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Poll
Question: Rate The Beach Boys Love You
5 - 117 (54.4%)
4 - 61 (28.4%)
3 - 22 (10.2%)
2 - 6 (2.8%)
1 - 5 (2.3%)
0 - 4 (1.9%)
Total Voters: 198

Pages: 1 ... 11 12 13 14 15 [16] 17 Go Down Print
Author Topic: The Beach Boys Love You  (Read 76457 times)
kookadams
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« Reply #375 on: March 05, 2014, 02:31:14 AM »

The first new wave album. That's good enough for me.
more punk than new wave.
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« Reply #376 on: March 05, 2014, 03:23:18 AM »

The main thing bout LY is that ya gotta take the times into context; the 70s was an awful time for commercially viable rock, in fact quality commercial rock died in the late 60s,not just for the BBs in america but overall. LY was and is a masterpiece for the fact that it was the BBs last strong album and I do believe that their contract with wb prevented it from being a solo album because with that bein said the  Holland was their last solid group effort. I mean think about this- the ramones rejuvenated rock in 77 with their leave home and rocket to russia albums and they were never a commercialy viable group so it was about quality and not quantity. The BBs from 63 to 67 made hit albums , after that the industry changed and quality groups made quality records whether they sold well or not and in the mid 70s the BBs solidified their place as the greatest-most beloved and important rock band of all time and that fact is carved in stone.
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« Reply #377 on: March 16, 2014, 08:14:17 AM »

I never get tired of the magic of this album.. I think it speaks volumes of how far out Brian had gotten, and yet how he hadn't lost it. People so often use the word childlike to describe Brian and his music, and maybe here it could be described as childlike, considering he was 34. But I don't think it's "childlike", as if he was playing with legos between recording sessions. I think it's basic human feeling, longing for connection, and love. The same soul that wouldn't accept the truth in 'Please Let Me Wonder' longed for the love to never end in 'Let Us Go On This Way'. That love and longing, in the "pure" form (you don't know it, you feel it), is at the core of Love You. It was at the core of Pet Sounds, too. But there's a difference between PS and LY. On Pet Sounds, his love is there, blooming; on Love You, it's lost. And he wants it back. Brian's entire adult life up until that point was filled with that loss, ever since he fell in love with Carol Mountain back in high school, and one just has to look at the time between Love You to Pet Sounds and Pet Sounds to high school, from high school to little Brian listening and falling in love to the sound of his dad playing piano, the same dad who beat him. Brian's music has nothing to do about time, at all. The synths and sparsity of the sound compared to the full production of Pet Sounds shouldn't really turn anyone off. I remember being 13 and listening to Pet Sounds constantly, and listening to Love You and not feeling much of a difference between them. There is one difference though, I think, or one that might not be obvious. I think what Brian was longing for on Love You, and had been for years and years before it finally exploded into these songs, was the magic of Smile, and of Pet Sounds, and of the old days, when expressing himself almost made up for all the pain in his heart. It was the same pain that Brian was feeling when he wrote Til I Die, one of his greatest songs ever. Perhaps sadness/loss is the one only real thing in Brian Wilson's life. Perhaps subconsciously he knew that without it, he himself wouldn't be real. So for all those years between Smile and Love You, Brian was afraid to leave it's comfort, and only came close when its intensity pushed Brian to express it. One has to, in this regard, thank Eugene Landy for getting Brian out of bed during this time, and pushing him to the point where he could express himself again. He was obviously, in a very very weird place, and that's a magic about Love You. You can imagine Brian, washed out from his fear and wonder of his whole cosmic, multicolored 1960s experience,  just sitting down and watching Carson. Mike Love's vocal at the end it is one of my favorites of his. There's something funny about the "Honk! Honk! Honkin down the highway!" chorus of Honkin Down the Highway in the same way Barnyard was funny. I wouldn't say it's off putting, but something of that nature. It catches you. Solar System reminds me of that picture of young Brian looking up into the sky with a telescope. Maybe he was feeling nostalgic, or afraid of Landy, of band pressures, of everything, and so he escaped to the solar system. The Night Was So Young is one of the greatest songs he ever wrote, I think. I could go on about each song, but there's no reason for words really. Another thing, if one gets hung up about the silly words on this record, I think it's a pretty worthless fault. You're missing a beautiful, singular, cathartic experience. Like everything Brian Wilson did. And this is, really, a Brian Wilson album. I think it's said more actually then any of his actual solo records. It's the last great record the Beach Boys or Brian Wilson ever made. Brian even said to Peter Carlin 10 years ago, "That's where my heart lies."

There's something life affirming about someone diving into their own pain like this. It kind of heals yours. And no one went through pain like Brian did, and no one expressed it like he did. That's what Brian Wilson, the greatest musician in all of popular music, should and will be remembered for. It's nice to know that Brian loves you. 
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"In my opinion it makes Pet Sounds stink - that's how good it is!" - Dennis Wilson

"Our records were really very good. We're very talented and we know how to do what we do." - Carl Wilson

"The thing is, I'm just pooping along. Some people buzz along. I poop along. I just can't help it; that's the way I am. I'm just a pooper." - Brian Wilson
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« Reply #378 on: April 15, 2014, 05:54:31 PM »

Doesn't anybody know how to use paragraphs?

It's not hard.  Sad
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« Reply #379 on: April 15, 2014, 05:58:31 PM »

I don't see anyone doing anything wrong here  Huh
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MyDrKnowsItKeepsMeCalm
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« Reply #380 on: April 18, 2014, 11:05:05 AM »

I'm new to Love You, but wow. It's a crazy album, and I love it! Been listening for a month or two and not even remotely tired of it.

I'm curious about live performances of the Love You songs. I know a handful of the songs were performed in 1976-1978 or thereabouts.
Have Brian or one of the various BBs lineups ever revisited any of the songs in the 1980s, 90s or beyond? If so, which ones?

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« Reply #381 on: April 21, 2014, 03:44:22 AM »

I'm new to Love You, but wow. It's a crazy album, and I love it! Been listening for a month or two and not even remotely tired of it.

I'm curious about live performances of the Love You songs. I know a handful of the songs were performed in 1976-1978 or thereabouts.
Have Brian or one of the various BBs lineups ever revisited any of the songs in the 1980s, 90s or beyond? If so, which ones?



Brian has played "The Night Was So Young" 15 times (13 times in 2002, 2 times in 2004). Outside of that, I don't think he's done any other Love You songs  Sad
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« Reply #382 on: April 23, 2014, 07:50:56 AM »

I'm new to Love You, but wow. It's a crazy album, and I love it! Been listening for a month or two and not even remotely tired of it.

I'm curious about live performances of the Love You songs. I know a handful of the songs were performed in 1976-1978 or thereabouts.
Have Brian or one of the various BBs lineups ever revisited any of the songs in the 1980s, 90s or beyond? If so, which ones?



Brian has played "The Night Was So Young" 15 times (13 times in 2002, 2 times in 2004). Outside of that, I don't think he's done any other Love You songs  Sad
Thanks for the reply. Would love to hear that live 'Night Was So Young' someday!

A shame that Brian hasn't performed more songs from the album in recent years. I can imagine some of them fitting nicely with his current/mature voice.

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« Reply #383 on: May 08, 2014, 06:12:44 AM »

In a way, it's a pity that Brian and the Boys made other albums.  As outsider music, Love You is hard to beat. It would certainly have earned Brian a chapter in Irwin Chusid's book on the subject.

Yes, that coat----the one being trampled... ;=)
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« Reply #384 on: August 23, 2014, 05:16:04 PM »

4/5. "The Night Was So Young" and "I'll Bet He's Nice" are two of my favourite BB songs. I actually think "Johnny Carson" is underrated. I think of that song as being about Brian and the pressure on him from labels and the other members of the band. If you keep that in mind, it makes more sense. A lot of it's really cheesy, but that's something I find endearing about The Beach Boys.
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« Reply #385 on: December 21, 2014, 06:55:09 PM »

What parts on this reveal a punk-type of recording? I've often heard that referred to for this album, but with my in-experience with the punk-genre, I can't point anything out unfortunately.

If you're still around, listen to the first couple of albums by the band Suicide.
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« Reply #386 on: December 21, 2014, 07:08:35 PM »

I never get tired of the magic of this album.. I think it speaks volumes of how far out Brian had gotten, and yet how he hadn't lost it. People so often use the word childlike to describe Brian and his music, and maybe here it could be described as childlike, considering he was 34. But I don't think it's "childlike", as if he was playing with legos between recording sessions. I think it's basic human feeling, longing for connection, and love. The same soul that wouldn't accept the truth in 'Please Let Me Wonder' longed for the love to never end in 'Let Us Go On This Way'. That love and longing, in the "pure" form (you don't know it, you feel it), is at the core of Love You. It was at the core of Pet Sounds, too. But there's a difference between PS and LY. On Pet Sounds, his love is there, blooming; on Love You, it's lost. And he wants it back. Brian's entire adult life up until that point was filled with that loss, ever since he fell in love with Carol Mountain back in high school, and one just has to look at the time between Love You to Pet Sounds and Pet Sounds to high school, from high school to little Brian listening and falling in love to the sound of his dad playing piano, the same dad who beat him. Brian's music has nothing to do about time, at all. The synths and sparsity of the sound compared to the full production of Pet Sounds shouldn't really turn anyone off. I remember being 13 and listening to Pet Sounds constantly, and listening to Love You and not feeling much of a difference between them. There is one difference though, I think, or one that might not be obvious. I think what Brian was longing for on Love You, and had been for years and years before it finally exploded into these songs, was the magic of Smile, and of Pet Sounds, and of the old days, when expressing himself almost made up for all the pain in his heart. It was the same pain that Brian was feeling when he wrote Til I Die, one of his greatest songs ever. Perhaps sadness/loss is the one only real thing in Brian Wilson's life. Perhaps subconsciously he knew that without it, he himself wouldn't be real. So for all those years between Smile and Love You, Brian was afraid to leave it's comfort, and only came close when its intensity pushed Brian to express it. One has to, in this regard, thank Eugene Landy for getting Brian out of bed during this time, and pushing him to the point where he could express himself again. He was obviously, in a very very weird place, and that's a magic about Love You. You can imagine Brian, washed out from his fear and wonder of his whole cosmic, multicolored 1960s experience,  just sitting down and watching Carson. Mike Love's vocal at the end it is one of my favorites of his. There's something funny about the "Honk! Honk! Honkin down the highway!" chorus of Honkin Down the Highway in the same way Barnyard was funny. I wouldn't say it's off putting, but something of that nature. It catches you. Solar System reminds me of that picture of young Brian looking up into the sky with a telescope. Maybe he was feeling nostalgic, or afraid of Landy, of band pressures, of everything, and so he escaped to the solar system. The Night Was So Young is one of the greatest songs he ever wrote, I think. I could go on about each song, but there's no reason for words really. Another thing, if one gets hung up about the silly words on this record, I think it's a pretty worthless fault. You're missing a beautiful, singular, cathartic experience. Like everything Brian Wilson did. And this is, really, a Brian Wilson album. I think it's said more actually then any of his actual solo records. It's the last great record the Beach Boys or Brian Wilson ever made. Brian even said to Peter Carlin 10 years ago, "That's where my heart lies."

There's something life affirming about someone diving into their own pain like this. It kind of heals yours. And no one went through pain like Brian did, and no one expressed it like he did. That's what Brian Wilson, the greatest musician in all of popular music, should and will be remembered for. It's nice to know that Brian loves you. 

This is my favorite forum post I've ever read by anyone on any subject. I mean that.
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« Reply #387 on: January 13, 2015, 10:50:03 PM »

A work of flawed brilliance. In some ways, it's the Pet Sounds of the '70s--Brian barring his soul to the world. And in others, it's the anti-Pet Sounds with the complete lack of a Wrecking Crew and eloquent lyrics.

I think one could compare this to Syd Barrett's solo albums. That sense of a master at work is still there, but with noticeably sparser production and unexplainable feeling of damage and loss.

It's an enjoyable listen, I think the simple lyrics add to the sense that Brian's unafraid of exposing himself, warts/vulnerabilities and all, and that he's got nothing to prove and he knows it. He's just having fun again and trying to make a new album with the new 70s technology.

I take off a star for Solar System, though. Holy sh*t, what an absolute train wreck of a song. Here, those simplistic lyrics go from a stylistic choice and become an embarrassment. I hate to bash a Brian song to such a degree, but I'd be absolutely ashamed if anyone heard me listening to that song, and if I tried to say "The guy who wrote this is a genius who made the best music of the 20th century" they'd laugh in my face, I'd bet my life on that.

But aside from that brief moment where the album goes from cute to amateur-sounding, it's all good. A solid 4/5
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« Reply #388 on: March 25, 2015, 04:02:10 AM »

It is awesome but feels like an intrusion on someone undergoing primal therapy to place him in a totally childlike state, like Lennon on Plastic Ono Band.

Some moments are as good as any popular music I have ever heard - The Night Was So Young stands up alongside any song you can name IMHO

Carl's plea, "Tell me what's on your mind" send chills

"I Wanna Pick You Up" also has eternal joyfulness for me.
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« Reply #389 on: April 02, 2015, 06:01:05 AM »

I take off a star for Solar System, though. Holy sh*t, what an absolute train wreck of a song. Here, those simplistic lyrics go from a stylistic choice and become an embarrassment. I hate to bash a Brian song to such a degree, but I'd be absolutely ashamed if anyone heard me listening to that song, and if I tried to say "The guy who wrote this is a genius who made the best music of the 20th century" they'd laugh in my face, I'd bet my life on that.

I feel let down by the tossed-off middle eight of "Solar System". But ashamed of the song? No way! Grin
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« Reply #390 on: April 07, 2015, 06:51:37 PM »

I take off a star for Solar System, though. Holy sh*t, what an absolute train wreck of a song. Here, those simplistic lyrics go from a stylistic choice and become an embarrassment. I hate to bash a Brian song to such a degree, but I'd be absolutely ashamed if anyone heard me listening to that song, and if I tried to say "The guy who wrote this is a genius who made the best music of the 20th century" they'd laugh in my face, I'd bet my life on that.

I feel let down by the tossed-off middle eight of "Solar System". But ashamed of the song? No way! Grin

I actually do have to admit, the song has grown on me immensely the past couple listens.
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Aquarian SMiLE>HERE
Dumb Angel (Olorin Edition)>HERE
Dumb Angel [the Romestamo Cut]>HERE

& This is a new pet project Ive worked on, which combines Fritz Lang's classic film, Metropolis (1927) with The United States of America (1968) as a new soundtrack. More info is in the video description.
The American Metropolitan Circus>HERE
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« Reply #391 on: April 10, 2015, 10:51:12 AM »

Moooooooog Madness
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« Reply #392 on: April 11, 2015, 08:22:46 AM »

Solar System is an awesome song and maybe the last Brian vocal that I unreseverdly love. It has all the charm of Brian at his best: childlike in his innocence (or naivety) but incredibly sophisticated musically. I don't think "mental illness" is a factor at all; Brian could have written it for Friends or even a pre-Pet Sounds project. Johnny Carson likewise.

The only songs I give less than a 5 on Love You are "Let's Put Our Hearts Together" and "Love Is a Woman", which are just too MOR and trying to achieve arrangements that are outside of Brian's strengths at that point. Even in 1966, I'm not sure Brian would have made those songs quite work.
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« Reply #393 on: April 16, 2015, 11:20:22 AM »

WARNING - What you are about to read is an unbiased opinion on my views of The Beach Boys Love You album, released in 1977.  These views do not represent the views of Mr. Michael Love, Mr. Brian Wilson, Mr. Alan Jardine, nor the Estates of Mr. Carl Wilson, Mr. Dennis Wilson, or Dr. Eugene Landy.  This is purely opinion, not to be taken as fact. 

OK, got that out of the way.  I have to give Love You a three.  Other than Mona and The Night Was So Young, nothing really stands up. 

I don't think this is a bad album, per se.  I just don't find it particularly good or memorable.  It's one of that albums that I can put on, and about four songs in, I'm watching the clock.   I just think its run of the mill.  To my ears, this sounds like a once great band going through the motions. 

Out of all the two-fers my 15 Big Ones / Love You gets the least amount of spins. 
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« Reply #394 on: June 22, 2015, 12:23:48 PM »

The Night Was So Young is one of the best BB songs ever composed and one of my favorites. The synths and harmonies are beyond special.
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« Reply #395 on: July 06, 2015, 01:27:20 PM »

I never get tired of the magic of this album.. I think it speaks volumes of how far out Brian had gotten, and yet how he hadn't lost it. People so often use the word childlike to describe Brian and his music, and maybe here it could be described as childlike, considering he was 34. But I don't think it's "childlike", as if he was playing with legos between recording sessions. I think it's basic human feeling, longing for connection, and love. The same soul that wouldn't accept the truth in 'Please Let Me Wonder' longed for the love to never end in 'Let Us Go On This Way'. That love and longing, in the "pure" form (you don't know it, you feel it), is at the core of Love You. It was at the core of Pet Sounds, too. But there's a difference between PS and LY. On Pet Sounds, his love is there, blooming; on Love You, it's lost. And he wants it back. Brian's entire adult life up until that point was filled with that loss, ever since he fell in love with Carol Mountain back in high school, and one just has to look at the time between Love You to Pet Sounds and Pet Sounds to high school, from high school to little Brian listening and falling in love to the sound of his dad playing piano, the same dad who beat him. Brian's music has nothing to do about time, at all. The synths and sparsity of the sound compared to the full production of Pet Sounds shouldn't really turn anyone off. I remember being 13 and listening to Pet Sounds constantly, and listening to Love You and not feeling much of a difference between them. There is one difference though, I think, or one that might not be obvious. I think what Brian was longing for on Love You, and had been for years and years before it finally exploded into these songs, was the magic of Smile, and of Pet Sounds, and of the old days, when expressing himself almost made up for all the pain in his heart. It was the same pain that Brian was feeling when he wrote Til I Die, one of his greatest songs ever. Perhaps sadness/loss is the one only real thing in Brian Wilson's life. Perhaps subconsciously he knew that without it, he himself wouldn't be real. So for all those years between Smile and Love You, Brian was afraid to leave it's comfort, and only came close when its intensity pushed Brian to express it. One has to, in this regard, thank Eugene Landy for getting Brian out of bed during this time, and pushing him to the point where he could express himself again. He was obviously, in a very very weird place, and that's a magic about Love You. You can imagine Brian, washed out from his fear and wonder of his whole cosmic, multicolored 1960s experience,  just sitting down and watching Carson. Mike Love's vocal at the end it is one of my favorites of his. There's something funny about the "Honk! Honk! Honkin down the highway!" chorus of Honkin Down the Highway in the same way Barnyard was funny. I wouldn't say it's off putting, but something of that nature. It catches you. Solar System reminds me of that picture of young Brian looking up into the sky with a telescope. Maybe he was feeling nostalgic, or afraid of Landy, of band pressures, of everything, and so he escaped to the solar system. The Night Was So Young is one of the greatest songs he ever wrote, I think. I could go on about each song, but there's no reason for words really. Another thing, if one gets hung up about the silly words on this record, I think it's a pretty worthless fault. You're missing a beautiful, singular, cathartic experience. Like everything Brian Wilson did. And this is, really, a Brian Wilson album. I think it's said more actually then any of his actual solo records. It's the last great record the Beach Boys or Brian Wilson ever made. Brian even said to Peter Carlin 10 years ago, "That's where my heart lies."

There's something life affirming about someone diving into their own pain like this. It kind of heals yours. And no one went through pain like Brian did, and no one expressed it like he did. That's what Brian Wilson, the greatest musician in all of popular music, should and will be remembered for. It's nice to know that Brian loves you. 

This is the best comment I've ever read. I definitely feel a connection when listening to Love You. Its like for me, its all about knowing the feeling of Love, but not getting it or accepting it in your life, and it pains you emotionally, mentally and physically.  You always think about what Love can do, the wonders but you don't have that person or spark that will make you do it. TNWSY is such a heart breaking song, gives me the chills and helped me cope through my depressing and heartbreaking times through late high school. I love the synths and some of the lyrics its so cheesy but I love it, it makes me feel innocent and all fuzzy. Its just a shame I can't share my admiration with the BB to anyone else I know.
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« Reply #396 on: September 25, 2015, 08:13:10 AM »

Let Us Go On This Way (3/5)
Roller Skating Child (4/5)
Mona (2/5)
Johnny Carson (2/5)
Good Time (4/5)
Honkin' Down The Highway (4/5)
Ding Dang (3/5)
Solar System (0/5)
The Night Was So Young (3/5)
I'll Bet He's Nice (5/5)
Let's Put Our Hearts Together (1/5)
I Wanna Pick You Up (0/5)
Airplane (3/5)
Love Is A Woman (0/5)

One gem, a few potentially great songs let down by poor production and horrid vocals, a very good song that had no place being on the record in that form and far too many abominations.
Overall 2/5.
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« Reply #397 on: September 25, 2015, 09:38:34 AM »

Sorry if this is overly 'critic-y' but...

Admittedly, I like a lot of record as a fascination, rather than an enjoyable piece of music. The first side plays like a hypothetical Side 3 of 15 BO, silly rock 'n' roll numbers that are willfully obtuse in the sense that Brian seemed to be daring the listener to enjoy them. Totally abrasive and wild, and often very funny, but with a gleeful perversity to them that makes them very unique to this particular era of Brian/BBs. It's hard to enjoy them, it took me years not to immediately skip to "Good Time", which is a highlight for me, but I've learned to appreciate the sheer balls of recording a track like "Johnny Carson" or "Honkin' Down the Highway". Even though around this time most of the Boys were apologizing publicly for the let down of 15 BO, Brian seemed to basically double-down on that record's approach with an almost complete deconstruction of rock music as we know it, instead playing a stripped-down and mechanical machination of rock that almost plays like a parody of the genre itself.

Side 2 is where most of the record's gems lie, "Solar System", "I'll Bet...", "Airplane" and "The Night" are as good as anything they did in the '70s. They play more to the obvious strengths of all involved and are almost entirely devoid of rock music, but play well together as a collection of waltzes and robotic ballads. The instrumental arrangement on "I'll Be He's Nice" is brilliant, the guitars and synths play off each other like a call and response, so cool! Mike does an incredible job with "Airplane", and I actually love Carl's soulful, kind-of-drunk vocals that are all over the second side. "Love is a Woman" is an obvious weak point, no wonder its stashed away at the end there. "Pick you Up" I actually enjoy mostly because the lead synth sound is wonderful, and "pat....pat.....pat her on her buuuuuutt" always cracks me up, only Brian would ever sing that lyric on a record.

I'd give this record a solid 4, I'd probably even go 4.5 just for the complete madness that is this record. A classic Brian record.
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« Reply #398 on: November 20, 2015, 02:01:57 AM »

Yesterday, I gave Love You the first listen in years----and thoroughly enjoyed it. What a strange, engaging album.

I seem to have already voted on it without comment----I hope it was a good vote.   
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« Reply #399 on: November 21, 2015, 02:51:03 AM »

I seem to have already voted on it without comment----I hope it was a good vote.   

You should score each track like Mike's Beard has as you don't remember voting.  Tongue
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