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Author Topic: Recent thoughts on Jack Rieley by the Beach Boys?  (Read 6141 times)
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« on: September 08, 2018, 06:16:36 AM »

By recent, I mean in the last 30 years.  Basically in hind sight, are there any quotes from Brian? Mike? Al? Carl? Blondie? Ricky? About Jack 'how to spell' Rieley?
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"Over the years, I've been accused of not supporting our new music from this era (67-73) and just wanting to play our hits. That's complete b.s......I was also, as the front man, the one promoting these songs onstage and have the scars to show for it."
Mike Love autobiography (pg 242-243)
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« Reply #1 on: September 08, 2018, 09:09:24 AM »



Jack was the best thing that happened for the band. He brought them back from a near death existence with some actual direction and relevant lyrics that complimented their incredible music of that particular era. No, he was not a perfect person but you've got to wonder what direction they would have gone had he stayed on. If Western Justice was any indication, all things BB may have been far better. Who knows, perhaps Mike who so wanted his outrageous share of control would have left them in frustration and that's where things would have gotten very interesting. Perhaps Jack could have rekindled Brian's enthusiasm with the whiney Love out of the way. Food for thought in the "what if" department.
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« Reply #2 on: September 08, 2018, 11:40:19 AM »



Jack was the best thing that happened for the band. He brought them back from a near death existence with some actual direction and relevant lyrics that complimented their incredible music of that particular era. No, he was not a perfect person but you've got to wonder what direction they would have gone had he stayed on. If Western Justice was any indication, all things BB may have been far better. Who knows, perhaps Mike who so wanted his outrageous share of control would have left them in frustration and that's where things would have gotten very interesting. Perhaps Jack could have rekindled Brian's enthusiasm with the whiney Love out of the way. Food for thought in the "what if" department.

I agree about how Jack pushed the Beach Boys to be more progressive,  leading to 3 of their most mature albums plus their best live album.  He probably would have encouraged them to fight against the oldies. However,  I no they were financially struggling at the time. They were not only fighting Endless Summer,  but their own fans. I think Mike has had good things to say about that era. Specifically,  he was supportive of bringing Blondie and Ricky on board. He said in his book that as the front man, he was the one promoting the newer songs on stage, and had the scars to show for it. Granted, I would not be one of those. I wish they would have continued to progress and experiment. 
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"Over the years, I've been accused of not supporting our new music from this era (67-73) and just wanting to play our hits. That's complete b.s......I was also, as the front man, the one promoting these songs onstage and have the scars to show for it."
Mike Love autobiography (pg 242-243)
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« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2018, 11:57:26 AM »

You might find some comments in this thread:


http://smileysmile.net/board/index.php/topic,20413.0.html
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2018, 11:07:45 AM »

From Brian’s Facebook, April 21, 2015
https://www.facebook.com/officialbrianwilson/photos/a.452661542240/10153245968177241/?type=3
Quote
I’m sad to hear about Jack Rieley passing away last Friday. Jack was our manager in the early 1970s and helped us a lot. He wrote the lyrics for “A Day in the Life of a Tree” which blew me away. I also had Jack sing the lead on that one because his voice seemed to fit the song. Jack was a real force on our “Surf’s Up” and “Holland” albums and I’ll always remember his kindness. My thoughts go out to Jack’s family and friends.
- Love and Mercy, Brian
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2018, 11:20:18 AM »

Here are some excerpts from Brian’s book mentioning Jack Rieley.




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« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2018, 01:39:33 PM »

Thanks guys. I just pulled out Mike Loves book and he talks a bit about him as well. Perhaps I should pull out the Dennis and Carl books as well. Though they aren't autobiographies. But I'm sure they both would think highly of that era today. I'm curious if Al has said anything.
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"Over the years, I've been accused of not supporting our new music from this era (67-73) and just wanting to play our hits. That's complete b.s......I was also, as the front man, the one promoting these songs onstage and have the scars to show for it."
Mike Love autobiography (pg 242-243)
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« Reply #7 on: September 09, 2018, 06:30:49 PM »



Jack was the best thing that happened for the band. He brought them back from a near death existence with some actual direction and relevant lyrics that complimented their incredible music of that particular era. No, he was not a perfect person but you've got to wonder what direction they would have gone had he stayed on. If Western Justice was any indication, all things BB may have been far better. Who knows, perhaps Mike who so wanted his outrageous share of control would have left them in frustration and that's where things would have gotten very interesting. Perhaps Jack could have rekindled Brian's enthusiasm with the whiney Love out of the way. Food for thought in the "what if" department.

I agree about how Jack pushed the Beach Boys to be more progressive,  leading to 3 of their most mature albums plus their best live album.  He probably would have encouraged them to fight against the oldies. However,  I no they were financially struggling at the time. They were not only fighting Endless Summer,  but their own fans. I think Mike has had good things to say about that era. Specifically,  he was supportive of bringing Blondie and Ricky on board. He said in his book that as the front man, he was the one promoting the newer songs on stage, and had the scars to show for it. Granted, I would not be one of those. I wish they would have continued to progress and experiment. 

What are these "scars" he's referring to?
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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2018, 08:47:48 AM »

"Plus, I wanted the lead to sound like a dying tree, and if that's what you're going for, Jack Rieley's your man."   LOL LOL LOL
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« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2018, 08:58:00 AM »

I wonder if a version of the song with Brian singing still exists? Even if he only sang one or two lines before bailing, it would be interesting to hear.
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« Reply #10 on: September 10, 2018, 09:32:06 AM »

I wonder if a version of the song with Brian singing still exists? Even if he only sang one or two lines before bailing, it would be interesting to hear.

It was a bit of an urban legend in past years on the internet that Brian had come out on stage at a show circa 1971 and performed "A Day in the Life of a Tree." The last I can remember, the most accurate version of what actually happened was that at one show, usually cited as Long Beach in December 1971, Jack Rieley came out and sang the song on stage, with reportedly Brian accompanying on organ.

I *still* have the Rusten/Stebbins "In Concert" book in a box out of reach, so that book probably provides the most definitive version of what's known.
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« Reply #11 on: September 10, 2018, 03:07:45 PM »



Jack was the best thing that happened for the band. He brought them back from a near death existence with some actual direction and relevant lyrics that complimented their incredible music of that particular era. No, he was not a perfect person but you've got to wonder what direction they would have gone had he stayed on. If Western Justice was any indication, all things BB may have been far better. Who knows, perhaps Mike who so wanted his outrageous share of control would have left them in frustration and that's where things would have gotten very interesting. Perhaps Jack could have rekindled Brian's enthusiasm with the whiney Love out of the way. Food for thought in the "what if" department.

I agree about how Jack pushed the Beach Boys to be more progressive,  leading to 3 of their most mature albums plus their best live album.  He probably would have encouraged them to fight against the oldies. However,  I no they were financially struggling at the time. They were not only fighting Endless Summer,  but their own fans. I think Mike has had good things to say about that era. Specifically,  he was supportive of bringing Blondie and Ricky on board. He said in his book that as the front man, he was the one promoting the newer songs on stage, and had the scars to show for it. Granted, I would not be one of those. I wish they would have continued to progress and experiment. 

What are these "scars" he's referring to?

I believe he is inferring that many fans were very cruel toward the progressive music. Perhaps they literally threw bottles at them in the middle of a song like Long Promised Road or Surf Up. I haven't seen the scars myself. He mentions this in his book. Could have meant emotional scars too. I don't know.
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"Over the years, I've been accused of not supporting our new music from this era (67-73) and just wanting to play our hits. That's complete b.s......I was also, as the front man, the one promoting these songs onstage and have the scars to show for it."
Mike Love autobiography (pg 242-243)
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« Reply #12 on: September 10, 2018, 03:10:37 PM »

I wonder if a version of the song with Brian singing still exists? Even if he only sang one or two lines before bailing, it would be interesting to hear.

It was a bit of an urban legend in past years on the internet that Brian had come out on stage at a show circa 1971 and performed "A Day in the Life of a Tree." The last I can remember, the most accurate version of what actually happened was that at one show, usually cited as Long Beach in December 1971, Jack Rieley came out and sang the song on stage, with reportedly Brian accompanying on organ.

I *still* have the Rusten/Stebbins "In Concert" book in a box out of reach, so that book probably provides the most definitive version of what's known.

Custom Machine (Rob) - you were there - care to comment?   Wink
« Last Edit: September 10, 2018, 03:11:29 PM by c-man » Logged
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« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2018, 06:48:48 PM »


I wonder if a version of the song with Brian singing still exists? Even if he only sang one or two lines before bailing, it would be interesting to hear.


It was a bit of an urban legend in past years on the internet that Brian had come out on stage at a show circa 1971 and performed "A Day in the Life of a Tree." The last I can remember, the most accurate version of what actually happened was that at one show, usually cited as Long Beach in December 1971, Jack Rieley came out and sang the song on stage, with reportedly Brian accompanying on organ.

I *still* have the Rusten/Stebbins "In Concert" book in a box out of reach, so that book probably provides the most definitive version of what's known.


Custom Machine (Rob) - you were there - care to comment?   Wink


Yes, I was there, Dec. 3, 1971, Long Beach Arena - easily one of the very best BB concerts I've ever attended. Jack Rieley MC'd the concert, which started quite late as Jack announced that Carl's son Justin had been injured, as I recall from a fall, thus delaying Carl's arrival. Rather than walking out on stage at the same time, the group members individually sauntered out on stage. Bruce was the last guy to show up, stating, "Man, it takes a long time to shoot up!" I recall having a sinking feeling, wondering, "OMG, is Bruce Johnston on smack?" Turns out he was obviously joking.

At some point during the concert it was suggested that A Day in the Life of a Tree be performed. It may have been Jack himself who made the suggestion, or perhaps Mike, I don't really recall. Brian was coaxed up on stage to play the organ, and it did take some coaxing, from both the band and the audience, before he finally agreed, and Jack sang the song.

In my photo of the event a bright spotlight was on Brian, so he just shows up as a big white blob. (This was back in the day when you had only 24 or 36 photos on a roll of film, so you had to be judicious as to when to take a pic.) Toward the end of the concert I was one of a number of fans who had made our way down the aisle to the front of the stage. Suddenly I noticed Brian and Marilyn leaving early, with Brian walking right in front of me and Marilyn behind him.  I figured I had to say something as BW walked by, so I put my hand on his shoulder and said in his right ear, "Surf's Up, Brian!" I later realized I had spoken into the ear in which he has virtually no hearing, not that the three words I spoke would have meant all that much to him anyway, but my intent was to convey that it was really cool that Surf's Up had finally been released.

I made the recording of the concert that has been floating around for years. Unfortunately, the quality is very poor, as I placed a portable cassette recorder, with a low quality built-in mono mic, under my chair and left it there, so the sound is quite muffled. Haven't listened to that recording in quite a few years, but it's probably still floating around the internet for those curious to hear it. You can hear my buddy Ralph blabbing away at times, while I'm trying to be quiet so as to not compete with the on-stage performance.

Another recollection, on a number of occasions Carl would yell out, "What do you want to hear?" The band would then begin playing a song, which I presumed was in response to the songs the crowd had requested. Jack Rieley told the audience something like, "Don't worry, we'll be here all night!" But he later came on stage announcing, "There's some kind of a deal here, the city of Long Beach won't let us play much longer, so we'll have to wrap it up."

The very next night my girlfriend and I saw the BBs at the Sports Arena in San Diego, and I was surprised that the set-list was virtually identical (but no Brian in the audience, although he had appeared in the audience in San Diego summer '68), and thus the BBS were not spontaneously receptive to requests after "What do you want to hear" as I had assumed the night before. The San Diego concert drew a small crowd of only around 2,000, whereas a few years later, after Endless Summer, the band easily sold out the same venue, with around 14,500 fans in attendance.

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« Reply #14 on: September 11, 2018, 07:24:16 PM »



Jack was the best thing that happened for the band. He brought them back from a near death existence with some actual direction and relevant lyrics that complimented their incredible music of that particular era. No, he was not a perfect person but you've got to wonder what direction they would have gone had he stayed on. If Western Justice was any indication, all things BB may have been far better. Who knows, perhaps Mike who so wanted his outrageous share of control would have left them in frustration and that's where things would have gotten very interesting. Perhaps Jack could have rekindled Brian's enthusiasm with the whiney Love out of the way. Food for thought in the "what if" department.

I pretty much agree with the old boy here BUT...Sunflower remains a great album and it happened before Jack officially took the reins...thus further raining on the 'love' reign.  I saw the BB's several times during Jack's 'time''.  Carl and Dennis had shown a keen desire to forge a new direction for the group.  Jack's arrival, then, made sense as he helped them to do just that.  What would have happened had Jack not answered the call of the Wilson triumvirate?  'Mid-teen Bigguns'.  Jack's era was remarkably GREAT.  The 'love' era?  Ca ca.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 By the way...at NO TIME during Jack's tenure did I, even once, hear the audience do, say or yell anything which might have 'scarred' ol' Chrome Dome.  If he's scarred...the scars are ALL self inflicted.
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« Reply #15 on: September 12, 2018, 06:18:35 AM »



Jack was the best thing that happened for the band. He brought them back from a near death existence with some actual direction and relevant lyrics that complimented their incredible music of that particular era. No, he was not a perfect person but you've got to wonder what direction they would have gone had he stayed on. If Western Justice was any indication, all things BB may have been far better. Who knows, perhaps Mike who so wanted his outrageous share of control would have left them in frustration and that's where things would have gotten very interesting. Perhaps Jack could have rekindled Brian's enthusiasm with the whiney Love out of the way. Food for thought in the "what if" department.

I pretty much agree with the old boy here BUT...Sunflower remains a great album and it happened before Jack officially took the reins...thus further raining on the 'love' reign.  I saw the BB's several times during Jack's 'time''.  Carl and Dennis had shown a keen desire to forge a new direction for the group.  Jack's arrival, then, made sense as he helped them to do just that.  What would have happened had Jack not answered the call of the Wilson triumvirate?  'Mid-teen Bigguns'.  Jack's era was remarkably GREAT.  The 'love' era?  Ca ca.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 By the way...at NO TIME during Jack's tenure did I, even once, hear the audience do, say or yell anything which might have 'scarred' ol' Chrome Dome.  If he's scarred...the scars are ALL self inflicted.

In total agreement, Lee. like you, I saw them during that era many times and not once did I hear any bickering or shouts of disapproval before, during or after the new material was played. It just goes to show that crybaby luHv's book is certainly not the Beach Boy bible but more of a shopping list of events that this spoiled brat of a clown likes to spout off about.
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« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2018, 10:17:53 AM »

To be fair to Mike's comment, I feel like I remember live recordings from that '71 era where the audience did indeed call out for old songs. Didn't the BBs start some shows in this era by making a rather defensive general announcement to the effect that they were first going to play their current material and then the audience would get to hear the early hits, so hang on and be patient? It would surely not be a surprise if fans showed up to hear songs from the '62-'66 era. 'Scars' might be a slightly melodramatic way of putting it but it doesn't seem a complete stretch either.

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« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2018, 10:21:30 AM »

I don't think I've ever heard his name spoken; I've read it in a number of books, articles, etc.  By the spelling, I'd guess it was pronounced "REE-lee."  Is that correct, or is it pronounced like the name "Riley"?
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« Reply #18 on: September 12, 2018, 12:25:16 PM »

When the BBs mentioned him at shows in the '70s, they pronounced it "Riley."
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« Reply #19 on: September 12, 2018, 12:51:49 PM »


To be fair to Mike's comment, I feel like I remember live recordings from that '71 era where the audience did indeed call out for old songs.


Right, it happened all the time. I loved the newer stuff, but unfortunately the majority of the audience members wanted to hear the big hits.


Didn't the BBs start some shows in this era by making a rather defensive general announcement to the effect that they were first going to play their current material and then the audience would get to hear the early hits, so hang on and be patient?


Correct.


'Scars' might be a slightly melodramatic way of putting it but it doesn't seem a complete stretch either.


That's how I took it when I read the book.



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« Reply #20 on: September 12, 2018, 01:03:26 PM »

Fact is we could list almost any concert from nearly any band we or people we know have attended where the crowd either shouted out requests for "the hits" or got restless as new or lesser-known material was played. In some cases, very popular artists would start getting the requests shouted at them veering on heckling if they stayed too long on the "new" songs when a lot of the crowd came to hear the hits. Off the top of my head, I know of two Philly shows from Neil Young and Tom Petty which had the exact same thing happen to them. In Neil's case, which was far from a first from him, some of the audience got hostile as he did his thing on stage. Again, those are just two local examples out of many we all could cite from any number of big artists' live shows through the years.

I see this as others have posted, a near-tradition at concerts (good or bad) being blown up into something it wasn't, perhaps being stated as something that happened at every show during this era when in reality it wasn't quite as bad as some have suggested, and this also being used as part of a list of gripes to air out in a book (or books).

If some want to take it as a mandate or an excuse for whatever...it won't be the first time in BB's history.

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« Reply #21 on: September 12, 2018, 01:24:50 PM »

I have to say, the idea of an audience reacting tepidly or worse to new material and instead clamoring for hits is about as much of a non-story as there is with respect to successful (or previously successful) bands. GF2002 is entirely correct. I can completely understand a band being frustrated by it and trying to shove new material down the audience’s throats whether they like it or not (as I understand both Bowie and Prince did at times during their careers), and I can understand bands going the other way and giving the audience what they want.
 
That’s not an easy row to hoe. Go too far one way and you’re a self-indulgent asshole who disrespects the fans who financially supported your career. Go too far the other way and you lose all respect and are seen as no longer creative, coasting on your past.
 
Frankly, I think that in the Rieley era, the Beach Boys did a pretty tremendous job of threading that needle. They were performing a good amount of new material—and not restricting it to the kind of “singles from the new album” presentation you got at, say, C50, but truly representing a good variety of their music including multiple songs from multiple recent albums. I can see feeling a little bitter about wanting to show off your new material but having it pushed aside for “Fun, Fun, Fun” or “I Get Around,” but it’s a first-world problem. And complaining too much about it is a little like saying your ass is sore from sitting on your yacht all day…
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« Reply #22 on: September 12, 2018, 01:41:47 PM »


Fact is we could list almost any concert from nearly any band we or people we know have attended where the crowd either shouted out requests for "the hits" or got restless as new or lesser-known material was played. In some cases, very popular artists would start getting the requests shouted at them veering on heckling if they stayed too long on the "new" songs when a lot of the crowd came to hear the hits. Off the top of my head, I know of two Philly shows from Neil Young and Tom Petty which had the exact same thing happen to them. In Neil's case, which was far from a first from him, some of the audience got hostile as he did his thing on stage. Again, those are just two local examples out of many we all could cite from any number of big artists' live shows through the years.

I see this as others have posted, a near-tradition at concerts (good or bad) being blown up into something it wasn't, perhaps being stated as something that happened at every show during this era when in reality it wasn't quite as bad as some have suggested, and this also being used as part of a list of gripes to air out in a book (or books).

If some want to take it as a mandate or an excuse for whatever...it won't be the first time in BB's history.


When was this blown up into something it wasn't?

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« Reply #23 on: September 12, 2018, 02:36:35 PM »


Fact is we could list almost any concert from nearly any band we or people we know have attended where the crowd either shouted out requests for "the hits" or got restless as new or lesser-known material was played. In some cases, very popular artists would start getting the requests shouted at them veering on heckling if they stayed too long on the "new" songs when a lot of the crowd came to hear the hits. Off the top of my head, I know of two Philly shows from Neil Young and Tom Petty which had the exact same thing happen to them. In Neil's case, which was far from a first from him, some of the audience got hostile as he did his thing on stage. Again, those are just two local examples out of many we all could cite from any number of big artists' live shows through the years.

I see this as others have posted, a near-tradition at concerts (good or bad) being blown up into something it wasn't, perhaps being stated as something that happened at every show during this era when in reality it wasn't quite as bad as some have suggested, and this also being used as part of a list of gripes to air out in a book (or books).

If some want to take it as a mandate or an excuse for whatever...it won't be the first time in BB's history.


When was this blown up into something it wasn't?



Whenever suggestions are made that the live shows in the era being discussed were full of fans yelling and heckling when the band did new material. It was refuted above by fans who were at shows during that era.

Maybe someone should post relevant quotes from Mike's book for the discussion.
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« Reply #24 on: September 12, 2018, 03:32:48 PM »

I don't think Mike's mi-remembering anything...David Leaf (while also mentioning that some of that era's audiences were great in terms of appreciating the newer material) reported the exact same thing in respect to some audiences, in his book back in '78, and even related that there were "some depressing nights when their cries for 'Help Me Rhonda' drowned out the applause for 'Caroline No'", and "On the nights when the rowdies disrupted the show, the band would shorten the program, leave out some of the slower songs, play the hits, and get out of town." (page 143 of the original edition). To the point of this thread, though, he goes on to write, "It was probably at Jack Riley's insistence that the program stayed in its long form".

 
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