gfxgfx
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
logo
 
gfx gfx
gfx
639679 Posts in 25560 Topics by 3632 Members - Latest Member: stinkynimrod November 17, 2018, 01:15:13 AM
*
gfx*HomeHelpSearchCalendarLoginRegistergfx
gfxgfx
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.       « previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Sinatra!  (Read 4347 times)
Summer_Days
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 632


...and your dream comes true.


View Profile WWW
« on: September 06, 2012, 10:35:05 AM »

Anybody else here big Frank Sinatra fans?

I love his Capitol years best, what with masterpieces like In The Wee Small Hours (the first Sinatra album I bought) and the bleak but spectacular Frank Sinatra Sings for Only The Lonely LP.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2012, 09:32:54 PM by Summer_Days » Logged

Wouldn't it be nice if we were older, then we wouldn't have to wait so long
And wouldn't it be nice to live together, in the kind of world where we belong?
http://wildsmiley.weebly.com
I. Spaceman
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2271

Revolution Never Again


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: September 06, 2012, 12:39:07 PM »

Big Frank fan here. His Capitol material is the most consistent, but there are many Reprise LPs as great as any of the more vaunted Capitol concept albums.
Logged

Nobody gives a sh*t about the Record Room
Sheriff John Stone
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5309



View Profile
« Reply #2 on: September 06, 2012, 01:50:10 PM »

Also a Sinatra fan. Actually saw him in concert in his later years. Listen to Sundays With Sinatra with host Sid Mark as much as I can. I even like Frank's movies!

While I appreciate all of his eras - Columbia, Capitol, and Reprise, I find myself listening more to his later stuff, meaning post 1964. Granted the voice was fraying a bit (though I think the vocals were superb longer than most music fans give him credit for), I think I'm drawn to the more mature or "real" lyrics. It was less of those goofy, rhyming Sammy Cahn-type sentences and more themes that I could relate to, not that I don't appreciate the classic Cole Porter and other romantic 50's material like In The Wee Small Hours. I don't know if that makes sense.   
Logged
I. Spaceman
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2271

Revolution Never Again


View Profile
« Reply #3 on: September 06, 2012, 03:20:33 PM »

I don't think it gets more mature than Irving Berlin or any of those songs on Only The Lonely, No One Cares, Where Are You, Sinatra & Strings, etc. I think that stuff is far more adult than the mostly pandering attempts at being contemporary Sinatra made after 1964.
Logged

Nobody gives a sh*t about the Record Room
Summer_Days
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 632


...and your dream comes true.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: September 06, 2012, 09:35:53 PM »

I tend to love and focus on his brilliant Capitol albums the most, but much of his Reprise work is tremendous too, particularly September of My Years.

Now how d'ya guys feel about his best arranger/conducter? Nelson Riddle, Alex Stordahl, Billy May, Gordon Jenkins...

For me, it's Riddle, who worked with Sinatra on his greatest albums, though I love the bright, exuberant feel of Billy May's work on Come Fly With Me.
« Last Edit: September 06, 2012, 09:36:50 PM by Summer_Days » Logged

Wouldn't it be nice if we were older, then we wouldn't have to wait so long
And wouldn't it be nice to live together, in the kind of world where we belong?
http://wildsmiley.weebly.com
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8294


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #5 on: September 07, 2012, 12:50:34 AM »

I try to catch Sid Mark at least for a few minutes every weekend! When I wasn't in Philly, Boston had Ron Della Chiesa spinning Frank on the weekends. But I like Sid the best, what a great radio show.

My favorites are Nelson Riddle's arrangements for Frank, whether Capitol or Reprise.

Capitol, the classic 50's sets, are my go-to favorites that sound good anytime, and sound even better late at night depending on the record.

But growing up, more of the Reprise era was in my Dad's collection, and I remember spinning Sinatra At The Sands very young and not knowing or understanding what I was hearing, but liking the horns. Funny that I turned into a Sinatra fan as I grew up. Smiley Reprise has some great records to be heard, beyond the hits.

On Reprise, there are actually two all time favorite songs of mine: "All Or Nothing At All", the Riddle chart with Hammond organ, and "The Way You Look Tonight", which is simply beautiful vocally and instrumentally. A masterpiece that you can either dance or sit and listen to and get the same feeling when he sings that last line.

All Or Nothing At All (the 60's Reprise remake) is part of a handful of songs when Nelson Riddle added Hammond organ to Frank's sound, and I love every one of them. What a sound, Hammond with horns with Frank's voice piloting the ship.  There is even a TV special, filmed at that exact time, featuring Nelson conducting and the Hammond playing those charts behind Frank in a TV studio. Well worth seeking out, same with any number of TV specials Frank did in the 60's, including performing with Jobim.

Sinatra/Jobim...that first album more than the sequel...is there any more peaceful, beautiful yet forceful music than that album? When a certain Beck song hit the radio, featuring a flute-laden Latin swing arrangement, the first think to think was "Beck must be a Sinatra fan too...". Very cool.

"I've Got You Under My Skin" is one of the few records, the Capitol studio version, that will always be considered among the best studio records ever made. Despite the technology, nothing in 2012 from a Skrillex bass drop to the heaviest of metal or hardcore explodes out of the speakers like those horns in the arranger's chorus (to me, anyway). Only matched in sheer power by the arranger's chorus in All Or Nothing At All...and quite possibly Frank's most swinging vocal. A damn fine record, that one.

Logged

ďSome people think you have to knock somebody down in order to build yourself up, I donít look at it that way. To the mentality that likes to disparage other people, I say perhaps you should get a life. Itís just wrong thinking in my opinion and I donít mind saying that.Ē - Mike Love

"Every single person who criticized Brian for having She & Him, Kacey Musgraves, Sebu and Nate Ruess guesting on his solo album can now officially go heartily f*** themselves." - Wirestone
Sheriff John Stone
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5309



View Profile
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2012, 10:00:39 AM »

All Or Nothing At All (the 60's Reprise remake) is part of a handful of songs when Nelson Riddle added Hammond organ to Frank's sound, and I love every one of them. What a sound, Hammond with horns with Frank's voice piloting the ship. 

That version of "All Or Nothing At All" is from the Strangers In The Night album. That album is a curious one. It's fairly short (10 songs, about 27 minutes long), and they threw "Downtown" in there, but it sold well and I love it. Frank is in fine spirits and voice, and as you mentioned, the sound is cool.  What a way to go out for Nelson Riddle. I believe that was his last album with Frank.   
Logged
Summer_Days
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 632


...and your dream comes true.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #7 on: September 07, 2012, 12:47:57 PM »

You know, a lot of Frank's Reprise remakes are as good, sometimes better than the original Capitol classics. One that comes to mind is 'Come Fly With Me', which he seems to have fun singin' on the Reprise recording.

"And don't tell your mama."
Logged

Wouldn't it be nice if we were older, then we wouldn't have to wait so long
And wouldn't it be nice to live together, in the kind of world where we belong?
http://wildsmiley.weebly.com
Sheriff John Stone
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5309



View Profile
« Reply #8 on: September 07, 2012, 03:05:07 PM »

You know, a lot of Frank's Reprise remakes are as good, sometimes better than the original Capitol classics.

I know this is sacrilegious but I prefer "I've Got You Under My Skin", "Witchcraft", and "All The Way" from 1963's Sinatra's Sinatra than the original Capitol versions. They are slightly, just SLIGHTLY faster versions but I like the added punch.
Logged
I. Spaceman
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2271

Revolution Never Again


View Profile
« Reply #9 on: September 07, 2012, 04:39:18 PM »

The only tracks I like on Sinatra's Sinatra are Nancy and Oh! What It Seemed To Be. That album was a mercenary part of Frank's campaign against Capitol Records. Another part of that was his throwing away of the vocals and song selection on the last three Capitol albums. He began that with the song selection on the Nice N' Easy album, but at least he still gave great performances there. Compare Come Swing With Me, Sinatra's Swingin' Session and Point Of No Return with the contemporary Reprise albums Ring-A-Ding-Ding!, Swing Along With Me and Sinatra And Strings, where Frank is at an absolute peak of artistry and commitment. Granted, the other early Reprise album, I Remember Tommy, hasn't aged so well.
Logged

Nobody gives a sh*t about the Record Room
Summer_Days
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 632


...and your dream comes true.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #10 on: September 07, 2012, 06:52:40 PM »

You know, a lot of Frank's Reprise remakes are as good, sometimes better than the original Capitol classics.

I know this is sacrilegious but I prefer "I've Got You Under My Skin", "Witchcraft", and "All The Way" from 1963's Sinatra's Sinatra than the original Capitol versions. They are slightly, just SLIGHTLY faster versions but I like the added punch.

It is sacrilegious. Smiley But a lot of his Sinatra's Sinatra vocals are punchier. Some not; I way prefer the Capitol version of 'I Get A Kick Out of You', complete with the cocaine line.
« Last Edit: September 07, 2012, 07:09:13 PM by Summer_Days » Logged

Wouldn't it be nice if we were older, then we wouldn't have to wait so long
And wouldn't it be nice to live together, in the kind of world where we belong?
http://wildsmiley.weebly.com
I. Spaceman
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2271

Revolution Never Again


View Profile
« Reply #11 on: September 07, 2012, 06:56:58 PM »

I way prefer the Capitol version of 'I Get A Kick Out of You', complete with the cocaine line.

I agree on that. Same with the remakes on Sinatra-Basie.
Logged

Nobody gives a sh*t about the Record Room
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8294


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: September 07, 2012, 11:18:57 PM »

Re: Strangers In The Night and that era of albums - it does feel like Frank's albums were sort of adrift and wandering at this time, trying to appeal to the jukebox audience, his core audience, his older audience, and trying for anything in between. Hence, an album like Strangers... which is short and not very connected, despite the awesome organ sounds.

Yet, the sheer power of a song and arrangement like All Or Nothing At All somehow makes up for all of that, if not completely overshadowing the shortcomings of the album as a whole. And the title track was a monster, among a pretty amazing run where Frank was charting hit records again, and his name was associated with hits separate from his core (i.e. older) audience.

So his 65-67 output, album-wise, was a bit erratic. Good, but erratic. Yet his chart success was better than it had been in a decade, and consistent at that. Then when he put more direction into his albums and went for thematic, cohesive albums again, his sales sort of slipped and he wasn't charting hit singles. And then we're into semi-retirement into the early 70's.

One thing I can't listen to and enjoy as much instrumentally is the later recordings where you can hear a prominent electric bass in the big band setting. Hearing that amplified bass on a Sinatra big band chart from the late 70's and beyond can be distracting for me, but that's a pet peeve of mine.

Logged

ďSome people think you have to knock somebody down in order to build yourself up, I donít look at it that way. To the mentality that likes to disparage other people, I say perhaps you should get a life. Itís just wrong thinking in my opinion and I donít mind saying that.Ē - Mike Love

"Every single person who criticized Brian for having She & Him, Kacey Musgraves, Sebu and Nate Ruess guesting on his solo album can now officially go heartily f*** themselves." - Wirestone
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8294


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #13 on: September 07, 2012, 11:29:44 PM »

What a way to go out for Nelson Riddle. I believe that was his last album with Frank.   

There are those few songs he arranged and recorded with Frank for the "names" album that never materialized in 1977, including "Sweet Lorraine" which I think is the highlight and also a highlight of most of what I've heard from Frank in the 70's, actually. There is some kind of magic there which drew me in when I first heard it, even though the record is a bit rough around the edges...

It's a little loopy, it's a little bit dated with the electric piano which was jazz-trendy bordering on de rigueur in the mid 70's, Sinatra isn't swaggering or phrasing as he did 2 decades prior, but I put that tune on more than one mix tape in previous years because it has that really specific light swing feel that Nelson and Frank did as good if not better than anyone when they got down to it. And the magic.

Basie swung hard, Sinatra pushing tempos on remakes and using his preferred heavy-footed, bashing swing drummers swung hard, Nelson could write screaming swing charts with the best of them, yet that light, breezy swing heard sadly for the last time on "Sweet Lorraine" as it was the final Riddle-Sinatra session was their fastball, their calling card.

I hear that all over the mid-50's Capitol albums, and it wasn't just with Nelson either (Billy May...), but the Riddle-Sinatra partnership owned that sound. If the Reprise remakes swung with more attitude and played hard and fast with the tempos, they lost that bit of airiness that was on the earlier Capitol versions.
Logged

ďSome people think you have to knock somebody down in order to build yourself up, I donít look at it that way. To the mentality that likes to disparage other people, I say perhaps you should get a life. Itís just wrong thinking in my opinion and I donít mind saying that.Ē - Mike Love

"Every single person who criticized Brian for having She & Him, Kacey Musgraves, Sebu and Nate Ruess guesting on his solo album can now officially go heartily f*** themselves." - Wirestone
I. Spaceman
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2271

Revolution Never Again


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: September 08, 2012, 07:45:54 AM »

For me, the Strangers In The Night album is all about Summer Wind. That is in Frank's top 10 tracks of all time, for sure.
That version of All Or Nothing At All is excellent, of course. For vocal power and drama, I gotta go with the stunning chart by Don Costa for that tune on the Sinatra and Strings album, tho. One of Frank's most intense vocal moments happens at the end of that performance.
A very notable thing about the Strangers album is the wild decision to resurrect no less than three songs by the composer Walter Donaldson, all very ubiquitous novelty-type songs that somehow sit quite well with the more modern tracks.
The Petula Clark covers are awful. I think Strangers itself is pretty bad too.
Now, Moonlight Sinatra, THAT is a Sinatra-Riddle album.
Logged

Nobody gives a sh*t about the Record Room
Justin
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 2236



View Profile
« Reply #15 on: September 08, 2012, 08:45:12 AM »

Big fan here as well.  I have the Capitol records box set among others and there are many gems on that one.  A great one to put on when you're heartbroken:



Anyone pick this up?  Amazing set:

« Last Edit: September 08, 2012, 08:47:14 AM by Justin » Logged
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8294


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #16 on: September 08, 2012, 10:37:42 AM »

The funny thing about Frank's chart resurgence from 65-67 or thereabout is the opinion among the more diehard, old-school fans that it was something of a fluke that Frank was cutting hit singles in the midst of that pop-youth revolution. Looking back on it, was it plausible to assume that Frank Sinatra would be that popular at that specific time? I guess ultimately he was fishing for a hit record and a hit sound, and he and those working around him just found the right combination which appealed to a wider audience.

I will say that some of his choices of covers, not just the Pet Clark tunes, could at times sound like he was trying too hard to cover "contemporary" hit records, and some of them just don't work. Then again, he gets a lot of ridicule in some circles for his cover of "Something" where he famously injected the word "Jack!" into the lyrics, but taken as a whole the instrumental arrangement is beautiful and respectful of the Beatles' original at the same time.

Re: Strangers..., the song: I think you can hear Frank's opinion of the whole scene by the way he all but cuts up at the end with his scat singing. Not that it isn't a decent performance, but he's laughing almost at himself by the end of it, and such is the unpredictability of which songs will appeal to the public.
Logged

ďSome people think you have to knock somebody down in order to build yourself up, I donít look at it that way. To the mentality that likes to disparage other people, I say perhaps you should get a life. Itís just wrong thinking in my opinion and I donít mind saying that.Ē - Mike Love

"Every single person who criticized Brian for having She & Him, Kacey Musgraves, Sebu and Nate Ruess guesting on his solo album can now officially go heartily f*** themselves." - Wirestone
I. Spaceman
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2271

Revolution Never Again


View Profile
« Reply #17 on: September 08, 2012, 11:48:49 AM »

I think the resurgence of Frank, as well as Dean (who had a #1 in the Beatle era first, with Everybody Loves Somebody) and Louis Armstrong (who had a #1 even before that with Hello Dolly, breaking the run of Beatle chart-toppers in half), had a lot to do with a reaction by the older music-listening audience and radio programmers to the onslaught of "young" music from both Britain and America. Just when the teenage audience became absolutely rabid for the 45 and LP miracles rolling along at the rate of a hundred a week, the older crowd suddenly became more interested in purchasing records again as well. Patly, of course, this had to do with the older artists making more beat-heavy, contemporary-sounding records to keep up with the times.  Despite what many think, the "adult contemporary" market genuinely exploded post-Beatles. Herb Alpert sold a LOT more records in the Beatle era than he did before. It is cool that there were a few acts, such as Petula Clark, that bridged the gap between older and younger sensibilities.
Logged

Nobody gives a sh*t about the Record Room
Ron
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5086


View Profile
« Reply #18 on: September 10, 2012, 11:50:13 PM »

I think it's hard for anybody who's paid any attention to his music to NOT be a big fan.  I can't put it in words, it may have just been he consistantly chose great songs, but man what a performer. 

My favorite has always been "Summer Wind", but I can get into about any of his songs that swing a little bit.  Some of the really slow ballads don't do much for me but I still respect them and understand the audience. 

There will be a ton of imitators of his 'style' from now until the end of time, but he was the only one who got to do that style when a song was still worth something to people.  Back when people owned 6 records and 4 of them were Sinatra's. 
Logged
Alex
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2602


Yes, I do dig worms.


View Profile WWW
« Reply #19 on: September 11, 2012, 02:30:54 AM »

Great singer and performer, but way too cozy with the establishment. (Which doesn't diminish the quality of his music one bit.)
Logged

"I thought Brian was a perfect gentleman, apart from buttering his head and trying to put it between two slices of bread"  -Tom Petty, after eating with Brian.
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8294


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #20 on: September 11, 2012, 02:53:34 PM »

Great singer and performer, but way too cozy with the establishment. (Which doesn't diminish the quality of his music one bit.)

What? Please explain.
Logged

ďSome people think you have to knock somebody down in order to build yourself up, I donít look at it that way. To the mentality that likes to disparage other people, I say perhaps you should get a life. Itís just wrong thinking in my opinion and I donít mind saying that.Ē - Mike Love

"Every single person who criticized Brian for having She & Him, Kacey Musgraves, Sebu and Nate Ruess guesting on his solo album can now officially go heartily f*** themselves." - Wirestone
I. Spaceman
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2271

Revolution Never Again


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: September 11, 2012, 04:05:01 PM »

I'd assume he means from his association with Nixon on. It should be noted that before that, Frank was a staunch Democrat, worked with blacklisted writers, etc.
Logged

Nobody gives a sh*t about the Record Room
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8294


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #22 on: September 11, 2012, 11:35:22 PM »

It is mostly about the music anyway, so it's irrelevant to gauge how "establishment" versus "anti-establishment" the man was when we're discussing his music. And I hope some folks aren't out to lessen Sinatra because he became associated with whichever political party or views they don't agree with. That is some petty sh*t, especially when it's Frank Sinatra and the man and the music are what will be remembered.

Seriously, is that the current rap on Sinatra, that he wasn't "anti-establishment" enough? Turn that idea around, and is it more of a positive for entertainers to be more cozy with anti-establishment types? Still confused by that notion, but whatever, I listen to the music and watch his films (and his guest spots on Magnum PI, remember those? Smiley ), that's good enough for me to enjoy no matter how he voted.

Sinatra's voting record - at least in the more familiar elections - is pretty well known and publicized anyway. He voted for the ideas and the person running more than the party as he got older, and among those getting his votes and support after his almost exclusive support of the Democratic candidates from FDR to Truman to JFK was Hubert Humphrey(D) in 1968, then Richard Nixon(R) in 1972 over McGovern, and in between those races an old pal of his Ronald Reagan(R) for governor of California then later endorsing Reagan and producing his inaugural concert events in 1980-81. And the Reagan votes came when Sinatra was still registered as a Democrat, and I can't recall if he ever gave up that registration as long as he voted.

Nixon was the first president to invite Sinatra to perform at The White House in 1973 - an honor which meant a great deal to Sinatra. Note that despite working very hard for Democratic presidents in the past - most famously and publicly John Kennedy - none had invited him to the White House to sing, despite the work Frank did for their campaigns.

And the John Kennedy White House - through Bobby, the AG - actually cut off Frank Sinatra from their administration due to the perceived connections he had with the mob. Those same connections, mind you, which some say helped win JFK some crucial votes in certain areas where he was lagging behind Nixon as the 1960 campaign was coming to an end.

So yeah, I'd say Frank would be a bit hurt and pissed about this, although his ties to the Kennedy family remained through the years...but the slight of being uninvited by RFK never left his mind. And he also said that his views became more conservative as he got older...is that a negative on the man's legacy? That's who he was.

So I think it's a plus to have Sinatra voting how he felt about people over party affiliation - it's a pretty noble and risky thing to do but ultimately no one could accuse Sinatra of not having the balls to do things his way.  Smiley
Logged

ďSome people think you have to knock somebody down in order to build yourself up, I donít look at it that way. To the mentality that likes to disparage other people, I say perhaps you should get a life. Itís just wrong thinking in my opinion and I donít mind saying that.Ē - Mike Love

"Every single person who criticized Brian for having She & Him, Kacey Musgraves, Sebu and Nate Ruess guesting on his solo album can now officially go heartily f*** themselves." - Wirestone
Ron
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5086


View Profile
« Reply #23 on: September 15, 2012, 11:58:36 PM »

Yeah I don't get the establishment thing.  I also don't get why anybody would let any of that influence they're opinion of him as a singer.  I know tons of people I disagree with about anything from politics to religion to favorite breast size and I don't let it keep me from appreciating people. 
Logged
rn57
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 886


View Profile
« Reply #24 on: September 16, 2012, 10:40:28 AM »

I think I may have more albums by old Frank than by anyone else in my collection - mostly (pre-recorded) cassettes I haven't listened to in years and years, since I generally listen to him on Youtube now. But I should dig out Watertown again - not all the tracks from that are on Youtube.

I hate to admit it, but the three songs of his I post on Facebook most often are his disco versions of "All Or Nothing At All" and "Night And Day," and "Mama Will Bark." Mostly because I like to startle my friends who have never heard them. Not that fair to Francis Albert, though.

Something interesting I read years ago: when Sinatra sold his Reprise label to Warner Brothers Records, he had a clause put in the contract saying that he had the right to personally listen to every single and album on the label before its release, and to veto anything he thought was not up to the label's standard. So, apparently until he retired temporarily in 1971, he did just that. Mo Ostin, the head of Warner Bros Recs, would bring him the discs at his house on the weekends, and he'd listen to them. Apparently he never vetoed anything.

But it's still incredible to think of what he heard. Ostin told Ed Sanders that Frank indeed listened to all the Fugs albums released by Reprise in his (Mo's) presence.  And can you picture Sinatra listening to the West Coast Pop Art Experimental Band's A Child's Guide To Good And Evil?  My cerebral cortex kind of balks at the idea of conceptualizing that.

There's an interesting interview in the current (September) issue of Mojo with Van Dyke Parks. As everybody knows, one of Frank's biggest latter-day hits was his duet with Nancy on "Somethin' Stupid" by VDP's brother Carson.  I had always read before that Sinatra first heard the song on an album Carson Parks recorded. Not so, according to Van Dyke. He says he personally pitched - ie, sang - "Somethin' Stupid" to Frank while the latter was getting a massage. In other words, he sang it acapella. Then Sinatra agreed to listen to Carson's version. Ah, that's one scene I wish somebody had captured on film or video, or even tape.

Frank, when attending The Paris Review's 13th anniversary party at the Village Gate club in NYC in 1966, got bored with the crowd  and he and Mia Farrow wandered into the performance room, where a group hired by George Plimpton's right-hand man, the late Peter Ardery, was performing. It was the Velvet Underground. With Nico. With Gerald Malanga and Mary Woronov and the whips. He watched them for 30 seconds and walked out.

Apparently Lou, John & Co never saw him, but the guy who later booked the Velvets into the Boston Tea Party club all the time was there and I have an email from him where he swears it happened.  I've got Mia's email address someplace around here so I should write her about it - and of course ask her, while I'm at it, what her ex thought of the BBs.
Logged
gfx
Pages: [1] 2 Go Up Print 
gfx
Jump to:  
gfx
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Page created in 0.479 seconds with 21 queries.
Helios Multi design by Bloc
gfx
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!