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Author Topic: My site updates 1967  (Read 3424 times)
Ian
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« on: February 27, 2021, 10:03:16 AM »

I have updated BeachBoysgigs.com to include 1967 up to but not including the May 1967 European tour-so if you want to look at the first half of 1967 (or 1961-1966) they are up on the gigs section-with photos from gigs, reviews if they exist (many newspapers by 67 did review shows but many still did not), etc. Here is a link to 1967 https://www.beachboysgigs.com/1967-2/  I have also have an additions blog-that list shows up (so far) to 1969 that were not included in my book with Jon, as I have discovered them since (the list of discoveries since that time is getting pretty lengthy-but I feel that rather than a new book-this website is enough for now)
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« Reply #1 on: February 27, 2021, 10:06:03 AM »

By the way if you go to gigs home page, it looks like 1967 is not an active link but it is-I can't figure out why it doesn't look like it is but it is
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« Reply #2 on: February 27, 2021, 12:00:28 PM »

Superb work Ian, it really is appreciated.
Some of the pics are awesome, love the pic from London May 4th with Carl on Bass.
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Ian
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« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2021, 12:57:54 PM »

Yeah it is really hard to find quality shots sometimes. As you may know, you can literally find a quality photo of every Beatles show after mid 1963 but BBs photos that can be precisely dated are pretty scarce. I guess if they were worth more people would dig them out. Often I have to get them from an old magazine or a grainy newspaper photo (originals gathering dust in the photo archives of newspapers or thrown in the trash
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« Reply #4 on: March 01, 2021, 09:01:46 AM »

I have updated BeachBoysgigs.com to include 1967 up to but not including the May 1967 European tour-so if you want to look at the first half of 1967 (or 1961-1966) they are up on the gigs section-with photos from gigs, reviews if they exist (many newspapers by 67 did review shows but many still did not), etc. Here is a link to 1967 https://www.beachboysgigs.com/1967-2/  I have also have an additions blog-that list shows up (so far) to 1969 that were not included in my book with Jon, as I have discovered them since (the list of discoveries since that time is getting pretty lengthy-but I feel that rather than a new book-this website is enough for now)

Thank you so much for your hard work, Ian!!
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« Reply #5 on: March 01, 2021, 09:59:27 AM »

I have updated BeachBoysgigs.com to include 1967 up to but not including the May 1967 European tour-so if you want to look at the first half of 1967 (or 1961-1966) they are up on the gigs section-with photos from gigs, reviews if they exist (many newspapers by 67 did review shows but many still did not), etc. Here is a link to 1967 https://www.beachboysgigs.com/1967-2/  I have also have an additions blog-that list shows up (so far) to 1969 that were not included in my book with Jon, as I have discovered them since (the list of discoveries since that time is getting pretty lengthy-but I feel that rather than a new book-this website is enough for now)

Thank you so much for your hard work, Ian!!


I second that, of course!


That one picture from Germany reminded me of a thread I wanted to start in the media section. Maybe I will do that today but otherwise later this week, I guess.



EDIT:

I just found this. It says there is a ten minute 'documentary' called "Die Beach Boys in Berlin" from 1967:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt4213928/

I'm guessing it would be something like a report for the Beat Club TV show. Does anybody have more knowledge? The data looks too detailed to be just about a rumour imo. There definitely is well known footage from their European tour(s), but if I'm not mistaken that comes from later years.
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« Reply #6 on: March 01, 2021, 01:24:20 PM »

Well if you pull out my book under May 1967 you will see that I consulted and quoted from a number of German language contemporary newspapers and they mention that the BBs were being filmed by German TV while hanging out in West Berlin
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Ian
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« Reply #7 on: March 01, 2021, 01:26:27 PM »

Carl definitely have an interview for the Zwischenstation show
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« Reply #8 on: March 02, 2021, 07:32:40 AM »

Well if you pull out my book under May 1967 you will see that I consulted and quoted from a number of German language contemporary newspapers and they mention that the BBs were being filmed by German TV while hanging out in West Berlin


Interesting! I only knew about the ZDF-filmed backstage material from '64-ish that has never come out. I'd need to take Lowbacca with me and search through their archives, when the Covid situation has improved  Grin
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To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

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« Reply #9 on: March 03, 2021, 02:30:36 AM »

This is too good to be free! Thank you for doing this.

What was the "Then I Kissed Her" debacle you mention in the Sunday May 7 1967 entry? Not sure I've heard about that before.
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« Reply #10 on: March 03, 2021, 08:43:21 AM »

Yeah, I remember reading about that in Look Listen Vibrate Smile. Apparently it was the result of Capitol stressing out about ‘Heroes and Villains’ still not ready for release (unless Priore is dead wrong or I’m remembering it wrong, it’s been a long time since I read anything from LLVS).
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« Reply #11 on: March 03, 2021, 02:09:52 PM »

Yeah, I remember reading about that in Look Listen Vibrate Smile. Apparently it was the result of Capitol stressing out about ‘Heroes and Villains’ still not ready for release (unless Priore is dead wrong or I’m remembering it wrong, it’s been a long time since I read anything from LLVS).

I don't have LLVS but that's what I remember reading on Wikipedia.  Even Mike was disappointed they didn't use one of Brian's originals if they had to release a stopgap single.
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Ian
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« Reply #12 on: March 04, 2021, 06:13:05 AM »

 Right-they showed up in Europe with all the Derek Taylor hype of them as the number one group and the single that EMI put out was from 1965 and therefore seemed like an anti-climax-it did not seem hip or show the progression-so seemed old fashioned after Good Vibrations.  It's hard to stress enough how important singles were in the 1960s-one bad single could really harm you.
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Ian
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« Reply #13 on: March 04, 2021, 06:13:42 AM »

By the way since this post I have actually had a bit of time and now have listings up to October 1967
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« Reply #14 on: March 04, 2021, 06:49:01 AM »

Right-they showed up in Europe with all the Derek Taylor hype of them as the number one group and the single that EMI put out was from 1965 and therefore seemed like an anti-climax-it did not seem hip or show the progression-so seemed old fashioned after Good Vibrations.  It's hard to stress enough how important singles were in the 1960s-one bad single could really harm you.

An old Spector-lite single with a B-side from the Party! album that had nothing to do with the band's "new sound" which  made them #1 in the UK as of 1967...that sucked. And more importantly besides the sonic issues, the fans felt ripped off getting old album tracks as a new single release.

The band as far as I'm aware had no say in this before it was done, and it was strictly EMI UK making this call similar to how Capitol US handled the early Beatles albums and singles in the US without input from the band in the UK - would that be an accurate statement?
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« Reply #15 on: March 04, 2021, 06:50:21 AM »

The full news interviews with Brian from Hawaii '67 show he was not a happy camper in quite a few ways.
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« Reply #16 on: March 04, 2021, 08:08:32 AM »

Yeah-I was very excited when I gained access to Hawaiian newspapers and found that Brian interview!  Pretty interesting stuff.  Yeah, I think that no matter what spin people put on it-Brian recognized that the BBs had missed their chance and the Beatles had seized it.  He knew that Smile was the big chance to be the leader of the pack and that Smiley Smile was a sonic retreat.  That being said-Sunshine Tomorrow and the 1968 release prove that he was still plugging away and doing exciting stuff.  He had not given up but I think he had stepped back from competing (as Mike has often said).  As far as Then I Kissed Her-the BBs bitched about that release in almost every interview they gave in May 1967 (and I have them all!)-they were not happy about it.  And really-if they had to put out a single, why not at least God Only Knows? But it is true that the unfinished nature of Smile meant that nothing recorded since Good Vibrations was on offer to the label in April 1967....I wonder if all that work on Vegetables in April was to try and get a single out quick.....
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« Reply #17 on: March 04, 2021, 08:46:35 AM »

Yeah-I was very excited when I gained access to Hawaiian newspapers and found that Brian interview!  Pretty interesting stuff.  Yeah, I think that no matter what spin people put on it-Brian recognized that the BBs had missed their chance and the Beatles had seized it.  He knew that Smile was the big chance to be the leader of the pack and that Smiley Smile was a sonic retreat.  That being said-Sunshine Tomorrow and the 1968 release prove that he was still plugging away and doing exciting stuff.  He had not given up but I think he had stepped back from competing (as Mike has often said).  As far as Then I Kissed Her-the BBs bitched about that release in almost every interview they gave in May 1967 (and I have them all!)-they were not happy about it.  And really-if they had to put out a single, why not at least God Only Knows? But it is true that the unfinished nature of Smile meant that nothing recorded since Good Vibrations was on offer to the label in April 1967....I wonder if all that work on Vegetables in April was to try and get a single out quick.....

I was actually shocked at how candid Brian was in those interviews, it sounded like he was really fed up with the notion of "The Beach Boys" but even being candid he couldn't come right out and say it. I'm paraphrasing before re-reading the article, but one line that stuck was when he said something about not wanting to be "Beach-Boying" into the future...I'll double-check that before saying more.

But whether it was jet-lag, stress from the show, lack of sleep, or just a notion of being upset on other levels, Brian didn't sound as upbeat or positive as we might expect on the eve of these big shows which were going to be recorded. Yet when you look back at more interviews from the latter half of '67, especially after the guys returned from the Europe tour that spring, quite a few interviews have them sounding pretty downbeat if not angry at various things that were going on. And indeed '67 was not a good year for the group overall, due in part to a lot of external situations which swept them up in a mess of legal and personal issues, not to mention the issues with their new music.
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« Reply #18 on: March 04, 2021, 11:43:46 AM »

So I re-read the Brian interview, given Thursday Aug 24th '67 while the band was rehearsing for the shows that weekend. It's a combination of pessimism and optimism lol. Maybe not as outright negative as I may have implied. But - Brian does say things like "I'd say we have between 3 and 5 years more of Beach Boy-ing to go"; "I'm running out of ideas. In a way we've grown up musically. In some ways, we haven't developed much."; and, as Ian quoted above "...I think basically The Beach Boys are squares. We're not happening - But we've been so lucky in the past, it doesn't hurt now. We get enjoyment in our recordings."

It's pretty candid even if you just take those comments out of the larger piece, and it does come off as sounding less than enthusiastic. However, one takeaway to consider is how for Brian himself, he actually nailed the timeline looking ahead. He did have more or less between 3-5 years of "Beach Boy-ing" left in him before he truly did drop out, with his involvement in those early 70's albums lessening perhaps with Holland being one of the end points we can hear, and his withdrawing entirely becoming more obvious. His interests were elsewhere, even musically, and it did happen as he said, roughly 3-5 years after this interview.



Ian, there was also a column written by KPOI DJ Dave Donnelly where he reports on a visit to the radio station that Saturday of the concert by Mike Love, Al Jardine, Bobbie Gentry and Mark Lindsay. They were interviewed on-air at KPOI, which was the top-40 station in Honolulu, and Donnelly besides being a DJ there also wrote a regular column on the music scene there. First, how I'd love for an aircheck recording of that interview to turn up...but the question was about "Smiley Smile". Donnelly's column is cryptic on what actually happened, but he does suggest an advance copy or acetate of Smiley Smile was listened to at KPOI...and his reaction was less than positive overall, suggesting it sounded like a "rehearsal before the musicians showed up". Ouch.

Have you heard whether this advance pressing was carried in or delivered when Al and Mike went to KPOI for the interview, or were advance copies sent even prior to that? I'm thinking it was delivered with Mike and Al, either by them or by a Capitol rep who went with them for the shows, because Bobbie Gentry was on Capitol too, and her debut single (and Bobbie herself) was literally the hottest commodity in pop music at that exact time in history that summer.

Just curious if anything else about the KPOI visit that afternoon or that advance pressing of Smiley Smile had come up in other research.

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« Reply #19 on: March 04, 2021, 12:15:13 PM »

Yeah I have that article-and they criticize the LP-I think you are right that they must have brought a promo copy and played it for him-as the release date was still three weeks away. But that seems to have been common. There is a May 5 1966 radio interview with Mike and Al, where the DJs had already received a promo copy of Pet Sounds before its release date.  It's clear that the DJ represented the view of the public-everyone thought Smiley Smile was a disappointment.....And it's only in recent times that some people have looked at it with fresh eyes and judged it on its own merits.  But in 1967 it just was not the right response in the face of Sgt. Pepper and they all knew it.
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« Reply #20 on: March 04, 2021, 03:55:36 PM »

Great, great stuff, Ian--thanks so much...no question that the band painted itself into a corner in the first half of '67. But just how do you follow up "Good Vibrations," anyway? Coming full circle on it, I think their best bet was probably the original version of "Wind Chimes," but they'd recorded it so early on in the process...and Brian/Van Dyke had blown past it in ways that must have diminished it. The bass hook that Brian eventually pulled from the track was how they could've threaded the needle and given themselves a viable stop-gap single, but it got pushed out of view by "Heroes and Villains" and "Vegetables."  Of course, Brian never did really figure out how to use that bass hook to make the killer single it should've anchored--it got lost again when he couldn't find the handle on "Can't Wait Too Long." (And I really think that was a kind of Rubicon for Brian with respect to "Beach-Boying.")

They finally got a modified version of it into a track four years later, simplifying it and inverting it for the tag in "Mess of Help"--a great song that went nowhere because virtually no one could figure out it was the Beach Boys.
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« Reply #21 on: March 04, 2021, 05:36:28 PM »

When I first was able to read and research those original articles from Hawaii, my jaw literally dropped with that Brian interview. I had to re-read it multiple times, and still do years later. It's brief, but I think Brian spelled out some of what was going on behind the scenes and what he was feeling, and it surrounds issues that are *still* not widely discussed, which are still shrouded in mystery, and which still generate arguments from some circles who will bend information into a pretzel braid to try changing the story. I think he had in fact reached his limit, with being a "Beach Boy" and the band overall, and something really big that no one talks about happened in between the time when the band returned from a pretty bad European tour in May '67 and by June there were mic cables running through Brian's living room and a Gates Dualux radio mixer sitting on a table, recording music that the DJ said "sounded like a rehearsal before the musicians showed up". Everything had changed, literally, in how this band went about making records. And whenever *that* book comes out, maybe we'll all know more than just the surface facts.

Brian saying "I'm running out of ideas" is, to me, a KEY factor to consider. Are there any other examples of interviews from '67 or before where he was this blunt and honest? If so, I haven't seen one. This is the same Brian Wilson who for the past year leading up to summer '67 was chock full of all kinds of ideas, brimming with ideas about Brother Records, revolutionary ideas for his and the band's music and recordings...and by August '67 he admits he's running out of ideas, and says The Beach Boys are square? Unbelievable, reading it the first or the 50th time, to hear him say that.

I'll suggest he was running out of ideas for The Beach Boys. After the Hawaii situation was done and shelved, unable to be salvaged, he went full-bore into working with Redwood. Is that any accident or pure coincidence? I don't think so.

What Don suggested as Brian's Rubicon, a fantastic description that fits many aspects of this saga, could have been the sheer notion of "Beach Boy-ing" much longer, as Brian described it. As Caesar discovered, once you cross, there is no turning back, you've made your move. And for whatever reasons Brian didn't cross it, but instead his direct involvement in making records with and for the band kept dwindling until he matched his own timeline in his interview of 3-5 years before he was pretty much out of the process.

He says he ran out of ideas...again I'll submit that adding "for the Beach Boys" would explain further...so what were the Beach Boys' next efforts? Blue-eyed R&B stylings, also with horns, for the singles on Wild Honey. What was the next big seller single they had in '68? "Do It Again". The Buckinghams were owning the charts throughout '67, and one of their calling cards was using a horn section. "Darlin" as the BB's recorded it could have been a hit Buckinghams single, with those horns. "Wild Honey" was blue-eyed soul with a crazy Carl lead vocal and a catchy octave-based two-note Theremin hook. "Do It Again" was a thematic throwback to the early 60's, with a heavier modern groove and a fuzzed out blues guitar solo. But were the ideas as "new" as anything he had done for the band in the 2 years prior? Fantastic records, great singles...but not necessarily anything built on new ideas.

If he said he was running out of ideas, and we add "for the Beach Boys", is it an accident that the most successful singles he had in the year or so after Good Vibrations were not as much taking steps forward as they were using existing hit records and previous themes and sounds as a template to make the charts? Not trying to break new ground as much as run across what already existed and had sold records. The ideas were nowhere near as innovative and progressive as they were throughout 66 and the first part of 67. The Smile material truly is and was new and innovative. No one was making music like that in the pop business. Cabinessence? Surfs Up? Totally new ideas for pop music in 1966. Debate and argue the reasons why, but I think he ran out of ideas because the ones he was recording were not sitting as well with and for the band as they did with us decades later when it was rediscovered. It's no accident he started putting his ideas outside the norm into other outlets like Redwood and his own recordings.

Just some rambling thoughts before tackling more on Hawaii.  Smiley

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« Reply #22 on: March 04, 2021, 05:58:03 PM »

Yeah I have that article-and they criticize the LP-I think you are right that they must have brought a promo copy and played it for him-as the release date was still three weeks away. But that seems to have been common. There is a May 5 1966 radio interview with Mike and Al, where the DJs had already received a promo copy of Pet Sounds before its release date.  It's clear that the DJ represented the view of the public-everyone thought Smiley Smile was a disappointment.....And it's only in recent times that some people have looked at it with fresh eyes and judged it on its own merits.  But in 1967 it just was not the right response in the face of Sgt. Pepper and they all knew it.

What struck me while digging through those articles from Hawaii was what I'll call the "Bobbie Gentry Element" lol, and the irony involved with that specific record "Ode To Billy Joe". For one, whoever booked her on that bill at the Beach Boys "Summer Spectacular" really did score a coup with Bobbie. It's lost to history to some degree, but reading through the articles from August '67 she was among the hottest acts in the music business by that time. She had that one single, "Billy Joe", which became a pop culture item that transcended itself as a smash hit record. People were talking about the lyrics, the story she was telling, and trying to figure out what was thrown off that bridge and what happened that fictional day on that bridge. Crazy, right? Bobbie had pretty much only recorded that song for Capitol, in a quick session, and the B-side was one of her demos that helped get her signed to Capitol if my history is correct.

Her single became a sensation, and again unless my history is off, her appearing on the bill was either her first major live show and/or the first time wider audiences could see her perform. All the TV appearances came after she appeared in Hawaii, and I think one of those articles has her manager saying this show (with the BB's) was her first appearance for an audience like that. Everyone wanted to book her, again because that record was an out-of-the-box smash hit.

How did either the Beach Boys or the promoters combined with management get her on that bill? Did Capitol add her on the same bill as her label-mates the Beach Boys?

Anyway, by all accounts, Bobbie stole the show(s) in Hawaii. Nothing but high praise and excitement for her performances, while the other acts at the Spectacular pretty much got blasted or panned outright in the reviews.

The irony comes in when we listen to "Ode To Billy Joe". This was the Summer Of Love, the Summer Of Sgt Pepper, the time when every act seemed to want to go big like the Beatles and throw everything but the kitchen sink into their record productions and arrangements. And Bobbie's song consists mostly of her singing to a guitar...no drums, no backwards tapes, no huge orchestra backing her...just a few strings adding flavor.

It's one of the most basically recorded and arranged hit records you'll hear from 1967. Simple as can be.

So there's the Beach Boys wanting to simplify and strip down for their new sound after June '67, there's the Beatles and Stones going all colorful and overloaded with their music, and here was Bobbie Gentry selling all kinds of records with her and a guitar recorded in an hour or something, with no sonic trickery or special effects.

I don't know exactly what that signifies or if it means anything, but it's ironic that the singer who scored a major hit with her "back to basics" recording was foreshadowing what was to come in the wake of Sgt Pepper and the overblown sounds of those wanting to do similar things in the pop world and was in August '67 making her first major concert appearance with The Beach Boys no less, whose sound was deliberately stripped down for these concerts and the soon-to-be-released Smiley album.

I think where Bobbie trumped them was her song was catchy and the lyrics were compelling as hell. It was a great *song* people could get involved with and tap their foot to at the same time. A devastating combination which always proves successful. All she needed was that song, her voice, and a guitar to deliver it.

Makes me think what if something like Brian doing Surf's Up solo at the piano had come out when Inside Pop first aired in April '67.


EDIT - With a big "duh!" sound added - The Hawaii show was indeed Bobbie Gentry's first live performance. She said so in the same interview/article that featured Brian, from the Thursday rehearsals before the weekend shows. Duh!
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« Reply #23 on: March 05, 2021, 12:01:37 PM »

Just a little trivia: In Oct. '67 Capitol released a "DJ album" with tunes by a. o. Bobbie Gentry and one Murry Wilson.


https://www.ebay.com/itm/Capitol-DJ-Album-Oct-1967-P-Murry-Wilson-2-Bobbie-Gentry-2-Al-Martino-2/353259191144
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To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

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« Reply #24 on: March 06, 2021, 06:27:04 AM »

Well, rocker, remember that many moods of Murry Wilson came out at that time. As to Bobby gentry, yeah she stole the show according to reviews. I interviewed billy Hinsche and he noted that the audience just didn’t respond that enthusiastically to the BBs at the show he attended (Dino desi and billy played the second night only). He said that they opened with that instrumental
And it was a sort of in-joke about Hawthorne that the crowd just did not get. Honestly do you open a show with an unfamiliar instrumental? Also I appreciate that it may be the only time they played it but Getting hungry is kind of a dud in the middle of a show.  Clearly that show has a lot of love from me because in retrospect Brian would hardly ever again take such an upfront vocal role in such good voice but at the time it was not enough of a factor to make up for a poorly paced show with slowed down songs like Rhonda
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