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Author Topic: Rap  (Read 22104 times)
Sir Rob
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« Reply #50 on: March 21, 2006, 02:04:20 AM »


You're talking about occasional experiments (and I'm not entirely sure how pertinent they are to the subject) here not an entire genre of music that has arguably become the prevalent popular musical form.  Thats what people (who may be wrong) tell me is the case in America.  At the very least, rap is a huge part of today's music scene.

Well, James Brown made a lot of songs based on the same principles, so for him it certainly wasn't an occasional experiment and even if they were experiments, I don't think anybody would deny that it was still great music. I think "Sex Maxhine" is pretty relevant, if you compare it to for instance Public Enemy's "Fight The Power" there's  the same call and response and the way he uses the guitar sounds very much like the way rappers would later use loops.


I think you're misunderstanding me, probably because I didn't express myself very well.  I'm talking about the overall pervasiveness of rap as a form in popular music and culture and its effect, not just individual songs or even individual artists in the past.
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jazzfascist
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« Reply #51 on: March 21, 2006, 03:06:16 AM »


You're talking about occasional experiments (and I'm not entirely sure how pertinent they are to the subject) here not an entire genre of music that has arguably become the prevalent popular musical form.  Thats what people (who may be wrong) tell me is the case in America.  At the very least, rap is a huge part of today's music scene.

Well, James Brown made a lot of songs based on the same principles, so for him it certainly wasn't an occasional experiment and even if they were experiments, I don't think anybody would deny that it was still great music. I think "Sex Maxhine" is pretty relevant, if you compare it to for instance Public Enemy's "Fight The Power" there's  the same call and response and the way he uses the guitar sounds very much like the way rappers would later use loops.


I think you're misunderstanding me, probably because I didn't express myself very well.  I'm talking about the overall pervasiveness of rap as a form in popular music and culture and its effect, not just individual songs or even individual artists in the past.

Well, if you read my first post on this thread, I wasn't really addressing the pervasiveness of rap, more if rap could be considered music or not.  But sure it would be a problem if nothing but rap was played, just as it would be if radios played nothing but country music. I'm just saying that rap isn't necessarily particularly musically limited, just because it's based on one/two chords and a rhythm.

Søren
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Sir Rob
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« Reply #52 on: March 21, 2006, 03:27:30 AM »


You're talking about occasional experiments (and I'm not entirely sure how pertinent they are to the subject) here not an entire genre of music that has arguably become the prevalent popular musical form.  Thats what people (who may be wrong) tell me is the case in America.  At the very least, rap is a huge part of today's music scene.

Well, James Brown made a lot of songs based on the same principles, so for him it certainly wasn't an occasional experiment and even if they were experiments, I don't think anybody would deny that it was still great music. I think "Sex Maxhine" is pretty relevant, if you compare it to for instance Public Enemy's "Fight The Power" there's  the same call and response and the way he uses the guitar sounds very much like the way rappers would later use loops.


I think you're misunderstanding me, probably because I didn't express myself very well.  I'm talking about the overall pervasiveness of rap as a form in popular music and culture and its effect, not just individual songs or even individual artists in the past.

Well, if you read my first post on this thread, I wasn't really addressing the pervasiveness of rap, more if rap could be considered music or not.  But sure it would be a problem if nothing but rap was played, just as it would be if radios played nothing but country music. I'm just saying that rap isn't necessarily particularly musically limited, just because it's based on one/two chords and a rhythm.

Søren

Well, I do think it is limited.  Sure there's been great records but a broad pallet of expression has never been the genre's particular forte.
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andrew k
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« Reply #53 on: March 21, 2006, 10:19:10 AM »

i didnt say anybody was white. i desribed the discussion as being 'white'.  i stand by it, in the comical sense of the word.   the beach boys are probbaly the whitest form of pop music on the planet - romatic blond hair middle class suburband surfer boys and pom poms - regardless of blondie and ricky's temporary soulifying.  go figure that hilariously morinic and ignorant statements about a largely black art form are made here. 
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b.dfzo
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« Reply #54 on: March 21, 2006, 01:04:38 PM »

i didnt say anybody was white. i desribed the discussion as being 'white'.  i stand by it, in the comical sense of the word.   the beach boys are probbaly the whitest form of pop music on the planet - romatic blond hair middle class suburband surfer boys and pom poms - regardless of blondie and ricky's temporary soulifying.  go figure that hilariously morinic and ignorant statements about a largely black art form are made here. 

Question: Would that argument hold weight if it were a black person discussing how rap has more genuine music than anything by The (largely white) Beach Boys, or would you consider that to be "hilariously morinic [sic]"?  In the words of Jack Black, and I apply this to myself, as well: "You Can't Win."
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donald
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« Reply #55 on: March 21, 2006, 01:15:47 PM »

I liked that Wipe Out song by those fat guys back in the 80's.

I don't care for ice pick or Dr Drelittle or eneemaem or old dirty 50 cents.

How come those guys always shoot each other and move their hands that way?

Beats me!
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b.dfzo
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« Reply #56 on: March 21, 2006, 01:34:47 PM »

I liked that Wipe Out song by those fat guys back in the 80's.

I don't care for ice pick or Dr Drelittle or eneemaem or old dirty 50 cents.

How come those guys always shoot each other and move their hands that way?

Beats me!

It's official: you're caucasian! Smiley  Too funny.
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summerinparadise.flac
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« Reply #57 on: March 21, 2006, 05:00:16 PM »

I liked that Wipe Out song by those fat guys back in the 80's.

I don't care for ice pick or Dr Drelittle or eneemaem or old dirty 50 cents.

How come those guys always shoot each other and move their hands that way?

Beats me!

Have you seen the video for Wipeout?
Classic!
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"I'll haunt you like a ghost"
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Please support the Beach Boys without being a rude dude or grumpy gus.
Sir Rob
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« Reply #58 on: March 22, 2006, 02:06:58 AM »

Haven't I heard somewhere that originally there was meant to be a collaboration between the group and Run DMC only, for some reason, that was vetoed by the man we love to Love?  If so, that was a big mistake.  Sure was Aerosmith's gain!  Walk This Way is one of the greatest rap racords ever!  And perhaps more to the point, one of the biggest rock 'n' roll rehabilitations.  Of course, I don't think Run DMC could have restored The Beach Boys latter day artistic and commercial credibility single handed.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2006, 02:09:32 AM by Sir Rob » Logged

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Rerun
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« Reply #59 on: March 22, 2006, 09:33:36 AM »

I have a rap song, but I don't ya'll could handle it, know what I'm sayin?
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« Reply #60 on: March 22, 2006, 11:38:44 AM »

Golly no.  I DON'T know what you are saying.
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carlydenise2
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« Reply #61 on: March 26, 2006, 09:40:53 AM »

I listen to rap, because my kids listen to rap. Some songs are actually quite good.  I love the old school stuff; Gangstas paradise, still an old run DMC fan, Ludacris, Eminem.  It's a whole different world than rock. 
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cta
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« Reply #62 on: March 26, 2006, 12:33:56 PM »

Gangsta's Paradise is considered a "classic" now? 

Oh man.  Either I'm getting old or rap is so low quality it's here today, gone today. 

I'm thinking the former.  Afro  Muh'fugga.  Razz
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carlydenise2
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« Reply #63 on: March 26, 2006, 12:39:44 PM »

it's old school......word up from the hood, dawg.
Carly  Cool Cool Guy
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JK
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« Reply #64 on: November 02, 2015, 02:34:10 AM »

Krs One

If we're going to talk rap and hiphop it might just as well be in a topic devoted to the subject. This is where the recent discussion began:

http://smileysmile.net/board/index.php/topic,22827.msg543222.html#msg543222

I suppose in a way rap is like jazz----either the bug bites you or it doesn't. It hasn't bitten me in either case but there are individual jazz pieces that I like and the same holds for rap. Which is something, I suppose...     

I'd forgotten all about this brilliant track by KRS-One:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ky8WPo2RHl8 

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beatnickle
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« Reply #65 on: November 02, 2015, 04:14:00 AM »

99 % of rap is crap but I do like " Funky Cold Medina"
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Rentatris
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« Reply #66 on: November 02, 2015, 04:50:13 AM »

I only found this out the other day...but did you know that rap as a term is an acronym?

Stands for rhythm and poetry.


Now you know.
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the captain
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« Reply #67 on: November 02, 2015, 06:11:04 AM »

Was that true as the style began, or someone's clever retrofitting? Considering rap had already meant informal talk, not to mention the style's party roots (emcees were just that, emcees of parties, I have to wonder. But I'm open to the possibility. Curious of the source.
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« Reply #68 on: November 02, 2015, 09:57:23 PM »

Mr. T's Commandments:
http://www.amazon.com/Mr-Ts-Commandments-Mr-T/dp/B000U6IWG8
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JK
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« Reply #69 on: June 02, 2016, 05:13:02 AM »

This makes for a fascinating read:

http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/2003/3/03.03.07.x.html
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« Reply #70 on: June 02, 2016, 06:04:18 AM »


Thank goodness I'm not in college anymore. 
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JK
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« Reply #71 on: June 02, 2016, 06:13:16 AM »


Thank goodness I'm not in college anymore. 

 LOL
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Ovi
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« Reply #72 on: June 02, 2016, 11:37:52 AM »

A fascinating video about how much craft and skill goes into the rapping and rhyme constructing of some of best ones out there - Kendrick, MF DOOM, Mos Def, Eminem, Biggie, Rakim or Andre 3000. Recommended especially for those who still think rappers are talentless (regarding of whether or not you dig the genre personally...).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWveXdj6oZU

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A band called The Beach Boys are mostly going to be a fun in the sun-themed group. And that has, is, and will always be just as it should. There needs to be ONE classic band that isn't a pack of endless "artistic" moan. All people wanna do is make The Beach Boys into another Beatles they are less tired of.
And, for anyone who has actually experienced them, surfing and cars carry PLENTY of emotion and life experience. They can carry as much metaphor as any Van Dyke Parks clever epistle.
JK
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« Reply #73 on: June 02, 2016, 12:20:52 PM »

A fascinating video about how much craft and skill goes into the rapping and rhyme constructing of some of best ones out there - Kendrick, MF DOOM, Mos Def, Eminem, Biggie, Rakim or Andre 3000. Recommended especially for those who still think rappers are talentless (regarding of whether or not you dig the genre personally...).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWveXdj6oZU

Thanks, Ovi. I don't think I'd ever say rappers are talentless----it's just not my genre, is all.

Anyway, I've bookmarked the video and will watch it at the end of the evening. :=)
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JK
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« Reply #74 on: June 02, 2016, 02:46:30 PM »

A fascinating video about how much craft and skill goes into the rapping and rhyme constructing of some of best ones out there - Kendrick, MF DOOM, Mos Def, Eminem, Biggie, Rakim or Andre 3000. Recommended especially for those who still think rappers are talentless (regarding of whether or not you dig the genre personally...).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWveXdj6oZU

Fascinating is the word----and enlightening. I'll hear it in a whole new way from now on. Thanks!

If you had to recommend just one album by Kendrick Lamar, would it be To Pimp A Butterfly?
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