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Non Smiley Smile Stuff => General Music Discussion => Topic started by: JK on February 26, 2015, 11:53:53 AM



Title: I Hear A Symphony: A "classical" music topic?
Post by: JK on February 26, 2015, 11:53:53 AM
I noticed an opera thread somewhere but not a general "classical" (awful word but it'll have to do) topic.

As a great fan of symphonies, my opening post is one by a 20th-century favourite of mine, Jean Sibelius:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uKhCHvaAc3o

Any other takers? 

 



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: alf wiedersehen on February 26, 2015, 01:05:26 PM
I haven't really dug too deeply into symphonies, but I'm a big fan of classical piano and organ pieces. I guess I don't have any particular favorites to share - I usually just go on YouTube and choose some at random to listen to. I also had a college piano class where every once in a while, the teacher would perform pieces from different classical eras in the hopes that we could learn what was unique about each. I don't remember everything I learned, but I do remember that she was a brilliant pianist.

I think I liked the works of Brahms and Bach the most.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Larry Franz on February 26, 2015, 01:40:56 PM
My entire musical education was a college introductory course that began at 8 am. The only thing I remember is my head frequently jerking up as I tried to stay awake. But a couple of people eventually got me interested in classical music to the point where I've sometimes listened to that more than rock.

I don't have time to listen to all of the Sibelius right now, but I tend to prefer later 19th and 20th century composers like him, and a few others, Beethoven in particular. I also prefer chamber music in general, especially string quartets.

Here's Carl Nielsen's 4th Symphony, "The Inextinguishable". It was recommended by someone who thought it might appeal to me as someone new to classical music. It did.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=niF6Y7ZNqys [UPDATE: No -- it was actually Nielsen's 4th!!!]

But, aside from Beethoven, my favorite composer is Bela Bartok. This is his Concerto for Orchestra.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C68SkzGb6Ww


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Alan Smith on February 26, 2015, 02:17:11 PM
John K, I'm greedily hoping this topic gets a lot of bites.  I'm starting to develop a interest in classical outside the Baroque and the Dambusters theme.

I've been getting into Benjamin Britten and I've read some interesting things about Bartok's violin concerto, so might be pursuing that one.

Looking forward to sitting down and watching the vids from both you and Larry Franz.

One of the key things that confounds me is which version of a classical piece should one seek out in terms of the performing orchestra - LSO, Weiner Philharmonic, etc?  Or is that a moot point?
And which labels to avoid?


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Larry Franz on February 26, 2015, 07:50:00 PM
One of the key things that confounds me is which version of a classical piece should one seek out in terms of the performing orchestra - LSO, Weiner Philharmonic, etc?  Or is that a moot point?
And which labels to avoid?

Hi Alan -- Those are good questions but difficult to answer. People love to argue about which versions are best, but it all comes down to personal taste. You might look around on the internet, however, and you'll find lists and recommendations like this:

http://www.gramophone.co.uk/features/focus/greatest-recordings-of-all-time-chosen-by-leading-musicians


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Ron on February 26, 2015, 08:03:30 PM
I'm a redneck so don't look at me for too much deep discussion about long lost classical favorites, but like anybody I love classical music, I only know most of the famous stuff though.

I've always enjoyed Bach's stuff.  His Double Violin Concerto is beautiful.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DJh6i-t_I1Q



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NickandthePassions on February 27, 2015, 08:06:15 AM
Interestingly, the vocal arrangements and harmonies of the Baroque era don't appeal to me, I guess because I'm so used to Brian's vocal arrangements. I consider myself a fan of "modern" classical music. My favorite are Prokofiev, Debussy, Satie, and Philip Glass (although he's a different era). Prokofiev's Nevsky...woah!


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: halblaineisgood on February 27, 2015, 09:01:52 AM
Play this one loud.
Glenn Gould -Bach G Minor Concerto https://www.sendspace.com/file/u4ry6m


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Larry Franz on February 27, 2015, 09:37:17 AM
I don't have time to listen to all of the Sibelius right now, but I tend to prefer later 19th and 20th century composers like him, and a few others, Beethoven in particular. I also prefer chamber music in general, especially string quartets.

Here's Carl Nielsen's 4th Symphony, "The Inextinguishable". It was recommended by someone who thought it might appeal to me as someone new to classical music. It did.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=niF6Y7ZNqys

Reminder to self: Do not post on Internet before rushing out the door! The Nielsen symphony I was thinking of was his 5th Symphony, not the 4th. Sorry about that!:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rWHXKjXNWBc


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Larry Franz on February 27, 2015, 12:51:40 PM
The classical piece that especially impressed me recently was Henryk Gorecki's Symphony No. 3 ("Symphony of Sorrowful Songs"), composed in 1976. I heard it on the car radio the first time and stayed in the car until it was over (which took a while, because it's 53 minutes long).

I believe this is the 1992 recording that, according to Wikipedia, went to top of the classical charts in the US and UK.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dIvEtzGEVTA


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 27, 2015, 04:16:18 PM
Wow. Nielsen's Fifth, Glenn Gould, Prokofiev's Alexander Nevsky, Gorecki's Third... what a musical treasurehouse! Makes me glad I started this thread. :=)

Actually, the first version I ever heard of the Nielsen symphony is still the only one for me.  It's by Jascha Horenstein with the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra and was recorded in 1969. To quote myself on another website: "At one point [in the first movement] as the orchestral forces gather, Nielsen instructs his snare drummer to 'improvise as if at all costs he wants to stop the progress of the orchestra'. Alfred Dukes in the Horenstein recording goes the furthest, climaxing with a furious salvo of rimshots."
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VXVTlnBLxXI


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 28, 2015, 02:04:27 PM
Here are two movements from two of my favourite 19th-century symphonies, Mendelssohn's 5th ("The Reformation", in the version I own) and Franck's lone symphony in D minor:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CSvsslDvk8E

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YKsQOpTTd7w

And one from a 20th-century masterpiece. Note the use of the Ondes Martenot:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tv67YkOWJNA 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 03, 2015, 10:34:00 AM
This is one of my all-time favourite symphonies, Shostakovich's Fourth, in the definitive recording by the Moscow Phil under Kirill Kondrashin:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7U2WzC47sQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I7U2WzC47sQ)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Please delete my account on March 04, 2015, 01:01:48 AM
I know so little about classical music- it's so hard to get to know what you like and don't like when everything sounds so great. Except I always have a harder time liking vocal classical music, whether its opera or art song or whatever. The singing style is so different to what I'm used from folk and pop. But I'm gradually becoming accustomed to it.

I think, apart from the obvious choices of Mozart, Beethoven and Bach, I really like Greig, Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Tchaikovsky, and Schnittke


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: beatnickle on March 04, 2015, 05:06:48 AM
Pavane, Opus 50 by Gabriel Faure......... a divine listening experience

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuM6tFwYaoI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuM6tFwYaoI)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 08, 2015, 07:54:48 AM
I know so little about classical music- it's so hard to get to know what you like and don't like when everything sounds so great. Except I always have a harder time liking vocal classical music, whether its opera or art song or whatever. The singing style is so different to what I'm used from folk and pop. But I'm gradually becoming accustomed to it.

I think, apart from the obvious choices of Mozart, Beethoven and Bach, I really like Grieg, Stravinsky, Shostakovich, Tchaikovsky, and Schnittke


Agree about vocal things. I love choral music but all that exaggerated vibrato by soloists can get pretty tedious. There are exceptions, of course, like the wonderful Kathleen Ferrier: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P7S162WFNI8

And I can agree with your choice of composers, except for Bach----still having trouble with him. ;D


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Please delete my account on March 09, 2015, 02:11:34 AM
Yeah, I 'd also make an exception for Kathleen Ferrier. I have one of her records. But I may be biased because of my maternal Irish heritage.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 10, 2015, 02:01:08 PM
This is one of my favourite works by a French composer, Maurice Ravel, under one of my favourite conductors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SvjJF6zs1k


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 31, 2015, 12:19:59 PM
Pavane, Opus 50 by Gabriel Faure......... a divine listening experience

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuM6tFwYaoI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuM6tFwYaoI)

Fauré wrote some wonderfully restrained music. His Requiem is worth checking out. This is the sublime closer, "In Paradisum":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIB9Tq5uWIc

   


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 04, 2015, 03:10:31 AM
Another Frenchman who wrote a magnificent Requiem was Maurice Duruflé. But perhaps his finest hour for me is as an organist in Francis Poulenc's Concerto for Organ, Timpani and Strings in G Minor (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Organ_Concerto_(Poulenc)). I don't iike concertos as a rule----pitting one player against the rest----but I love this one, here in the original (and best) version:   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bF0e9CSQNXQ


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: SBonilla on April 04, 2015, 05:04:56 AM
Pavane, Opus 50 by Gabriel Faure......... a divine listening experience

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuM6tFwYaoI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuM6tFwYaoI)
The Ventures - Ravel's Pavane...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4WB9iJLp3Q

I know, I know, it's not classical, but it's still a great track.



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: beatnickle on April 05, 2015, 04:52:35 AM
Pavane, Opus 50 by Gabriel Faure......... a divine listening experience

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuM6tFwYaoI (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuM6tFwYaoI)
The Ventures - Ravel's Pavane...
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4WB9iJLp3Q

I know, I know, it's not classical, but it's still a great track.



You're right...... that is a great track.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: feelsflow on April 05, 2015, 10:47:14 AM
I played this for Easter morning.  Spiritual and uplifting.  Played with passion and power.

Vladimir Ashkenazy with the Concertgebouw Orchestra, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Sergei Rachmaninoff:  Symphony No. 1 in D minor, Op. 13

https://youtu.be/1q0t683xaWI


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A
Post by: SMiLE-addict on April 05, 2015, 06:33:07 PM
This is one of my favourite works by a French composer, Maurice Ravel, under one of my favourite conductors:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SvjJF6zs1k
The opening several minutes, in my opinion, one of the most spectacular pieces of music ever written:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHrstmOPKBQ

Debussy's La Mer has a similarly spectacular opening:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FOCucJw7iT8
The transition around the 1:38 mark brings tears to my eyes,


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: rn57 on April 05, 2015, 07:12:16 PM
If we're talkin early 20th century French composers, I've always had a soft spot for Albert Roussel. Below, his Symphony No 2 from 1920:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHTXGePpP7A


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 06, 2015, 02:13:01 AM
Love the choice of music, guys (including The Ventures!). Actually I'm listening to the Roussel symphony now. Thanks for the tip, rn57. Stirring stuff, which oddly puts me in mind of Shostakovich at times. I know, have and love his Le festin de l'araignée orchestral suite but that's about it...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: halblaineisgood on April 07, 2015, 06:50:45 PM
Here's some more Glenn Gould/Bach : https://www.sendspace.com/file/khi534
Dig it.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 08, 2015, 01:15:01 AM
Here's some more Glenn Gould/Bach : https://www.sendspace.com/file/khi534
Dig it.

Can't beat Mr Gould. In fact, it's just about the only way I can listen to Bach. The man's a genius (Glenn Gould, I mean). ;D 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Fire Wind on April 08, 2015, 01:57:04 PM
One of my favourite Bach pieces is 'Erbame Dich' from the St Matthew Passion.  Seen the passion performed a couple of times, but with a woman in the role.  Someday, hopefully I'll get to hear a counter-tenor singing it, given that, like many here I assume, I have a penchant for men singing high.  Here's the John Eliot Gardiner version -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z4Vi8GrdGao

My favourite classical guy is probably Wagner, particularly the late stuff, Parsifal, Tristan und Isolde, The Ring.  Bite-sized chunks lose the power, though, so I don't have particularly favourite clips to post.

Not sure about a favourite symphonist.  Often, I prefer their chamber works or other stuff.  Mozart's piano concertos, plus his operas, and Schubert's string quartets.  One symphonist I like a lot is Bruckner, particularly his 7th and 9th symphonies.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IYj1mDIz6_M

One guy I tried exploring a while back was Hugo Wolf, though never made it all the way through his songbooks.  Fantastic songs, though.  Here's a favourite, 'Der Knabe und das Immlein' from his Morike Lieder.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVRHwUsG9oA





Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 14, 2015, 02:58:04 AM
Love Bruckner's Ninth. Wagner's orchestral music too, but not once they start singing, lol.

This is a fascinating work by Paul Hindemith, his Concertino for Trautonium and Strings:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kvg7H0co5Rw


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: alf wiedersehen on May 24, 2015, 01:31:50 AM
I recently bought and have been playing this:
(http://ecsmedia.pl/c/nocturnes-b-iext21282807.jpg)
Gorgeous stuff.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Peter Reum on May 25, 2015, 01:57:25 PM
Any Russian composer....especially Mussorgsky


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on May 26, 2015, 04:54:38 AM
Listening now-
 Nicolaus Esterhazy Sinfonia - Beethoven's Symphony №3, E-fmaj (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fnBhpQ2IHY4)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: joshferrell on May 28, 2015, 06:14:29 PM
well if you like RnR then you will like Mozarts symphonies 40 and 41...they are pretty dark and they fit on an album,,usually side one is 40 and side to is 41 so it's the length of a typical rock album,,, these are his last two symphonies,,,also his Requiem which fits on a record too,, it's like a rock album too in the sense of how dark it is and how long it is...just long enough and not too long...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 29, 2015, 03:37:39 AM
Any Russian composer....especially Mussorgsky

i can go with that. :=)

Here in Rotterdam we have an annual Gergiev Festival, held in September and named after my favourite living conductor, Valery Gergiev, who is the festival's guest of honour. This year's featured composer is Rachmaninoff:   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Nrf4Ib2oYw


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 17, 2015, 03:11:49 PM
Jean Sibelius was born 150 years ago this year. I love his symphonies but his symphonic poems shouldn't be overlooked.

This is Tapiola, one of his last works:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yy0_zqEOp4A

Read a little about it here: http://inkpot.com/classical/sibtapiola.html


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on October 04, 2015, 07:43:26 AM
I'm no fan of J.S. Bach as such. That said, I love pianist Glenn Gould's performances of his music and Anton Webern's arrangement of the "Six-part Ricercar" from Bach 's Musical Offering. But my favourite rendition of Bach is that by Alban Berg in his Violin Concerto...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violin_Concerto_(Berg)

...of "Es ist genug" from Bach's cantata O Ewigkeit, du Donnerwort.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/O_Ewigkeit,_du_Donnerwort,_BWV_60

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ScDHnoGVltQ

This brief chorale sounds surprisingly modern to my ears. Berg introduces it on the solo violin (beginning in the YouTube link below at 19:40), alternating with Bach's original version (in the clarinets).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AmWfihQJgBE  


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 13, 2015, 12:22:18 PM
The opening fanfare of Paul Dukas' La Péri is often heard alone, yet it only really makes sense when followed by the swirling, exotic main body of the work, like a musical "once upon a time".   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmh3A7ohFnc


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Alan Smith on November 13, 2015, 04:01:04 PM
The opening fanfare of Paul Dukas' La Péri is often heard alone, yet it only really makes sense when followed by the swirling, exotic main body of the work, like a musical "once upon a time".   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmh3A7ohFnc
Thanks for the link and insights re La Peri, john - I recently picked up a '69 LSO conducted by Richard Bonynge LP, so some good comparison material and food for thought next time I spin it (I really enjoyed the first listen through).

I also recently took a plunge/blind purchase of Heifetz doin' Bruch's Scottish Fantasy Concerto No. 1 and Vieuxtemps' Volin Concerto No 5 in A Minor OP. 37 (phew) from 61/62.  Wonderful stuff, both pieces - I hear a lot of influence on contemporary scores, including possibly Michael Nyman's Drowning by Numbers soundtrack: perhaps that's just me tho'

Thanks again - A


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 15, 2015, 04:52:16 AM
The opening fanfare of Paul Dukas' La Péri is often heard alone, yet it only really makes sense when followed by the swirling, exotic main body of the work, like a musical "once upon a time".   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vmh3A7ohFnc
Thanks for the link and insights re La Peri, john - I recently picked up a '69 LSO conducted by Richard Bonynge LP, so some good comparison material and food for thought next time I spin it (I really enjoyed the first listen through).

I also recently took a plunge/blind purchase of Heifetz doin' Bruch's Scottish Fantasy Concerto No. 1 and Vieuxtemps' Volin Concerto No 5 in A Minor OP. 37 (phew) from 61/62.  Wonderful stuff, both pieces - I hear a lot of influence on contemporary scores, including possibly Michael Nyman's Drowning by Numbers soundtrack: perhaps that's just me tho'

Thanks again - A

I have that same recording. The Bruch concerto is so well-known and often played but it still sounds great every time. I heard it performed live by Ray Chen (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=39oTb9a5jow) and the BBC Symphony Orchestra not so long ago. A stunning performance, although Heifetz is still the guv'nor in my book. ;=)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on December 03, 2015, 02:30:47 AM
This suits my mood right now, particularly in light of recent sad developments round these parts:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGMwNe9WWmE



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Cool Cool Water on December 03, 2015, 12:28:09 PM
This suits my mood right now, particularly in light of recent sad developments round these parts:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGMwNe9WWmE



Excellent stuff from Barber. An all time classic imo.  ;D


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 03, 2016, 03:50:58 AM
Of all great American composers, Charles Ives probably comes the closest to the Americana of Brian and VDP (Happy Birthday, Van Dyke!):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHs6VGKZ4Wo


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 28, 2016, 03:25:00 AM
Powerful stuff now from Jean Sibelius, a favourite composer of mine.

"In Pohjola there are thick, dark forests
that dream wild dreams, forever secret.
Tapio's eerie dwellings are there
and half-glimpsed spirits, and the voices of twilight."  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yy0_zqEOp4A

Edit: I see this is its second airing in this thread. There's always that risk, of course...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 16, 2016, 02:53:21 AM
I don't think I've linked this yet. Carlos Chávez's Symphony No. 2 (Sinfonía india) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinfon%C3%ADa_india) could not be further removed from its predecessor in this topic:
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xHn0FfB6GGU


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 02, 2016, 04:03:51 AM
Richard Strauss's Also Sprach Zarathustra is much more than just the 2001 theme. 
Herbert von Karajan conducts what may be the definitive performance:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h3eEHZCahVU

(Crank up the volume to catch that initial low C!)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 13, 2016, 05:04:54 AM
I think it was Prokofiev who wrote, way back during the last century, that there was still so much to say in C major. The Czech composer Leoš Janáček (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leos_Janacek) certainly bears this out. The opening melody of his Sinfonietta will be familiar to ELP fans.  (R.I.P., Keith E.) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MIL5CM3ce5U


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 16, 2016, 05:15:56 AM
Apologies if I've posted this already.

Maurice Ravel wrote some fantastic pieces for orchestra but this ballet suite probably takes the cake.

You may need to turn up the volume to catch the initial early morning stirrings. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ooh6qOR_dFc

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daphnis_et_Chloé


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 27, 2016, 01:31:55 AM
My favourite "classical" piece for this occasion. Happy Easter, folks. :=)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7FHFJ0lU9Us


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 13, 2016, 10:20:56 AM
Ottorino Respighi's symphonic poem Pines of Rome is an overwhelming experience in the right hands, such as here under Fritz Reiner:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BBcNFcMZmEg

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pines_of_Rome


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 01, 2016, 02:31:20 AM
If Gustav Holst is best known for The Planets, much to his dismay (he didn't rate that work highly), this haunting miniature is arguably his masterpiece. Apparently the composer thought so too. Crank up the volume----it begins very quietly and much of it is hushed. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=msIL7eavgk4

http://www.phillipcooke.com/on-gustav-holsts-egdon-heath/



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 12, 2016, 06:36:16 AM
Veering slightly off course, here are two fairly (or rather unfairly) obscure works you might lend an ear to:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=940dNX5zHEU

(Info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dora_Pejačević)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k8iFPHq6zjM

(Info: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_Fanelli)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on June 02, 2016, 02:28:36 AM
The English composer Edward Elgar was born 159 years ago today. This is my favourite among his compositions:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lPCQNlWnG-8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cello_Concerto_(Elgar) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cello_Concerto_(Elgar))


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: thorgil on June 18, 2016, 05:48:01 PM
I love Nielsen's symphonies, especially the 4th ("The Inextinguishable") and the 5th (with the snare drum fighting the rest of the orchestra). I'd name him as #1 among the underrated composers.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on June 19, 2016, 10:46:20 AM
I love Nielsen's symphonies, especially the 4th ("The Inextinguishable") and the 5th (with the snare drum fighting the rest of the orchestra). I'd name him as #1 among the underrated composers.

He's amazing, isn't he? The Horenstein version of his Symphony No. 5 is one of my favourite recordings of anything----particularly that first movement! This exquisite miniature is from the same 1969 Unicorn album:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQi08boz6xg


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: thorgil on June 20, 2016, 04:32:25 PM
Ah, the Saga-Drøm, another fantastic (in more than one meaning) piece, and Jascha Horenstein directs it so well. Thanks for the link! :)

Speaking of underrated music, imho this is a very underrated gem, though it's by Beethoven himself. I noticed that classical works integrating folk or folk-like tunes (here, starting at 6.57) tend to be underrated. The great Ludwig putting folk dance music in the middle of a serious piece? Preposterous!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQaS5P9gxwg





Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on June 21, 2016, 03:37:43 AM
Ah, the Saga-Drøm, another fantastic (in more than one meaning) piece, and Jascha Horenstein directs it so well. Thanks for the link! :)

Speaking of underrated music, imho this is a very underrated gem, though it's by Beethoven himself. I noticed that classical works integrating folk or folk-like tunes (here, starting at 6.57) tend to be underrated. The great Ludwig putting folk dance music in the middle of a serious piece? Preposterous!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bQaS5P9gxwg

I've never been a fan of the Ninth Symphony (except perhaps in the fantastic Beethoven cycle under René Leibowitz, now unfortunately removed from YouTube) but here you have the finale of the Ninth and a piano sonata all rolled into one. And it's not too long. Perfect! Maybe it's underrated because it's treated as a preamble to the Ninth rather than as a work in its own right. I love it. Thanks for that, Thorgil.

Perhaps Beethoven's most famous rustic episode is in the 3rd movement of his Pastoral Symphony, up to and including a flat-footed folk dance:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fbFxVVLM2zc

  


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on June 26, 2016, 04:27:05 AM
Heard an excellent performance of Fauré's Requiem (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Requiem_(Fauré)) yesterday with just piano accompaniment. Most enlightening to hear a skeletal version of a work whose original scoring was for organ or (as here) orchestra:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nYC2uyxSC60


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 13, 2016, 05:56:37 AM
In the Netherlands, if ever they play something from Smetana's Má vlast, it's always "Vltava", which is a wonderful piece but there are five others, two of which are truly magnificent: "Vyšehrad" and this one whose English title is "From Bohemia's Woods And Fields".  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQj33Oh_qOQ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ma_vlast

This is for Alan Smith, who I'm sure looks in here from time to time. It may even inspire him to start a "classical" topic across the road (if they don't have one already).


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 17, 2016, 04:42:14 AM
Allegri's Miserere is a fascinating work with an equally fascinating history:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Miserere_(Allegri) [evidently takes two steps to get there]

This for me is the definitive version from 1963, with some stunning soprano singing from the then 12-year-old Roy Goodman:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piPiVndX7kw



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 30, 2016, 10:54:12 AM
The Finnish composer Einojuhani Rautavaara died three days ago aged 87----a good age, I suppose.

The choir I accompanied at rehearsals used to perform works by him and pretty demanding they were too.

This is my favourite work of Rautavaara's, the haunting Cantus Arcticus for orchestra and tape:  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6uRQkXSfDOU

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cantus_Arcticus

Rest in peace, maestro.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on July 30, 2016, 01:23:02 PM
Why hadn't I known of this thread before?

I grew up surrounded by classical music. My parents both sang in a concert choir and my Dad was in the New Orleans Symphony Chorus as well.
In college I had a student subscription to hear the Symphony concerts. Heard all the Beethoven symphonies that year, also was the first time hearing Pachelbel's Canon.
While in the Symphony Chorus was able to sing Beethoven's Ninth under the direction of then wunderkind Leonard Slatkin, and later on Maxim Shostakovich conducted us in his father Dmitri's The Execution of Stepan Razin, a wild and wonderful piece with a surprising, macabre ending. I'll always treasure these experiences.

Have been attracted to classical music with Folk elements, so Grieg, Kodaly, Bartok, Vaughn Williams, Copland, Dvorak, and some Beethoven are favorites. Also a soft spot for French music of Debussy and Bizet.
And of course, our wonderful local composer Louis Moreau Gottschalk. My piano teacher was a big fan of his and had done a lot of research into his work when she was in college way back in the day.

Sung a bunch of Requiems over the years, my favorites being Faure and Durufle. Was just contrasting the two "In Paradisum" versions. Faure's version is so angelic and peaceful. Durufle's in contrast indicates a bit of unsettledness. As a Beach Boys fan I love unusual chords - that final chord in Durufle's version - wow! Positively slays me!

Am open to suggestions for further listening and will check out the suggestions given.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 30, 2016, 02:34:57 PM
Welcome to this thread, NOLA BBF! :=)

i first heard Stepan Razin (on the radio) in '62 (which does tend to date me) under Rozhdestvensky, whose bracing (not to say fiery) approach to conducting was new to Western ears. A fantastic work. And you've sung it----under Maxim Shostakovich! I saw him conduct once, when Valery Gergiev was held up in New York. (This was just days after 9/11.)  It was his father's Fourth Symphony (my favourite) and you can imagine what an electric performance that was, not least because of the circumstances.

My list of names would include all the people whose music I've linked here. But I generally tend to like works rather than composers...  

Duruflé's and Fauré's Requiems are both stunning in their own way. Yes indeed----that final chord!!!

As for Gottschalk, I found this orchestral work of his: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_kKKFPbz4M

I shall give it a listen later...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 31, 2016, 03:57:39 AM
Why hadn't I known of this thread before?

Regrettably a number of its posters have since moved on. I'm still hoping Alan Smith (or maybe Silken) will start a "classical" topic at the new site. Every board should have one, you know.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on August 01, 2016, 02:40:32 AM
As for Gottschalk, I found this orchestral work of his:  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_kKKFPbz4M

I shall give it a listen later...

What a wonderful piece! Amazing to think this was written in 1859, the year Brahms' first piano concerto was premiered. I'd always imagined Gottschalk to be from much later but he was born two years after Beethoven died...  

Seeing the name Tchaikowsky mentioned across the road, it struck me that he hasn't been featured yet in this topic. His Capriccio Italien is a fine example of a work dedicated to a country other than that of its composer:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b-jWskOx3mg  


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: thorgil on August 04, 2016, 05:24:47 AM
Capriccio Italien is a good piece by one of my fav composers, but imho the masterpiece in the "homage to another country" genre is this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nP0gqKmWuY

The finale is majestic, and you can easily imagine it played by a big bagpipe band.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on August 04, 2016, 06:51:26 AM
The finale is majestic, and you can easily imagine it played by a big bagpipe band.

I can see (or rather hear) what you mean!

I have (and love) nos. 4 and 5 and a bunch of brilliant overtures but the Scottish seems to have passed me by----until now. Many thanks!


Before that, I listened to some Wagner conducted by a great favourite of mine, Sergiu Celibidache:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JlZeO_GT45k





Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: thorgil on August 04, 2016, 07:13:28 AM
Ah well... Tristan & Isolde... that's sublime. It's Wagner's Pet Sounds, much like the "Ring" is his Smile. :)

Everybody who, like me, has watched a lot of classic Hollywood movies has listened, usually without knowing it, to countless uncredited variations on Tristan & Isolde's music...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: halblaineisgood on August 04, 2016, 04:32:54 PM
Macho Man Randy Savage's entrance theme!


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on August 07, 2016, 05:43:37 AM
Macho Man Randy Savage's entrance theme!

I had to look this up, never having heard of Randy Savage. Yes, a fine entrance theme indeed. :=)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xc1lu-WU3hI


Actually, I came here to link a stunning piece I heard this morning by the Mexican composer Silvestre Revueltas. I know his Sensemayá but heard this linked one and its companion pieces in the suite La Noche de los Mayas for the first time today...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DEo5RKvs8gY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Silvestre_Revueltas



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on August 10, 2016, 07:10:43 AM
This has to be one of the most beautiful pieces of choral music written during the past fifty years, if not of all time:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nn5ken3RJBo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morten_Lauridsen

At the risk of having my knuckles rapped (or much worse) I respectfully dedicate this to Silken across the road and wonder whether her choir sings this.

The choir I used to accompany at rehearsals once performed this gem together with a second choir. That was an amazing experience----and their finest hour.
 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on August 10, 2016, 07:44:28 AM
Oh my goodness.
Thank you.
Such beauty.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on August 17, 2016, 01:08:54 PM
I once met the composer Herbert Howells. It was some time in the mid '60s. I'd been convinced to apply for a place at The Royal College of Music in London----a ridiculous idea, as I was nowhere near qualified to do so. I was interviewed by this Mr Howells, who was equally at a loss as to why I was there! What did I think of Bach, Mozart and Beethoven? In those days not much, I'm afraid. Poor man. Well, that was that.

Much later, I got to hear some of his music and fell in love with it. It's a funny old world, to be sure.

"My" choir used to sing a number of his works, including this heartbreaking Requiem:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1hBco-7y6M

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Herbert_Howells


 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on August 31, 2016, 06:45:38 AM
Noticing halblaineisgood's question about Tchaikovsky in a future on-board Q&A with the Big Fella, I think Brian might warm to old Tsch.'s Manfred Symphony, by no means his most famous work in the genre but certainly my favourite. The passionate first movement is worth the price of admission alone:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hvIPcRwIW04

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Manfred_Symphony


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 01, 2016, 04:28:32 AM
Being an incorrigible musical snob, it took me a while to get to appreciate the genius of George Gershwin but his and Leonard Bernstein's music are firm favourites with me now.

This is for bringahorseinhere:   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2RcUPs2S-MM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuban_Overture


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 10, 2016, 03:15:09 AM
Saw Daniel Lozakovitj playing Prokofiev last night at a local music festival.

It's good to keep in mind that he is only fifteen! And boy did he wow them yesterday...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwwZu6hl8sk


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: SurfRapGrungeFiend on September 12, 2016, 09:08:10 AM
Saw Daniel Lozakovitj playing Prokofiev last night at the Gergiev Festival in Rotterdam.

It's good to keep in mind that he is only fifteen! And boy did he wow them yesterday...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mwwZu6hl8sk

Incredible, he makes it look tooo easy.. I woulda broke a string 0:37


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on September 12, 2016, 04:55:49 PM
Great performance.
Closed my eyes while listening. Mental video of horses galloping across a field, birds flying, swooping up and down, our dog chasing a squirrel up a tree...

Oh, Prokofiev. Mainly know him from the wonderful Peter and the Wolf heard when a child. Will explore him further.
Hard to go wrong with those incredible Russian composers.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 13, 2016, 02:05:43 AM
Oh, Prokofiev. Mainly know him from the wonderful Peter and the Wolf heard when a child. Will explore him further.
Hard to go wrong with those incredible Russian composers.

My two eldest grandchildren attended a performance of Peter and the Wolf last Sunday:

http://gergievfestival.nl/en-us/Programme/Zaterdag-en-US/Peter-en-de-wolf-4-met-verteller-en-US

They knew the piece already from a tape but now they could actually watch the orchestral instruments playing the various roles...   


Yes, the Russians are amazing. (I know Peter Reum is a big fan.)

And do they ring the changes! I cannot imagine a greater contrast between Prokofiev's serene First Symphony (the "Classical") and its modernist successor, which I heard during that same festival.

Shostakovich is another who wrote lighter stuff (quite literally to keep himself alive during The Terror) as well as some of the most profound symphonies ever...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: thorgil on September 14, 2016, 05:36:56 AM
There is also a good rock version of "Peter and the Wolf":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rock_Peter_and_the_Wolf

Stephane Grappelli playing "The Cat" is worth the price of admission by himself.

And yes, the Russians are amazing. Their music is second to none.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 14, 2016, 07:07:16 AM
There is also a good rock version of "Peter and the Wolf":

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Rock_Peter_and_the_Wolf

Stephane Grappelli playing "The Cat" is worth the price of admission by himself.

And yes, the Russians are amazing. Their music is second to none.

Thanks for the link, sir.

This is one I found while tidying up my own "classical" topic. Maybe those fearsome gong strokes towards the end will spur someone at PSF to start a similar topic over there. Every music forum worth its salt should have one...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5hxWp5QBN4g

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Foulds


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on October 09, 2016, 06:03:12 AM
Everyone should hear this magical gem by Claude Debussy at least once in their lives.

The first audience did better than that: they requested (and got) a repeat performance...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bZvbuAXdmv4

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prelude_a_l%27apres-midi_d%27un_faune




  


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on October 09, 2016, 06:29:15 AM
Thanks. Haven't heard this in a while.
Just listened to it. Perfect music to get the day going, not just for afternoons!  :)
This and Grieg's "Morning Mood" are great songs for lazy Sunday mornings.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on October 30, 2016, 03:36:16 AM
This and Grieg's "Morning Mood" are great songs for lazy Sunday mornings.

True. Ravel's second Daphne et Chloé suite is another...

For those who can receive it (and are interested) the BBC is an hour or so into playing 12 hours of non-stop classical music (and some jazz, but no speech at all):

http://radiotoday.co.uk/2016/10/radio-3-to-play-non-stop-music-for-12-hours/ 



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on October 30, 2016, 08:33:01 AM
Thanks. Was able to listen for a couple of hours before going to church services.
Nice symphony followed by fast sitar music followed by Monteverdi followed by bossa nova followed by...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 21, 2016, 07:40:25 AM
John Knowles Paine is a name I can't say I'm familiar with. His "ocean fantasy" Poseidon and Amphitrite is a gem that should be better known:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fnPXD075Jc

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Knowles_Paine



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 23, 2016, 03:47:35 AM
John Knowles Paine is a name I can't say I'm familiar with. His "ocean fantasy" Poseidon and Amphitrite is a gem that should be better known:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6fnPXD075Jc

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Knowles_Paine

In fact I would heartily recommend the entire playlist of "American Classical Music (19th/early 20th century) ":

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLMv5p5cWZLjBlnMJgxJ6Mls05-fOWMVL-


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on December 04, 2016, 01:20:33 AM
Heard the slow movement from Ravel's G Major Piano Concerto on the radio this morning in the wake of some awful news from Oakland, CA.

This is respectfully dedicated to the victims of that tragic event: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RlBIOOLcWLM


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on December 08, 2016, 05:55:41 AM
This is bound to have the purists screaming sacrilege but I think it's great. Vivaldi's Four Seasons does tend to get up one's nose after the 555th hearing, so kudos to Max Richter for respectfully "recomposing" it. See what you think:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8oYWfJuMGMA
 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on December 24, 2016, 03:36:03 AM
Strauss, Janowitz and Karajan----it doesn't get much better than this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aUJgye0A5PY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gundula_Janowitz

 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on December 30, 2016, 07:53:37 AM
Oh that was exquisite! Thanks for introducing me to Ms. Janowitz. Can't believe that I didn't know about her until now. Such a beautiful, clear tone. Will definitely check out more of her songs.

Last night I was watching a special on Shakespeare, showing scenes from various plays.
Among the scenes shown was the Balcony Scene from Romeo and Juliet. They performed the Prokofiev's ballet.
Hadn't seen that in a while - so beautiful.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a04IcHI1fFQ (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a04IcHI1fFQ)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: feelsflow on December 31, 2016, 11:50:38 AM
Wanted to add something to this thread as we all move to a new year.

I'm travelling through pepperland:  https://youtu.be/DIj8l_hS3lA



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: pixletwin on December 31, 2016, 11:57:57 AM
I just finished copying the last disc from  my Mozart 225 boxset. That was a pain the butt!  :lol


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on December 31, 2016, 01:32:32 PM
Oh you got that Mozart box set! I've been tempted and almost "bit" when I saw the price below 400 dollars. It's gone back up again at least temporarily.

To add- just checked - there are so many other choices to get Mozart's works. Am mainly interested in his choral works and operas.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: pixletwin on December 31, 2016, 01:56:01 PM
It's worth it from a Mozart-geek perspective. It's has things I have dreamed off for decades that aren't available anywhere. Like recordings. On Mozarts instruments. Fragments like the Mozart only score of the Requiem.  Also the books included are excellent.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on December 31, 2016, 03:12:09 PM
That's right. I had read about the excellent books that are included. And a Mozart only score of the Requiem? Wow, that sure is tempting!
Will see if the price can come down just a bit.

Happy New Year!


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: pixletwin on December 31, 2016, 04:05:22 PM
That's right. I had read about the excellent books that are included. And a Mozart only score of the Requiem? Wow, that sure is tempting!
Will see if the price can come down just a bit.

Happy New Year!

The Mozart only Lacrymosa is heartbreaking to hear.... but... HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU TOO! :)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on December 31, 2016, 06:00:17 PM
The Mozart only Lacrymosa is heartbreaking to hear.... but... HAPPY NEW YEAR TO YOU TOO! :)

Must see if I can dig that out.

Happy New Year to you, Elizabeth and pixletwin. And to everyone else who reads this. :=)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: feelsflow on December 31, 2016, 06:39:00 PM
Happy New Year.  I've made it through.  Time has waved it's hand across America.





Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: feelsflow on January 01, 2017, 12:22:02 AM
a closing song for the night.
https://youtu.be/7X6u1vYwoCc

Nicky and a few stones.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 06, 2017, 11:52:42 AM
Another death, I'm afraid. On the positive side, the conductor Georges Prêtre reached the ripe old age of 92. Although it seems he was best known for his interpretations of opera, I have a wonderful LP of orchestral music by Debussy under his baton.

Here's the maestro together with another legend, the soprano Victoria de los Ángeles, in a 1963 performance of "L'invitation au voyage" by Henri Duparc:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q1yEoHjkV1k

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Georges_Prêtre

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Victoria_de_los_Ángeles


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 09, 2017, 01:02:45 AM
It's that day again (although it seems Shostakovich was in fact depicting the Soviet Union's brutal suppression of the then recent Hungarian Uprising):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EqjseZX4vM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._11_(Shostakovich)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 21, 2017, 03:19:28 AM
Maxim Shostakovich conducted us in his father Dmitri's The Execution of Stepan Razin, a wild and wonderful piece with a surprising, macabre ending.

This version under Kondrashin may well be the definitive recording. I discovered it a week or so ago.

Spine-tingling stuff. Vitali Gromadsky's bass is out of this world!  

https://youtu.be/H0wSxjy3Kyo


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on February 21, 2017, 06:13:25 PM
Thank you for posting the link.
Stepan Razin is incredible. Love the wacky ending when his severed head starts laughing!  :lol
I remember Maxim S talking to us. There was a little section after the execution where the chorus sings that people should dance. This is followed by jolly music. This was confusing to me. Maxim S explained that the soldiers/police had guns pointed at the crowd: "Dance or die." His explaining things to us really made the piece come alive.

When Maxim S returned for another season as Music Director, there were t-shirts made available that said "Max is back!" Wish I had gotten one of them. There was a gala for the Symphony, and the folk ensemble that I was in performed. Got so nervous when I and a couple of other singers/musicians stood right in front of him and sang a couple of Russian folk songs. Kept thinking, "please don't screw up the pronunciation too much!" He smiled at us and nodded - did he like the songs (did he understand  the words) or was he just being polite? Anyway, everything I saw about him indicated that he was a Class Act.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on February 21, 2017, 07:10:38 PM
It's that day again (although it seems Shostakovich was in fact depicting the Soviet Union's brutal suppression of the then recent Hungarian Uprising):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EqjseZX4vM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._11_(Shostakovich)


Very powerful and moving. The buildup, then all of a sudden, quiet.
Interesting that he was depicting the Hungarian uprising. Even in the post-Stalin era he had to be very careful.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 22, 2017, 04:11:37 AM
When Maxim S returned for another season as Music Director, there were t-shirts made available that said "Max is back!" Wish I had gotten one of them. There was a gala for the Symphony, and the folk ensemble that I was in performed. Got so nervous when I and a couple of other singers/musicians stood right in front of him and sang a couple of Russian folk songs. Kept thinking, "please don't screw up the pronunciation too much!" He smiled at us and nodded - did he like the songs (did he understand  the words) or was he just being polite? Anyway, everything I saw about him indicated that he was a Class Act.

I'm hoping he'll pay our concert hall another visit sometime. This time I'll have the score of his father's Fourth Symphony with me, hopefully for signing! There's a fantastic description of this wayward masterpiece in Ian MacDonald's book The New Shostakovich


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 27, 2017, 10:19:18 AM
Max Reger is hardly a household name, yet he wrote music that is eminently listenable. Perhaps his interest in academic musical forms, fugues and the like, make his music seem "difficult" or "dry", particularly when placed among that of his Late Romantic peers. His Variations and Fugue on a Theme by Mozart should dispel that image:

https://youtu.be/-mVQxR9Ll9U

http://www.maxreger.org/max_reger_biography.html


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 27, 2017, 10:19:58 AM
While I'm here, there is a wonderful Reger anecdote. One critic was persistently scathing in his reviews of Reger's music. On one occasion, the composer's response was:

"I am sitting in the smallest room in my house. I have your review before me. In a moment it will be behind me."  :lol  


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: Wrightfan on March 04, 2017, 02:26:14 PM
The 2nd movement of Beethoven's ninth is music at it's best:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwIvS4yIThU


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on March 04, 2017, 03:17:11 PM
I'm enough of an old hag to remember that second movement as the "Huntley-Brinkley theme" (US news program way back in the day)

Always thought it a bit funny when, at the 1:20 mark, Beethoven just stops it suddenly and decides to do it all again.

Great music!


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on March 04, 2017, 03:27:13 PM
I'm hoping he'll pay our concert hall another visit sometime. This time I'll have the score of his father's Fourth Symphony with me, hopefully for signing! There's a fantastic description of this wayward masterpiece in Ian MacDonald's book The New Shostakovich

That book looks really interesting.

I'm presently reading a book about the Siege of Leningrad (which will take a while as the siege lasted a long time  :( )
Then I'll read "Symphony for the City of the Dead - Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad."
Then will listen to his Symphony No 7 "Leningrad" written in honor of his beloved city.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 06, 2017, 06:55:13 AM
I'm presently reading a book about the Siege of Leningrad (which will take a while as the siege lasted a long time  :( )
Then I'll read "Symphony for the City of the Dead - Dmitri Shostakovich and the Siege of Leningrad."
Then will listen to his Symphony No 7 "Leningrad" written in honor of his beloved city.

Enjoy!

That monstrous mechanical advance by the German Army in the Leningrad reminds me of the faceless (and remorseless) Teutonic Knights in Alexander Nevsky, both in Eisenstein's visuals and in Prokofiev's music, where they're accompanied by a meaningless Latin chant:     

https://youtu.be/-x5grdx3g_8


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 06, 2017, 07:27:17 AM
This is quite an earful: Dietrich Fischer-Dieskau accompanied by none other than "our" Leonard Bernstein in "Um Mitternacht" from Mahler's Rückert-Lieder:

https://youtu.be/h9661ev8-Qc

 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 08, 2017, 02:50:54 AM
Sticking with Herr Fischer-Dieskau, here he is in Schubert's unbeatable song cycle Winterreise accompanied by Alfred Brendel, another favourite of mine, who recently retired from performing.

I'm not sure whether this performance is definitive----it's certainly up there among the very best.

Ignore the orchestra tuning up at the onset----it's piano and voice only. Enjoy!
    
https://youtu.be/dfLGYDBVnYM


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 02, 2017, 12:19:33 PM
Has this been posted here yet? I've no idea.

Charles Ives has a lot to answer for.  So has Mr Bernstein. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vXD4tIp59L0


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: rab2591 on April 06, 2017, 05:28:57 AM
Found this yesterday and have been obsessed with it since. Golijov's Azul featuring Yo Yo Ma. The opening track is incredible, and the Dvorak piece is turning into a favorite.

https://itun.es/us/cN1cib (https://itun.es/us/cN1cib)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 06, 2017, 01:10:58 PM
Found this yesterday and have been obsessed with it since. Golijov's Azul featuring Yo Yo Ma. The opening track is incredible, and the Dvorak piece is turning into a favorite.

https://itun.es/us/cN1cib (https://itun.es/us/cN1cib)

I must look out for this on YouTube. It's bound to get there sooner or later...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 10, 2017, 02:58:50 AM
I'm back at a "rough draft" stage so I can listen to instrumental music while I work.

My current earful is this most enlightened selection of Late Romantic orchestral music:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggcjRfI-TLY&index=1&list=PLY9AQ6MtYEKK_n5X26zQHHAs2jgp7ffW2


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 15, 2017, 02:11:24 AM
May you all have a peaceful Easter, folks. :=)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRrJ2MXwmRQ

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passio_(Pärt)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 24, 2017, 02:09:10 AM
I love Haydn symphonies (he wrote over a hundred, you know).

The second movement from "The Clock" (#101) was on the radio this morning...

Here it is, under one of my favourite conductors, Jascha Horenstein:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0M-cmFKdp-Y


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on April 24, 2017, 04:54:23 AM
Long-time lurker 1st time poster.
Haydn is good, written many positive major key things like Mozart. What do you regard the best Haydn work discounting the radio?


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 24, 2017, 06:11:02 AM
Long-time lurker 1st time poster.
Haydn is good, written many positive major key things like Mozart. What do you regard the best Haydn work discounting the radio?

I like all the symphonies and even listened to them all while working a while back.

I've always been intrigued by #22, "The Philosopher", possibly because of the title...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uaR32rtYOyo

Welcome to the "classical" topic!


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: pixletwin on May 06, 2017, 05:19:32 PM
I have been intrigued by Gesualdo lately.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFXrMrp1o60


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 07, 2017, 01:33:55 AM
I have been intrigued by Gesualdo lately.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qFXrMrp1o60

I agree. Extraordinary to think he wrote this in the early 1600s!

A fascinating composer with a fascinating if lurid life story.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carlo_Gesualdo 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 08, 2017, 12:48:03 AM
Riccardo Muti rocks Respighi's socks. This version of Pini da Roma was once chosen as the best----maybe it still is. Wow.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8a7LAKZCUlA

I played football with my son on the grass in the first image of the vid. Must have been in '84 or '85...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 16, 2017, 06:12:14 AM
I cannot recommend this 300+ selection of Late Romantic works for orchestra highly enough. There are very occasional glitches and one serious dip in volume (Respighi again) but 99% of what I've heard so far (140 pieces!) has been astoundingly beautiful. Hats off to compiler David W!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ggcjRfI-TLY&list=PLY9AQ6MtYEKK_n5X26zQHHAs2jgp7ffW2

And after piece #316, what's to prevent one from starting at the beginning again? :hat


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on May 22, 2017, 07:27:28 AM
Hi,
Here's a Battle of Ave Verums, both of which I've sung a lot over the years.  they are both wonderful.

Mozart:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXjn6srhAlY

Byrd:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vFZZMF7SRRo



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 23, 2017, 02:03:24 AM
Great post there, E.

BBC Radio played this wonderful piece this morning as a response to last night's horrific attack in Manchester:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z1Czo0BSHvw


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on May 23, 2017, 06:08:11 AM
So beautiful.  :'(

I love that, although it's a sad song, the lyrics speak of hope.

(There have been other occasions where Barber's Adagio for Strings was played after a tragic event, That piece is almost despairing)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 23, 2017, 06:59:07 AM
So beautiful.  :'(

I love that, although it's a sad song, the lyrics speak of hope.

(There have been other occasions where Barber's Adagio for Strings was played after a tragic event, That piece is almost despairing)

I remember on the normally jubilant last night of the 2001 BBC Promenade Concert series in London (this was September 15) they changed the programme. Conductor Leonard Slatkin told the audience that when the British suffer a tragedy, they play Elgar's "Nimrod". "And we play this." And "this" was Barber's heart-rending Adagio.   


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on May 29, 2017, 07:05:44 AM
On FB yesterday was a post from Smithsonian Folkways. Folkways is a label that specializes in folk music around the world.
The article was about one of their recordings available - Bela Bartok's field recordings of Hungarian music.

Bartok spent much of his time recording folk musics of the various ethnic groups in the area, and incorporated them into his music.

One of the songs I sang in college was Bartok's "Four Slovak Folk Songs."
The first song, The Wedding, is achingly beautiful. The woman, getting married, will now be living far from her parents, siblings.
The alto line for this song is incredible.
The other 3 songs are folk dances.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGyo_w4oyDQ


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on May 29, 2017, 07:10:56 AM
Sticking with folk music, Zoltan Kodaly was an ethnographer and composer, as well as a mentor and close friend to Bartok.

One of the favorite choral works I've done over the years was the Budavari Te Deum. Such a joy to sing. 20 minutes or so of bliss.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-SgjYuF8dkY


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on May 29, 2017, 07:45:55 AM
And now for something completely different...

Was thinking, what's the most difficult classical music I've done? The most difficult was, by far, Catulli Carmina by Carl Orff.  None of the wonderful music or charm of Carmina Burana. We had so much trouble with it. The only time we got it right, thank goodness, was at the performance! We were all scared to death, on pins and needles, determined, just once, to not screw up.

Another toughie, although much more enjoyable, was singing The Mighty Casey by American composer William Schuman. It's based on the iconic American poem "Casey at the Bat", about a cocky star Baseball player who is so confident that he will win the game for his team. The last two lines tell the story, however - "But there is no joy in Mudville,  mighty Casey has struck out."

Here's the final part of it. VERY hard to sing. I pride myself in being a good sightreader but  almost met my Waterloo, so to speak, with this. Spent lots of time practicing it in the loo during breaks at work. The alto line in this last section is crazy hard. And towards the end we had to hit a high A flat, at the very top of my range back then (can't hit that anymore!). Usually the top for the alto line would be a D or perhaps E.  On rare occasions, an F.

Here it is:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XoHv89At0Gk

On a lighter note, don't know if Mari (RangeRoverA1) is reading this thread, but here's something she'd like. William Schuman was the first guest on a "What's My Line" episode back in 1962. (My family used to watch this program back in its early years)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQ20S10LWqo


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 30, 2017, 04:58:38 AM
On FB yesterday was a post from Smithsonian Folkways. Folkways is a label that specializes in folk music around the world.
The article was about one of their recordings available - Bela Bartok's field recordings of Hungarian music.

Bartok spent much of his time recording folk musics of the various ethnic groups in the area, and incorporated them into his music.

One of the songs I sang in college was Bartok's "Four Slovak Folk Songs."
The first song, The Wedding, is achingly beautiful. The woman, getting married, will now be living far from her parents, siblings.
The alto line for this song is incredible.
The other 3 songs are folk dances.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RGyo_w4oyDQ

"The Wedding" is a beautiful piece. Bartok's harmonies are amazing! Another great artist forced abroad by that madman.

The Kodaly sounds good too.

So you're an alto. Is that lower or higher than a contralto or are the two interchangeable? I've seen "contralto" used for the part between the sopranos and the tenors. Maybe it's a language thing...



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on May 30, 2017, 07:58:13 AM
Guess when I think of the word 'contralto' it's the lower alto part (or Alto II). If the alto part is divided I would sing Alto I.
I LOVE singing Alto, as Soprano is so boring. I don't want to sing the melody!
In "pick up" choirs over the years (mainly choirs at work formed to sing Christmas songs) I always sung Alto because I can read music.
I remember auditioning for a choir, telling the director beforehand that I was an Alto. After checking me out he said that I really should be a Soprano II. After pleading with him he put me with the Alto I's instead.

The Sopranos would sometimes act superior. But we Altos would snicker behind their backs because we were usually much better sight readers. Really rather silly.

If by some twist of fate I had been born a male and lived in Hawthorne, somehow getting into the BBs, I wouldn't have wanted to sing the high part, and probably not Mike's low part. Put me in that "stack". I'd tell Brian, Bring It On. Give me some crazy harmony to sing. I'd be in Seventh Heaven!


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on June 08, 2017, 01:24:15 AM
Guess when I think of the word 'contralto' it's the lower alto part (or Alto II). If the alto part is divided I would sing Alto I.
I LOVE singing Alto, as Soprano is so boring. I don't want to sing the melody!
In "pick up" choirs over the years (mainly choirs at work formed to sing Christmas songs) I always sung Alto because I can read music.
I remember auditioning for a choir, telling the director beforehand that I was an Alto. After checking me out he said that I really should be a Soprano II. After pleading with him he put me with the Alto I's instead.

The Sopranos would sometimes act superior. But we Altos would snicker behind their backs because we were usually much better sight readers. Really rather silly.

If by some twist of fate I had been born a male and lived in Hawthorne, somehow getting into the BBs, I wouldn't have wanted to sing the high part, and probably not Mike's low part. Put me in that "stack". I'd tell Brian, Bring It On. Give me some crazy harmony to sing. I'd be in Seventh Heaven!

I forgot to thank you for explaining first time round, so I'll do it now. :=)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on June 23, 2017, 04:02:17 AM
During the earlier phases of my work I often have music playing. Most recently, this has been the complete works of Anton Webern. It is well to remember that Webern was a miniaturist and that his entire oeuvre takes up something like five and a half hours all told.  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hZelEcPZU8A&index=1&list=PLTw81JEOyOZJaN77uFCQAkI0FXPKytK6t

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton_Webern


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on June 25, 2017, 02:15:09 PM
Oops, double post.  Oh well. Here's some Beethoven, played in chilling circumstances (see the comments):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G3346Dq9fXM


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 17, 2017, 02:02:30 AM
Been listening to excerpts from this on YouTube while working. Highly recommended.

(http://www.maxrichtermusic.com/content/blog/large/230.jpg)

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_(Max_Richter_album) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleep_(Max_Richter_album))


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 31, 2017, 06:41:55 AM
Here's a great rendition of Schumann's complete symphonies under Lennie B:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifMO227wrN4

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71jQENnDN8L._SY355_.jpg)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on August 06, 2017, 05:28:47 AM
I've been listening to a lot of Max Richter's music lately. The latest album to come my way is Three Worlds, originally the music for a ballet called Woolf Works based on three novels by Virginia Woolf: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVLFh0tPTlQ

It contains an excerpt from the only known recording of Ms Woolf's voice. The full BBC broadcast from 1937 can be heard here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zcbY04JrMaU


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on August 29, 2017, 10:07:39 AM
This is perhaps the most moving solo song performance I know:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-Z8cmo7cbs

I remember hearing this on the radio in the 1950s. My father pointed out (I could only have been about five) that the singer, Kathleen Ferrier, had died recently. Although this only confused me at the time, it has made it an emotional listening experience ever since...      


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 01, 2017, 02:20:19 AM
I couldn't get this beautiful work off my mind during doggie-walking duties this morning. Just love that "Scotch snap"!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j75FhfQYWeU

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scottish_Fantasy

https://musicinvestigation.wordpress.com/music-investigation-home/




Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 03, 2017, 03:10:34 AM
I heard this choral gem this morning (I'd heard it before). Immortal Bach is an extraordinary reworking (someone described it as a decomposition, in a positive sense) of Bach's chorale "Komm suesser Tod" by the Norwegian Knut Nystedt, who died three years ago.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q42GDx98a_k

  


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 15, 2017, 02:51:39 AM
Heard a simply staggering version of Scriabin's Le Poème de l'extase last night in the local concert hall.

This one ain't bad either...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lW1efa9Ypyw

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Poem_of_Ecstasy


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: alf wiedersehen on September 15, 2017, 02:26:04 PM
Franz Liszt is super.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 15, 2017, 03:06:46 PM
Franz Liszt is super.

You're a classical pianist so that would make sense. :=) Some of his transcriptions of other composers' orchestral works sound fantastic.

I'm not much of a piano music fan myself----a three-year piano tuning course took care of that (all to no avail as well).

I prefer Liszt's symphonic poems:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lnyug-qrP-k


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: the captain on September 15, 2017, 04:02:39 PM
I consider his "Totentanz" one of my biggest musical influences and/or mind-blowers ever. I was a little obsessed with requiems in my late teens as I went to college to study music. It got a little out of hand, maybe. (What 18-year-old non-religious, non-depressed person is obsessed with masses for the dead?) But that got me in a roundabout way to this masterpiece. Sorry, jk, that you don't care for the piano!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nVmFlSV1ok


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 16, 2017, 02:19:11 AM
I consider his "Totentanz" one of my biggest musical influences and/or mind-blowers ever. I was a little obsessed with requiems in my late teens as I went to college to study music. It got a little out of hand, maybe. (What 18-year-old non-religious, non-depressed person is obsessed with masses for the dead?) But that got me in a roundabout way to this masterpiece. Sorry, jk, that you don't care for the piano!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7nVmFlSV1ok

Ooohh, that was nice, cap'n. I suppose because there's a very colourful orchestra in there too. So there's blowing and scraping as well as banging...

Rachmaninoff was another who was partial to the Dies Irae----it pops up all over the place in his music. But you knew that already. ;=)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=luYTzah6J9U

I love religious music for choir and orchestra----there have indeed been some fantastic requiems written over the centuries.

When in Vienna we heard Mozart's Requiem performed as part of a church service! And what a performance...

NB: I ain't religious either.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: the captain on September 16, 2017, 12:33:14 PM
Spent the early part of this afternoon with Scriabin's Symphony No. 3, The Divine Poem, playing while I cooked.

And now, on to college football.

(Normal afternoon, no? Start with Scriabin and stock, and with sports and suds.*)



*I'd never say "suds" instead of beer, but the alliteration was inescapable. Wait, I have Summit "Saga" IPA. Let me rewrite that sentence! Damnit, Time, you never skip backward when I need it most. (Which implies time travel happens to me when I need it least?)



Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: SMiLE Brian on September 16, 2017, 12:41:03 PM
Gophers football and classical music?


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 17, 2017, 03:10:02 AM
Gophers football and classical music?

Why not? It was good enough for Charles Ives:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mqsX4TnXtNw


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on September 22, 2017, 07:32:46 AM
For the people of Puerto Rico   :'(

'Souvenir de Porto Rico' by Gottschalk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fu0ff_fMMDU (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fu0ff_fMMDU)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 23, 2017, 04:12:36 AM
For the people of Puerto Rico 

This suitably melancholy piece is by Puerto Rico's foremost contemporary composer, Roberto Sierra:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Q_VJkuxXQE

What a tragedy...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 24, 2017, 03:20:17 AM
Shostakovich leaves more questions than answers in this Chamber Symphony, as relevant a piece now as it was at the time of its composition in 1960:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TjeyUPuqXyE

https://www.laphil.com/philpedia/music/chamber-symphony-op-110a-arr-bashai-dmitri-shostakovich


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on October 03, 2017, 05:04:54 AM
Philip Glass has written some magnificent music, some of it extremely intimate and some wide-screen and
overpowering. Itaipu, a four-movement work for choir and orchestra, belongs to the last-named category:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZNsVwBv_jcw

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Itaipu_(Glass)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on October 31, 2017, 03:35:48 AM
This gargantuan work by Olivier Messiaen was written in the space of two years just after WWII. It's a ten-movement symphony, a horrendously difficult piano concerto and a love song all rolled in one. There is also a crucial part for an Ondes Martenot, which in the overpowering performance I heard earlier this year was played, as it is here, by Valérie Hartmann-Claverie: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nTlc4Nvyhw4

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turangalîla-Symphonie

https://www.valeriehartmannclaverie.com


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 02, 2017, 04:55:01 AM
A song for All Souls Day, Schubert's great "Litanei auf das Fest Aller Seelen":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NrqIEwQhRMo

http://figures-of-speech.com/2015-11/aller-seelen.htm


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 08, 2017, 08:06:59 AM
I don't think we've had Steve Reich yet. I regard Music for 18 Musicians as his magnum opus. There is so much happening in it----it's like living a lifetime within the space of an hour. This is the original recording on ECM, which sees Reich and company striking out into unknown territory. Logically, all subsequent recordings, even under Reich's guidance, lack that pioneering spirit...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ILpCKQlDmhc

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_for_18_Musicians


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 17, 2017, 07:14:49 AM
I seem to be talking to myself here (story of my life) but it is a message board and messages don't necessarily require responses...

Yesterday was World Philosophy Day, reason enough (as if we needed one) to post Haydn's Symphony No. 22, nicknamed "The Philosopher".  According to the work's wiki page, "the nickname dates from the composer's own lifetime. The title is thought to derive from the melody and counterpoint of the first movement (between the horns and cor anglais), which musically allude to a question followed by an answer and paralleling the disputatio system of debate. The piece's use of a muted tick-tock effect also evokes the image of a philosopher deep in thought while time passes by." Enjoy!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uaR32rtYOyo

http://www.unesco.org/new/en/social-and-human-sciences/themes/most-programme/humanities-and-philosophy/philosophy-day-at-unesco/ 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on November 17, 2017, 07:50:47 AM
I’m lurking in the background.    ;D


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 17, 2017, 08:46:59 AM
I’m lurking in the background.    ;D

That's most encouraging, E. I shall post here more regularly. :=) 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on November 18, 2017, 03:05:13 AM
It appears only a handful of pianists are able to make a decent job of playing Prokofiev's Second Piano Concerto. Some big names, including the likes of Martha Argerich, have passed on it as being simply too demanding. This version by Horacio Gutiérrez (with the RCO under Neeme Järvi) was recommended on Dutch radio a few days ago as the version to hear (and, in this case, to follow in short score):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xcte8hM6kYA     


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on December 12, 2017, 12:51:34 PM
I heard the name Zara Levina for the first time last Sunday on Dutch classical radio. This was the piece
they played, her Piano Concerto No. 2, in this version with Maria Lettberg at the piano. Ms Levina
(1906--1976) was a Russian composer who studied under Nicolai Myaskovsky and Reinhold Glière.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ifGSdPf6pNo

https://web.archive.org/web/20141129021029/http://home.online.nl/ovar/levina.htm (https://web.archive.org/web/20141129021029/http://home.online.nl/ovar/levina.htm)

(http://www.radiosefarad.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/zaralevina.png)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on December 17, 2017, 12:26:57 PM
I heard a piece by the seldom-performed British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor on Dutch TV and then noticed that his
Hiawatha Overture had been programmed on UK radio earlier in the day. Most encouraging. Here is that overture: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkqaSqwHlsw

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samuel_Coleridge-Taylor


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 09, 2018, 04:09:06 AM
Today is the fateful day in 1905 in Russian history when soldiers of the Imperial Guard fired upon
unarmed demonstrators marching on the Winter Palace in St Petersburg, killing several hundred of
them. Shostakovich commemorates it in the second movement of his Symphony No. 11, although
it is more likely a depiction of the then recent crushing of the Hungarian Revolution by Soviet troops.     

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EqjseZX4vM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._11_(Shostakovich) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._11_(Shostakovich))


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: NOLA BB Fan on January 09, 2018, 06:01:41 AM
I heard a piece by the seldom-performed British composer Samuel Coleridge-Taylor on Dutch TV and then noticed that his
Hiawatha Overture had been programmed on UK radio earlier in the day. Most encouraging.

Thank you for posting this. I confess to being unfamiliar with his work, something that I will now rectify! I'm so glad he didn't grow up in the US. He probably wouldn't have been able to develop as a classical composer (unless he pursued his musical training in Europe).


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 13, 2018, 03:29:33 AM
He probably wouldn't have been able to develop as a classical composer (unless he pursued his musical training in Europe).

Thankfully, times have changed (or at least I hope they have).

I heard this riveting work on Dutch radio this morning. There's more to Albinoni's Adagio than meets
the eye (or ear). It's a little complicated (my brain's hurting already) so I'll let Wikipedia do the honours. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t4DNY4bgtXM

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adagio_in_G_minor


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 28, 2018, 12:49:55 PM
I'm familiar with (and love) E.J. Moeran's Symphony but I heard this gorgeous orchestral miniature for the first time this morning:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YNL-pOJVRew

http://www.moeran.net/Orchestral/LonelyWaters.html


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 07, 2018, 04:53:16 AM
Johan Svendsen was a fellow countryman and contemporary of the much more famous Edvard Grieg.

Svendsen's Norwegian Artists' Carnival deserves to be heard more often:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NeYS4QdPhAI

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Johan_Svendsen


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 14, 2018, 05:38:05 AM
I came across this sparkling three-movement symphony quite by accident:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7xOMDIOyfNo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yasushi_Akutagawa


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 09, 2018, 02:31:00 AM
On the subject of little gems, this is Carl Nielsen's symphonic poem Saga-Drøm, in the version I have by Jascha Horenstein and the New Philharmonia Orchestra:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQi08boz6xg

The main work on this world-beating disc (shamefully yet to be transferred to CD) is Nielsen's towering Fifth Symphony, whose first movement in this version is essential listening (it used to be on YouTube). 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 09, 2018, 04:50:34 AM
Funny you bumped this thread today, I've got question - can you tell what's being played/ sung when Paul's grandfather appears from bottom to the stage & interferes the singing in AHDN film? It's in 43:19-44:21 min. Ta in advance.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 09, 2018, 06:38:44 AM
Funny you bumped this thread today, I've got question - can you tell what's being played/ sung when Paul's grandfather appears from bottom to the stage & interferes the singing in AHDN film? It's in 43:19-44:21 min. Ta in advance.

I had to look around but it would seem to be from the opening duet in the Finale of Act One of Johann's Strauss's operetta Die Fledermaus:  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zgbnlzs-sY

This is where the AHDN excerpt begins:

Die dir einst dein Herz erfreut, [Which once delighted your heart,]
Gibt der Wein dir Tröstung schon [Wine will soon give you consolation]
Durch Vergessenheit! [By forgetting!]
Glücklich ist, wer vergisst, [Happy is the person who forgets,]
Was doch nicht zu ändern ist. [What can't be altered anyway.]
Kling, kling, sing, sing, sing [Ting-a-ling, sing, sing, sing,]
Trink mit mir, sing mit mir, [Drink with me, sing with me,]
Lalala, lalala, etc. [la la la, etc.]

But please check for yourself...


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A
Post by: SMiLE-addict on March 09, 2018, 04:52:03 PM
At work, a big chunk of my job is to do this really tedious stuff processing real estate transfer deeds and as a result I can listen to A LOT of music while I do that. I've found that music with vocals is a bit distracting, but instrumental music, such as classical, is perfect.

Recently while doing this, I decided to listen to all 104 of Hayden's symphonies on Youtube. I started with #1 and am going in order. I just finished #51 (I think) today. Almost halfway through.

My review of them is, while they're all very nice, they all sound very similar - almost to the point where they're getting a bit tedious. But I'm going to insist to myself that I finish them all, just ... because. I can easily imagine Mr. Haydn, at the end of his career, likely unable to recall all of the symphonies he wrote, it almost seems like these authors who churn out volumes and volumes of pulp fiction stories to the point where they all seem to run into each other and you can't really tell them apart (even if they're entertaining).


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on March 10, 2018, 12:16:58 AM
I had to look around but it would seem to be from the opening duet in the Finale of Act One of Johann's Strauss's operetta Die Fledermaus: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zgbnlzs-sY

This is where the AHDN excerpt begins:

Die dir einst dein Herz erfreut, [Which once delighted your heart,]
Gibt der Wein dir Tröstung schon [Wine will soon give you consolation]
Durch Vergessenheit! [By forgetting!]
Glücklich ist, wer vergisst, [Happy is the person who forgets,]
Was doch nicht zu ändern ist. [What can't be altered anyway.]
Kling, kling, sing, sing, sing [Ting-a-ling, sing, sing, sing,]
Trink mit mir, sing mit mir, [Drink with me, sing with me,]
Lalala, lalala, etc. [la la la, etc.]
Thanks to the fast reply. :thumbsup Lyrics match with the AHDN bit in question. Cool music, cheerful as I like. :3d


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A
Post by: JK on March 10, 2018, 02:50:39 AM
At work, a big chunk of my job is to do this really tedious stuff processing real estate transfer deeds and as a result I can listen to A LOT of music while I do that. I've found that music with vocals is a bit distracting, but instrumental music, such as classical, is perfect.

Recently while doing this, I decided to listen to all 104 of Haydn's symphonies on Youtube.
I started with #1 and am going in order. I just finished #51 (I think) today. Almost halfway through.

My review of them is, while they're all very nice, they all sound very similar - almost to the point where they're getting a bit tedious. But I'm going to insist to myself that I finish them all, just ... because. I can easily imagine Mr. Haydn, at the end of his career, likely unable to recall all of the symphonies he wrote, it almost seems like these authors who churn out volumes and volumes of pulp fiction stories to the point where they all seem to run into each other and you can't really tell them apart (even if they're entertaining).

The bold bit could have been posted by me (except that I do non-boring rough drafts of stuff). I went through all the Haydn symphonies and thoroughly enjoyed the trip. If I remember correctly, I started in the middle working my way forwards and then from the middle backwards to #1. ;D

Amazingly, at least one symphonist has written more than 104. This is Leif Segerstam's Symphony No. 253...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v7Ht2W8Z6E

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leif_Segerstam


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 10, 2018, 02:52:15 AM
Thanks to the fast reply. :thumbsup Lyrics match with the AHDN bit in question. Cool music, cheerful as I like. :3d

Any time. I used to enjoy identifying things for people on YouTube but stopped when the place became user-unfriendly... 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A
Post by: SMiLE-addict on March 10, 2018, 03:56:12 PM
Amazingly, at least one symphonist has written more than 104. This is Leif Segerstam's Symphony No. 253...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v7Ht2W8Z6E

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leif_Segerstam
Holy moly! While one might admire that guy's work ethic, when you're writing that many symphonies, you're pretty much writing a lot of symphonies just for the sake of writing a lot of symphonies.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A
Post by: JK on March 11, 2018, 09:03:11 AM
Amazingly, at least one symphonist has written more than 104. This is Leif Segerstam's Symphony No. 253...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2v7Ht2W8Z6E

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leif_Segerstam
Holy moly! While one might admire that guy's work ethic, when you're writing that many symphonies, you're pretty much writing a lot of symphonies just for the sake of writing a lot of symphonies.

Haha, yes. A better case in point perhaps is Havergal Brian, who wrote a mere 32 (!) but many are of epic proportions, particularly Symphony No. 1, "The Gothic", which I heard premiered in 1966. And a pretty staggering experience it was too:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VRdozy4l07g

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._1_%22The_Gothic%22_(Brian)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 14, 2018, 03:12:25 AM
This is in memory of Stephen Hawking, who died today aged 76. In "Neptune" from Gustav Holst's orchestral suite The Planets, the door closes slowly on the female choir with the final bar "repeated until the sound is lost in the distance". A genius now rests in peace. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9EX6gCCLx_8

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_Hawking

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Planets




Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 30, 2018, 02:57:11 AM
Seeing as it's Good Friday today:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lB5OrgydzIA

Arranged by Wagner into a concert piece, this music accompanies the second half of Act 3, Scene 1 of his opera Parsfal.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parsifal


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A
Post by: SMiLE-addict on April 05, 2018, 03:35:30 PM
I finally finished the last of them yesterday!

As I said, they're all nice, but they're VERY repetitive. I suppose that's going to happen when you write 104 symphonies. Only about a dozen of them are worth listening to more than once. Also, you could tell in the last 10-20 of them he started getting a little more adventurous, and dabbling into some of the then-new Romanticism. But I am pretty sure if you asked him near the end of his life if he could remember every one of those symphonies, he would probably say no.

At work, a big chunk of my job is to do this really tedious stuff processing real estate transfer deeds and as a result I can listen to A LOT of music while I do that. I've found that music with vocals is a bit distracting, but instrumental music, such as classical, is perfect.

Recently while doing this, I decided to listen to all 104 of Hayden's symphonies on Youtube. I started with #1 and am going in order. I just finished #51 (I think) today. Almost halfway through.

My review of them is, while they're all very nice, they all sound very similar - almost to the point where they're getting a bit tedious. But I'm going to insist to myself that I finish them all, just ... because. I can easily imagine Mr. Haydn, at the end of his career, likely unable to recall all of the symphonies he wrote, it almost seems like these authors who churn out volumes and volumes of pulp fiction stories to the point where they all seem to run into each other and you can't really tell them apart (even if they're entertaining).


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A
Post by: JK on April 15, 2018, 05:00:52 AM
I finally finished the last of them yesterday!

As I said, they're all nice, but they're VERY repetitive. I suppose that's going to happen when you write 104 symphonies. Only about a dozen of them are worth listening to more than once. Also, you could tell in the last 10-20 of them he started getting a little more adventurous, and dabbling into some of the then-new Romanticism. But I am pretty sure if you asked him near the end of his life if he could remember every one of those symphonies, he would probably say no.

Proficiat, S-a. I suppose the whole concept of the symphony was developing as Papa Haydn was pouring them out. I must admit I'm a fan, although I'm not likely to repeat this marathon listening session. ;D

One of the pieces I heard during the "boring" stage of my work was this gem by Morton Gould. Harvest is part of a channel of American 20th-century orchestral music I'm listening to right now.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pcoKsFBmk6c

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morton_Gould



     


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 29, 2018, 04:12:32 AM
Heard this on the radio this morning. A bit out of season perhaps, but a gem just the same:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6pquwsisEc

http://old.bhso.org.uk/repert-273-Delius-Summer-night-on-the-river.htm


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: pixletwin on April 29, 2018, 10:44:07 PM
I’m curious what you all think if Crumb’s “Ancient Voices of Children”. I became aquatinted with it the same time I first heard Smile and the two and kind of welded in my mind where I found much inspiration.

https://youtu.be/yvpuiI3fGeU


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 30, 2018, 02:03:50 AM
I’m curious what you all think of Crumb’s “Ancient Voices of Children”. I became acquainted with it the same time I first heard Smile and the two kind of welded in my mind where I found much inspiration.

https://youtu.be/yvpuiI3fGeU

Thanks for sharing, pixletwin. I've heard music by Crumb before, mainly piano music if I remember correctly.

Perhaps they're too intimate (I'm happier with a broader canvas) but song cycles with a chamber group have never really appealed to me--with the possible exception of Pierrot Lunaire. The ones with orchestra by, say, Berlioz and Zemlinsky are more up my street. I can imagine AVOC and SMiLE gelling in one's mind though.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 19, 2018, 07:26:56 AM
Heard a live performance of Stravinsky's ballet The Firebird last night. Here are the closing eleven minutes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WsqK1mCGeY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Firebird


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on June 03, 2018, 07:31:00 AM
This morning I heard "Silouan's Song" by Arvo Pärt on UK radio. This deeply sad piece fits well with some news I heard yesterday at a prize-giving ceremony for architecture graduates. One of the winners could not be there to accept their award, having taken their own life late last year. How incredibly cruel life can be.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6A9XZ7Fw-oU


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 21, 2018, 07:25:08 AM
The soprano whom I used to help with her parts (she sings in a semi-professional choir) has resumed singing again after a bout of illness. One of the pieces I helped her with today was this incredibly moving Requiem by Herbert Howells:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1hBco-7y6M

http://www.chicagochorale.org/herbert-howells-requiem/


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: RangeRoverA1 on July 21, 2018, 07:33:43 AM
His daughter Ursula Howells is jolly talented British actress. Could play heroes & villains equally well.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: the captain on July 21, 2018, 08:21:57 AM
The soprano whom I used to help with her parts (she sings in a semi-professional choir) has resumed singing again after a bout of illness. One of the pieces I helped her with today was this incredibly moving Requiem by Herbert Howells:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E1hBco-7y6M

http://www.chicagochorale.org/herbert-howells-requiem/

Beautiful.

I was surprised to hear Psalm 23 ("the Lord is my shepherd") in there. Was Howells the first composer to use that in a requiem? I know it's in Rutter's, and thought that was an anomaly. Now I'm wondering how common it might be, and when it entered that context. (It is an obvious fit, really.)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 21, 2018, 10:13:54 AM
I was surprised to hear Psalm 23 ("the Lord is my shepherd") in there. Was Howells the first composer to use that in a requiem? I know it's in Rutter's, and thought that was an anomaly. Now I'm wondering how common it might be, and when it entered that context. (It is an obvious fit, really.)

Looks like they're the only two to use it in a requiem. I have yet to "get" Rutter but Herbert H nails it for me. I agree--his is an achingly beautiful work.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A
Post by: SMiLE-addict on July 23, 2018, 03:41:08 PM
I finally finished the last of them yesterday!

As I said, they're all nice, but they're VERY repetitive. I suppose that's going to happen when you write 104 symphonies. Only about a dozen of them are worth listening to more than once. Also, you could tell in the last 10-20 of them he started getting a little more adventurous, and dabbling into some of the then-new Romanticism. But I am pretty sure if you asked him near the end of his life if he could remember every one of those symphonies, he would probably say no.

At work, a big chunk of my job is to do this really tedious stuff processing real estate transfer deeds and as a result I can listen to A LOT of music while I do that. I've found that music with vocals is a bit distracting, but instrumental music, such as classical, is perfect.

Recently while doing this, I decided to listen to all 104 of Hayden's symphonies on Youtube. I started with #1 and am going in order. I just finished #51 (I think) today. Almost halfway through.

My review of them is, while they're all very nice, they all sound very similar - almost to the point where they're getting a bit tedious. But I'm going to insist to myself that I finish them all, just ... because. I can easily imagine Mr. Haydn, at the end of his career, likely unable to recall all of the symphonies he wrote, it almost seems like these authors who churn out volumes and volumes of pulp fiction stories to the point where they all seem to run into each other and you can't really tell them apart (even if they're entertaining).
Update to my comment about Hayden symphonies.

As I said, due to what I do at work, I get to listen to A LOT of music. I've mostly been listening to Romantic-era symphonies, plus a bit of Baroque and Modern stuff. In the past few months I think I've listened to several dozen Romantic-era symphonies. And to expand upon what I said about Hayden, after you listen to a bunch of them, they all start to run into each other and sound about the same, even though they're different composers. It's made me start to ponder the nature of creativity, and art in general, and why artists move on to new stuff, to the point where they delve into increasingly marginal stuff (that is, stuff that's bound to be less popular and sound increasingly awkward). Today, after listening to the first 6 symphonies from ... I forget his name ... it made me wonder if someday art in general - at least the creation of new art - is someday going to "die" simply because it's become increasingly difficult to create things that doesn't sound like something that's already been written (actually, I've pondered that many times over the past several years, but I digress). Is art of all kinds someday going to be replaced by ... I don't know what? It's either that, or artists will increasingly be faced with the choice of creating things that are similar to stuff that's already been done, or do increasingly bizarre stuff that will have limited appeal. Merzbow becomes increasingly understandable. But then, what happens after several hundred artists have created Merzbow-style music?

Probably off-topic, but a philosophical question to ponder. I think you have to listen to about 50 Romantic-era symphonies (or, 50 High-Classical era symphonies, or 50 ....) to really get what I'm saying. After a while the repetition becomes impossible to escape, even among artists who are "different" from one another.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on July 30, 2018, 04:02:26 AM
Here's a composer I discovered quite by accident. Morfydd Llwyn Owen died tragically young, aged just 26. But she left quite a sizeable oeuvre behind. This is her Nocturne in D flat major for orchestra, written in 1913:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-ZYKkxYEvY

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morfydd_Llwyn_Owen


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on September 21, 2018, 05:47:33 AM
Yesterday marked the death 61 years ago of Jean Sibelius. The majestic Tapiola was one of his last and greatest works:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HZdQqCjszsU

 


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on December 08, 2018, 05:35:20 AM
It's that time of year again...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rUcdKa3wkHo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Christmas_Oratorio


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 14, 2019, 02:10:37 PM
Today I heard this magical movement from a magical work by a musical magician, Hector Berlioz.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgG9YtrYU4Q

http://www.hberlioz.com/Scores/sharold.htm (http://www.hberlioz.com/Scores/sharold.htm)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 24, 2019, 02:14:28 PM
I keep hearing individual movments of Sibelius's Sixth Symphony on the radio these days. Most gratifying as it happens, as this particular symphony is generally overlooked. Here is the fourth movement in the version I know best, by the LSO under Anthony Collins:   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67VhT1QZIM0

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._6_(Sibelius) (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Symphony_No._6_(Sibelius))


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: gruelingpace on January 24, 2019, 11:35:12 PM
Sibelius is on my list. (I've never listened to Sibelius. )


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: gruelingpace on January 24, 2019, 11:42:24 PM
Sibelius: Symphony No.5 - Vänskä/LPO(2010Live)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7RwOxQBpVyg

I'm trying this.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: gruelingpace on January 24, 2019, 11:56:00 PM
Nope.


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on January 27, 2019, 03:59:28 AM
Nope.

You can't win 'em all, gh. Try this instead:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjyLWoJvtME

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Swan_of_Tuonela


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: gruelingpace on February 01, 2019, 09:41:27 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS8pVaQVJuY




Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 01, 2019, 10:09:29 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS8pVaQVJuY

Wow, Erich Kleiber! Great choice there, gh. Better than Sibelius, eh? :lol

Listening to it now. Thanks for sharing! ;)


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: gruelingpace on February 01, 2019, 06:45:26 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS8pVaQVJuY

Wow, Erich Kleiber! Great choice there, gh. Better than Sibelius, eh? :lol


My preferences tend towards perfection of the warhorse .


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 02, 2019, 05:19:21 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LS8pVaQVJuY

Wow, Erich Kleiber! Great choice there, gh. Better than Sibelius, eh? :lol


My preferences tend towards perfection of the warhorse .

Aha. Are you familiar with the nine Beethoven symphonies under René Leibowitz? Fantastic!

You'll find them here: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=leibowitz+beethoven


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 11, 2019, 01:07:05 PM
Heard this today as the background music to a scene from Mr. Robot. Holst's The Planets suite has always afforded rich pickings for makers of films and TV programmes:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B-G272M77N0

https://songsfromsodeep.wordpress.com/2015/07/25/space-music-holsts-neptune-the-mystic/


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on February 17, 2019, 11:56:59 AM
The soprano whom I used to help with her parts (she sings in a semi-professional choir) has resumed singing again after a bout of illness. One of the pieces I helped her with today was this incredibly moving Requiem by Herbert Howells:

Another work on that programme is Domenico Scarlatti's Stabat Mater. (Not to be confused with the one written by his father Allessandro.)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KmmM-sgvXQk

https://www.stabatmater.info/componist/scarlatti-2/


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 22, 2019, 03:42:58 PM
This spectacular sequence is from part two of Eisenstein's Ivan the Terrible. Prokofiev supplies the equally spectacular music.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5tcPBx3O_H4

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ivan_the_Terrible_(1944_film)#Part_2


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on March 27, 2019, 02:12:32 PM
Michael Nyman's Music After a While narrowly avoided being unceremoniously dumped in the ambient thread. It was the association with Henry Purcell's Music For a While that saved the day (see details in link):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OiQFJhvukVs

https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8546907--if-michael-nyman-henry-purcell


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 05, 2019, 05:20:01 AM
This is for you, zosobird. You know why.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Cd3Mt2SDCw


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 10, 2019, 05:21:15 AM
My last major project at the Endless Harmony forum was a seven-post rundown of Gustav Holst's orchestral suite The Planets.

That mini-series was prompted by the unexpected inclusion of the final movement, "Neptune, the Mystic", as background music in a TV show, where it represented alienation rather than the hush of concentration Holst intended. You'll need to crank up the volume considerably as I believe the loudest it gets is mezzo-piano:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=26tYwaTFOzA

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Planets


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 19, 2019, 10:35:30 AM
It's that day again. This rendition of Wagner's "Good Friday Music" is for halblaineisgood aka Treatzapiza, who I hope is doing well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pb9sx5G3YZw

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pb9sx5G3YZw


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on April 21, 2019, 01:16:48 AM
It's that other day again, folks...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQoGMgA3wR0

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Russian_Easter_Festival_Overture


Title: Re: I Hear A Symphony: A \
Post by: JK on May 15, 2019, 03:08:35 AM
Last week we attended a concert for string quartet. Normally I'm not a chamber music fan at all but this programme was special. Aside from Steve Reich's Different Trains for string quartet and tape (see today's ambient topic), what attracted us was a work by John Luther Adams, The Wind in High Places. We'd been bowled over by Adams's recent orchestral masterpiece Becoming Desert a while back and this older work didn't disappoint (read the linked wiki page for essential details). Here's part two:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxYnROT9QUI

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_in_High_Places