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Author Topic: I Hear A Symphony: A "classical" music topic?  (Read 19151 times)
RangeRoverA1
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« Reply #175 on: March 10, 2018, 12:16:58 AM »

I had to look around but it would seem to be from the opening duet in the Finale of Act One of Johann's Strauss's operetta Die Fledermaus: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zgbnlzs-sY

This is where the AHDN excerpt begins:

Die dir einst dein Herz erfreut, [Which once delighted your heart,]
Gibt der Wein dir Tröstung schon [Wine will soon give you consolation]
Durch Vergessenheit! [By forgetting!]
Glücklich ist, wer vergisst, [Happy is the person who forgets,]
Was doch nicht zu ändern ist. [What can't be altered anyway.]
Kling, kling, sing, sing, sing [Ting-a-ling, sing, sing, sing,]
Trink mit mir, sing mit mir, [Drink with me, sing with me,]
Lalala, lalala, etc. [la la la, etc.]
Thanks to the fast reply. Thumbs Up Lyrics match with the AHDN bit in question. Cool music, cheerful as I like. 3D
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« Reply #176 on: March 10, 2018, 02:50:39 AM »

At work, a big chunk of my job is to do this really tedious stuff processing real estate transfer deeds and as a result I can listen to A LOT of music while I do that. I've found that music with vocals is a bit distracting, but instrumental music, such as classical, is perfect.

Recently while doing this, I decided to listen to all 104 of Haydn's symphonies on Youtube.
I started with #1 and am going in order. I just finished #51 (I think) today. Almost halfway through.

My review of them is, while they're all very nice, they all sound very similar - almost to the point where they're getting a bit tedious. But I'm going to insist to myself that I finish them all, just ... because. I can easily imagine Mr. Haydn, at the end of his career, likely unable to recall all of the symphonies he wrote, it almost seems like these authors who churn out volumes and volumes of pulp fiction stories to the point where they all seem to run into each other and you can't really tell them apart (even if they're entertaining).

The bold bit could have been posted by me (except that I do non-boring rough drafts of stuff). I went through all the Haydn symphonies and thoroughly enjoyed the trip. If I remember correctly, I started in the middle working my way forwards and then from the middle backwards to #1. Grin

Amazingly, at least one symphonist has written more than 104. This is Leif Segerstam's Symphony No. 253...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v7Ht2W8Z6E

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leif_Segerstam
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« Reply #177 on: March 10, 2018, 02:52:15 AM »

Thanks to the fast reply. Thumbs Up Lyrics match with the AHDN bit in question. Cool music, cheerful as I like. 3D

Any time. I used to enjoy identifying things for people on YouTube but stopped when the place became user-unfriendly... 
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« Reply #178 on: March 10, 2018, 03:56:12 PM »

Amazingly, at least one symphonist has written more than 104. This is Leif Segerstam's Symphony No. 253...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v7Ht2W8Z6E

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leif_Segerstam
Holy moly! While one might admire that guy's work ethic, when you're writing that many symphonies, you're pretty much writing a lot of symphonies just for the sake of writing a lot of symphonies.
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« Reply #179 on: March 11, 2018, 09:03:11 AM »

Amazingly, at least one symphonist has written more than 104. This is Leif Segerstam's Symphony No. 253...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v7Ht2W8Z6E

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leif_Segerstam
Holy moly! While one might admire that guy's work ethic, when you're writing that many symphonies, you're pretty much writing a lot of symphonies just for the sake of writing a lot of symphonies.

Haha, yes. A better case in point perhaps is Havergal Brian, who wrote a mere 32 (!) but many are of epic proportions, particularly Symphony No. 1, "The Gothic", which I heard premiered in 1966. And a pretty staggering experience it was too:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRdozy4l07g

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._1_%22The_Gothic%22_(Brian)
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« Reply #180 on: March 14, 2018, 03:12:25 AM »

This is in memory of Stephen Hawking, who died today aged 76. In "Neptune" from Gustav Holst's orchestral suite The Planets, the door closes slowly on the female choir with the final bar "repeated until the sound is lost in the distance". A genius now rests in peace. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EX6gCCLx_8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hawking

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Planets


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« Reply #181 on: March 30, 2018, 02:57:11 AM »

Seeing as it's Good Friday today:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lB5OrgydzIA

Arranged by Wagner into a concert piece, this music accompanies the second half of Act 3, Scene 1 of his opera Parsfal.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsifal
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« Reply #182 on: April 05, 2018, 03:35:30 PM »

I finally finished the last of them yesterday!

As I said, they're all nice, but they're VERY repetitive. I suppose that's going to happen when you write 104 symphonies. Only about a dozen of them are worth listening to more than once. Also, you could tell in the last 10-20 of them he started getting a little more adventurous, and dabbling into some of the then-new Romanticism. But I am pretty sure if you asked him near the end of his life if he could remember every one of those symphonies, he would probably say no.

At work, a big chunk of my job is to do this really tedious stuff processing real estate transfer deeds and as a result I can listen to A LOT of music while I do that. I've found that music with vocals is a bit distracting, but instrumental music, such as classical, is perfect.

Recently while doing this, I decided to listen to all 104 of Hayden's symphonies on Youtube. I started with #1 and am going in order. I just finished #51 (I think) today. Almost halfway through.

My review of them is, while they're all very nice, they all sound very similar - almost to the point where they're getting a bit tedious. But I'm going to insist to myself that I finish them all, just ... because. I can easily imagine Mr. Haydn, at the end of his career, likely unable to recall all of the symphonies he wrote, it almost seems like these authors who churn out volumes and volumes of pulp fiction stories to the point where they all seem to run into each other and you can't really tell them apart (even if they're entertaining).
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« Reply #183 on: April 15, 2018, 05:00:52 AM »

I finally finished the last of them yesterday!

As I said, they're all nice, but they're VERY repetitive. I suppose that's going to happen when you write 104 symphonies. Only about a dozen of them are worth listening to more than once. Also, you could tell in the last 10-20 of them he started getting a little more adventurous, and dabbling into some of the then-new Romanticism. But I am pretty sure if you asked him near the end of his life if he could remember every one of those symphonies, he would probably say no.

Proficiat, S-a. I suppose the whole concept of the symphony was developing as Papa Haydn was pouring them out. I must admit I'm a fan, although I'm not likely to repeat this marathon listening session. Grin

One of the pieces I heard during the "boring" stage of my work was this gem by Morton Gould. Harvest is part of a channel of American 20th-century orchestral music I'm listening to right now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcoKsFBmk6c

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morton_Gould



     
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« Reply #184 on: April 29, 2018, 04:12:32 AM »

Heard this on the radio this morning. A bit out of season perhaps, but a gem just the same:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6pquwsisEc

http://old.bhso.org.uk/repert-273-Delius-Summer-night-on-the-river.htm
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« Reply #185 on: April 29, 2018, 10:44:07 PM »

I’m curious what you all think if Crumb’s “Ancient Voices of Children”. I became aquatinted with it the same time I first heard Smile and the two and kind of welded in my mind where I found much inspiration.

https://youtu.be/yvpuiI3fGeU
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« Reply #186 on: April 30, 2018, 02:03:50 AM »

I’m curious what you all think of Crumb’s “Ancient Voices of Children”. I became acquainted with it the same time I first heard Smile and the two kind of welded in my mind where I found much inspiration.

https://youtu.be/yvpuiI3fGeU

Thanks for sharing, pixletwin. I've heard music by Crumb before, mainly piano music if I remember correctly.

Perhaps they're too intimate (I'm happier with a broader canvas) but song cycles with a chamber group have never really appealed to me--with the possible exception of Pierrot Lunaire. The ones with orchestra by, say, Berlioz and Zemlinsky are more up my street. I can imagine AVOC and SMiLE gelling in one's mind though.
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« Reply #187 on: May 19, 2018, 07:26:56 AM »

Heard a live performance of Stravinsky's ballet The Firebird last night. Here are the closing eleven minutes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WsqK1mCGeY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Firebird
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« Reply #188 on: June 03, 2018, 07:31:00 AM »

This morning I heard "Silouan's Song" by Arvo Pärt on UK radio. This deeply sad piece fits well with some news I heard yesterday at a prize-giving ceremony for architecture graduates. One of the winners could not be there to accept their award, having taken their own life late last year. How incredibly cruel life can be.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6A9XZ7Fw-oU
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« Reply #189 on: July 21, 2018, 07:25:08 AM »

The soprano whom I used to help with her parts (she sings in a semi-professional choir) has resumed singing again after a bout of illness. One of the pieces I helped her with today was this incredibly moving Requiem by Herbert Howells:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1hBco-7y6M

http://www.chicagochorale.org/herbert-howells-requiem/
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« Reply #190 on: July 21, 2018, 07:33:43 AM »

His daughter Ursula Howells is jolly talented British actress. Could play heroes & villains equally well.
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« Reply #191 on: July 21, 2018, 08:21:57 AM »

The soprano whom I used to help with her parts (she sings in a semi-professional choir) has resumed singing again after a bout of illness. One of the pieces I helped her with today was this incredibly moving Requiem by Herbert Howells:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1hBco-7y6M

http://www.chicagochorale.org/herbert-howells-requiem/

Beautiful.

I was surprised to hear Psalm 23 ("the Lord is my shepherd") in there. Was Howells the first composer to use that in a requiem? I know it's in Rutter's, and thought that was an anomaly. Now I'm wondering how common it might be, and when it entered that context. (It is an obvious fit, really.)
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« Reply #192 on: July 21, 2018, 10:13:54 AM »

I was surprised to hear Psalm 23 ("the Lord is my shepherd") in there. Was Howells the first composer to use that in a requiem? I know it's in Rutter's, and thought that was an anomaly. Now I'm wondering how common it might be, and when it entered that context. (It is an obvious fit, really.)

Looks like they're the only two to use it in a requiem. I have yet to "get" Rutter but Herbert H nails it for me. I agree--his is an achingly beautiful work.
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« Reply #193 on: July 23, 2018, 03:41:08 PM »

I finally finished the last of them yesterday!

As I said, they're all nice, but they're VERY repetitive. I suppose that's going to happen when you write 104 symphonies. Only about a dozen of them are worth listening to more than once. Also, you could tell in the last 10-20 of them he started getting a little more adventurous, and dabbling into some of the then-new Romanticism. But I am pretty sure if you asked him near the end of his life if he could remember every one of those symphonies, he would probably say no.

At work, a big chunk of my job is to do this really tedious stuff processing real estate transfer deeds and as a result I can listen to A LOT of music while I do that. I've found that music with vocals is a bit distracting, but instrumental music, such as classical, is perfect.

Recently while doing this, I decided to listen to all 104 of Hayden's symphonies on Youtube. I started with #1 and am going in order. I just finished #51 (I think) today. Almost halfway through.

My review of them is, while they're all very nice, they all sound very similar - almost to the point where they're getting a bit tedious. But I'm going to insist to myself that I finish them all, just ... because. I can easily imagine Mr. Haydn, at the end of his career, likely unable to recall all of the symphonies he wrote, it almost seems like these authors who churn out volumes and volumes of pulp fiction stories to the point where they all seem to run into each other and you can't really tell them apart (even if they're entertaining).
Update to my comment about Hayden symphonies.

As I said, due to what I do at work, I get to listen to A LOT of music. I've mostly been listening to Romantic-era symphonies, plus a bit of Baroque and Modern stuff. In the past few months I think I've listened to several dozen Romantic-era symphonies. And to expand upon what I said about Hayden, after you listen to a bunch of them, they all start to run into each other and sound about the same, even though they're different composers. It's made me start to ponder the nature of creativity, and art in general, and why artists move on to new stuff, to the point where they delve into increasingly marginal stuff (that is, stuff that's bound to be less popular and sound increasingly awkward). Today, after listening to the first 6 symphonies from ... I forget his name ... it made me wonder if someday art in general - at least the creation of new art - is someday going to "die" simply because it's become increasingly difficult to create things that doesn't sound like something that's already been written (actually, I've pondered that many times over the past several years, but I digress). Is art of all kinds someday going to be replaced by ... I don't know what? It's either that, or artists will increasingly be faced with the choice of creating things that are similar to stuff that's already been done, or do increasingly bizarre stuff that will have limited appeal. Merzbow becomes increasingly understandable. But then, what happens after several hundred artists have created Merzbow-style music?

Probably off-topic, but a philosophical question to ponder. I think you have to listen to about 50 Romantic-era symphonies (or, 50 High-Classical era symphonies, or 50 ....) to really get what I'm saying. After a while the repetition becomes impossible to escape, even among artists who are "different" from one another.
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« Reply #194 on: July 30, 2018, 04:02:26 AM »

Here's a composer I discovered quite by accident. Morfydd Llwyn Owen died tragically young, aged just 26. But she left quite a sizeable oeuvre behind. This is her Nocturne in D flat major for orchestra, written in 1913:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-ZYKkxYEvY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morfydd_Llwyn_Owen
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« Reply #195 on: September 21, 2018, 05:47:33 AM »

Yesterday marked the death 61 years ago of Jean Sibelius. The majestic Tapiola was one of his last and greatest works:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZdQqCjszsU

 
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