gfxgfx
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
logo
 
gfx gfx
gfx
677679 Posts in 27358 Topics by 4046 Members - Latest Member: reecemorgan November 30, 2022, 03:09:03 PM
*
gfx*HomeHelpSearchCalendarLoginRegistergfx
gfxgfx
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.       « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: SMiLE's influence  (Read 782 times)
Rerun
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 167



View Profile
« on: October 30, 2011, 01:30:47 PM »

The heartbreaking part about not having a completed SMiLE released in 1967 is of course that we will never get to experience the vision in full and the songs as they were truly meant to be, but along with that, we miss out on a chance to see the kind of influence it may have had.  Though there have been bootlegs hovering around for decades for the die hard to seek and dig up, alongside various official releases scattered among later Beach Boys albums and box sets, the influence was still compact and contained.  Now that we have an official release of these songs for the masses to enjoy as a semi mainstream Beach Boys release, do you think there could still be some musical or cultural impact to be created from this material?

I think about songs like "Do You Like Worms?," which to my ears is unlike anything else I've ever heard, filled with insanity, lushes harmonies, unexpected twists, and spanning through various genres.  Why can't a musician hear this, have his/her world altered, and change the course of music forever?  Why can't, now that we have a fairly hyped release of a lost and broken album, artists who have always heard rumors of the genius of Brian Wilson, that The Beach Boys were more than just The Beach Boys, discover these lost gems and feel their impact?

My dream is that since the passing of time compresses history, this album can one day be considered, not just a relic of the 60s, but the kind of music that was being created in the 20th and 21st century and one day take on greater prominence instead of just an answer to an obscure trivia question.
Logged

"Today, in our increasingly secular world, loving one another doesn't just mean "loving."  It means being forced to accept as normal those behaviors and lifestyles that are absolutely abnormal.  It's not enough to live and let live.  You must chant their mantra as well; you must repent, renounce your own values, and pronounce those of the radical left as superior and adopt them."
JohnMill
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 1253


View Profile
« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2011, 04:43:37 PM »

The heartbreaking part about not having a completed SMiLE released in 1967 is of course that we will never get to experience the vision in full and the songs as they were truly meant to be, but along with that, we miss out on a chance to see the kind of influence it may have had.  Though there have been bootlegs hovering around for decades for the die hard to seek and dig up, alongside various official releases scattered among later Beach Boys albums and box sets, the influence was still compact and contained.  Now that we have an official release of these songs for the masses to enjoy as a semi mainstream Beach Boys release, do you think there could still be some musical or cultural impact to be created from this material?

I think about songs like "Do You Like Worms?," which to my ears is unlike anything else I've ever heard, filled with insanity, lushes harmonies, unexpected twists, and spanning through various genres.  Why can't a musician hear this, have his/her world altered, and change the course of music forever?  Why can't, now that we have a fairly hyped release of a lost and broken album, artists who have always heard rumors of the genius of Brian Wilson, that The Beach Boys were more than just The Beach Boys, discover these lost gems and feel their impact?

My dream is that since the passing of time compresses history, this album can one day be considered, not just a relic of the 60s, but the kind of music that was being created in the 20th and 21st century and one day take on greater prominence instead of just an answer to an obscure trivia question.

Then and now: I believe Brian Wilson was a once in a lifetime kind of cat.  Someone recently posted on here that in 1966 if someone went into a recording studio with a competent amount of talent they probably couldn't bring themselves up to the high standards of the SMiLE recordings.  Now that isn't to say Brian's contemporaries weren't great in their own right as the sixties in my opinion anyhow was and is the golden standard of rock music. 

However, I don't see even with a release of "SMiLE" in 1967, other musicians following Brian's playbook so to speak and beginning to craft songs in his uncanny manner.  The Beatles were doing their own thing, The Stones were doing their own thing etc etc.  I'm not going to say that "SMiLE" wouldn't have influenced other bands in subtle ways as Brian's music already had (see The Beatles and "Paperback Writer") but Brian was a special kind of cat like I said.  He had a vision, he had a mind for music and he was one of those rare people who was able to put it all together and produce magic when he stepped into the recording studio.  Again, I don't want to sound disrespectful of his contemporaries because there were a lot of great records but "Pet Sounds" and "SMiLE" were something different indeed.  A hard act to follow or emulate.

If speaking of today specifically: the musicians out there who would be influenced by the "SMiLE" have already been influenced by it because they somewhat of our mindset.  They have heard this music already, they had studied it and been influenced by it.  Although I'm not a huge Smashing Pumpkins fan, I believe Billy Corgan mentioned that he is a fan of "SMiLE" and there are probably many others like him.  But they have already heard this music through bootlegs and what not so it has already reached those individuals. 

I'm not saying that this new boxset won't reach the hands of future musicians and influence them but generally speaking the direction of mainstream music has changed and that is a debate in enough of itself.  Add that to the fact that we are talking about Brian Wilson here, who came along with his immense talents at a time when pop music was ready to be turned on it's ear and he was someone who certainly someone who had all the tools to accomplish that task.  Again hate to sound like a broken record but Brian was a special kind of guy who because of his immense talents was able to rise to a level in both musicianship and production value that most musicians despite their own contributions (be it positive or negative) to the music industry are never going to be able to reach.

So short answer: Much like anything else, the "SMiLE" music is going to reach the audience that is open to it but just don't expect it to produce V2.0 anytime soon.
Logged

God Bless California
For It Marks My Faith To See
You're The Only State With The Sacred Honor
....to sink into the sea
gfx
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
gfx
Jump to:  
gfx
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Page created in 0.212 seconds with 21 queries.
Helios Multi design by Bloc
gfx
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!