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Author Topic: New album info (as it rolls out...)  (Read 230383 times)
Mikie
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« Reply #1850 on: May 04, 2012, 12:11:41 PM »

I like the double connotation in the title "Beaches In Mind".  Maybe the person (writer) is just thinking about beaches. But when I first saw it, I thought to myself, "B*tches In Mind".  

I guess the double entendre was the intention, right?  Am I stating the obvious?  Or maybe I'm just weird.
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I, I love the colorful clothes she wears, and she's already working on my brain. I only looked in her eyes, but I picked up something I just can't explain. I, I bet I know what shes like, and I can feel how right shed be for me. Its weird how she comes in so strong, and I wonder what shes picking up from me. I hope its good, good, good, good vibrations, yeah!!
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« Reply #1851 on: May 04, 2012, 12:18:35 PM »

I like the double connotation in the title "Beaches In Mind".  Maybe the person (writer) is just thinking about beaches. But when I first saw it, I thought to myself, "B*tches In Mind".  

I guess the double entendre was the intention, right?  Am I stating the obvious?  Or maybe I'm just weird.
"Beaches in mind"
I got those beaches on my mind,they have nice tans
beaches on my mind they walk on the sand
those beaches are on the beaches all day long..
those fine sexy beaches are on my mind
I want to make love to those beaches
all night long.
i'm going surfing with the beaches (ooooohhhhhh)
those hot fine beaches (oooooohhhhhhh)
then we go to the beach..
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Mikie
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« Reply #1852 on: May 04, 2012, 12:18:52 PM »

Because people that get free things want to make sure they keep on getting free things. Therefore, they will do what they have to do to make sure the free things keep on coming. That's how I remember the record business working when I was in it. I doubt things have changed too much in that regard.

That's the impression I've always gotten.  Good reviews no matter what, accenting the positive.  Not just with music either - also electronics (i.e. TV's and stereo/AV equipment) So they'll continue to get free samples to evaluate. Even if it's not very good, the reader comes away thinking it's an above average to excellent product.

By jove, I think you've got it!
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I, I love the colorful clothes she wears, and she's already working on my brain. I only looked in her eyes, but I picked up something I just can't explain. I, I bet I know what shes like, and I can feel how right shed be for me. Its weird how she comes in so strong, and I wonder what shes picking up from me. I hope its good, good, good, good vibrations, yeah!!
b00ts
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« Reply #1853 on: May 04, 2012, 12:45:10 PM »

Of course, when reading about an album that is yet to be released, reviews can colour one's assessment of said album. "Gone Troppo" is regarded by critics as George Harrison's nadir, but when I finally gave the record a fair shake after years of writing it off due to bad press, I realized that I enjoyed the record a lot more than I would have ever expected.

B00ts, you raise a very good point.  I happened to get into George's Gone Troppo just a couple of months ago, and it is one FINE album in every way.  Quite marvelous, in fact.  The "critics" totally missed the boat on that one.

eff Twitter, eff Paste Magazine, they sukk

I am looking forward to a damm fine album from the Freakin' Beach Boys!


Hell yes! It seems like a lot of political/non-musical factors affect album ratings, such as (in the case of Gone Troppo) Harrison's complete unwillingness to support the album by doing promotional tours/interviews/etc. Warners decided to not put any effort into promoting it, either. Hype has so much to do with perception.

And yes, f*** the critics, except the ones who give my stuff a good write-up - they are the one exception.
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b00ts
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« Reply #1854 on: May 04, 2012, 12:47:13 PM »

Because people that get free things want to make sure they keep on getting free things. Therefore, they will do what they have to do to make sure the free things keep on coming. That's how I remember the record business working when I was in it. I doubt things have changed too much in that regard.

That's the impression I've always gotten.  Good reviews no matter what, accenting the positive.  Not just with music either - also electronics (i.e. TV's and stereo/AV equipment) So they'll continue to get free samples to evaluate. Even if it's not very good, the reader comes away thinking it's an above average to excellent product.

By jove, I think you've got it!
So you're telling me that it isn't a coincidence that Rolling Stone - which at one point actually put effort into their reviews, such as Kurt Loder's excellent write-up of Pink Floyd's "The Final Cut" - now gives 3 1/2 stars to nearly every album they review?

I remember when I used to buy print copies of RS and I'd see an ad for the reviewed album on the facing page. They don't even try to hide it. Brazen corporate gladhanding.
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Mikie
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« Reply #1855 on: May 04, 2012, 01:00:13 PM »

It snot a coincidence.

Kurt Loder Crap.   Didn't he useta be an MTV DJ?  Or he did the news highlights or something?  What's he doing reviewing music for the Rolling Stone rag?

Rolling Stone ain't what it use to be. (Understatement).
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I, I love the colorful clothes she wears, and she's already working on my brain. I only looked in her eyes, but I picked up something I just can't explain. I, I bet I know what shes like, and I can feel how right shed be for me. Its weird how she comes in so strong, and I wonder what shes picking up from me. I hope its good, good, good, good vibrations, yeah!!
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« Reply #1856 on: May 04, 2012, 01:06:33 PM »

I haven't read Rolling Stone since 1996. Got tired of all the ads and fluff.
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Wirestone
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« Reply #1857 on: May 04, 2012, 01:10:50 PM »

It snot a coincidence.

Kurt Loder Crap.   Didn't he useta be an MTV DJ?  Or he did the news highlights or something?  What's he doing reviewing music for the Rolling Stone rag?

Rolling Stone ain't what it use to be. (Understatement).

Loder was a journalist first, and an excellent one. MTV then hired him away.

Of course, when reading about an album that is yet to be released, reviews can colour one's assessment of said album. "Gone Troppo" is regarded by critics as George Harrison's nadir, but when I finally gave the record a fair shake after years of writing it off due to bad press, I realized that I enjoyed the record a lot more than I would have ever expected.

This was my experience with M.I.U., which a certain generation of older BB/BW fan once held in white-hot contempt. When I finally heard it, I was stunned: This pleasant, unassuming little record was what got everyone so angry?
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« Reply #1858 on: May 04, 2012, 01:14:38 PM »

I'm getting less and less excited about this. At least most people are impressed by the tour.

so a big reviewer saying it might be the best since sunflower is a downer?  and that track by track review says it has some great moments?  all downers eh.

A big reviewer? Is he tall or fat? I could not give a rip about a big reviewer's opinion. I'm referring to what sounds like it has steel drums and horrible lyrics in places. That is the key for me. Some decent stuff with some crap sounds a lot like the bad years to me. It does not have to be a gem, but if I'm going to have to hit the skip button on several tracks I"M NOT GOING TO BE EXCITED about it. I've been doing that since 15 Big Ones. I thought the cheese was past everyone involved and was hoping none would be here this time.

Those steel drums are keeping Al Jardine in the group.
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I'm hoping these songs will bring you as many good vibrations as a checkered flag at Daytona Beach.
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« Reply #1859 on: May 04, 2012, 01:15:26 PM »

Yeah, I finally just MIU, and had the same feeling. It's not fantastic, it is indeed pleasant, and was surprisingly un-horrible.
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Mikie
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« Reply #1860 on: May 04, 2012, 01:27:57 PM »

Wirestone, you're in the journalism business, aren't you?  What do you think of Krabklaw's analysis?  I've thought that for years about music reviewers.
« Last Edit: May 04, 2012, 01:45:50 PM by Mikie » Logged

I, I love the colorful clothes she wears, and she's already working on my brain. I only looked in her eyes, but I picked up something I just can't explain. I, I bet I know what shes like, and I can feel how right shed be for me. Its weird how she comes in so strong, and I wonder what shes picking up from me. I hope its good, good, good, good vibrations, yeah!!
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« Reply #1861 on: May 04, 2012, 01:41:22 PM »

It snot a coincidence.

Kurt Loder Crap.   Didn't he useta be an MTV DJ?  Or he did the news highlights or something?  What's he doing reviewing music for the Rolling Stone rag?

Rolling Stone ain't what it use to be. (Understatement).

Loder was a journalist first, and an excellent one. MTV then hired him away.

Of course, when reading about an album that is yet to be released, reviews can colour one's assessment of said album. "Gone Troppo" is regarded by critics as George Harrison's nadir, but when I finally gave the record a fair shake after years of writing it off due to bad press, I realized that I enjoyed the record a lot more than I would have ever expected.

This was my experience with M.I.U., which a certain generation of older BB/BW fan once held in white-hot contempt. When I finally heard it, I was stunned: This pleasant, unassuming little record was what got everyone so angry?
M.I.U. is a great example of this. Like you, I was scared away from it first, but it lies solidly in the middle third of the catalog in terms of quality. The album is a bit dull, but it doesn't veer off the rails into straight-up embarassing territory too often compared to "Still Cruisin'" and "Summer In Paradise." In my estimation, it also beats out BB'85 and "Keepin' the Summer Alive."

Another thing that affects reviews is precedent. I would imagine that hearing M.I.U.  would be a lot more shocking at the time of its release than it is nowadays;  the worst album the group had put out up to that point was 15 Big Ones, which still had plenty of Brian involvement.

In keeping with this line of thought, anyone who knows Kurt Loder as an MTV guy should read his review of Pink Floyd's "The Final Cut." It is an excellent piece of music journalism from a time when the pages of Rolling Stone were suitable for more than lining a birdcage.
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« Reply #1862 on: May 04, 2012, 01:52:45 PM »

Based on what I've read over at The Record Room, this album sounds promising. Like, REAL promising. I think a lot of us are going to be very, very pleasantly surprised. A lots of those reviews have been very positive so far too!
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« Reply #1863 on: May 04, 2012, 02:41:03 PM »

Wirestone, you're in the journalism business, aren't you?  What do you think of Krabklaw's analysis?  I've thought that for years about music reviewers.

I have a few thoughts on the subject.

1.) Music reviews, with very few exceptions, are not journalism.

-- Secondary point: Most music reviewers have little knowledge of music. They have knowledge of trends, personalities and lyrical analysis. But they don't actually know anything about music. This is one of the reasons why so many excellent books have been written about Dylan's work (he's a masterful lyricist), but so few good ones about the Beatles' output (Revolution in the Head being the most important). It's also telling that the true musical analysis of rock music tends to come in book form, and not in shorter articles.

2.) Most big print publications, including Rolling Stone, probably are not influenced by advertising in the way most reviews are written. These older mags tend to be pretty strict about dividing advertising from editorial operations. But that doesn't mean that review sections are immune to popular trends, and I'm sure that if Jan Wenner wants to tweak some stars being assigned to one album or another, no one would object. You can also control who is assigned to review what, I suppose.

3.) I think a lot of places reviewing things online do fall into the "give us something for free" trap. But they also have less to lose if they want to start being super-critical.

-- Secondary point: I think the pressure to be "cool" and in step with the latest trends is far more corrupting than the desire to get free stuff. Case in point: What happened to British music criticism after punk hit.

4.) If you think music reviews are bad and / or corrupt, you should try the world of video game reviews! Those are insanely, unbelievably horrible.

5.) I've always found it best to locate a few critics I like, and whose viewpoints I understand. I don't like all the records Christgau likes, for instance, but I appreciate his viewpoint and love his writing. So I don't mind if he badmouths something -- I read his work for the enjoyment of it. The same with someone like Ebert. And then, because I have the tastes of someone older and duller than myself, I'm pretty sure that if something is featured on NPR or similar outlets, I'll probably like it. But that's just how I handle it.
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« Reply #1864 on: May 04, 2012, 03:22:02 PM »

Wirestone, you're in the journalism business, aren't you?  What do you think of Krabklaw's analysis?  I've thought that for years about music reviewers.

I have a few thoughts on the subject.

1.) Music reviews, with very few exceptions, are not journalism.

-- Secondary point: Most music reviewers have little knowledge of music. They have knowledge of trends, personalities and lyrical analysis. But they don't actually know anything about music. This is one of the reasons why so many excellent books have been written about Dylan's work (he's a masterful lyricist), but so few good ones about the Beatles' output (Revolution in the Head being the most important). It's also telling that the true musical analysis of rock music tends to come in book form, and not in shorter articles.

2.) Most big print publications, including Rolling Stone, probably are not influenced by advertising in the way most reviews are written. These older mags tend to be pretty strict about dividing advertising from editorial operations. But that doesn't mean that review sections are immune to popular trends, and I'm sure that if Jan Wenner wants to tweak some stars being assigned to one album or another, no one would object. You can also control who is assigned to review what, I suppose.

3.) I think a lot of places reviewing things online do fall into the "give us something for free" trap. But they also have less to lose if they want to start being super-critical.

-- Secondary point: I think the pressure to be "cool" and in step with the latest trends is far more corrupting than the desire to get free stuff. Case in point: What happened to British music criticism after punk hit.

4.) If you think music reviews are bad and / or corrupt, you should try the world of video game reviews! Those are insanely, unbelievably horrible.

5.) I've always found it best to locate a few critics I like, and whose viewpoints I understand. I don't like all the records Christgau likes, for instance, but I appreciate his viewpoint and love his writing. So I don't mind if he badmouths something -- I read his work for the enjoyment of it. The same with someone like Ebert. And then, because I have the tastes of someone older and duller than myself, I'm pretty sure that if something is featured on NPR or similar outlets, I'll probably like it. But that's just how I handle it.

Excellent post, Wirestone. The part about Rolling Stone separating advertisements and reviews is very surprising to me, as I had always assumed the opposite. Then again, I don't really know what I'm talking about; I am just stabbing in the dark based on anecdotal experiences. It is nice to know that Wenner still has integrity in this area.

One thing I have noticed about contemporary music reviews (I am mainly talking about the indie world here) is that if an artist is unknown, and a blog decides to review the artist's work, there is a very good chance that it will result in a positive review. If the blogger doesn't like the artist's work, he or she will just not bother with it. Of course, this doesn't apply to larger acts with established/well-promoted names, where a negative review can draw plenty of page views... Nor does it necessarily apply to print media. Moreover, this is another opinion formed from anecdotal evidence, so I could well be wrong.
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« Reply #1865 on: May 04, 2012, 04:02:15 PM »

From MY personal experience, I've always felt the reviews at Pitchfork were fair, well written, and gave really nice insight into both the music, the story behind the album, and the lyrics. Of course, many people probably disagree with me. It should be noted that Pitchfork LOVES Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys, giving Brian's solo efforts, Smiley Smile, and Love You all positive reviews. They gave the Smile Sessions a perfect ten, and three or four Beach Boys songs are in their top twenty for greatest songs of the 60s, with GOK at number one  Grin

Yeah I love that website.
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« Reply #1866 on: May 04, 2012, 04:17:13 PM »

Excellent post, Wirestone. The part about Rolling Stone separating advertisements and reviews is very surprising to me, as I had always assumed the opposite. Then again, I don't really know what I'm talking about; I am just stabbing in the dark based on anecdotal experiences. It is nice to know that Wenner still has integrity in this area.

I should point out I don't have firsthand experience with RS or anything. I just know that the newspaper biz takes the separation of ad and news content very seriously, and I'd  be very surprised if mainstream magazines didn't either. Basically, you would have a lot of RS staff quit if they were being ordered to give certain reviews to certain things.

That being said, as I suggested, there are many ways that the owner of the mag could massage reviews if he wanted. You could only assign certain kinds of albums to certain reviewers. You could change the star score. It's not a hard thing to do. And for that matter, they may assign the reviews first, then share the reviews to the sales staff, who could sell ads to companies whose records were well-reviewed.

One thing I have noticed about contemporary music reviews (I am mainly talking about the indie world here) is that if an artist is unknown, and a blog decides to review the artist's work, there is a very good chance that it will result in a positive review. If the blogger doesn't like the artist's work, he or she will just not bother with it. Of course, this doesn't apply to larger acts with established/well-promoted names, where a negative review can draw plenty of page views... Nor does it necessarily apply to print media. Moreover, this is another opinion formed from anecdotal evidence, so I could well be wrong.

This is truer than you know. Across the board. And it applies to reviews of nearly everything. Audiences generally do not like negative reviews of new acts, new movies, new games, new anythings. And publications big and small (online and off) don't like devoting space to negativity. Writers tend not to enjoy trashing up-and-coming acts, either. So if you have a bad response to somebody new, it's easier to not write it and not print it.
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« Reply #1867 on: May 04, 2012, 04:19:41 PM »

Yeah, I finally just MIU, and had the same feeling. It's not fantastic, it is indeed pleasant, and was surprisingly un-horrible.

At the time it was a "them and us situation" (Mike Love dixit). That sh*t leaked into the fanbase, including the most respected and influential among them. Therefore liking MIU, in the mind of many, meant siding against the Wilsons. Sad but true.
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« Reply #1868 on: May 04, 2012, 04:24:31 PM »

From MY personal experience, I've always felt the reviews at Pitchfork were fair, well written, and gave really nice insight into both the music, the story behind the album, and the lyrics. Of course, many people probably disagree with me. It should be noted that Pitchfork LOVES Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys, giving Brian's solo efforts, Smiley Smile, and Love You all positive reviews. They gave the Smile Sessions a perfect ten, and three or four Beach Boys songs are in their top twenty for greatest songs of the 60s, with GOK at number one  Grin

Yeah I love that website.

http://www.theonion.com/articles/pitchfork-gives-music-68,2278/
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« Reply #1869 on: May 04, 2012, 04:29:34 PM »

From MY personal experience, I've always felt the reviews at Pitchfork were fair, well written, and gave really nice insight into both the music, the story behind the album, and the lyrics. Of course, many people probably disagree with me. It should be noted that Pitchfork LOVES Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys, giving Brian's solo efforts, Smiley Smile, and Love You all positive reviews. They gave the Smile Sessions a perfect ten, and three or four Beach Boys songs are in their top twenty for greatest songs of the 60s, with GOK at number one  Grin

Yeah I love that website.

http://www.theonion.com/articles/pitchfork-gives-music-68,2278/

 LOL Yeah, so many people just rip on that website.  Oh well, I still think it's great. Do you have any personal opinion of Pitchfork Wirestone?
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« Reply #1870 on: May 04, 2012, 04:30:49 PM »

i like pitchfork too.  People just don't get their rating scale is lower than everyone else's.  I remember like 10 years ago when the website was that ugly brown color, and they had a rating scale.  5.0 is their average, i've remembered that. 
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« Reply #1871 on: May 04, 2012, 04:33:31 PM »

Yeah, I finally just MIU, and had the same feeling. It's not fantastic, it is indeed pleasant, and was surprisingly un-horrible.

At the time it was a "them and us situation" (Mike Love dixit). That sh*t leaked into the fanbase, including the most respected and influential among them. Therefore liking MIU, in the mind of many, meant siding against the Wilsons. Sad but true.
Good point, Lenny. Politics have a huge role to play, and the simplistic "Mike bad, Wilsons good" mentality seems like it was really coming to the fore in the late 1970s.

I wonder what the fan reaction would have been in the 80s-90s if Mike Love had written and produced an album that was magnificent, at the level of SMiLe and Pet Sounds? I'll bet many people would never even give it a chance. In 2012, I think people are much more open-minded about Dr. Love.

This is not to imply that Mike has the capability to single-handedly deliver that type of art. M.I.U. is nowhere near that rarefied level of quality, but it is far from their worst work. I just wonder what the f*** the group was thinking, putting "Hey Little Tomboy" on the album... and making it the second song! Truly bizarre, and it is of a piece with many other baffling decisions made by the Beach Boys over the years. This "wildcard" factor is responsible for 'sore thumb' tunes all over the group's discography, but it also has resulted in lots of sterling work.

It seems like we may have a new album from the boys that is around the same overall level of quality as M.I.U., but with more direct Brian involvement.  If that is the case, it is a nice enough denouement for the Beach Boys' recording career.
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« Reply #1872 on: May 04, 2012, 04:34:26 PM »

From MY personal experience, I've always felt the reviews at Pitchfork were fair, well written, and gave really nice insight into both the music, the story behind the album, and the lyrics. Of course, many people probably disagree with me. It should be noted that Pitchfork LOVES Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys, giving Brian's solo efforts, Smiley Smile, and Love You all positive reviews. They gave the Smile Sessions a perfect ten, and three or four Beach Boys songs are in their top twenty for greatest songs of the 60s, with GOK at number one  Grin

Yeah I love that website.

http://www.theonion.com/articles/pitchfork-gives-music-68,2278/

 LOL Yeah, so many people just rip on that website.  Oh well, I still think it's great. Do you have any personal opinion of Pitchfork Wirestone?

I just think the article is funny. It's a fantastic piece on music criticism, period.

But I generally do like Pitchfork -- they gave TLOS a respectful listen, and their take on the Beatles and Queen remasters are excellent historical appraisals.

I'm a little less sold on their current-day coverage, simply because I've been out of the "indie" stream for awhile and am unfamiliar with a sizable number of the bands. It's too much work!
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« Reply #1873 on: May 04, 2012, 04:36:10 PM »

It seems like we may have a new album from the boys that is around the same overall level of quality as M.I.U., but with more direct Brian involvement.  If that is the case, it is a nice enough denouement for the Beach Boys' recording career.

I'd hope for better production quality and slightly better hooks, let's put it that way.
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« Reply #1874 on: May 04, 2012, 04:42:38 PM »

It seems like we may have a new album from the boys that is around the same overall level of quality as M.I.U., but with more direct Brian involvement.  If that is the case, it is a nice enough denouement for the Beach Boys' recording career.

I'd hope for better production quality and slightly better hooks, let's put it that way.

I think this record will be ten times better than MIU. Seriously. I'm very confident in that, especially after hearing TWGMTR
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