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Author Topic: The Filmore East - last 3 nights feat the Beach Boys + other contemporary acts  (Read 6195 times)
Cabinessenceking
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« on: June 23, 2016, 06:33:20 AM »

Hey all,

Just by accident came upon the Filmore East live recordings in A quality on Spotify, and since I had a hard time finding it, maybe some others haven't found it either and would be interested in hearing it!

Beach Boys setlist:

01. Bill Graham Intro - The Beach Boys
02. Heroes And Villains (Al lead)
03. Do It Again (Mike lead)
04. Cotton Fields (Al lead)
05. Help Me, Rhonda (Carl lead)
06. Wouldn't It Be Nice (Al lead)
07. Your Song (Bruce lead)
08. Student Demonstration Time (Mike lead)
09. Good Vibrations (Carl lead)
10. California Girls (Mike lead)
11. I Get Around (Mike lead)
12. It's About Time (Carl lead)

All great performances too!
I listened to the other acts, and while they might be considered more hip at the time it was the Beach Boys that made this show.

Hear the show: https://open.spotify.com/album/7yD35cRJ1w0pQpeY1qe0Wj
« Last Edit: June 23, 2016, 06:36:16 AM by Cabinessenceking » Logged
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« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2016, 07:21:25 AM »

One memory that has always stuck with me after hearing this show is how weird it was for Bruce to plop a cover of "Your Song" right in the middle of a show like this. Indeed, the crowd seems very restless as Bruce does the song. I dunno if they thought an Elton John song was relevant enough for the crowd or what, but "Your Song" and "Student Demonstration Time" are the weak points in the set.
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« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2016, 07:30:18 AM »

I love it, but I can't help but feel like songs like Darlin', Wild Honey, Cool, Cool Water, This Whole World etc. would have gone over better than the above songs HeyJude mentioned.
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« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2016, 09:59:00 AM »

G. Allman had a story about the Beach Boys regarding this final night in his autobiography.  I would have to look it up to get all the details but it was something along the lines that the Beach Boys weren't happy with the allotted time given to play and they ended up playing over their given time by a long shot which didn't sit well with the Allman Brothers who were the headliners that night.
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« Reply #4 on: June 23, 2016, 10:32:18 AM »

Interesting. I mean, I guess it's plausible they told the BBs they only had like 30 minutes or something, but that 11-song set is not exactly a long one, even for that era.
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2016, 11:50:32 AM »

It's ridiculous to think now, that the freakin' Beach Boys would have had to take a back seat to anyone. (Not disrespecting the Allman Brothers, just saying in general) Crazy how much their fortunes changed post-Endless Summer.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2016, 11:51:10 AM by SamMcK » Logged
wantsomecorn
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« Reply #6 on: June 24, 2016, 08:09:23 PM »

It's ridiculous to think now, that the freakin' Beach Boys would have had to take a back seat to anyone. (Not disrespecting the Allman Brothers, just saying in general) Crazy how much their fortunes changed post-Endless Summer.

The fact that they were even there was a sign of how much Jack Rieley improved their reputation. This was a band that was struggling to get what, 300 hundred people to show up for their tour several years earlier?
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On our way through this "backstage" maze, Bruce joined up with the group and said hello, singing "It Never Rains in Southern California" and joking with some of the older ladies. I'm not sure if they knew he was a Beach Boy or simply an enthusiastic elderly gay gentleman.
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« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2016, 07:17:59 PM »

I think the band had something to do with that too. Their live playing really began to hit it's stride by late '69 and '70 and only got better. There was a period of transition and finding their identity post Good Vibes. Reilly helped somewhat but the Boys made it happen.
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CenturyDeprived
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« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2016, 08:10:52 PM »

It's ridiculous to think now, that the freakin' Beach Boys would have had to take a back seat to anyone. (Not disrespecting the Allman Brothers, just saying in general) Crazy how much their fortunes changed post-Endless Summer.

The fact that they were even there was a sign of how much Jack Rieley improved their reputation. This was a band that was struggling to get what, 300 hundred people to show up for their tour several years earlier?

Totally. I shudder to think how much less awesomeness we'd have gotten from the band if Rieley hadn't entered the picture. Maybe something like MIU '70 or something akin to that.
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« Reply #9 on: June 26, 2016, 09:27:19 PM »

It's ridiculous to think now, that the freakin' Beach Boys would have had to take a back seat to anyone. (Not disrespecting the Allman Brothers, just saying in general) Crazy how much their fortunes changed post-Endless Summer.

The fact that they were even there was a sign of how much Jack Rieley improved their reputation. This was a band that was struggling to get what, 300 hundred people to show up for their tour several years earlier?

Totally. I shudder to think how much less awesomeness we'd have gotten from the band if Rieley hadn't entered the picture. Maybe something like MIU '70 or something akin to that.

"Sunflower" was just pre-Riley and I think it's pretty good.  But there's no question his pushing them to gigs like this and the 'hip" profile that came with it put the band on more successful path.  I was a  teenager back then and recall reading about the show in Rolling Stone  and how "Surf's Up" cuts started getting played on the local  "underground" FM station about this time.  It made me go out and buy the album.
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« Reply #10 on: June 27, 2016, 08:06:48 AM »

If you've read my book with Jon Stebbins than you know that I have a story from their agent chip Rachlin. He told me that jack rieley insisted that they wouldn't play unless they had star billing as the headliner and chip and his partner Michael almost got into a fist fight with him because they knew bill graham would throw the bbs out the door and they didn't want jack to ruin this opportunity to be part of a major counter culture event
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« Reply #11 on: June 27, 2016, 08:14:49 AM »

This was in June 1971 when the bbs were still at a low ebb commercially and Bill graham had refused to let them play at his venues due to a disagreement in 1968 so it was kind of a second chance
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« Reply #12 on: June 27, 2016, 09:06:11 AM »

There are some background points and details that should be mentioned in this discussion, namely the status of the Beach Boys in New York in 1971. Rock was still somewhat regional in nature at this time, even with FM radio and the whole free-form movement which had become the home for rock and roll, there was still a throwback to 60's AM top-40 where certain acts might be hugely popular in some regions while being lukewarm in others, and by "regions" a lot of that revolved around whatever stations the fans were listening to in their areas.

The Beach Boys had played - and packed - Carnegie Hall on Feb 24th, 1971. It was a success on all levels. They were the only band on the bill, and they delivered a knockout performance. That Feb 24th show got positive reviews including one published nationally in Billboard, and again they had packed the place. There is a radio interview with Michael Cuscuna just prior to the show where the band was on the air on WPLJ (which had just transitioned from WABC), and were taking calls from listeners. Often during that interview, fans were asking about getting tickets, and there was a great buzz around the performance...the ads even promoted it as their only NY appearance for that time. The band played a preview tape which had been compiled by their engineer on the air, with then-unreleased songs, alongside Cuscuna spinning tracks like Cabinessence during the interview.

Even on the air, they said very few tickets were left, so the buzz was already there and the show was all but sold out by the time they were on the air. February 1971 - Important to note.

At the end of the Billboard review, the writer made mention of the band coming back to New York on the strength of this Carnegie show...and they did. New York was more than friendly to the band, in 1971 I'd say the New York market was one of the biggest and friendliest fan bases the band had, and thanks to the media reports and reviews of shows like Carnegie, the band's image and demand for them to play live increased dramatically. Consider too that the band starting at Carnegie looked more "real" than they had previously. No matching suits, no schtick, no crazy outfits, just a band of real guys dressed like real guys, and it was very in tune with the era.

Fast forward into 1971. The demand was strong for the Beach Boys to come back to New York, so they did. In the fall, they did indeed return to Carnegie for more successful shows. They played Central Park, headlining the outdoor package show there, and drew however many people you want to take from observers there - 100,000...150,000...somewhere around there. The gig was filmed and broadcast later on ABC. You can watch a video showing a sea of fans moving and grooving to Heroes And Villains, etc.

They were on David Frost's show, and Dennis got the spotlight as well as being asked about Two Lane Blacktop, which was released just after the Central Park show.

The notion that the Beach Boys were at a low point in terms of demand did not hold true in New York, and wasn't true especially after the Carnegie show in February and related media reports literally lit a spark under the group's fortunes and increased their demand. 1971 was a good year.

If the Fillmore bookers were banking on what happened back in '68 to gauge the demand and viability of the Beach Boys as a featured act, they were clueless. Remember that Graham's Fillmore - and this can be shown clearly by seeing who else was on the bill for that final show - was focused a lot on blues-based acts, and specifically those who would feature extended jams. The Beach Boys were not and never were a band to feature jamming or even heavy blues-based excursions. But they were, actually, in demand in New York by the time the show actually happened and a lot of it was on the strength of their songs, which they managed to fill several hours' worth into the sets at Carnegie and floored people by being so damn good at doing it.

I'd say the Fillmore bookers had their reasons to be wary about booking the Beach Boys to the gig, but I'd also say they must have had their heads in the sand regarding the band's profile and demand fro them in New York at this time. And that can kind of hilariously be shown by watching video of the band in Central Park playing for over a hundred thousand fans just a week after the Fillmore.

Arguing about order of appearance and who will open for whom is age-old showbiz stuff regarding ego and the fear of getting upstaged, etc. Same with who gets billed as the headliner versus the lead-up acts.

But the band at this time in 1971, following the triumph of Carnegie in February, was actually a hot act, they were making money, they were getting positive press coverage, and they were getting both respect and getting noticed. So '71 was a good year. Whatever Reiley was doing was working, and the band was delivering great shows.
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« Reply #13 on: June 27, 2016, 11:21:44 AM »

Yes indeed you make some great points.  The 1968 thing had to do with the bbs or their manager questioning the integrity of Graham's people by demanding a stub count.  Graham was incensed and said he'd never book them again. Indeed when Rachlin suggested booking the bbs in January 1971 graham said he wouldn't touch them but chip was welcome to book them himself at another venue. Hence Carnegie hall. By the way I've never heard that interview do you have a copy?
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« Reply #14 on: June 27, 2016, 02:53:52 PM »

Great synopsis there GF!  Definitely the bill was centered on blues-based bands and the Beach Boys, despite being different, were definitely in demand around that time.  The Allmans were at their height and I doubt were worried about being upstaged by anyone, but were rightfully the headliners for the show.  Ian- thanks for the insight on the booking.
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« Reply #15 on: June 27, 2016, 03:53:57 PM »



[Source---all worth reading]
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You're Grass and I'm a Power Mower: A Beach Boys Orchestration Web Series
the Carbon Freeze | Eclectic Essays & Art
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« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2016, 04:44:21 PM »

There are some background points and details that should be mentioned in this discussion, namely the status of the Beach Boys in New York in 1971. Rock was still somewhat regional in nature at this time, even with FM radio and the whole free-form movement which had become the home for rock and roll, there was still a throwback to 60's AM top-40 where certain acts might be hugely popular in some regions while being lukewarm in others, and by "regions" a lot of that revolved around whatever stations the fans were listening to in their areas.

The Beach Boys had played - and packed - Carnegie Hall on Feb 24th, 1971. It was a success on all levels. They were the only band on the bill, and they delivered a knockout performance. That Feb 24th show got positive reviews including one published nationally in Billboard, and again they had packed the place. There is a radio interview with Michael Cuscuna just prior to the show where the band was on the air on WPLJ (which had just transitioned from WABC), and were taking calls from listeners. Often during that interview, fans were asking about getting tickets, and there was a great buzz around the performance...the ads even promoted it as their only NY appearance for that time. The band played a preview tape which had been compiled by their engineer on the air, with then-unreleased songs, alongside Cuscuna spinning tracks like Cabinessence during the interview.

Even on the air, they said very few tickets were left, so the buzz was already there and the show was all but sold out by the time they were on the air. February 1971 - Important to note.

At the end of the Billboard review, the writer made mention of the band coming back to New York on the strength of this Carnegie show...and they did. New York was more than friendly to the band, in 1971 I'd say the New York market was one of the biggest and friendliest fan bases the band had, and thanks to the media reports and reviews of shows like Carnegie, the band's image and demand for them to play live increased dramatically. Consider too that the band starting at Carnegie looked more "real" than they had previously. No matching suits, no schtick, no crazy outfits, just a band of real guys dressed like real guys, and it was very in tune with the era.

Fast forward into 1971. The demand was strong for the Beach Boys to come back to New York, so they did. In the fall, they did indeed return to Carnegie for more successful shows. They played Central Park, headlining the outdoor package show there, and drew however many people you want to take from observers there - 100,000...150,000...somewhere around there. The gig was filmed and broadcast later on ABC. You can watch a video showing a sea of fans moving and grooving to Heroes And Villains, etc.

They were on David Frost's show, and Dennis got the spotlight as well as being asked about Two Lane Blacktop, which was released just after the Central Park show.

The notion that the Beach Boys were at a low point in terms of demand did not hold true in New York, and wasn't true especially after the Carnegie show in February and related media reports literally lit a spark under the group's fortunes and increased their demand. 1971 was a good year.

If the Fillmore bookers were banking on what happened back in '68 to gauge the demand and viability of the Beach Boys as a featured act, they were clueless. Remember that Graham's Fillmore - and this can be shown clearly by seeing who else was on the bill for that final show - was focused a lot on blues-based acts, and specifically those who would feature extended jams. The Beach Boys were not and never were a band to feature jamming or even heavy blues-based excursions. But they were, actually, in demand in New York by the time the show actually happened and a lot of it was on the strength of their songs, which they managed to fill several hours' worth into the sets at Carnegie and floored people by being so damn good at doing it.

I'd say the Fillmore bookers had their reasons to be wary about booking the Beach Boys to the gig, but I'd also say they must have had their heads in the sand regarding the band's profile and demand fro them in New York at this time. And that can kind of hilariously be shown by watching video of the band in Central Park playing for over a hundred thousand fans just a week after the Fillmore.

Arguing about order of appearance and who will open for whom is age-old showbiz stuff regarding ego and the fear of getting upstaged, etc. Same with who gets billed as the headliner versus the lead-up acts.

But the band at this time in 1971, following the triumph of Carnegie in February, was actually a hot act, they were making money, they were getting positive press coverage, and they were getting both respect and getting noticed. So '71 was a good year. Whatever Reiley was doing was working, and the band was delivering great shows.

Love to think so, but I think you will find it was less than 10,000 - It was a relatively small 'rounded' off area of the Park.
Great writing as always though
« Last Edit: June 27, 2016, 04:45:43 PM by Rob Dean » Logged
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« Reply #17 on: June 27, 2016, 06:10:46 PM »

There are some background points and details that should be mentioned in this discussion, namely the status of the Beach Boys in New York in 1971. Rock was still somewhat regional in nature at this time, even with FM radio and the whole free-form movement which had become the home for rock and roll, there was still a throwback to 60's AM top-40 where certain acts might be hugely popular in some regions while being lukewarm in others, and by "regions" a lot of that revolved around whatever stations the fans were listening to in their areas.

The Beach Boys had played - and packed - Carnegie Hall on Feb 24th, 1971. It was a success on all levels. They were the only band on the bill, and they delivered a knockout performance. That Feb 24th show got positive reviews including one published nationally in Billboard, and again they had packed the place. There is a radio interview with Michael Cuscuna just prior to the show where the band was on the air on WPLJ (which had just transitioned from WABC), and were taking calls from listeners. Often during that interview, fans were asking about getting tickets, and there was a great buzz around the performance...the ads even promoted it as their only NY appearance for that time. The band played a preview tape which had been compiled by their engineer on the air, with then-unreleased songs, alongside Cuscuna spinning tracks like Cabinessence during the interview.

Even on the air, they said very few tickets were left, so the buzz was already there and the show was all but sold out by the time they were on the air. February 1971 - Important to note.

At the end of the Billboard review, the writer made mention of the band coming back to New York on the strength of this Carnegie show...and they did. New York was more than friendly to the band, in 1971 I'd say the New York market was one of the biggest and friendliest fan bases the band had, and thanks to the media reports and reviews of shows like Carnegie, the band's image and demand for them to play live increased dramatically. Consider too that the band starting at Carnegie looked more "real" than they had previously. No matching suits, no schtick, no crazy outfits, just a band of real guys dressed like real guys, and it was very in tune with the era.

Fast forward into 1971. The demand was strong for the Beach Boys to come back to New York, so they did. In the fall, they did indeed return to Carnegie for more successful shows. They played Central Park, headlining the outdoor package show there, and drew however many people you want to take from observers there - 100,000...150,000...somewhere around there. The gig was filmed and broadcast later on ABC. You can watch a video showing a sea of fans moving and grooving to Heroes And Villains, etc.

They were on David Frost's show, and Dennis got the spotlight as well as being asked about Two Lane Blacktop, which was released just after the Central Park show.

The notion that the Beach Boys were at a low point in terms of demand did not hold true in New York, and wasn't true especially after the Carnegie show in February and related media reports literally lit a spark under the group's fortunes and increased their demand. 1971 was a good year.

If the Fillmore bookers were banking on what happened back in '68 to gauge the demand and viability of the Beach Boys as a featured act, they were clueless. Remember that Graham's Fillmore - and this can be shown clearly by seeing who else was on the bill for that final show - was focused a lot on blues-based acts, and specifically those who would feature extended jams. The Beach Boys were not and never were a band to feature jamming or even heavy blues-based excursions. But they were, actually, in demand in New York by the time the show actually happened and a lot of it was on the strength of their songs, which they managed to fill several hours' worth into the sets at Carnegie and floored people by being so damn good at doing it.

I'd say the Fillmore bookers had their reasons to be wary about booking the Beach Boys to the gig, but I'd also say they must have had their heads in the sand regarding the band's profile and demand fro them in New York at this time. And that can kind of hilariously be shown by watching video of the band in Central Park playing for over a hundred thousand fans just a week after the Fillmore.

Arguing about order of appearance and who will open for whom is age-old showbiz stuff regarding ego and the fear of getting upstaged, etc. Same with who gets billed as the headliner versus the lead-up acts.

But the band at this time in 1971, following the triumph of Carnegie in February, was actually a hot act, they were making money, they were getting positive press coverage, and they were getting both respect and getting noticed. So '71 was a good year. Whatever Reiley was doing was working, and the band was delivering great shows.


Mostly accurate, but to claim that Carnegie Hall was packed for the February concert is quite misleading.
Originally they were scheduled to perform two shows at Carnegie Hall that night, an early and a late show.
In fact POOR ticket sales forced the promoters to cancel one show. The one show ended up being a  virtual sellout but the reality is they couldn't fill Carnegie Hall, not a very big venue,  for two shows. However, their strong performance that night was the catapult for a much stronger demand when they returned in the fall. In 1972 they had no problem selling out two shows at Carnegie Hall on Thanksgiving night. I was there for the midnight show and they were at their very best.
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« Reply #18 on: June 27, 2016, 06:53:25 PM »

There are some background points and details that should be mentioned in this discussion, namely the status of the Beach Boys in New York in 1971. Rock was still somewhat regional in nature at this time, even with FM radio and the whole free-form movement which had become the home for rock and roll, there was still a throwback to 60's AM top-40 where certain acts might be hugely popular in some regions while being lukewarm in others, and by "regions" a lot of that revolved around whatever stations the fans were listening to in their areas.

The Beach Boys had played - and packed - Carnegie Hall on Feb 24th, 1971. It was a success on all levels. They were the only band on the bill, and they delivered a knockout performance. That Feb 24th show got positive reviews including one published nationally in Billboard, and again they had packed the place. There is a radio interview with Michael Cuscuna just prior to the show where the band was on the air on WPLJ (which had just transitioned from WABC), and were taking calls from listeners. Often during that interview, fans were asking about getting tickets, and there was a great buzz around the performance...the ads even promoted it as their only NY appearance for that time. The band played a preview tape which had been compiled by their engineer on the air, with then-unreleased songs, alongside Cuscuna spinning tracks like Cabinessence during the interview.

Even on the air, they said very few tickets were left, so the buzz was already there and the show was all but sold out by the time they were on the air. February 1971 - Important to note.

At the end of the Billboard review, the writer made mention of the band coming back to New York on the strength of this Carnegie show...and they did. New York was more than friendly to the band, in 1971 I'd say the New York market was one of the biggest and friendliest fan bases the band had, and thanks to the media reports and reviews of shows like Carnegie, the band's image and demand for them to play live increased dramatically. Consider too that the band starting at Carnegie looked more "real" than they had previously. No matching suits, no schtick, no crazy outfits, just a band of real guys dressed like real guys, and it was very in tune with the era.

Fast forward into 1971. The demand was strong for the Beach Boys to come back to New York, so they did. In the fall, they did indeed return to Carnegie for more successful shows. They played Central Park, headlining the outdoor package show there, and drew however many people you want to take from observers there - 100,000...150,000...somewhere around there. The gig was filmed and broadcast later on ABC. You can watch a video showing a sea of fans moving and grooving to Heroes And Villains, etc.

They were on David Frost's show, and Dennis got the spotlight as well as being asked about Two Lane Blacktop, which was released just after the Central Park show.

The notion that the Beach Boys were at a low point in terms of demand did not hold true in New York, and wasn't true especially after the Carnegie show in February and related media reports literally lit a spark under the group's fortunes and increased their demand. 1971 was a good year.

If the Fillmore bookers were banking on what happened back in '68 to gauge the demand and viability of the Beach Boys as a featured act, they were clueless. Remember that Graham's Fillmore - and this can be shown clearly by seeing who else was on the bill for that final show - was focused a lot on blues-based acts, and specifically those who would feature extended jams. The Beach Boys were not and never were a band to feature jamming or even heavy blues-based excursions. But they were, actually, in demand in New York by the time the show actually happened and a lot of it was on the strength of their songs, which they managed to fill several hours' worth into the sets at Carnegie and floored people by being so damn good at doing it.

I'd say the Fillmore bookers had their reasons to be wary about booking the Beach Boys to the gig, but I'd also say they must have had their heads in the sand regarding the band's profile and demand fro them in New York at this time. And that can kind of hilariously be shown by watching video of the band in Central Park playing for over a hundred thousand fans just a week after the Fillmore.

Arguing about order of appearance and who will open for whom is age-old showbiz stuff regarding ego and the fear of getting upstaged, etc. Same with who gets billed as the headliner versus the lead-up acts.

But the band at this time in 1971, following the triumph of Carnegie in February, was actually a hot act, they were making money, they were getting positive press coverage, and they were getting both respect and getting noticed. So '71 was a good year. Whatever Reiley was doing was working, and the band was delivering great shows.


Mostly accurate, but to claim that Carnegie Hall was packed for the February concert is quite misleading.
Originally they were scheduled to perform two shows at Carnegie Hall that night, an early and a late show.
In fact POOR ticket sales forced the promoters to cancel one show. The one show ended up being a  virtual sellout but the reality is they couldn't fill Carnegie Hall, not a very big venue,  for two shows. However, their strong performance that night was the catapult for a much stronger demand when they returned in the fall. In 1972 they had no problem selling out two shows at Carnegie Hall on Thanksgiving night. I was there for the midnight show and they were at their very best.

It's not quite misleading because they did pack Carnegie Hall on February 24, and according to Chip Rachlin the show was sold out by the afternoon of the show. This was one of the ads people saw:



So whenever this early show was apparently canceled due to poor sales, something doesn't add up: The ad above which fans would have seen made mention of only one show, one night only in New York. And according to fans who were there, fans who had bought tickets and were going there, and Rachlin himself who would know since he was managing it, Carnegie Hall was sold out and packed for the show advertised, Feb 24.

Maybe there is an ad for two shows, and I just haven't seen it? Or I'm forgetting such an ad? If so, please point me in the direction of the ad, because the one posted above clearly lists one show at 8PM and that's it. And as I said, that one show was sold out, so they packed Carnegie.

Have you heard the interview from the night before on WPLJ? Fans were calling in live about tickets, and were told very few remained, one girl who called that night said she had bought tickets but lost them...you couldn't hear the actual callers talking on the air but the band and Cuscuna could, and the questions were summarized by Cuscuna. A question was also asked whether The Flame would be there, and the answer was no, they were due to return from South Africa or something along those lines but hopefully would join the band for future dates.
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« Reply #19 on: June 27, 2016, 06:59:54 PM »

What also doesn't add up at all with the 'early show' comment is that February 24th, 1971 was a Wednesday. The band waslive on the radio the night before, on Tuesday.

If any promoter thought they could expect a successful booking at Carnegie Hall for a rock band to do an "early" show on a Wednesday afternoon in New York, they must have been clueless, if there was indeed such a show booked. What time would the gates have opened on a Wednesday afternoon in the dead of winter in midtown Manhattan in order to be ready for the late show at 8? It wasn't Broadway, these were rock fans and a good majority of them would have been in school or taking classes when the doors would have opened.

I'm a little skeptical, not saying it didn't happen because there may be some ad or some proof somewhere, but it would make no sense to book a rock band for a Wednesday afternoon show in midtown Manhattan in 1971.
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« Reply #20 on: June 27, 2016, 07:06:16 PM »

Take a zero off the attendance total, my bad.
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« Reply #21 on: June 27, 2016, 07:09:04 PM »

Yes indeed you make some great points.  The 1968 thing had to do with the bbs or their manager questioning the integrity of Graham's people by demanding a stub count.  Graham was incensed and said he'd never book them again. Indeed when Rachlin suggested booking the bbs in January 1971 graham said he wouldn't touch them but chip was welcome to book them himself at another venue. Hence Carnegie hall. By the way I've never heard that interview do you have a copy?

I know the interview, and it is fascinating. Several times Smile is mentioned, and they say they had just been listening to the tapes. There was also a question about what from Smile had already come out, like the Smiley tracks, and they say none of it. That is only one of many interesting comments.
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« Reply #22 on: June 27, 2016, 07:28:23 PM »

Carlin mentions two shows planned in his book on page 155, not necessarily an early and late or on the same day, though I suppose the 8:00 could have been the original early show. Not much detail in the book.
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« Reply #23 on: June 27, 2016, 07:32:16 PM »

Adding to the previous comments...I'm assuming "early" meant before the evening show...perhaps this was early then later that night?

Even so, it doesn't add up and I have yet to hear of any tickets being sold for a second show that day/night at Carnegie Hall then one of the shows being canceled. if anything, it would make more sense if Chip Rachlin had tried to secure a booking for two shows at Carnegie but they passed on the offer and only booked one. But that's far different than suggesting a show had to be canceled due to bad sales, and that it was misleading to suggest the show that did happen was packed, especially since the promoter himself said it was sold out by the afternoon of the 24th, and the band the night before said very few remained as they were taking calls on the air with fans.

If there is something to suggest otherwise, I'm definitely open to hearing about it. But the show was in fact sold out, and the band did pack Carnegie.
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« Reply #24 on: June 27, 2016, 07:36:53 PM »

To sum up: They couldn't cancel an upcoming show due to poor ticket sales if it were never booked in the first place, and tickets were never sold or offered to fans to buy. Rachlin could have tried to book it but only got an agreement for one show from Carnegie. That is not canceling due to poor sales.
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"All of us have the privilege of making music that helps and heals - to make music that makes people happier, stronger, and kinder. Don't forget: Music is God's voice." - Brian Wilson
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