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Author Topic: First reactions to when albums originally came out  (Read 3414 times)
Foster's Freeze
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« Reply #25 on: February 24, 2010, 07:28:27 AM »

It was hard to defend the band when they did "Wipe Out" with the Fat Boys.

 Tongue
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Synth Wash
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« Reply #26 on: February 24, 2010, 07:38:35 AM »

It was hard to defend the band when they did "Wipe Out" with the Fat Boys.

 Tongue

But if you look at that song in context, even if it can't be defended artistically, I'm guessing they were going after the success that Aerosmith saw with their big comeback Permanent Vacation album and the Run-DMC Walk This Way single.
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« Reply #27 on: February 24, 2010, 07:49:57 AM »

It was hard to defend the band when they did "Wipe Out" with the Fat Boys.

 Tongue

But if you look at that song in context, even if it can't be defended artistically, I'm guessing they were going after the success that Aerosmith saw with their big comeback Permanent Vacation album and the Run-DMC Walk This Way single.

I agree totally but Run-DMC had credible status - the Fat Boys had.........double whoppers with cheese, LOL.

In the band's defense, a lot of non die-hard fans did like it, the rest of us were left to deal with the shame!
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Ganz Allein
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« Reply #28 on: February 24, 2010, 11:02:46 AM »

The first one I heard when it came out was the '85 Beach Boys album. I had just recently gotten into the band, and since I had yet to hear anything later than Love You, it was heartening to hear Brian's falsetto on Getcha Back sounding a lot more like the old Brian. But I didn't like much of the album because it sounded mostly split between an "adult contemporary" sound (She Believes in Love Again, Passing Friend, etc.) and cheesy attempts at capturing the old sound (California Calling and Getcha Back). However, I really loved I Do Love You (being a big Stevie Wonder fan).

The next release I remember was California Dreaming, which sounded strong and had me enthused.  But Wipe Out really bummed me out because it seemed to be an embarrassing cash-in on the rap phenomenon and evidence that the BBs were committed to an oldies bent from now on.  I gagged at Kokomo and Still Cruisin' from first listen and still do. After that I gave up on any hopes of decent new BB's stuff being released and totally ignored the rest of Still Cruisin' and Summer in Paradise. I only found out about Stars & Stripes on CMT, and Willie Nelson's version of Warmth of the Sun and Tim Schmitt's take on Caroline No were the only tracks I found interesting.

As for Brian's releases, I was pleasantly surprised by the '88 BW album. I used to like and listen to it a lot, but after getting deeply into the BBs, my enthusiasm for it has waned. I didn't like IJWMFTT because I thought Brian's vocals were bad and the musical/background vocal arrangements didn't suit most of the tunes. I remember being real excited hearing Your Imagination because I loved the song and Brian's voice sounded like it was getting stronger. But I thought the rest of the album was mostly bland and didn't like the remakes or Jimmy Buffet track.  Later there was GIOMH, which I thought was mostly awful (the remade songs were better on Sweet Insanity!) except for the wonderful title track and Soul Searchin'.

But then things really started looking up. I loved BWPS, and although I suspected Brian's involvement was minimal and autotune was in heavy use, I didn't care. Brian deserved closure on his part (though not to say it's closure for some of us) and all of the accolades.  TLOS really took me by surprise because I was expecting another GIOMH. But I was really amazed at the strong songs (blown away by Midnight's Another Day and Southern California) and the enthusiasm in Brian's voice.   I even like Brian's narratives between tracks - something that usually (e.g., Beaks of Eagles) makes me gag.



 
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mtaber
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« Reply #29 on: February 24, 2010, 05:19:13 PM »

When Brian's solo album came out in '88, I didn't know what to expect and feared for the worst.  I listened on headphones and when I heard "Rio Grande" I started crying, I couldn't believe Brian could sound so good again. 

Of course, the first time I heard "Smart Girls", I also started crying, but for different reasons.
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MBE
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« Reply #30 on: February 24, 2010, 10:04:22 PM »

When Brian's solo album came out in '88, I didn't know what to expect and feared for the worst.  I listened on headphones and when I heard "Rio Grande" I started crying, I couldn't believe Brian could sound so good again. 

Of course, the first time I heard "Smart Girls", I also started crying, but for different reasons.
Marty that made me laugh out loud.
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mtaber
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« Reply #31 on: February 25, 2010, 04:44:43 AM »

 Grin
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Foster's Freeze
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« Reply #32 on: February 25, 2010, 06:25:19 AM »

When Brian's solo album came out in '88, I didn't know what to expect and feared for the worst.  I listened on headphones and when I heard "Rio Grande" I started crying, I couldn't believe Brian could sound so good again. 

Of course, the first time I heard "Smart Girls", I also started crying, but for different reasons.

That was damn funny!
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Mike's not a Hawthorne boy. The Hawthorne guys stuck together. The Wilson's and I always had a special bond. We felt like we were a team.
the captain
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« Reply #33 on: February 25, 2010, 06:35:13 AM »

It was hard to defend the band when they did "Wipe Out" with the Fat Boys.

 Tongue
I disagree. I loved that Wipeout. It was fun, and got a lot of play on MTV.
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« Reply #34 on: February 26, 2010, 07:11:58 AM »

 I graduated in 66..Today and the Party album were real popular with my group of friends..when PS came out it wasn't that big a deal
 

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Pinder's Gone To Kokomo And Back Again
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« Reply #35 on: February 26, 2010, 12:56:16 PM »

My Mom isn't even a big Beach Boys fan but I still have her original copy of Wild Honey! She said she was in a record store with her friends and they were playing the title track. She loved it and asked who it was and was suprised to learn it was The Beach Boys, so she bought the record. But of course she didn't buy Friends or 20/20 or Sunflower..... or.....
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