10:33 AM
I asked about interesting info on musician's biography.  trivia about music. your "tiny" comment didn't seem to be about music. I'm not sure what the rolling eyes is for.

 :afro


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on February 26, 2016, 05:41:58 AM
And just what does his hairstyle have to do with it?!?!? Oh my god, my head is exploding.  ;D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on February 26, 2016, 05:50:01 AM
Emily and 1-1-wonderful, thanks for the suggestions. I've read several of them (Bulgakov, Gogol, and Wilson) but not several of the others. I've been reading Sarah Hall's short stories in The Beautiful Indifference but will look into some of those others.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: 1-1-wonderful on February 26, 2016, 06:38:44 AM
I recently read Time's Arrow and Zone of interest by Martin Amis

Both powerful takes on the Holocaust wildly divergent from one another or anything else


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 01, 2016, 06:46:50 PM
I bought these today. I plan to read them.
(http://d.gr-assets.com/books/1328753053l/23296.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/415xlCkOvxL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41WWKQmYmZL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on March 01, 2016, 07:15:27 PM
The Joyce and Kafka books are two of my favourites.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on March 01, 2016, 08:09:51 PM
I sense the metamorphosis will be right up Bubbly Waves' alley. Bubbly Waves, have you read any Ionesco?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 01, 2016, 08:15:11 PM
Bubbly Waves, have you read any Ionesco?

No, I don't think I've ever heard of him/her.
Why do you ask?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on March 01, 2016, 08:17:22 PM
Bubbly Waves, have you read any Ionesco?

No, I don't think I've ever heard of him/her.
Why do you ask?
He was a major proponent of the 'theater of the absurd' movement, of which your writings remind me.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 01, 2016, 08:53:18 PM
Bubbly Waves, have you read any Ionesco?

No, I don't think I've ever heard of him/her.
Why do you ask?
He was a major proponent of the 'theater of the absurd' movement, of which your writings remind me.

Interesting. I'll have to check him out.  :)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on March 02, 2016, 04:43:49 AM
Domain of Being/Ontology, by Celestine Bittle.

(http://www.amazon.com/Reality-Mind-Epistemology-Clestine-Bittle/dp/B000P1BECW#immersive-view_1456921374070)

I'm not sure my image link is going to work but if it does, it is just going to be a solid blue, hardback cover, not even for the book I'm reading but another in the same series which looks exactly the same except for the title on the spine.

What it is about:

In essence, virtually all of philosophy can be broken into two groups, realism and idealism.  Bittle is a moderate realist, as am I.  I am reading this book (and most of the series) because though I've read more than my fair share of philosophy throughout the years I have never systematically worked through my position, so I am attempting to do that now.  

Why it is important:

As at any given time in history we are being governed (whether externally or internally or both) by one of these two systems, in one way or another, and usually more ways than one, through academia, government, literature, news, etc, it seems good to familiarize oneself with both systems.  Yet I have found most people are unaware of either system, though examples can be multiplied of where these ideas overlap and directly influence our day to day lives.  Why then should one be governed unknowingly by these things rather than knowingly?  Perhaps one will find one prefers one system to the other and will take steps to align oneself accordingly.

EoL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on March 02, 2016, 05:05:10 AM
I'm not sure my image link is going to work but if it does, it is just going to be a solid blue, hardback cover, not even for the book I'm reading but another in the same series which looks exactly the same except for the title on the spine.

This one?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51-2GIBI8ZL._SL500_SX373_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on March 02, 2016, 05:24:08 AM
I'm not sure my image link is going to work but if it does, it is just going to be a solid blue, hardback cover, not even for the book I'm reading but another in the same series which looks exactly the same except for the title on the spine.

This one?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51-2GIBI8ZL._SL500_SX373_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

That is the one, or at least an instance of it.   :)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Unreconstructed Wilsonite on March 04, 2016, 06:22:22 PM
Cloudstreet by Tim Winton. Though it lacks a coherent structure, it's definitely a very interesting story that spans several decades in the lives of two families living in the same house.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 05, 2016, 03:56:56 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.

This, in my opinion, is one of the greatest novels ever written. Top 5, at least, for me. Would like to hear your thoughts on it.

Okay, finally got around to finishing it. I sure read a great deal less when I'm around a computer.
Anyway, I'm still not really sure what to think. I feel like I'm missing so many important details.

Wow, was anyone else aware of the entirely wretched-looking James Franco film adaptation of The Sound and the Fury? What the f*** is that guy doing


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on March 05, 2016, 04:01:53 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.

This, in my opinion, is one of the greatest novels ever written. Top 5, at least, for me. Would like to hear your thoughts on it.

Okay, finally got around to finishing it. I sure read a great deal less when I'm around a computer.
Anyway, I'm still not really sure what to think. I feel like I'm missing so many important details.

Wow, was anyone else aware of the entirely wretched-looking James Franco film adaptation of The Sound and the Fury? What the f*** is that guy doing
Was not aware. The idea makes me a little queasy.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 05, 2016, 04:09:09 PM
Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.

This, in my opinion, is one of the greatest novels ever written. Top 5, at least, for me. Would like to hear your thoughts on it.

Okay, finally got around to finishing it. I sure read a great deal less when I'm around a computer.
Anyway, I'm still not really sure what to think. I feel like I'm missing so many important details.

Wow, was anyone else aware of the entirely wretched-looking James Franco film adaptation of The Sound and the Fury? What the f*** is that guy doing
Was not aware. The idea makes me a little queasy.

Just wait 'til you see the trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qs6rYmlP2oM.
It all goes seriously downhill in a record-breaking 6 seconds.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on March 05, 2016, 05:00:34 PM
Excuse my language but sh*t. What's that face he's making?
I'm going to go throw up now.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 11, 2016, 08:47:49 PM
I've been reading a lot of Joyce lately. Stephen Dedalus' interactions with Eileen are so pained yet beautiful, and they're easily my favorite parts of this book (so far). The way he talks about her slender, pale fingers, or the episode at the rail station. I love it. Or the way he casts himself as Monte Cristo, gloomily replying, "Madame, I never eat Muscatel grapes," as he stands in her rose garden. Or the way it all topples over, and he finds himself stalking the streets of Dublin looking to find prostitutes. It's all gorgeous, romantic writing.

But now I find myself near the end. I've read about 40 pages of Stephen being an amateur philosopher and my head is spinning.

Also, reading the priest describe hell is probably the closest I've ever been to repenting for my sins.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: halblaineisgood on March 12, 2016, 09:36:47 PM
I wish I was reading the Norm Macdonald memoir. Supposed to be coming out sometime later this year.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on March 13, 2016, 06:26:10 AM
I've been reading a lot of Joyce lately. Stephen Dedalus' interactions with Eileen are so pained yet beautiful, and they're easily my favorite parts of this book (so far). The way he talks about her slender, pale fingers, or the episode at the rail station. I love it. Or the way he casts himself as Monte Cristo, gloomily replying, "Madame, I never eat Muscatel grapes," as he stands in her rose garden. Or the way it all topples over, and he finds himself stalking the streets of Dublin looking to find prostitutes. It's all gorgeous, romantic writing.

But now I find myself near the end. I've read about 40 pages of Stephen being an amateur philosopher and my head is spinning.

Also, reading the priest describe hell is probably the closest I've ever been to repenting for my sins.

I love this book. The angry political conversation around the table near the beginning of the book resonated quite a bit when I read it.

I agree with your point about it being gorgeous, romantic writing. The other day I picked up Ulysses and read about ten pages of it, not to really get into the story but to instead just briefly inhabit Joyce's world. I feel like the same is true with a writer like Faulkner who I believe you read before. You can just read a little bit and instantly know who the writer is.

Currently, I'm reading a great collection of Chekhov's short stories.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on March 13, 2016, 06:27:45 AM
I wish I was reading the Norm Macdonald memoir. Supposed to be coming out sometime later this year.

I hope it comes out! Norm is content to spend the bulk of his time doing stand-up but I'm sorry that he is unable to do movies or tv shows the way he'd like to do them. He's a brilliant comedian as far as I'm concerned.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 13, 2016, 03:14:04 PM
"I had never spoken to her, except for a few casual words, and yet her name was like a summons to all my foolish blood."

I love James Joyce.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on March 14, 2016, 02:59:19 PM
I've just been reading Bubs's hilarious "contribution" to Rocky's book. I'm still laughing. 

http://smileysmile.net/board/index.php/topic,23026.msg565599.html#msg565599


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on March 14, 2016, 03:11:45 PM
I haven't read any Joyce in almost 20 years. I'd read Dubliners. Loved it. Read Portrait. Loved it. Read a few hundred pages of Ulysses. [Time passes.] And then the same few hundred pages of Ulysses. [Almost 20 years pass.] As smart as I felt I must look riding the bus to and from work, arrogant young-20-something I was, I felt that dumb. I just felt wholly unqualified to read it. But as for the other two I mentioned? You've actually inspired me to pull them off the shelf and read them again.

What? Finnegan's Wake? Um...waitissomeoneatthedoorgottagobye.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on March 15, 2016, 12:58:06 PM
Finnegan's Wake? Um...waitissomeoneatthedoorgottagobye.

Isn't that a word from Finnegan's Wake?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on March 15, 2016, 01:12:00 PM
I've just been reading Bubs's hilarious "contribution" to Rocky's book. I'm still laughing. 

:)


What? Finnegan's Wake? Um...waitissomeoneatthedoorgottagobye.

I actually started reading A Portrait... (and Dubliners) as a sort of primer for Ulysses. Which itself is a primer for Finnegans Wake. A Portrait, thankfully, turned out to be a great book in its own right, and I'm looking forward to reading Ulysses at some point. Finnegans Wake, on the other hand, I am not looking forward to. I sat down with it at a local bookstore a while back for about 30 minutes, understood none of it, and then promptly put the book back on the shelf and left the store.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on March 15, 2016, 01:45:53 PM
I've just been reading Bubs's hilarious "contribution" to Rocky's book. I'm still laughing. 

http://smileysmile.net/board/index.php/topic,23026.msg565599.html#msg565599
It's brilliant.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 21, 2016, 04:27:36 AM
2 of my favorites that I read going to school - Monteiro Lobato's "Yellow Woodpecker Farm" & Gillian Rubinstein's "Space Demons". The last one is a trilogy, I'd like to know what happened to the kids in the 2nd & 3rd eps.

These are the versions of the covers I have: (https://j.livelib.ru/boocover/1000484557/l/9f16/Montejru_Lobatu__Orden_zheltogo_dyatla.jpg) (http://fantlab.ru/images/editions/big/31100)

As you see, they're both published under the same series "Little creatures". I have all the books by these series. Btw, "Space Demons" was translated by a well-known children author Irina Tokmakova. She has one of her books in the series as well.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on March 21, 2016, 04:53:38 AM
What have I been reading? OSD's hilarious YouTube comments about Mike's solo stuff... 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 21, 2016, 05:00:32 AM
I thought you don't like OSD? You posted pictures of yawning guy in response to his posts (& ofc Smile Brian's, rightly so).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on March 21, 2016, 05:11:33 AM
I thought you don't like OSD? You posted pictures of yawning guy in response to his posts (& ofc Smile Brian's, rightly so).

The comments are hilarious because they are so predictable ("Tripe. Who's gonna listen to this sh*t?"). You can't accuse him of not being consistent. :smokin   


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 21, 2016, 05:14:32 AM
I thought you don't like OSD? You posted pictures of yawning guy in response to his posts (& ofc Smile Brian's, rightly so).

The comments are hilarious because they are so predictable ("Tripe. Who's gonna listen to this sh*t?"). You can't accuse him of not being consistent. :smokin   
I see. Though I'm willing to give the old guy benefit of the doubt. But not SB.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on March 21, 2016, 10:16:13 AM
After all the Joyce talk I re-read some Dubliners stories yesterday. They remain great. Shocking.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on March 21, 2016, 11:14:02 AM
Gary Clayton Anderson - The Conquest of Texas: Ethnic Cleansing in the Promised Land


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on March 21, 2016, 11:16:52 AM
Gary Clayton Anderson - The Conquest of Texas: Ethnic Cleansing in the Promised Land
Let me know how it is please.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on March 21, 2016, 11:27:18 AM
I'm really enjoying it. What has become accepted history (and poular entertainment and folklore) but seen from another angle


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 21, 2016, 11:29:48 AM
Any books about California that you can advise?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on March 21, 2016, 12:46:48 PM
Today I stopped into a bookstore to get "Boys Among Men," a book about the '90s and '00s phenomenon of high school stars going directly into the NBA. While superstars such as Kevin Garnett, Kobe Bryant, and LeBron James were among those who did quite well for themselves going this route, there were also plenty of people who weren't able to stick, or even make, the league. The practice has since been banned by the NBA and its players union (in, I think, 2006 or so). The author is Jonathan Abrams. I look forward to reading it, being both from the state that took on the modern pioneer of the phenomenon (Kevin Garnett) and being a gigantic NBA (and even more so, NBA Draft) nerd.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on March 21, 2016, 01:00:13 PM
I'm actually currently reading Mark Dillion's 50 Sides of The Beach Boys.  It's pretty good so far, I'm about 3/4 finished.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on March 21, 2016, 01:27:00 PM
Any books about California that you can advise?

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51d4e%2B7JiSL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)

Not just about California but it figures prominently. And, of course, there's that Beach Boys connection.

I found it a heart-warming read.

Anyone else read it?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Peter Reum on March 22, 2016, 10:56:06 AM
The Great River by Paul Horgan Pulitzer Prize winner in history about the Rio Grande


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on March 26, 2016, 12:01:04 PM
I picked up the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Nikolai Leskov's "The Enchanted Wanderer and Other Stories." Having been a big fan of their Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Tolstoy translations, I am pretty excited about it. I also got Geza Vermes's "The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English."


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MaryUSA on March 26, 2016, 12:04:01 PM
Hi all,

Liberty Weekend by Nevada Barr


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on March 26, 2016, 01:37:30 PM
I picked up the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Nikolai Leskov's "The Enchanted Wanderer and Other Stories." Having been a big fan of their Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Tolstoy translations, I am pretty excited about it. I also got Geza Vermes's "The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English."

Interesting choice.  Do you know anything about the translation method used?  Also, does complete mean complete?  For example, more than one Isaiah scroll was found, including one complete scroll.  Is each one translated or is each variant noted in a single translation?  Or is it not completely complete?

EoL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on March 26, 2016, 02:06:46 PM
I picked up the Pevear and Volokhonsky translation of Nikolai Leskov's "The Enchanted Wanderer and Other Stories." Having been a big fan of their Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Tolstoy translations, I am pretty excited about it. I also got Geza Vermes's "The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English."

Interesting choice.  Do you know anything about the translation method used?  Also, does complete mean complete?  For example, more than one Isaiah scroll was found, including one complete scroll.  Is each one translated or is each variant noted in a single translation?  Or is it not completely complete?

EoL

Re the "interesting choice," I've been reading (and finally almost finished) Robert Eisenman's "James, the Brother of Jesus," which as you may know tries to make the case that Paul is the "Wicked Priest" and James, or someone associated with him, is the "Teacher of Righteousness." While I find parts of that book fascinating, I find other parts unlikely. Regardless, when I saw a used copy of this, I figured it would be a great idea to have direct access to some of those scroll-books mentioned so often both in Eisenman and other books on the topic I've got. So now I've got my own copies of The Community Rule, The Damascus Document, etc.

I don't know the translation method at all, though presumably it's addressed somewhere within the book. But Vermes is certainly a well respected scholar in the field, and this version is praised by Lawrence Schiffman, so I'm pretty comfortable that it's not trash, anyway.

Regarding the completeness, no, it's not literally 100% complete. It doesn't include Biblical books or the smallest fragments. Vermes says in the introduction "While this translation does not claim to cover every fragment retrieved from the caves, it is complete in one sense: it offers in a readable form all the texts sufficiently well preserved to be understandable in English." He goes on to direct readers who want a literally complete translation of all texts to the more purely scholarly sources.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Smilin Ed H on March 30, 2016, 02:18:02 AM
Re-reading Catch 22 and would like to read this:

http://fridaynightboys300.blogspot.co.uk/2016/03/the-genesis-of-joseph-hellers-catch-22.html


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 03, 2016, 01:47:23 PM
After pausing halfway through Dubliners, I've been reading some Kafka (which I understand almost none of) and finished "The Metamorphosis" today.
The one thing that strikes me most about this story is Gregor's cool detachment from his bug plight. He seems oddly accepting of it.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on April 03, 2016, 05:13:31 PM
Captain,

Thank you for the explanation.  I had not looked at the data in a long, long time and was not considering just how many scrolls were found.  Kind of becomes a silly question to ask if it is complete.

Do you know of any work that collates the Biblical texts (amongst the scrolls) in terms of text-types (TR versus Alexandrian, or whatever method of categorization is current)?  I would be interested in such information and I suppose an analysis of this kind is out there...

EoL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 03, 2016, 06:05:28 PM
I'm sorry, I don't understand this:

in terms of text-types (TR versus Alexandrian, or whatever method of categorization is current)

My education on these things is almost entirely independent (minus the conservative Lutheran upbringing, which frankly doesn't include scholarly work at all), so even if I did, I am pretty sure I can't answer the question. I just want to know more about what you mean.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on April 06, 2016, 11:48:08 AM
So I made a boo boo.  The TR (which resembles the Majority/Byzantine Text) and Alexandrian text types are terms that apply to New Testament manuscripts and we are discussing Old Testament manuscripts.  Sorry about that.

My knowledge of the OT is far less than the NT (mostly because I have forgotten so much).  In the OT the debate is centered on the Masoretic Text versus everything else, more or less, including a Greek translation called the Septuagint (abbreviated as LXX).  The former is the text historically used by the Jews and is in Hebrew.  The latter is in Greek.  When English translations of the Old Testament differ, and the difference is not due to the method of translation employed, the difference is often due to the choice to prefer the LXX over the Hebrew/Masoretic Text.  The Catholic Bible may also contain lingering readings from the Latin Vulgate, though I am not certain about this.

With that said, I should have asked whether there is a resource that analyzes the scrolls in relation to their agreement with the Masoretic versus other texts.  However, I believe the Dead Sea Scrolls are known to support the Masoretic Text, which is even conceded on Wikipedia.  This should really come as no surprise as we are discussing a collection of Jewish books, the Jews have traditionally held to the Masoretic Text as genuine, and it is in the original language which is also the language of the Jews.

I've over simplified for the sake of brevity, and because I've forgotten more than I remember on the topic.

EoL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 07, 2016, 10:31:20 AM
Thanks, I now see what you meant. I am familiar w/ Masoretic v Septuagint. And the books here as I understand them (prior to reading, mind you--just off of what I know) isn't really quite either: Masoretic were really not formalized until substantially later, and Septuagint was of course in Greek. The scrolls are mostly in Hebrew, with some Aramaiac, Greek, and I think tiny bits of others (eg Syriac).

As I understand it, as is true between MT and LXX, the scrolls' canonical texts are generally quite close to either/both. But there are differences: based on pure memory (I'm at work), there are some differences in Daniel, some reordered psalms, etc. and presumably plenty of the "minor" (depending on who you are and why you care) differences throughout.

Then of course there are the extracanonical books, which I'm interested in. Community Rule, War Scroll, the various commentaries, etc.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on April 07, 2016, 04:12:29 PM
Thanks, I now see what you meant. I am familiar w/ Masoretic v Septuagint. And the books here as I understand them (prior to reading, mind you--just off of what I know) isn't really quite either: Masoretic were really not formalized until substantially later, and Septuagint was of course in Greek. The scrolls are mostly in Hebrew, with some Aramaiac, Greek, and I think tiny bits of others (eg Syriac).

As I understand it, as is true between MT and LXX, the scrolls' canonical texts are generally quite close to either/both. But there are differences: based on pure memory (I'm at work), there are some differences in Daniel, some reordered psalms, etc. and presumably plenty of the "minor" (depending on who you are and why you care) differences throughout.

Then of course there are the extracanonical books, which I'm interested in. Community Rule, War Scroll, the various commentaries, etc.

A quick survey of the information available amongst the first few Google hits indicate that where the MT and LXX disagree the DSS contain an MT reading 95% of the time and an LXX reading only 5% of the time.  I did not verify the accuracy of this claim.  However, all but one site affirmed that the DSS agree overwhelming with the MT.  I am not 100% sure what you mean when you say that the MT was formalized late, but I believe you are referring to the argument that the earliest copies of the MT are from AD 1000 (compared to the much earlier date of the LXX,  3rd century AD).  However, the scrolls have turned that idea upside down as I believe they date to the first century AD, or earlier.  So now we have a text essentially Masoretic in character that:

1. Predates the earliest LXX manuscript
2. Is in the original language and therefore does not contain the risk of translation errors
3. Has been held by the Jewish people to be the preserved text

An argument explaining the late date of the MT is the way that the Jewish scribes cared for each manuscript.  From what I have read not only was there great care taken in the copying process to ensure accuracy, but accuracy was so treasured that the physical scroll was destroyed once it began to fall apart.  If this is true, you would not expect to find a lot of early copies because they were regularly destroyed after a reliable copy had been made.  The reliability of their copying process is demonstrated by the complete Isaiah scroll found amongst the DSS.  The agreement between it and the earliest scroll prior to the DSS discovery is said to be astonishing - and they are dated 1000 years apart!

I find the OT scrolls interesting, less so the others.  I did read that nearly every scrap has been translated and published.  That must have taken quite some time given the number of fragments exceeds 15,000.

EoL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 07, 2016, 04:46:34 PM
I guess what I meant--and keep in mind this education of mine is strictly individual, so there are holes I'm filling in all the time--is that as I understand it, the Masoretic texts were assembled and copied by that specific group (the Masoretes? Masorites? Something like that.) during a specific time that is later than DSS. I'm not saying the individual texts weren't around sooner, or that they weren't using those earlier texts. I'm saying that their particular group is the one that formally collected, chose from among, and maintained their canon. And yes, while their text may have many matches within DSS, let's keep in mind DSS also had other books that aren't considered canonical by modern Jews or Christians. Point not about discrediting the maintenance of the texts over time, but rather just pointing to the diversity of opinions.

My particular interest is mostly in the first century or two CE. I find it fascinating how modern Judaism and Christianity arose from what had come before, often using the same texts as previous Jews had used, but not always, and often with different theological conclusions, slants, and obviously rituals. So anyway, that's my little back story. And please excuse anything I am getting jumbled, or holes in my background: as I said, still working on it.

For those not interested in Biblical history: sorry! But I can switch quickly back to another one: I read the first story from my book of Leskov's short stories, "The Lady Macbeth of Mtensk," and loved it. Looking forward to the rest of the stories.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on April 07, 2016, 04:55:42 PM
I'm a bit interested in biblical history and took a history of early Christianity class at the Divinity School associated with my college, but you guys make me feel like an ignorant baby!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 07, 2016, 05:20:56 PM

2. Is in the original language and therefore does not contain the risk of translation errors
3. Has been held by the Jewish people to be the preserved text

An argument explaining the late date of the MT is the way that the Jewish scribes cared for each manuscript.  From what I have read not only was there great care taken in the copying process to ensure accuracy, but accuracy was so treasured that the physical scroll was destroyed once it began to fall apart.  If this is true, you would not expect to find a lot of early copies because they were regularly destroyed after a reliable copy had been made.  The reliability of their copying process is demonstrated by the complete Isaiah scroll found amongst the DSS.  The agreement between it and the earliest scroll prior to the DSS discovery is said to be astonishing - and they are dated 1000 years apart!


I meant to comment on this before. I think there's truth there, but also some flaws. Or if not flaws, maybe biases? I'll just say what I have to say and we can figure out the right term (I don't mean it as disparaging criticism, anyway) later. Or not.

"The original language" in your 2 above obviously is usually true. But remember there were multiple languages, including among Jews, around that turn of the era. Age. Millenium. Whatever. There were Greek-speaking Jewish communities, Aramaic, Syriac, and such, as well as Hebrew.

That leads to your 3, "held by the Jewish people..." To me, that's a bit like saying what is in the Catholic Bible has been "held by the Christian people..." It's true, of course ... but not the whole picture. What we have evidence of is that the Judaism that continued after the destruction of the temple--rabbinic Judaism, I believe, would be the best term? Forgive an ex-Lutheran's mistakes, here--had roots that went back at least to the DSS period (physical documents generally considered to be 200 BCE to somewhere pre-68 CE, I believe). But there are, as noted earlier, other docs that weren't maintained by the Masoretic traditions. There are also other Judaisms (Samaritan Judaism) that are different. There are of course also the various sects we don't know a ton about, but that are mentioned in Josephus, "church fathers," and others: Pharisees, Sadduccees, Essenes, Zealots, Sicarii, which have various descriptions here and there that sometimes overlap, sometimes conflict, etc., but mainly are mysteries. But long ramble short, what we have is evidence that this group (of many) indeed selected and carefully maintained the books it wanted to preserve with great accuracy and reverence. But that's not to say there weren't other traditions that aren't reflected.

I don't mean that in some "Da Vinci Code" conspiracy theory nonsense. I just mean it quite simply, that we know there were diverse philosophies and traditions within what we now call Judaism, but even as diverse as modern Judaism is, its evolutionary history isn't branching off from a single trunk that was set in or by the first century. It was always diverse, always changing, and then underwent dramatic trauma, especially in the late 60s through the end of the century. What came out had commonalities, but also a lot of differences, one of which of course eventually becomes what is recognizable as Christianity.

That was probably borderline incoherent. One last quick stab at coherence, then I'll just hope for the best: I don't think there was a single set of texts that were preserved by a single religion; rather, there were many texts and many sects, some of which were accurately compiled by what we came to know as the mainstream of a religion. The texts they chose to maintain were maintained, but there were more "texts" and more "theys."


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on April 07, 2016, 05:51:24 PM
I guess what I meant--and keep in mind this education of mine is strictly individual, so there are holes I'm filling in all the time--is that as I understand it, the Masoretic texts were assembled and copied by that specific group (the Masoretes? Masorites? Something like that.) during a specific time that is later than DSS. I'm not saying the individual texts weren't around sooner, or that they weren't using those earlier texts. I'm saying that their particular group is the one that formally collected, chose from among, and maintained their canon. And yes, while their text may have many matches within DSS, let's keep in mind DSS also had other books that aren't considered canonical by modern Jews or Christians. Point not about discrediting the maintenance of the texts over time, but rather just pointing to the diversity of opinions.

My particular interest is mostly in the first century or two CE. I find it fascinating how modern Judaism and Christianity arose from what had come before, often using the same texts as previous Jews had used, but not always, and often with different theological conclusions, slants, and obviously rituals. So anyway, that's my little back story. And please excuse anything I am getting jumbled, or holes in my background: as I said, still working on it.

For those not interested in Biblical history: sorry! But I can switch quickly back to another one: I read the first story from my book of Leskov's short stories, "The Lady Macbeth of Mtensk," and loved it. Looking forward to the rest of the stories.

In reference to the Maserites (or however they are called), I follow you.  The area of interest for me is this: what is closest to the original document, the original Isaiah, for example.  Was the original text best preserved in the MT or the LXX?  For years scholars argued that the LXX was the best candidate.  The DSS has laid that argument to rest, largely.  Prior to the discovery of the DSS the only missing component in the pro-MT argument was the existence of an early manuscript with MT-like readings.  The DSS provided that.  In relation to those documents that wound up being called the TNKH, or as Christians refer to it, the Old Testament, the MT wins as best candidate for most likely to most accurately reflect the original documents.  The MT has always had on its side the original language in which these manuscripts were (mostly) written, least internal disagreement, as well as tradition.  With the DSS they now have antiquity as well.  To argue that a Greek translation of suspect origin with little to no tradition and greater internal disagreement (amongst the various available manuscripts) is a tough argument to make.  I understand you aren't making that argument, I point it out to show that the previously held view of the scholars is on the rocks.

EoL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on April 07, 2016, 06:18:37 PM

2. Is in the original language and therefore does not contain the risk of translation errors
3. Has been held by the Jewish people to be the preserved text

An argument explaining the late date of the MT is the way that the Jewish scribes cared for each manuscript.  From what I have read not only was there great care taken in the copying process to ensure accuracy, but accuracy was so treasured that the physical scroll was destroyed once it began to fall apart.  If this is true, you would not expect to find a lot of early copies because they were regularly destroyed after a reliable copy had been made.  The reliability of their copying process is demonstrated by the complete Isaiah scroll found amongst the DSS.  The agreement between it and the earliest scroll prior to the DSS discovery is said to be astonishing - and they are dated 1000 years apart!


I meant to comment on this before. I think there's truth there, but also some flaws. Or if not flaws, maybe biases? I'll just say what I have to say and we can figure out the right term (I don't mean it as disparaging criticism, anyway) later. Or not.

"The original language" in your 2 above obviously is usually true. But remember there were multiple languages, including among Jews, around that turn of the era. Age. Millenium. Whatever. There were Greek-speaking Jewish communities, Aramaic, Syriac, and such, as well as Hebrew.

That leads to your 3, "held by the Jewish people..." To me, that's a bit like saying what is in the Catholic Bible has been "held by the Christian people..." It's true, of course ... but not the whole picture. What we have evidence of is that the Judaism that continued after the destruction of the temple--rabbinic Judaism, I believe, would be the best term? Forgive an ex-Lutheran's mistakes, here--had roots that went back at least to the DSS period (physical documents generally considered to be 200 BCE to somewhere pre-68 CE, I believe). But there are, as noted earlier, other docs that weren't maintained by the Masoretic traditions. There are also other Judaisms (Samaritan Judaism) that are different. There are of course also the various sects we don't know a ton about, but that are mentioned in Josephus, "church fathers," and others: Pharisees, Sadduccees, Essenes, Zealots, Sicarii, which have various descriptions here and there that sometimes overlap, sometimes conflict, etc., but mainly are mysteries. But long ramble short, what we have is evidence that this group (of many) indeed selected and carefully maintained the books it wanted to preserve with great accuracy and reverence. But that's not to say there weren't other traditions that aren't reflected.

I don't mean that in some "Da Vinci Code" conspiracy theory nonsense. I just mean it quite simply, that we know there were diverse philosophies and traditions within what we now call Judaism, but even as diverse as modern Judaism is, its evolutionary history isn't branching off from a single trunk that was set in or by the first century. It was always diverse, always changing, and then underwent dramatic trauma, especially in the late 60s through the end of the century. What came out had commonalities, but also a lot of differences, one of which of course eventually becomes what is recognizable as Christianity.

That was probably borderline incoherent. One last quick stab at coherence, then I'll just hope for the best: I don't think there was a single set of texts that were preserved by a single religion; rather, there were many texts and many sects, some of which were accurately compiled by what we came to know as the mainstream of a religion. The texts they chose to maintain were maintained, but there were more "texts" and more "theys."

I think the following will clarify where we appear to disagree.  My comments are to be taken only in reference to books now commonly known as the Old Testament (or TNKH).  These books were written, for the most part, by Hebrew people who spoke and wrote Hebrew.  I am not attempting to make an argument about any other books and where the fit in and how or when the OT/TNKH became the OT/TNKH.  Of the books I am considering I don't believe any were originally written, or even alleged to have been originally written, in Greek.  FWIW, and in regards to the TNKH I think it is worth quite a bit, it is my understanding that even the Talmud/Kaballah, which teach that what the text most plainly says is what is least means, quote a TNKH which is very much in agreement with the MT.  I have not verified this because I cannot read Hebrew (though I could ask my brother as he does).  And my recollection could also be wrong, but to the best of my recollection this is not a disputed claim, even if not true in every single instance where the Talmud cites the TNKH.  Why is this important?  Because the Talmud/Kaballah is antagonistic toward the "plain reading" of the text.  If anyone were going to change the text or use another text in order to support a reading contrary to the plain reading, it would be those who authored the Talmud (or those who wrote down the oral tradition).  But instead they used a text that agrees with the MT and found ways to have the words mean the opposite of what common sense would dictate.  I cannot give examples at present because it has simply been too long since I have considered these things.  This may also mean my entire recollection is faulty.  If so, I apologize to those who have been following along, you really should double-check for yourself.

Regarding #3, the same can be said.  In relation to the books of the TNKH, the Jewish people have, with near unanimity, held to the MT as opposed to the LXX.  Have some also chosen to accept other documents, the Talmud for example, as authoritative?  Of course.  But as noted above, even the Talmud agrees that in relation to the TNKH the MT is the superior text.

So if my comments are taken to refer only to the TNKH, then I believe the apparent flaws/bias disappears.

With that said, I do not agree that the waters are as muddy as you have implied as to when and how the books of the OT came to be accepted as "canon", but that is for another discussion.

EoL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 17, 2016, 09:31:34 AM
I ordered both A Man Called Destruction: The Life and Music of Alex Chilton and Trouble Boys: The Story of The Replacements. The latter arrived before the former, so I've been reading that and really enjoying it. The story is so well-told and interesting; it's one of those books I have trouble putting down once I start reading. A Man Called Destruction just arrived last night, and I skipped to and read a bit about his friendship with Teenage Fanclub. I'm curious as to how these books will intersect.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 17, 2016, 09:37:20 AM
I'm curious as to how these books will intersect.

Presumably somewhere shortly before Pleased to Meet Me, at least!

And now all of a sudden I remembered how much I loved Westerberg's NYT memorial to Chilton. I searched for it and read it again, laughing at the story of their last meeting. And at Westerberg's last few lines here. Heh.

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/21/opinion/21westerberg.html?scp=1&sq=westerberg&st=cse


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on April 17, 2016, 10:56:03 AM
I have Pleased to Meet Me signed by all the Replacements. Paul Westerberg wrote, "Don't be so polite." One of my most treasured material possessions.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 17, 2016, 11:10:07 AM
That's great. He's among our state treasures.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Mr. Verlander on April 17, 2016, 02:40:41 PM
I ordered both A Man Called Destruction: The Life and Music of Alex Chilton and Trouble Boys: The Story of The Replacements. The latter arrived before the former, so I've been reading that and really enjoying it. The story is so well-told and interesting; it's one of those books I have trouble putting down once I start reading. A Man Called Destruction just arrived last night, and I skipped to and read a bit about his friendship with Teenage Fanclub. I'm curious as to how these books will intersect.

I want to read "A Man Called Destruction". I've read the Big Star biography already. It's kinda disappointing because their career as a band was so short, there isn't a lot to write about. I'd like to know more about Bell and Chilton's relationship though. I know they weren't the best of friends, but Alex did support Bell getting his record out, even though they had fallen out a bit.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SMiLE Brian on April 17, 2016, 04:25:15 PM
I have Pleased to Meet Me signed by all the Replacements. Paul Westerberg wrote, "Don't be so polite." One of my most treasured material possessions.

That is quite the item!!!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on April 18, 2016, 05:11:55 AM
I just starting reading John Fogerty's autobiography.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: The LEGENDARY OSD on April 18, 2016, 12:33:10 PM
Reading, with uncontrolled spasms of delight, the latest news on the " Welcome to the Smiley Smile Board" site.  :happydance


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 18, 2016, 12:39:10 PM
I know you two didn't get along and he was as rude to you as you to him, but that's still a shitty thing to say.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: The LEGENDARY OSD on April 18, 2016, 12:45:32 PM
Why?  ???


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 18, 2016, 01:10:52 PM
I am finding myself relating to both Chilton and Westerberg to a surprising degree.
I can easily see why there were friends.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on April 18, 2016, 01:28:10 PM
Reading, with uncontrolled spasms of delight, the latest news on the " Welcome to the Smiley Smile Board" site.  :happydance

When are you gonna go back to being banned?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Alan Smith on April 18, 2016, 03:16:09 PM
Reading, with uncontrolled spasms of delight, the latest news on the " Welcome to the Smiley Smile Board" site.  :happydance

When are you gonna go back to being banned?
The Million dollar question.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 18, 2016, 03:41:15 PM
At long last--nine months or so (?) of on-and-off reading--I have finished Robert Eisenman's "James the Brother of Jesus." Absolutely fascinating book, and absolutely HORRIBLY written. It's something of a scholarly book, but that's not the problem. The problem is Eisenman's writing. He is the king of unnecessarily complicated (and confusing) phrases that make reading tedious. Whether double negatives, unnecessary repetition of certain phrases and ideas, the "overuse" of "quotation marks" as one might see "on this very board" making it confusing considering the number of actual quotes throughout the book ... on and on. Just terribly written.

That said, for those into this kind of thing (i.e., EoL and probably nobody else!), it's fascinating. (And EoL, I'm quite certain you'd dismiss it.) Basically, Eisenman is saying that James or someone like him / of his community is the leader of the Qumran community, which practiced the Jerusalem brand of pre-Christianity/Judaism described in the Bible. He claims James to be Jesus' natural, full brother, and says in short that he and the other named brothers Jude and Simon are then multiplied into numerous characters to flesh out the list of the 12 and others. He also has Paul as "the Liar" found in various Dead Sea Scrolls, painting him as a very anti-Jamesian force (which isn't hard to imagine considering canonical text) who is aligned with (and possibly related to) corrupt Herodian/Roman establishment. Obviously there's a lot more going on, but those are some of the keys.

My recently purchased DSS book was purchased so I would have a reference I could read on my own. (Haven't yet.)

But that's 1,000 content-rich, poorly written pages DONE. Finally. Now it can sit on my bookshelf and make me look smart  ;D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: You Kane, You Commanded, You Conquered on April 18, 2016, 08:45:42 PM
Picked up Gravity's Rainbow recently after having put it off for a while. At this rate I should finish it by the next millennium.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SMiLE Brian on April 19, 2016, 04:02:20 AM
Reading, with uncontrolled spasms of delight, the latest news on the " Welcome to the Smiley Smile Board" site.  :happydance

When are you gonna go back to being banned?
  ???


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on April 19, 2016, 04:49:18 AM
Picked up Gravity's Rainbow recently after having put it off for a while. At this rate I should finish it by the next millennium.

I first read the extraordinary Gravity's Rainbow in late '77, which is when I bought David Bowie's album Heroes. Those two are inextricably linked in my mind.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 23, 2016, 03:56:09 AM
Had plans to revisit Neil Gaiman's "Coraline". I like it as I do animated film, tho at 1st I was slightly disappointed that the characters didn't look as I imagined them. Then again, the visuals are bound to be diff. People read the same book and picture the events, people in thousand ways. One of those could align with the screen adaptation. Mine usually don't.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on May 11, 2016, 07:52:57 AM
I'm starting Victor Hugo's Les Miserables and Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy. They are both giant books so we'll see how that goes.

I'm also doing research for an article on top of it.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 11, 2016, 08:06:24 AM
Had plans to revisit Neil Gaiman's "Coraline". I like it as I do animated film, tho at 1st I was slightly disappointed that the characters didn't look as I imagined them. Then again, the visuals are bound to be diff. People read the same book and picture the events, people in thousand ways. One of those could align with the screen adaptation. Mine usually don't.
I really liked The Sandman series. Not really a graphic novel reader, but it fell into my hands.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 11, 2016, 08:08:28 AM
I'm starting Victor Hugo's Les Miserables and Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy. They are both giant books so we'll see how that goes.

I'm also doing research for an article on top of it.
I really like a lot of French lit. but not so much Victor Hugo. What's your specialty, literature-wise?
I read all of however-many-thousand-or-so pages of Clarissa and much of it went by surprisingly quickly. Very soapy. But some parts dragged.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on May 11, 2016, 08:30:16 AM
My specialty is Canadian literature - but in my personal reading time I tend to be much broader in scope. Thanks for asking!

I have just started LM but I do enjoy it so far. I can see its influence on Tolstoy. I do like a lot of French lit too but I can see how Hugo doesn't quite fit comfortably with a lot of the great examples of French literature.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MaryUSA on May 11, 2016, 08:31:33 AM
Hi all,

Today I am reading Sweet Harmony by Luanne McClane.  It is a very good romance book.  A nice and short read is all I have time for today.  I would suggest this book for those who like country music.  


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 11, 2016, 08:40:08 AM
My specialty is Canadian literature - but in my personal reading time I tend to be much broader in scope. Thanks for asking!

I have just started LM but I do enjoy it so far. I can see its influence on Tolstoy. I do like a lot of French lit too but I can see how Hugo doesn't quite fit comfortably with a lot of the great examples of French literature.
Ooh. I'm embarrassingly ignorant. Other than Atwood and Munro, what would you recommend as THE Canadian fiction?

I confess to only having read The Hunchback...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: 1-1-wonderful on May 11, 2016, 08:54:15 AM
I, Claudius

by Robert Graves


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 11, 2016, 08:58:26 AM
Here's a book I'm looking forward to, coming out in English soon already out in English(!): http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/apr/18/solution-everything-working-less-work-pressure

Drives me nuts that we work so many hours when productivity is so much higher. Shouldn't we be buying time for ourselves with all that income, rather than a third house for the CEO?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/free-money-might-be-the-best-way-to-end-poverty/2013/12/29/679c8344-5ec8-11e3-95c2-13623eb2b0e1_story.html


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Empire Of Love on May 11, 2016, 09:14:33 AM
I'm starting Victor Hugo's Les Miserables and Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy. They are both giant books so we'll see how that goes.

I'm also doing research for an article on top of it.

One of the last books I read before taking quite a long reading sabbatical was Les Miserable.  While I loved the book and am glad I read the unabridged version, there were certainly portions that seemed to drag on.  It was rewarding to get through it.

Regarding Russell's History of Western Philosophy, I'm not a fan of Russell (nor Wittgenstein, Whitehead, etc), as I believe they did more harm than good to philosophy.  With that said, I would be interested in hearing your thoughts when you complete the book.  I am wondering whether he tackles the actual history (so and so thought thus and such) or is it more of an "argument" against what has gone before (so and so thought thus and such which was proven wrong by his successor).  Let me know your thoughts when you are done, or even as you go.

Edit: I read a few reviews of Russell's book, including by people who gave it five stars, and it appears the latter is the case.  One of the common complaints about the book is that Russell exhibits intolerance for views at odds with his own (I know he has a very particular view of logic and metaphysics, so I can imagine who he berates and from what angle).  I would still like to hear your thoughts, in particular on what he says about Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume and Kant.

EoL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on May 11, 2016, 09:36:49 AM
Am reading the new Paul McCartney bio. Interesting so far.
Wanted some light reading so have started The Inimitable Mr. Jeeves by Wodehouse.

At times when really stressed out, have been reading the Illustrated Beatrix Potter. Next story - "The Tale of Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle".  ;D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: MaryUSA on May 11, 2016, 09:54:53 AM
Hi all,

I read the book about Paul McCartney recently.  It is excellent!!!  A must read for fans of his and anyone who likes The Beatles. 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on May 11, 2016, 10:04:36 AM
My specialty is Canadian literature - but in my personal reading time I tend to be much broader in scope. Thanks for asking!

I have just started LM but I do enjoy it so far. I can see its influence on Tolstoy. I do like a lot of French lit too but I can see how Hugo doesn't quite fit comfortably with a lot of the great examples of French literature.
Ooh. I'm embarrassingly ignorant. Other than Atwood and Munro, what would you recommend as THE Canadian fiction?

Not embarrassing! There are many national literatures that I wish I had more time to know more about but unfortunately time is limited for all of us.

It is difficult to pick one text. Atwood and Munro's reputations are, in my view, justified, especially the latter. I do love Timothy Findley's Not Wanted On The Voyage and, when push comes to shove, would probably name it as my favourite book written by a Canadian author. The content, though, has very little to do with Canada unless I am missing some sort of symbolic point. Ranking close to Findley's novel would be Sheila Watson's The Double Hook, Morley Callaghan's Such Is My Beloved, and Thomas King's Green Grass Running Water. I would be proud to put those on any course syllabus. The Double Hook, especially, works as a fantastic mythopoetic construction of place in the same vein as Faulkner's construction of the American south.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on May 11, 2016, 10:12:45 AM
I'm starting Victor Hugo's Les Miserables and Bertrand Russell's History of Western Philosophy. They are both giant books so we'll see how that goes.

I'm also doing research for an article on top of it.

One of the last books I read before taking quite a long reading sabbatical was Les Miserable.  While I loved the book and am glad I read the unabridged version, there were certainly portions that seemed to drag on.  It was rewarding to get through it.

Regarding Russell's History of Western Philosophy, I'm not a fan of Russell (nor Wittgenstein, Whitehead, etc), as I believe they did more harm than good to philosophy.  With that said, I would be interested in hearing your thoughts when you complete the book.  I am wondering whether he tackles the actual history (so and so thought thus and such) or is it more of an "argument" against what has gone before (so and so thought thus and such which was proven wrong by his successor).  Let me know your thoughts when you are done, or even as you go.

Edit: I read a few reviews of Russell's book, including by people who gave it five stars, and it appears the latter is the case.  One of the common complaints about the book is that Russell exhibits intolerance for views at odds with his own (I know he has a very particular view of logic and metaphysics, so I can imagine who he berates and from what angle).  I would still like to hear your thoughts, in particular on what he says about Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Hume and Kant.

EoL

Haha - well, in the introduction, he has already labelled the ideas of Descartes and Kant as "insanity" (don't have the book in front of me so I can't say with certainly if he says exactly that about Kant but he definitely uses that word to describe Descartes' philosophy). I'm not particularly bothered by this kind of intolerance - not because I agree with it, but because I am reading the book from a distance, not necessarily looking to take on Russell's particular views but to, instead, gain some insight from his sweeping historical analysis. I also like writers who are opinionated even if I don't share the opinions. I can see the worry though that some might have about readers taking on these views. I will let you know my thoughts on the text as I read more of it.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 13, 2016, 10:05:50 AM
Had plans to revisit Neil Gaiman's "Coraline". I like it as I do animated film, tho at 1st I was slightly disappointed that the characters didn't look as I imagined them. Then again, the visuals are bound to be diff. People read the same book and picture the events, people in thousand ways. One of those could align with the screen adaptation. Mine usually don't.
I really liked The Sandman series. Not really a graphic novel reader, but it fell into my hands.
What is "graphic novel"? If the series are in horror/surreal genre, I'm interested.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 13, 2016, 10:42:14 AM
Had plans to revisit Neil Gaiman's "Coraline". I like it as I do animated film, tho at 1st I was slightly disappointed that the characters didn't look as I imagined them. Then again, the visuals are bound to be diff. People read the same book and picture the events, people in thousand ways. One of those could align with the screen adaptation. Mine usually don't.
I really liked The Sandman series. Not really a graphic novel reader, but it fell into my hands.
What is "graphic novel"? If the series are in horror/surreal genre, I'm interested.
A graphic novel is basically a long-form comic. A complete full story done with drawings.
The Sandman series was an earlier Gaiman series that's dark, mildly philosophical, mildly funny. I found it really interesting and entertaining.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 13, 2016, 10:50:11 AM
Hey, I like comics. That Gaiman seems diverse. My favorite comics used to be Calvin & Hobbes, Duck Tales (imo much interesting than cartoon) and Garfield. Are you an avid comic fan, what's your favorites besides the Sandman?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 13, 2016, 11:02:12 AM
Hey, I like comics. That Gaiman seems diverse. My favorite comics used to be Calvin & Hobbes, Duck Tales (imo much interesting than cartoon) and Garfield. Are you an avid comic fan, what's your favorites besides the Sandman?
I won't say I'm an avid comic fan because I haven't sought them out. But a number of good comics have come my way. My brother is an avid comic fan. He collects comics, knows trivia, etc. A bit like an Andrew Doe of comics.
In terms of comic strip-type comics, I've really enjoyed Calvin and Hobbes, Bloom County, Doonesbury and Peanuts.
Kids' graphic novels that I've enjoyed are Asterix, Tin Tin and Zita the Space Girl.
The adult ones that I've read are just two series that my brother particularly recommended to me: Sandman and Bone by Jeff Smith. There's a character called Emily the Strange that, back in the '90s my brother used to give me joke gifts of - cards and mugs and things - because the name and (he thought) the strangeness matched me. And the cats. I think that some Emily the Strange books were written later - she was originally just a logo that kind of caught on - but I never read them.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 13, 2016, 11:18:31 AM
I'm going to add my favorite - I forgot her because I put her in a different place in my brain because I love it so much; and you might enjoy it too, it's really dark and probably disturbing to a lot of people:
Cruddy by Lynda Barry. My god it's good. One of my favorite books.
She also did an earlier one, The Good Times are Killing Me, which was good, but a bit more serial comic strip like and less novelistic and less deeply involving.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 13, 2016, 11:21:00 AM
Cool! I'd like to have comics with my name. Your brother has good hobby - much better than collecting knives and bubble gum stickers.
Of the mentioned, I heard of Asterix - saw the french films - and Tin Tin. Used to watch that cartoon show, alternating with Heathcliff (about cat) and Rocky & Bullwinkle.
I like cats and would like smb. out there to create a really good friendly comics. NOT antropomorphic, just with human speech ability. I'm fed up with shows showing animals dressed like people, some even go further - animal head complete with human bod.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on May 13, 2016, 11:23:30 AM
I know of a Japanese comic/manga series called Uzumaki which I quite like. It's horror, so it could be what you're looking for, RR.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 13, 2016, 11:25:23 AM
I'm going to add my favorite - I forgot her because I put her in a different place in my brain because I love it so much; and you might enjoy it too, it's really dark and probably disturbing to a lot of people:
Cruddy by Lynda Barry. My god it's good. One of my favorite books.
She also did an earlier one, The Good Times are Killing Me, which was good, but a bit more serial comic strip like and less novelistic and less deeply involving.
Disturbing as in "gore"? As a horror fan, I'm OK with it.
Either way, thanks for suggestion, I'll check it out out of curiousity.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 13, 2016, 11:29:46 AM
I know of a Japanese comic/manga series called Uzumaki which I quite like. It's horror, so it could be what you're looking for, RR.
Well, you see, I'm not fan of J culture/anything (um, broadly speaking, anything Asian) but I will try to fight off my shallow views/prejudice and see if it's good.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 13, 2016, 11:35:28 AM
I'm going to add my favorite - I forgot her because I put her in a different place in my brain because I love it so much; and you might enjoy it too, it's really dark and probably disturbing to a lot of people:
Cruddy by Lynda Barry. My god it's good. One of my favorite books.
She also did an earlier one, The Good Times are Killing Me, which was good, but a bit more serial comic strip like and less novelistic and less deeply involving.
Disturbing as in "gore"? As a horror fan, I'm OK with it.
Either way, thanks for suggestion, I'll check it out out of curiousity.
Hmm. I guess being a horror fan might be for several different reasons. It's not gory, per se, but there's some grim knife action. It's more emotionally disturbing. Very blunt and raw.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 13, 2016, 11:58:56 AM
No, I like different kinds of horror, I just associate "disturbing" with "gore". I said "as a horror fan" because people I asked why they don't watch horrors, they'd usually say they're scared of slasher scenes, with cutting head, half the body, taking out eyeballs, car smashing passer-by etc. Hence my post.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 13, 2016, 12:02:21 PM
No, I like different kinds of horror, I just associate "disturbing" with "gore". I said "as a horror fan" because people I asked why they don't watch horrors, they'd usually say they're scared of slasher scenes, with cutting head, half the body, taking out eyeballs, car smashing passer-by etc. Hence my post.
Here's a quick and accurate review. I haven't read it in years. I used to give copies of it to everyone.  I'm going to have to reread it now. I'm so excited.
https://www.nytimes.com/books/99/09/05/bib/990905.rv103629.html


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 13, 2016, 12:13:22 PM
Thanks very much, I imagined following what I read and it's cool. I really like the cover, she reminds me of Sofia Coppola. pretty in a freakish way.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 13, 2016, 12:17:39 PM
& btw, like the fact that I indirectly made smb. to rmbr their favorite book. Who woulda thunk!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 13, 2016, 12:25:03 PM
& btw, like the fact that I indirectly made smb. to rmbr their favorite book. Who woulda thunk!
:-)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: alf wiedersehen on May 13, 2016, 01:25:28 PM
I know of a Japanese comic/manga series called Uzumaki which I quite like. It's horror, so it could be what you're looking for, RR.
Well, you see, I'm not fan of J culture/anything (um, broadly speaking, anything Asian) but I will try to fight off my shallow views/prejudice and see if it's good.

To be honest, I'm not a big fan of manga either, but I like this one a whole lot. It has some really cool art in it, like this:
(http://ih0.redbubble.net/image.111070921.0952/flat,800x800,070,f.u2.jpg)

I actually have that on a t-shirt.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on May 13, 2016, 08:45:02 PM
My specialty is Canadian literature - but in my personal reading time I tend to be much broader in scope. Thanks for asking!

I have just started LM but I do enjoy it so far. I can see its influence on Tolstoy. I do like a lot of French lit too but I can see how Hugo doesn't quite fit comfortably with a lot of the great examples of French literature.
Ooh. I'm embarrassingly ignorant. Other than Atwood and Munro, what would you recommend as THE Canadian fiction?

Not embarrassing! There are many national literatures that I wish I had more time to know more about but unfortunately time is limited for all of us.

It is difficult to pick one text. Atwood and Munro's reputations are, in my view, justified, especially the latter. I do love Timothy Findley's Not Wanted On The Voyage and, when push comes to shove, would probably name it as my favourite book written by a Canadian author. The content, though, has very little to do with Canada unless I am missing some sort of symbolic point. Ranking close to Findley's novel would be Sheila Watson's The Double Hook, Morley Callaghan's Such Is My Beloved, and Thomas King's Green Grass Running Water. I would be proud to put those on any course syllabus. The Double Hook, especially, works as a fantastic mythopoetic construction of place in the same vein as Faulkner's construction of the American south.
I'm going to try the Findley and the Watson to start. I have read a few books each by Atwood and Monro, but seeing as Canada's right there I feel awkward knowing so little. I spent three years in Buffalo and drove to Toronto a few times. Like, for an overnight just-something-to-do-on-the-weekend thing. I mean, it's right there!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on July 31, 2016, 02:46:39 PM
I've been reading the wondrous posts of Hank Briarstem.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: undercover-m on August 02, 2016, 10:37:21 PM
I have immersed myself in the world of Raymond Carver. Read What People Talk About When They Talk About Love as well as Will You Please Be Quiet, Please?. Each is a collection of short stories. Wonderful stuff.
Both have been a pleasure to read. Carver often incorporates the emotional turmoil of adultery and imagery of the Pacific Northwest where he was born.

I might take up some non-fiction reading next, however, but if that doesn't work out, I can fall back on Carver's Elephant :D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on August 04, 2016, 07:19:20 AM
I might take up some non-fiction reading next, however, but if that doesn't work out, I can fall back on Carver's Elephant :D

As long as you don't fall under Carver's Elephant. (Sorry about that.)

I see some most interesting reads listed "across the road", even a Pynchon.

I have had reader's block for years (did I really understand that sentence? Will I remember this later?) but at one time I did a lot of reading: V , The Crying of Lot 49 and Gravity's Rainbow (twice), the early novels of J.P. Donleavy (all multiple times), Slaughterhouse 5, The Sotweed Factor, everything by Kafka except America, Luke Reinhardt's The Dice Man...

Now I just browse through books about music. And most relaxing it is too...       


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: undercover-m on August 04, 2016, 01:02:32 PM
I might take up some non-fiction reading next, however, but if that doesn't work out, I can fall back on Carver's Elephant :D

As long as you don't fall under Carver's Elephant. (Sorry about that.)
Eh, you got a chuckle out of me :P.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Loaf on August 04, 2016, 02:26:53 PM
I've been reading a lot of graphic novels recently:

Adrian Tomine  - Killing and Dying
Chester Brown - Biography of Louis Riel
Gilberto Hernandez - Love and Rockets (vol.1)
Jeff Smith - entire Bone series
Paolo Parisi - Coltrane
Alan Moore - From Hell

All of these are brilliant.

I would HIGHLY recommend Adrian Tomine's Killing & Dying for anyone who wants to read literate graphic novels. His storytelling is on a par with Raymond Carver.
https://www.drawnandquarterly.com/killing-and-dying

and Jeff Smith's Bone series is up there with all literature.

For anyone who wants to get into graphic novels, Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics is a great place to start!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on August 07, 2016, 12:42:48 AM
Herbert Wells "The Time Machine". Lilian Jackson Braun "The Cat Who Tailed a Thief". Masters of detective (Hadley Chase etc).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Cool Cool Water on August 07, 2016, 04:14:53 AM
I'm currently reading "Terry Jones' Medieval Lives" which is the BBC book following the series.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on August 20, 2016, 05:32:10 PM
Read - So Close to Home: A True Story of an American Family's Fight for Survival During World War II, by Tougias and O'Leary.
This book concerns a family (parents, two children) onboard a banana freighter headed back to the US from South America in May 1942. Just off the coast of Louisiana south of New Orleans the ship was torpedoed by a UBoat.
Found the book very compelling reading, showing the family's plight after the attack. The book also gives info about the UBoat commanders, and the bizarre "war etiquette" they used.

Am presently reading two books, Hemingways A Moveable Feast about his time in Paris in the 1920s - fascinating, although no one comes off well so far - maybe there was a nice cat or dog mentioned lol.
The other book is Hillbilly Elegy by JD Vance. Vance, a "hillbilly", is describing the culture found in parts of America, lower income White people who can't seem to get ahead, and why. I'm a third of the way through the book. Haven't made up my mind how I feel about it yet.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: undercover-m on August 21, 2016, 11:43:12 AM
Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on September 06, 2016, 08:15:18 AM
Reading Perry Mason books - "The Case of the Moth-Eaten Mink" & "The Case of the Nervous Accomplice". I've got them in library as giveaway. Every day the library personnel leaves the books in the hall's windowsill for anybody to take home. People pick the books they like; by the end of day, it's empty. Then tomorrow, the other bunch is brought out. Isn't it fantastic? :3d Btw, it isn't just old irrelevant books like "Windows '98", about communists. There's new stuff too, ca. 2012 etc.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on September 06, 2016, 08:42:51 AM
when I was working at the local dental school, outside of the library was a bookshelf with books of all types. People could take one, donate one, etc.
Our local libraries have these as well. The books are either free, or for next to nothing in cost.
They're good places to get mysteries, 'who done it' books etc. also cookbooks.

P.S. For 3 years we had in my department a resident whose last name was Jardine. He was from the central US. Never got the nerve to ask him if he was related in any way to Al...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on September 06, 2016, 03:38:44 PM
Here, we've got bigger choice than you. It isn't just "place to get mysteries". There is classic literature too - Shakespeare, Chaucer, Wordsworth, Whitman, Hemingway etc. It's a good chance for people to build their house library. I like the idea.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on September 06, 2016, 05:14:58 PM
That's great that the library offers those books.
Unfortunately I don't think most Americans are into "heavy" reading. We're losing the patience to read things where we actually have to think, to take our time with difficult concepts. A lot of us want to know from someone else (a politician, or the media) what opinions to have. Sad.

Off my "soapbox" now.

Am presently reading John Fogerty's Fortunate Son. Good book, but a downer. Wish I had decided to read it at a different time, as he's starting to relate problems with band members. I'll be reading more about stuff like that when another book comes out next week, written by someone who's discussed a great deal on this board.   :)
The other book I'm reading has the provocative title The Bad-Ass Librarians of Timbuktu by Joshua Hammer, on their quest to save precious manuscripts from many hundreds of years ago, which are in danger of being destroyed by Al Qaeda. Fascinating so far.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SurfRapGrungeFiend on September 12, 2016, 04:42:48 PM
The oracle glass by judith merkle


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: rab2591 on September 12, 2016, 05:45:22 PM
The Final Days - Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SurfRapGrungeFiend on September 15, 2016, 12:36:16 PM
1997 jeep cherokee xj factory service manual figuring out the best way to change heater core.. Without completely removing dash


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on September 23, 2016, 05:48:08 AM
"Murder on the Orient Express" - rare case when the book beats various adaptations. I watched some, didn't like. When reading the book, I pictured the characters differently (duh). It was perfect cast. I could be good casting director. :3d Bottom line: this is classic for reason.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on September 28, 2016, 11:48:32 PM
I've read more than my share of modern German history, but this book review is fascinating:
http://www.nytimes.com/2016/09/28/books/hitler-ascent-volker-ullrich.html


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on September 29, 2016, 07:08:01 AM
Thank you, Emily, for this.
I will add this to my reading list. Have read numerous books about Hitler, and Germany, during that turbulent time period. Maybe one day I will fully understand exactly how his rise to power was able to happen, and especially why the German people were so willing to go along with his (stuff).
As someone with 3/4 German ancestry, I am repulsed by him, but have an obsession to watch or read anything about him that becomes available.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on September 29, 2016, 10:18:25 AM
Thank you, Emily, for this.
I will add this to my reading list. Have read numerous books about Hitler, and Germany, during that turbulent time period. Maybe one day I will fully understand exactly how his rise to power was able to happen, and especially why the German people were so willing to go along with his (stuff).
As someone with 3/4 German ancestry, I am repulsed by him, but have an obsession to watch or read anything about him that becomes available.

This post is lifted from my other forum. The book from which it comes, which I don't think has been translated into English yet (I may be wrong), contains lengthy passages about Hitler, told (according to my wife who is reading the Dutch version) disarmingly but with utter detachment. I cannot believe that there won't be an English-language edition soon...

We drove through a tunnel and all of a sudden a fjord lay beneath us, wide and blue, with farmhouses here and there along one shore and along the other a steep treeless mountain slope, bluish in the hazy sunlight. ... And Vanja's voice from the back seat. [Vanja is the author's elder daughter, then five or six years old.]
"When are we there, daddy?"
"It's not much further. Chin up."
"But it's so boring, daddy!"
"Look at that! A waterfall on the other side!"
"I can see it."
"Shall I put some music on?"
"Yes."
So I put on Dennis Wilson, which is what Vanja calls car music every time I play it at home. In the mirror I saw her leaning back, looking blankly out of the window.

Translated by jk from the Dutch version of part 6 of Min camp (My Struggle) by the Norwegian author Karl Knausgård.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Karl_Ove_Knausgard


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on October 08, 2016, 02:38:08 AM
New kettle instruction - jolly interesting.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on October 10, 2016, 11:16:48 AM
I see the first 5 volumes of the Knausgard available. Is that series worth looking into? Trying to expand my horizons by reading more International writers.

RR1 - what is "new kettle instruction"?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 10, 2016, 01:06:32 PM
This post is lifted from my other forum. The book from which it comes, which I don't think has been translated into English yet (I may be wrong), contains lengthy passages about Hitler, told (according to my wife who is reading the Dutch version) disarmingly but with utter detachment. I cannot believe that there won't be an English-language edition soon...

Here you go:

https://archipelagobooks.org/book/my-struggle-book-six/

"Coming soon."


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on October 10, 2016, 08:26:28 PM
RR1 - what is "new kettle instruction"?
I bought new kettle with cool fancy features. There is instruction (or what it's called).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: ♩♬☮ Billy C ♯♫♩☮ on October 10, 2016, 08:43:46 PM
Soon I'll be reading "I am Brian Wilson" :)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on October 10, 2016, 08:52:35 PM
Soon I'll be reading "I am Brian Wilson" :)
Cool! :bw Keep us updated, here or main thread.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: ♩♬☮ Billy C ♯♫♩☮ on October 10, 2016, 09:13:31 PM
will do :)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Rocky Raccoon on October 11, 2016, 11:14:29 AM
Born to Run by Bruce Springsteen   8)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 11, 2016, 03:05:27 PM
I see the first 5 volumes of the Knausgard available. Is that series worth looking into? Trying to expand my horizons by reading more International writers.

My wife and daughter-in-law are major fans (they read it in Dutch and even got a volume signed by the man himself). I'm told it's a sensational read----Nobel Prize material...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on October 11, 2016, 06:00:02 PM
My BW book arrived today. Been reading that, of course.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: ♩♬☮ Billy C ♯♫♩☮ on October 11, 2016, 06:18:21 PM
I will as soon as I get off work


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on October 11, 2016, 08:53:56 PM
I see the first 5 volumes of the Knausgard available. Is that series worth looking into? Trying to expand my horizons by reading more International writers.

My wife and daughter-in-law are major fans (they read it in Dutch and even got a volume signed by the man himself). I'm told it's a sensational read----Nobel Prize material...


Great. Will download Volume 1 and take it from there.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on October 13, 2016, 01:22:00 PM
Almost finished reading Brian's book. Great read so far. Only criticism - wish it had an index, as it's not written chronologically.

A couple of days ago I was in a local library for a couple of  hours and read half of Agatha Christie's "At Bertram's Hotel." It was a good read - Christie described the hotel as an old fashioned place where Americans could go to experience an old timey British ambience. And in describing it, I would love to be able to stay at a place like that LOL, especially as the places I stay nowadays are all cookie cutter, sterile, too utilitarian.
Curiously, a certain word came up several times, a word that caused more than a little flak for one of our presidential candidates.
Will go back to finish the book when I have the time. The only odd thing about it is that it's supposed to be a Miss Marple book, but she has hardly been in it so far.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 25, 2016, 02:18:58 AM
A great holiday read, if a little difficult to stop laughing about:

(https://03fcd67fd51850d3ba6b-6cb392df11a341bce8c76b1898d0c030.ssl.cf3.rackcdn.com/large/9780/6710/9780671037673.jpg)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: thorgil on October 25, 2016, 02:42:45 AM
I just re-read Ivanhoe. What a story, what a roster of characters, what a style. So much better than watching Game of Thrones, let alone trying to read the books: even the (great, imho) Peter Dinklage admitted that he tried reading them, but couldn't.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 26, 2016, 04:07:25 AM
(https://www.weiserantiquarian.com/pictures/53370.jpg?v=1443225716)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on October 26, 2016, 05:22:21 AM
"Hitler Homer Bible Christ," by Richard Carrier.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SurfRapGrungeFiend on October 28, 2016, 07:46:38 PM
Destiny of the republic: A tale of madness, medicine and the murder of the president.
Great book about James Garfield


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on October 28, 2016, 08:53:57 PM
Destiny of the republic: A tale of madness, medicine and the murder of the president.
Great book about James Garfield

Glad to see that it's a great book. It's in my queue to read in the near future.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on November 16, 2016, 08:41:19 AM
R. L. Stine goosebump No.24 "Phantom of the auditorium".


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on November 16, 2016, 08:54:56 AM
"It Can't Happen Here," by (minnesota's own) Sinclair Lewis. Obvious reasons.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on November 26, 2016, 07:51:22 AM
Yesterday I picked up four books:
 - Vegetarian Cooking of India, Mridula Baljekar
 - Wolf in White Van, John Darnielle
 - Readings on Fascism and National Socialism, ed. U. of Colorado Dept. of Philosophy
 - Imperialism, the Highest Stage of Capitalism, V.I. Lenin

The latter two, I was just thinking I hadn't ever actually read anything by contemporaneous proponents of those systems. They were there, they were cheap, why not?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on November 28, 2016, 06:01:33 PM
"Crooked House" by Agatha Christie. I just found it in the basement, last pages missed so I went to library site to finish it. It's very unusual & advanced for the time in that the murderer is Josephine, the 12-year-old girl. It's very smart because nobody would suspect child. She was bragging about knowing the identity of killer but funnily the adults around her decided that if she knows too much, she'll be the next victim. Agatha rules! :3d No wonder it's her favorite detective she'd written. & I was amazed that it wasn't adapted till now to film. But maybe they couldn't find the right girl to play villain.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on November 28, 2016, 06:35:34 PM
Oh no, you told the identity of the killer!
Should have indicated "spoiler alert"
 :lol


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on November 28, 2016, 08:16:38 PM
Too bad there isn't feature like in Imdb boards where you can black the bits with story giveaways. If need be, smb. can see what's written there.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on November 28, 2016, 08:46:59 PM
That's okay. I have so many other Agatha Christie stories to read, and my old brain isn't what it used to be, so I'll probably forget by the time I get to this story.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on December 30, 2016, 09:29:10 AM
I'm reading "The Conscience of a Conservative," by Sen. Barry Goldwater.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on December 30, 2016, 03:34:23 PM
I'm reading "The Conscience of a Conservative," by Sen. Barry Goldwater.

And I finished it. A short read, certainly worth the time for anybody interested in what might be the most important inspiration to modern Republicans and/or conservatives (along with, if some politicians are to be taken at their word, Ayn Rand's fiction). I'll say this, at least Goldwater presents mostly what seem to be informed arguments, as well as uncomfortable honesty. For example, he rejects the arguments of Brown v. Board of Education, though he admits he favored the objective of the decision.

What's interesting is where he splits with modern conservatives--or rather, where modern conservatives split with him--about issues like supporting labor unions (which he did, in a limited sense) and rejecting corporations' financing of campaigns.

There are other points where I just can't agree with him based on his presuppositions or definitions. For example, his criticism that liberals "look only at the material side of man's nature," while conservatives believe man is "also a spiritual creature with spiritual needs and spiritual desires. What is more, these needs and desires reflect the superior side of man's nature, and thus take precedence over his economic wants. Conservatism therefore looks upon the enhancement of man's spiritual nature as the primary concern of political philosophy." To be blunt, while I can't deny (or even weigh in on whether) that is a conservative's belief, it's incomprehensible to me. Wholly indefensible in a nation whose constitution--which the conservative staunchly defends--rejects state religion. (Perhaps his definitions of vague terms like "spiritual" could clear that up for me.)

Or in his segment on education, where he writes that "the proper function of the school is to transmit the cultural heritage of one generation to the next generation." It's somewhat ironic, considering in the same chapter he talks about how "we should look upon our schools--not as a place to train the 'whole character' of the child--a responsibility that properly belongs to his family and church--but to train his mind." It isn't clear to me how one would teach cultural heritage without going beyond the nuts-and-bolts education of math, science, etc., and into the "whole character."

The final, and longest, chapter is about "The Soviet Menace," and honestly it made me both sad and laugh. But it's not fair to judge in hindsight, when I can see that obviously there was no menace at all. But it's a myopic joke that is sadly similar to much of what we hear these days about ISIS and Iran.

All that said, there is plenty in the treatise I found perfectly rational, and with which I agreed. There was also plenty that, while I didn't immediately agree, I will think more about going forward.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Emily on January 01, 2017, 01:48:29 PM
I'm interested in hearing what you agreed with.

It would be hard to underestimate the impact of The Conscious of a Conservative. Reagan became the most prominent acolyte. Trump uses much of the rhetoric of Goldwater without the attempt at a consistent philosophy:
http://mobile.nytimes.com/1964/03/23/goldwater-using-patriotic-theme.html

I think the essential problem with Goldwater Conservative economic theory and philosophy is that it assumes non-existent conditions. It draws on a history that was singular to a place and time that only briefly existed - the American frontier: a pre-industrial and pre-corporate society in which each individual can, Pa Ingalls-like, forge their way independent of ties to institutions (of course if you read the books, Pa and all his compatriots got a hell of a lot of assistance from each other and from the government.)  It pretends we each get our claim and can make what we will of it, when of course many people receive no claim and industrial, corporate economies leave little room for self-determination. Also, the anti-welfare, charities-should-do-it attitude disregards the anonymity of modern society. In a pre-industrial society, community barn-raising or other forms of community assistance are encouraged and reinforced by the lack of anonymity. One is compelled to assist because one knows the sufferer and because the community expects one to assist. In an anonymous modern society, these factors don't compel assistance.







Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on January 02, 2017, 11:35:01 AM
I'm interested in hearing what you agreed with.

To be honest, I'll have to go back and peruse to find specific examples, but I can generally answer by saying I have a certain respect for and identification with classical liberalism. Not wholly, by any means, but somewhat. While I realize a few of us here are lumped together to be of a single mind, the reality is my personal political beliefs are quite a jumble that blends aspects of (at least) classical liberalism and social democracy, maybe even with a shake of conservatism here and there.

There are also some arguments about what the federal government has jurisdiction over under the constitution, and I have to admit that (barring constitutional amendments, which as someone who gives the constitution no particular scriptural standing, I am fine with, though it's a burdensome process) I have to hear out. Now to be clear on that last point, I'm no lawyer and haven't spent all that much time investigating the justification for federal intervention in these supposedly states' issues. I just say that if there are legitimate questions about them, that's fair, even if I don't like the outcomes. The end doesn't justify the means.

So in the end, I am always in a state of unease about where to draw the line between equality of opportunity and equality of outcome, especially considering it seems to me that outcomes are the most obvious and maybe only way to measure opportunities on a broad scale (while admitting that through individual cases it's obvious why there would be inequalities of outcome regardless of opportunity). I hope you'll grant me leeway as someone whose political ideology doesn't exist yet; it's morphing pretty consistently as I read, learn, converse, and think about it.

I think further discussion on this ought to be in the politics thread lest anyone post about Trump in the Beach Boys forum.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on January 04, 2017, 05:16:34 PM
Guess I would consider myself to be an "Eisenhower Conservative" - (sort of) conservative with economic problems, liberal with human problems. So I don't fit in with Goldwater, and most definitely not with modern day "conservatives".
I did have respect for Goldwater, however. And found it interesting that he was a neighbor of Alice Cooper.
Looked through the text quickly but plan to go back and read it more thoroughly, to see how things have or haven't changed over the past 50 plus years.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on January 04, 2017, 05:55:57 PM
Someone forwarded a post on FB, stating that 42 percent of US university graduates haven't read a book since graduation.
If true, how sad. And dangerous for the future of our country.
Can't imagine life without books!

Back in the late 60s I wasn't doing well in school. It was an attitude problem on my part, plus what could only be termed ADD - my mind was wandering all over the place. The only subject I was really able to excel in was History. During that time I read the Robert Massie classic, "Nicholas and Alexandra" which made me a fanatic about all things Russian. My seventh grade history teacher (I was 12-13 years old) encouraged me to write several term papers on Russian history, government etc. Then later on, music, literature.
I felt sorry for the Tsar's youngest children, Anastasia and Alexei. And with Alexei I also studied hereditary illnesses such as hemophilia.
Finally, like many others I've been fascinated by the figure of Rasputin, who perhaps saved Alexei's life, and had a big influence on the actions of the royal family.
BTW I'm no "romantic". The situation in Russia was terrible and something had to be done. But Communism, particularly under Stalin, certainly wasn't better.
Am saying all this because I found out that last December 30 was the 100th anniversary of Rasputin's murder. So I am now reading a biography that just came out - "Rasputin: Faith, Power and the Twilight of the  Romanovs." It's a fascinating read so far. Interesting fact : A number of people, including Rasputin's ancestors, moved to Siberia voluntarily. That far away there was a lot more freedom from the repressive policies of the Tsar.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on January 09, 2017, 12:10:18 PM
I'm back with Mike's book. I didn't stop because of the contents----it's a terrific read so far. It's just my reader's block. That's why I mainly do word and number puzzles. But now I'm back. I've just been reading about the cunning linguist. Fascinating.   


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on January 09, 2017, 01:33:04 PM
Someone forwarded a post on FB, stating that 42 percent of US university graduates haven't read a book since graduation.
If true, how sad. And dangerous for the future of our country.
Can't imagine life without books!

If true, that is sad. And I know what you mean, it's hard to imagine life without books (or music). I'm always astounded by people who don't read and/or listen/play. How much tv or Facebook or instagram does a person need? (Obviously anyone working so much as to not have time to spare is more easily forgiven.) not my idea of a rewarding life, anyway.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Ovi on January 09, 2017, 02:54:04 PM
Someone forwarded a post on FB, stating that 42 percent of US university graduates haven't read a book since graduation.
If true, how sad. And dangerous for the future of our country.
Can't imagine life without books!

If true, that is sad. And I know what you mean, it's hard to imagine life without books (or music). I'm always astounded by people who don't read and/or listen/play. How much tv or Facebook or instagram does a person need? (Obviously anyone working so much as to not have time to spare is more easily forgiven.) not my idea of a rewarding life, anyway.

Well I dunno. I'm not a big reader either, but I'm big into music and cinema and other art forms. I don't see them as being necessarily inferior. I've tried authors over the years but none have grabbed me in the same way a musician's work or a director's work does. And I think Facebook can be a great source of information - I use it to to read news and articles from multiples sources more than anything else.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on January 09, 2017, 04:54:23 PM
As I said, not MY idea.

Sorry I'm being short btw: on the move on a phone, not trying to be curt. I was thinking in my original post of saying something about elitism, changing artistic pastimes etc. So I hope you don't take offense.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SurfRapGrungeFiend on February 12, 2017, 03:53:52 PM
Mafia hits: 100 murders that changed the mob





Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 11, 2017, 05:03:45 AM
"Yellow Submarine" cartoon script. :3d


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 19, 2017, 04:53:27 AM
"Black Cat" by Edgar Allan Poe.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on April 27, 2017, 08:37:06 PM
Just finished reading Killers of the Flower Moon by David Grann.
Concerns a particularly unsavory time in US history.

The Osage, a Native American tribe, were moved about and were finally told that they could live on some worthless land. Well, it turned out to not be worthless; oil was found there and the Osage became millionaires. However, the white folks thought it unseemly that Indians, of all people, could have fancy cars and homes. Thus the Osage were forced to have white people be assigned to them as "guardians", who controlled the money and took more than a little of it for themselves.

Then in the early 1920s the Osage started to be murdered. And those investigating the murders were themselves murdered. Why? And by whom?
And could there be a fair trial if white people were involved?
A chilling quote, on p 215, by one of the Osage: "The question for them to decide is whether a white man killing an Osage is murder- or merely cruelty to animals."  :-\

A great book, detailing one of the early FBI cases, with a bittersweet ending.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 27, 2017, 09:13:40 PM
Is Flower Moon Indian tribe's nickname? What does this strange phrase mean?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on April 27, 2017, 09:28:25 PM

In April tiny flowers form.
In May, the moon appears to be larger. taller flowers appear, keeping the smaller flowers from getting enough sunlight, and they die.
So the Osage call May the time of the flower killing moon.

The murders of the Osage started in May, 1921


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 29, 2017, 01:42:17 PM
I recently finished the lauded memoir "Hillbilly Elegy," by JD Vance, about which I have mixed feelings, and the novel "The Devil and Webster," by Jean Hanff Korelitz, which I loved. I've got a few things in various states of completion: "Christian Beginnings," by Geza Vermes; "Dark Money," by Jane Mayer; the short story compilation "Memories of the Future" by Sigizmund Krzhizhanovsky; and "On the Edge of Reason," by Mirslav Krleza.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 29, 2017, 07:22:57 PM
Robert Stine "Creature Teacher" - 2/5. Tom B. Stone "Boo Year's Eve" - 3/5.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: undercover-m on May 30, 2017, 11:42:22 PM
I started Galápagos a couple of weeks ago, although I keep forgetting to bring it to work to read during my much-savored 30-minute break.

(http://images.gr-assets.com/books/1355012643l/9593.jpg)

These covers are fun. Unfortunately, I have a used copy that's pretty tattered already, and I made it worse the other day when I stuffed my work binder on top of it. I'm a fool—both for smashing my book and for not reading it more.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on June 12, 2017, 11:58:16 AM
I might be the only one on SS who didn't know this, but found out that Agatha Christie was an avid surfer. Saw a picture of her with a surfboard.
She surfed in South Africa and Hawaii.
So decided to check out her autobiography. It's great reading so far.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on June 22, 2017, 12:43:04 AM
(http://info.eastview.com/images/MN-WAR-04RF/00000IT09640T-031K/big.JPG)

Bought this book about the Lithuanian painter--composer M.K. Čiurlionis at the shop in the Thomas Mann Museum in Nida, Lithuania, originally the German author's summer residence...


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Mike Garneau on July 03, 2017, 02:56:03 PM
Punk Rock Blitzkrieg by Marky Ramone


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on July 04, 2017, 02:09:34 AM
I'm back with Mike's book. I didn't stop because of the contents----it's a terrific read so far. It's just my reader's block. That's why I mainly do word and number puzzles. But now I'm back.

Well, I got so far and no further. Reader's block again. Six months later I'm trying a new tack. I opened it at the end and read the credits, the index (fascinating!) and the acknowledgements. So far, so good----although I noticed that the index omits Frank Zappa. Then I took the plunge and opened it again (at random) at a chapter called "The Unraveling". And now I'm really getting stuck in. Things are looking good.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on August 06, 2017, 04:57:27 AM
Edgar Allan Poe "The Masque Of The Red Death" & "Berenice" - both inspired by great CBS Radio Mystery Theater plays. "The Masque" - 3.5/5, "Berenice" - 3/5.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Jay on August 09, 2017, 10:43:05 AM
Edgar Allan Poe "The Masque Of The Red Death" & "Berenice" - both inspired by great CBS Radio Mystery Theater plays. "The Masque" - 3.5/5, "Berenice" - 3/5.
No, actually it was the other way around. The story inspired the CBS Radio Play.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on August 22, 2017, 05:16:19 PM
Again, listened to CBS Mystery Theater; this time they adapted Mark Twain which inspired me again to go read the real deal. "The Stolen White Elephant" - 3.5, "The Man That Corrupted Hadleyburg" - 4.5.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on September 02, 2017, 02:33:18 AM
I finished Mike's book today. And I must admit I thoroughly enjoyed it.

It took me a while to get started, though (gosh darn reader's block playing up again). After it had lain on the shelf for months, I read the index and acknowledgements and then started at the beginning. After grinding to a halt after 30 pages, I put it back for several more months. Then I took the plunge and started in the middle, at a chapter called "The Unraveling" and read on quite quickly to the end. Last came the bit in between----which I finished last night.

Kudos, Mike, it was a great read!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on September 05, 2017, 10:29:00 AM
At present I'm reading The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes. Or rather I read the first third of it in a two-hour burst. (See the link below for a potted description of the novel.) Curiously, in the interval of a BBC Prom concert that ended with Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony, the author read a passage from that book that I had read only a few hours earlier----and the book had been lying on my bedside table for months. The passage in question begins on my page 49 ("On the Saturday night, and again on the Sunday night, he drank himself to sleep.") and ends at the chapter's conclusion on my page 58 ("They called his Fifth 'an optimistic tragedy'.") This is seriously recommended to anyone interested in the nightmare that was Stalin's Great Terror.

(https://images.gr-assets.com/books/1449890438l/25912206.jpg)

https://www.theguardian.com/books/2016/jan/17/the-noise-of-time-julian-barnes-review-dmitri-shostakovich


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on September 05, 2017, 03:23:36 PM
Thanks for the recommendation.
I have the Great Courses lectures on classical music, and was just listening to a lecture about Shostakovich's Fifth Symphony, the Symphony that "saved his life."
His earlier opera didn't go over very well with the top brass. If I knew that Stalin was going to attend one of my compositions I would have made sure to wear a nappie (diaper)! After having to put aside his Fourth, the Fifth was his last shot to, er, not be shot?
The West didn't take too kindly to the Fifth. Shostakovich said that only Russians could truly understand where he was coming from.
Usually when I listen to a classical work I interpret it my way. Will listen to the Fifth and see if I can "get it."

As to what I've been reading, believe it or not, I have only now read Anne Frank's Diary of a Young Girl (revised edition).
Don't know how I didn't see her house during the two times in Amsterdam (1978 and 1989).


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on September 07, 2017, 03:39:43 PM
I'm about 40 pages into Yuri Olesha's short novel "Envy," and I've been laughing out loud pretty much the whole time. It's hilarious! I bought a cheap copy last weekend on a whim, it just jumped out at me.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on October 09, 2017, 04:15:39 PM
"The Shunned House" by H. P. Lovecraft - 5/5.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 10, 2017, 02:40:27 AM
"The Shunned House" by H. P. Lovecraft - 5/5.

Lovecraft! In the early '70s I read some short stories by him that scared the living sh*t out of me. I may return to him one day, as they were fantastically well-written.

Last night I decided to make Testimony my bedtime read (see link). I'd read it before but couldn't remember much about it, except that it was controversial. I assumed there'd be nothing to laugh about in a book mainly about the Stalin era (I don't want to wake my wife up, you see). Little did I realize. It only took a few pages. Humour evidently was a major weapon against going nuts during those years. I'll look for another book tonight...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testimony_(book) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testimony_(book))


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on October 10, 2017, 04:12:14 AM
Lovecraft! In the early '70s I read some short stories by him that scared the living manure out of me. I may return to him one day, as they were fantastically well-written.
Halloween soon. :D

Re: Stalin era, did you read "The Gulag Archipelago" by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn?


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 10, 2017, 09:55:43 AM
Lovecraft! In the early '70s I read some short stories by him that scared the living manure out of me. I may return to him one day, as they were fantastically well-written.

Re: Stalin era, did you read "The Gulag Archipelago" by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn?

The living manure----I like that!  :lol

I read One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich many years ago and enjoyed it, despite the horrific subject matter. I'm afraid the idea of reading a book as weighty as The Gulag Archipelago is too daunting at this stage of the game. Maybe in a another life.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on October 12, 2017, 04:10:54 PM
Just finished The Noise of Time. Fascinating book but unrelentingly depressing with no let up.
Reminded me of Cormac McCarthy’s book The Road. No hope...

Am presently reading A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles, about a Russian who is sentenced after the Revolution to life long house arrest at a hotel.  Great book that immerses you in that time. Has some happy moments but a lot more sad ones.

Will have to find a book that’s funny. Seems like just about all of my books are downers!
Suggestions would be appreciated.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 13, 2017, 02:35:17 AM
Just finished The Noise of Time. Fascinating book but unrelentingly depressing with no let up.
Reminded me of Cormac McCarthy’s book The Road. No hope...

Am presently reading A Gentleman in Moscow by Amor Towles, about a Russian who is sentenced after the Revolution to life long house arrest at a hotel.  Great book that immerses you in that time. Has some happy moments but a lot more sad ones.

Will have to find a book that’s funny. Seems like just about all of my books are downers!
Suggestions would be appreciated.

Hi, Elizabeth. Maybe the captain can help you choose (although of course senses of humour differ):

I'm about 40 pages into Yuri Olesha's short novel "Envy," and I've been laughing out loud pretty much the whole time. It's hilarious! I bought a cheap copy last weekend on a whim, it just jumped out at me.

I see Olesha wrote Envy in 1927.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yury_Olesha


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on October 20, 2017, 07:06:58 PM
I believe manure is polite way to say the s-word (e.g. "People walked past some chap taking manure in the forest"). About funny books - read Spike Milligan (plus check his "The Goon Show").


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 21, 2017, 01:14:42 PM
I believe manure is polite way to say the s-word (e.g. "People walked past some chap taking manure in the forest"). About funny books - read Spike Milligan (plus check his "The Goon Show").

H'mm. "Taking manure" means the chap is collecting it rather than producing it. "Making manure" would be a better phrase. As in "People walked past some chap making manure in the forest".  :lol

Love that word "manure"! Good call, RR.

Yes, Spike Milligan is great. I've read a lot of his stuff. He did a lot of TV too (the bit you want is at 1:52):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTcRxIgPvx0

 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on October 25, 2017, 06:47:19 AM
What am I reading?

(https://www.universaledition.com/media/image/f2/b2/5f/ue12100_600x600.jpg)

Mainly for the libretto----and to check out the magnificent orchestration.

Don't worry, I can't hear the whole thing from reading it.  ;D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on November 18, 2017, 05:39:28 AM
H'mm. "Taking manure" means the chap is collecting it rather than producing it. "Making manure" would be a better phrase. As in "People walked past some chap making manure in the forest".  :lol

Love that word "manure"! Good call, RR.

Yes, Spike Milligan is great. I've read a lot of his stuff. He did a lot of TV too (the bit you want is at 1:52):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oTcRxIgPvx0
I figured you can say "take manure" since there is phrase "take the dump". Yep, Spike is hilarious. Today's read - Tom Waits' answers to Vanity Fair Proust questionnaire: http://tomwaitslibrary.info/interviews/04-octnov-vanityfair.html

Some funny witty answers: "What is your favourite journey? - Actually, I don't own any of their records". "What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? - The floor just below that". "Which talent would you most like to have? - Being able to fix the truck". "What is your most marked characteristic? - My ability to discuss, in depth, a book I've never read". "What do you most value in your friends? - Jumper cables and a tow chain". "Which words or phrases do you most overuse? - Do as I say and no one will get hurt".


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on November 18, 2017, 08:05:31 AM
Some funny witty answers: "What is your favourite journey? - Actually, I don't own any of their records". "What do you regard as the lowest depth of misery? - The floor just below that". "Which talent would you most like to have? - Being able to fix the truck". "What is your most marked characteristic? - My ability to discuss, in depth, a book I've never read". "What do you most value in your friends? - Jumper cables and a tow chain". "Which words or phrases do you most overuse? - Do as I say and no one will get hurt".

These are funny LOL.
I can relate to the “ability to discuss, in depth, a book I’ve never read”. In college for the upper level courses the tests would include essay questions. Sometimes I didn’t know the answer but learned that on occasion I could throw in some catch phrases or other such creative nonsense and get at least partial credit for the answer.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on November 18, 2017, 12:23:37 PM
(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51DGRvuBBGL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on November 18, 2017, 03:55:12 PM
I love that book - read it when it first came out, and plan to take the time to read again. So much info!
Only thing I didn’t like - it goes through 1963, then stops. Doesn’t go one second into 1964. I wanted more LOL


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on November 19, 2017, 12:24:18 PM
Only thing I didn’t like - it goes through 1963, then stops. Doesn’t go one second into 1964. I wanted more LOL

That's where the "becoming" bit comes in, E. It has to stop somewhere. But what a read for those three years! ;=)


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on November 19, 2017, 02:40:54 PM
It’s so well written. I’d love such detail for 1964 (and beyond).

I checked a newsletter for a local bookstore. They had a book club meeting last week, and the monthly book selection was - The Noise of Time! Argh! Oh well.

Am presently re-reading Dylan’s Chronicles Volume One.
After that will be the Battle of the Band. Reading Robbie Robertson’s Testimony and Levon Helm’s This Wheel’s on Fire.
Should be interesting.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on November 20, 2017, 01:54:16 AM
After that will be the Battle of the Band. Reading Robbie Robertson’s Testimony and Levon Helm’s This Wheel’s on Fire.
Should be interesting.

Levon's book is certainly interesting! I haven't read Robbie's.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on November 21, 2017, 10:49:42 AM
I just finished reading Dennis Dunaway's (Alice Cooper Group) book.  It was very entertaining, and sad at times (like how Alice Cooper sort of broke up the Alice Cooper Group without telling anybody). 

I have to give Dennis credit.  If he really wanted to, he could've thrown Alice under the bus for throwing away that great band in their prime, but he's got a pretty good outlook.  It probably doesn't hurt that Dennis occasionally performs and records with the surviving members of the original band. 


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Unreconstructed Wilsonite on November 22, 2017, 05:18:45 PM
This year for Literature classes, I’ve had to read Cat On A Hot Tin Roof by Arthur Miller, My Brilliant Career by Miles Franklin, Agamemnon by Aeschylus, and Dark Roots by Cate Kennedy. Overall, I was most impressed by the Miles Franklin book - one gets the sense that the author was born in the wrong period and would have been more at home in the 21st Century rather than in the 1890s. Anyway, currently reading The Great Gatsby, which I had wanted to read for a while


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: SMiLE Brian on November 22, 2017, 05:25:33 PM
Good education, sorry for being a d*ckhead to you....


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on December 08, 2017, 07:04:32 AM
Radio station during this time each year starts game but the jock said who rings 1st gets gift anyway. I did, went to take my gift - Agatha Christie's "And Then There Were None". Luckily, I didn't read it before. The book's got this special fragrance which I like usually - sweet & cinnamon plus sth. else.

10 people invited to faraway Negro (?) Island (the book's in Russian) by pair they didn't meet before. In everybody's room there is children's twister about 10 little blacks. 10 guests - 10 blacks. 10 black statues. You get the whole picture - everybody gets killed as poor black kids in twister. Statues disappear.

Very sporting of Agatha to add flashblacks to each character to help see who's who. I like books with motley crew. Don't like stories with few people. F.ex., tale about 2. Tale inside the family of 5.

Favorite definitely Blore, inspector. His lines - the best, he's talkative, even too talkative, smb. said he's fool. Hm...is he? In fact, he voiced theories that made sense few times. I wished him to be survivor by the end but...Agatha decided to leave Lombard & Ms. Claythorne who I didn't like at all. They should be killed way before.
Next favorite to make Top 3 - Mr. Rogers, the butler & Emily Brent, the old lady-religious freak. Mr. Rogers seems really nice, well-bred gentleman who didn't make friends with anybody but was polite to every guest. Did his work well. Ms. Brent, again, polite classy lady, I read her lines in plummy ceremonial voice. She kept it cool at the face of murders.
Least interesting - Dr. Armstrong - too chicken, hysterical, jittery. Mrs. Rogers - by default, killed early, i.e. not much character development.

Cool ending, nice twist but at the same time it does fall into place. I didn't suspect anybody, except doctor acted mad at times. 5/5.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on December 22, 2017, 02:56:37 AM
(https://i.gr-assets.com/images/S/compressed.photo.goodreads.com/books/1348383017i/3055423._UY630_SR1200,630_.jpg)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton_Webern


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on February 11, 2018, 08:46:02 PM
I'm reading Timekeepers by Simon Garfield. It's a book about the concept of time, which fascinates me.
One chapter is about calendars. Like Mike Love, my first job in the real world was in the "oil and gas business" LOL. I had to deal with some foreign businesses, and was the only job I had that required the use of a telex (are they around anymore?) Anyway, one of the companies was in Iran. This was in 1979, a turbulent year there to say the least. We had to date correspondence to them using their calendar. Can't remember the year, maybe around 2500? But sometime late in 1979 the calendar was changed; it was then 1358.
The book mentioned about how a calendar was changed back in the 18th century, knocking off 8 days. Can you imagine what a headache it would have been if there were payroll departments back then?

Another discussion is how have musical terms such as Andante or Allegro changed over time. And how the available space on a CD was determined - possibly to be long enough to have Beethoven 's Ninth fit on one disc.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on February 12, 2018, 02:23:57 AM
Another discussion is how have musical terms such as Andante or Allegro changed over time. And how the available space on a CD was determined - possibly to be long enough to have Beethoven's Ninth fit on one disc.

Really? That's amazing!


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on February 13, 2018, 06:28:54 PM
I'm reading a few things at once, which is a bad idea generally but sometimes that's how it goes.

Hans Fallada's novel "Once a Jailbird" is one, and it's fantastic. Then again, I've thought that of the two things of his I've read before ("Little Man, What Now?" and "Every Man Dies Alone"), so it's no shock. This is the story of a 1930s German convict leaving prison after a five-year sentence, and the challenges associated with starting life.

I'm also reading Margaret Atwood's "A Handmaid's Tale," because I watched the Hulu series last year and thought it might be fun to compare it to the book. It's good, if written in an annoyingly casual style. (If I may...) Lots of thoughts ... ellipses, too ... random run-on ideas that aren't meant to be sentences because it's a book meant to be imagined in the protagonist's head, you know, I'm sure you know, that's how it works here. Book. Movie. Differences. But style is different when written. Than when watched. (Thank you. Here ends our imitation.)

As for nonfiction, I'm enjoying Richard Pervo's "Profit With Delight," a study on the literary genre of the biblical Acts of the Apostles.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: KDS on February 14, 2018, 11:26:31 AM
Im reading Bruce Dickinson's recently released autobiography.   


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on March 08, 2018, 05:15:23 PM
Just finished reading a wonderful book with the provocative title "Roots, Radicals and Rockers: How Skiffle Changed the World" by Billy Bragg.
I had first heard of Skiffle way back when I saw the Compleat Beatles documentary. It mentioned John forming a skiffle group, and also showed a clip of Lonnie Donegan singing Rock Island Line.
I really liked the few skiffle songs I heard over the years, but noticed that it seemed to be denigrated as just a phase until more "important" music came along.
 This book helps put that to rest, showing that almost all the British bands that had any success in the mid 60s and beyond had a skiffle connection.
Highly recommended for those interested in roots music.

To add, there are a couple of YT videos online:
A short one: How old timey ‘skiffle’ music liberated British rock

Library of Congress Lecture (which begins a few minutes into the video): Billy Bragg, Roots, Radicals and Rockers


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 09, 2018, 06:09:13 PM
Well smb. bumped super-duper important Recipes thread just when I posted in great Cats thread (good folk, post there, will ya?). Baaad timing. Anyhoo, Charles Dickens "A Tale Of Two Cities" - not the best book by him. 3/5.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 09, 2018, 06:18:04 PM
I despise various biographies about rockers but, I'd like to read Mick Jagger's writing/ recollections. Esp. interested in his filming "Ned Kelly", the best Ned imo. :3d


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on March 09, 2018, 06:26:34 PM
Finally began my copy of Dostoevsky's "The Adolescent" that I picked up a few weeks ago.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 24, 2018, 04:14:15 AM
Bel Kaufman "Up The Down Staircase". 1st discovered the film ["Up The Down Staircase"] which is Top 5 favorite. Many people at Goodreads didn't like it saying "it lacks the book's humor". Sure there is humor, even the music's humorous, light, positive. That said, book 5/5 as well as film despite the fact I dislike the epistolary narration.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on March 25, 2018, 08:49:51 AM
Finishing up Bart Ehrman's new "The Triumph of Christianity: How a Forbidden Religion Swept the World." It's OK, but definitely not as interesting as some of his earlier books. I think because like many of his popular-audience books, it's not really positing anything especially new or controversial but rather just promoting the general consensus of relevant scholars. With books like "Forged" and "Misquoting Jesus," those consensus positions seem controversial, or are at least unknown to typical readers. But here ... there's just nothing especially novel.

Hopefully I'll finish it today and get back to "The Adolescent," which has been sitting on the coffee table for a week or two mostly untouched.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: D Cunningham on March 25, 2018, 09:33:06 AM
PSmith Journalist, by Wodehouse.  A student could write a nice thesis pairing this with Damon Runyon.
I've managed to learn a new word here and there...as when I read Peter DeVries. And that is a good reason to read.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? P.S.
Post by: D Cunningham on March 25, 2018, 09:48:25 AM
Thanks to RangeRover for mentioning Up the Down Staircase.  Released about the same time as the All Summer Long
album?  I remember reading it a year or two later (gosh I'm old) and enjoying it much. What has stayed with me is
the book's freshness, openness, a willing to listen. Ah, the Sixties.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on March 25, 2018, 12:13:03 PM
Anyhoo, Charles Dickens "A Tale Of Two Cities" - not the best book by him. 3/5.

Well, although it wasn't the best of times reading it, it wasn't the worst, either. :-)

One of my favorite Dickens' books is the Pickwick Papers. One of the only "classic" novels that had me laughing out loud.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on April 06, 2018, 02:19:56 AM
(http://blog.paperblanks.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/great_gatsby_picture2.jpg)

This is the cover of the version I already had in the house when I was alerted to this fantastic novel. And now I'm a good way in (bye bye, reader's block). ;D   


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 06, 2018, 06:41:25 AM
Daniel Ellsburg's "The Doomsday Machine," which is terrifying.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Gettin Hungry on April 06, 2018, 07:54:53 AM
I just finished Carrie Fisher's Postcards from the Edge. It was ... fine.

I just started Carson McCuller's The Heart Is a Lonely Hunter.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 08, 2018, 11:19:49 AM
Daniel Ellsburg's "The Doomsday Machine," which is terrifying.

To help mitigate the depression caused by the above, I started Steven Pinker's "Enlightenment Now." I'm going back and forth a few chapters at a time. We're all going to die. Everything's fine. We're all going to die. Everything's fine. And so on.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on April 08, 2018, 02:00:45 PM
Daniel Ellsburg's "The Doomsday Machine," which is terrifying.

To help mitigate the depression caused by the above, I started Steven Pinker's "Enlightenment Now." I'm going back and forth a few chapters at a time. We're all going to die. Everything's fine. We're all going to die. Everything's fine. And so on.

I'm pasting this not because I want to argue the merits of Pinker (whom, admittedly, I don't particularly like) but more because I just think it's a funny take-down in a style that I would never personally use:

http://fucktheory.tumblr.com/post/57633497486/in-which-steven-pinker-is-a-total-ignoramus-who


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 09, 2018, 04:19:10 PM
I'll be honest, I don't like that style. At all.

First, it's basically pure ad hominem in spirit, even if not in the facts. (I can't pretend to have read even much of what Pinker has written, much less the everything from the philosophers and other assorted historical figures he cites, so I won't be able to weigh in on the substance much.) But the tone of the piece is "oh, listen to this fucking dick. What an asshole, he's so dumb that he thinks..." That's a turn-off for me no matter where it comes from, or toward whom it's directed. When it's from someone with whom I disagree, naturally it's an annoyance. But when it's from someone with whom I agree, then I'm embarrassed for "my team," whom I expect to rise above that nonsense and stick to facts.

Second, it has the scent of someone wildly punching up. "You don't know who I am, but you'll know me when I take down this famous asshole!" Someone like a Pinker couldn't really respond even if he wanted to, because it dignifies the tactic.

As for the Pinker book, I'm enjoying it so far. I've only read a few chapters, maybe 75 pages. But I think it's good. Then again, I think his generally liberal leanings align more closely to my mindset than I'd guess they do to yours.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on April 09, 2018, 06:07:08 PM
I'll be honest, I don't like that style. At all.

First, it's basically pure ad hominem in spirit, even if not in the facts. (I can't pretend to have read even much of what Pinker has written, much less the everything from the philosophers and other assorted historical figures he cites, so I won't be able to weigh in on the substance much.) But the tone of the piece is "oh, listen to this fucking dick. What an asshole, he's so dumb that he thinks..." That's a turn-off for me no matter where it comes from, or toward whom it's directed. When it's from someone with whom I disagree, naturally it's an annoyance. But when it's from someone with whom I agree, then I'm embarrassed for "my team," whom I expect to rise above that nonsense and stick to facts.

Second, it has the scent of someone wildly punching up. "You don't know who I am, but you'll know me when I take down this famous asshole!" Someone like a Pinker couldn't really respond even if he wanted to, because it dignifies the tactic.

As for the Pinker book, I'm enjoying it so far. I've only read a few chapters, maybe 75 pages. But I think it's good. Then again, I think his generally liberal leanings align more closely to my mindset than I'd guess they do to yours.

Like I said, it's not in a style that I would use but I don't see how you could characterize it as an ad hominem attack. The writer points out, quite strikingly, that Pinker doesn't have a solid grasp on the key figures of Western thought - not only does he not understand their methodology, he pretends as if they didn't have one. These conclusions would be somewhat excusable if Pinker was talking about some obscure figure who had little impact on the field in which Pinker himself studies ... but Descartes? That alone would be a remarkable problem had not Pinker gone on from there and suggest how he would go back and time and "guide" these philosophers, whose work he seems to not understand.

The writer then goes on to point out how Pinker erects straw men after straw men in order to defend the sciences from the humanities.

I don't think that this has much to do with politics. I think that Pinker belongs to a current fad in scholarship that emphasizes branding over actual research work and the results show in the work itself. Pinker wrote a book The Better Angels of Our Nature which posited a historical decline in violence. The book won a tremendous amount of praise from the mainstream print sources. However, almost everybody who has spent a lifetime doing scholarly work in the field he was writing in pointed out how the book is simply riddled with historical inaccuracies. But the truth is that I can't imagine Pinker much cares - I highly doubt that the book was meant to add anything meaningful to research. It was simply a kind of junk history meant to garner attention from a mainstream audience.  But again, Pinker's not alone - there's a whole handful of professional charlatans out there now who are offering their brand-centric "research" on a regular basis.

So, I suppose here's my conclusion: the person in the article I posted uses extreme language. Steven Pinker is, in my view, a professional huckster at best and, at worst, someone who uses his clout to offer fashionable apologetics for war crimes. I will take the former over the latter any time.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 10, 2018, 05:35:36 AM
I said it was ad hominem in spirit: whatever its points, they’re buried in name-calling.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on April 20, 2018, 04:03:33 AM
I'm in the throes of finishing The Great Gatsby. What have I been missing all these years? Thank you, that person, for pointing me at it. :=)

I think next up will be 1984, another book I'd be put in front of a firing squad for not reading in an enlightened society. ;D


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 20, 2018, 04:25:30 AM
"A Calf For Christmas" by Astrid Lindgren. 5/5, nice tale.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: JK on April 20, 2018, 04:37:18 AM
"A Calf For Christmas" by Astrid Lindgren. 5/5, nice tale.

One of the best authors of children's books around. My granddaughter is crazy about the films and TV series based on her Pippi Longstocking books.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on April 20, 2018, 05:06:55 AM
I'm in the throes of finishing The Great Gatsby. What have I been missing all these years? Thank you, that person, for pointing me at it. :=)

I think next up will be 1984, another book I'd be put in front of a firing squad for not reading in an enlightened society. ;D

I love Gatsby! Phenomenal book.

I like 1984 too. It's not my favourite Orwell read but, yes, I'd say it's a bucket list book.

For anyone interested, here is my book bucket list though looking at it now, I'd say it's way too short but I think I must have truncated it for the thread: http://smileysmile.net/board/index.php/topic,25110.msg610116.html#msg610116


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 20, 2018, 05:26:53 AM
Didn't read the 2 mentioned books but by description, looks like I wouldn't like the either.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: the captain on April 20, 2018, 05:31:52 AM
Judaism in Persia’s Shadow, by Jon Berquist.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Gettin Hungry on April 20, 2018, 08:27:22 AM
Just started The Talented Mr. Ripley, by Patricia Highsmith. Many of her books, including the Tom Ripley stories, have been made into popular movies that I've somehow managed not to see. So far, so good.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Chocolate Shake Man on April 20, 2018, 09:33:27 AM
Just started The Talented Mr. Ripley, by Patricia Highsmith. Many of her books, including the Tom Ripley stories, have been made into popular movies that I've somehow managed not to see. So far, so good.

I've never read the book but The Talented Mr. Ripley movie is fantastic.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: Gettin Hungry on April 20, 2018, 11:56:01 AM
Just started The Talented Mr. Ripley, by Patricia Highsmith. Many of her books, including the Tom Ripley stories, have been made into popular movies that I've somehow managed not to see. So far, so good.

I've never read the book but The Talented Mr. Ripley movie is fantastic.

I've heard good things about the movies. There are actually four books in the Ripley series. I have a collection of the first three from my library. All three have been made into movies, and actually I lied. I have seen one of them.

Obviously, there's the 1999 Matt Damon version of the first book, but also a 1960 French adaptation, called Purple Noon. Ripley Under Ground, the second book, was made into movie in 2005. The third book, Ripley's Game, has been adapted twice, first in 1977 as The American Friend with Dennis Hopper as Ripley (this is the one I've seen), and then in 2002 under its original title with John Malkovich.

Highsmith also wrote Strangers on a Train, which became one of Alfred Hitchcock's famous films.


Title: Re: The What Are You Reading? Thread
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 20, 2018, 04:09:35 PM
Obviously, there's the 1999 Matt Damon version of the first book
Highsmith also wrote Strangers on a Train, which became one of Alfred Hitchcock's famous films.
I'd seen "Strangers" - not bad. Matt Damon's "Ripley" is good, with cool jazz & retro music playing throughout the film. Matt's very underrated, people usually associate him with "Born" stuff but I think he's got chops to do any role. I'd like to see John Malkovich' "Ripley", really extraordinary thespian.