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658652 Posts in 26378 Topics by 3745 Members - Latest Member: oncetoseeyou June 05, 2020, 05:13:37 AM
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Author Topic: The first time The Beach Boys used the 8-track recorder  (Read 1357 times)
zaval80
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« Reply #50 on: May 16, 2020, 12:36:32 PM »

Without a log of any kind, that would be a guesswork. Even the Beatles sessions which are so much better researched had quite a number of engineers from session to session. As we don't hear of people bragging "I engineered this and that hit for the Boys" too often, this may mean there was a number of such engineers. (And of course, the studios where Brian recorded were high-profile.)
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aeijtzsche
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« Reply #51 on: May 16, 2020, 12:45:07 PM »

There is documentation; what I am proposing here and I think the others who have contributed to conversations like these over the decades might agree, is that we can revisit our past assumptions about, not only Brian's, but the entire music-studio community's working methods.  So much of the mythos of Pet Sounds has been sort of set in stone, or maybe it'd be better to say drowned in aspic.  The same vague bromides get recycled over and over and pass into history without getting looked at seriously again.  It is actually very important on the broader scale to go back and mine the same documentation for potentially new fruit, because this period in music recording is so under-considered in general; the three-track and four-track era.  It really was a different country than the 8-track and 16-track era.  (I would group the 3- and 4- track eras together as one epoch -- incredibly brief though it was -- and the 8- and 16- track eras as a seperate epoch.)  It's very specific work and in the case of tying it together with the Beach Boys requires revisiting past narratives with an open mind.
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SaltyMarshmallow
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« Reply #52 on: May 16, 2020, 01:09:37 PM »

Well, according to c-man's notes, the engineers present for each Pet Sounds song's final session who would've likely handled the mixes with Brian were:

Sloop John B - Chuck Britz & Winston Wong
You Still Believe in Me - unknown
Pet Sounds - Chuck Britz
Let's Go Away for Awhile - Chuck Britz
Wouldn't It Be Nice - Ralph Valentin & mysterious Don T.
Caroline No - Chuck Britz
I Know There's an Answer - possibly Bowen David
Don't Talk - Bowen David
I Just Wasn't Made for These Times - Ralph Valentin
That's Not Me - unknown
I'm Waiting for the Day - Ralph Valentin & Don T.
God Only Knows - Ralph Valentin
Here Today - possibly Jerry Hockman

A couple of early Wouldn't It Be Nice mono mixes from Feb 16 and March 3 would've been Chuck at Western. Lots of early mixes going around but I think that's the only song with totally different vocal attempts at different studios.
« Last Edit: May 16, 2020, 01:10:51 PM by SaltyMarshmallow » Logged
aeijtzsche
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« Reply #53 on: May 16, 2020, 01:26:54 PM »

What's really interesting as I look at those names and their associated tracks for the billionth time, is to consider anew just how many hands and how many electronics touched these records.  One generation of tape was mixed by, say H Bowen through Bill Putnam circuits, the next gen was mixed by Jerry Hochman through CBS circuits, etc.  And then presumably everything went through another step at mastering by a different engineer.  All of these people would be credited on the album today--not then. 

Also, my mind pinged with memory about a hoffman forum thread about where PS was mastered.  I looked it up:

https://forums.stevehoffman.tv/threads/does-anyone-know-where-brian-wilson-mastered-pet-sounds-in-1966-info-is-here.37344/

Funny to see little 23 year old me back there in the early 2000s trying to get to the bottom of stuff....  Ah, we are who we are.
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c-man
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« Reply #54 on: May 17, 2020, 07:50:37 AM »

Well, according to c-man's notes, the engineers present for each Pet Sounds song's final session who would've likely handled the mixes with Brian were:

Sloop John B - Chuck Britz & Winston Wong
You Still Believe in Me - unknown
Pet Sounds - Chuck Britz
Let's Go Away for Awhile - Chuck Britz
Wouldn't It Be Nice - Ralph Valentin & mysterious Don T.
Caroline No - Chuck Britz
I Know There's an Answer - possibly Bowen David
Don't Talk - Bowen David
I Just Wasn't Made for These Times - Ralph Valentin
That's Not Me - unknown
I'm Waiting for the Day - Ralph Valentin & Don T.
God Only Knows - Ralph Valentin
Here Today - possibly Jerry Hockman

A couple of early Wouldn't It Be Nice mono mixes from Feb 16 and March 3 would've been Chuck at Western. Lots of early mixes going around but I think that's the only song with totally different vocal attempts at different studios.

Yeah, and don't forget that Jim Lockert and Phil Kaye reportedly engineered some Pet Sounds sessions, according to Byron Preiss. Whether or not that means mixing or simply vocal overdub sessions, we don't know.
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