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Author Topic: Bob Dylan Thread  (Read 24314 times)
Sheriff John Stone
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« Reply #150 on: October 13, 2009, 03:06:23 PM »

The idea to record some Christmas songs may even have its origin in Dylan's Theme Time Radio Hour (his radio show), where he played some of these songs, and/or maybe they started doing one or two Christmas songs one day during the "Together Through Life" sessions (December 2008!) and it led to this.

Yes, I thought that, too. Dylan also recorded these little 30 second to 1 minute Christmas "messages" or trivial snippets which are kind of cool. I like to hear him talk.

But, anyway, does anybody want to offer more of a review or detailed opinion of Christmas In The Heart?
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« Reply #151 on: October 13, 2009, 03:49:18 PM »

Heard the new XMAS album, something very cool and relaxed about it. The perfect Christmas album IMO,  Definitely not everyone's type though, I don't see it doing very well.

Funny, the idea of Bob releasing a Christmas album a few years ago would of been a bad joke.
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« Reply #152 on: October 15, 2009, 09:09:40 AM »

He ignores songs from his new album -- that's nothing new. Neither is his attempt to define himself through his changing set list.

Bob Dylan opened his three-night stand Tuesday at the Hollywood Palladium, essentially in the backyard of his Malibu residence, on the same day his latest studio album was released. How many songs did he play from the new collection for the hometown crowd? Zip. Nada. Zilch.

That's not a huge surprise given that the album happens to be “Christmas in the Heart,” his first holiday collection. Mid-October feels a little early to be dipping into the seasonal songbook -- even assuming Dylan would ever offer up "Must Be Santa," "Here Comes Santa Claus" or other chestnuts from the Christmas set in his live act.

The fact is, he's bypassed other new albums in concert before. Two decades ago he came through town just after "Oh Mercy" was released, but you never would have known it from his concert set list. The salient point being that the word "promotion" seems to be the one entry in the English language missing from his otherwise unabridged dictionary.

Instead, Dylan seems to treat the song selection at each night's performance as something of cabalistic ritual, a mystical exercise in which something transcendent might emerge from the proper sequence and combination of thoughts, sounds, notes and rhythms on a given evening.


On a new tour swing that opened last week in Seattle, several cornerstone numbers have appeared nearly every night. From the early years, he's relying regularly on "Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I'll Go Mine)," "Highway 61 Revisited," "Ballad of a Thin Man," "Like a Rolling Stone" and "All Along the Watchtower." Then there are linchpin songs from his most recent studio releases, including "Cold Irons Bound," "Beyond Here Lies Nothin'," "My Wife's Home Town," "High Water (for Charley Patton)," "Thunder on the Mountain" and "Jolene."

It might well be Dylan's way of emphasizing who he is right now -- the face the artist always had been most interested in sharing -- while offering enough of a reminder of who he used to be to keep hits-conscious fans from staging an uprising.

On Tuesday, following a spirited 40-minute set by an impossibly ageless-looking and sounding Johnny Rivers, Dylan also weaved in "Shooting Star" from "Oh Mercy" and "Nettie Moore" from 2006's "Modern Times," songs separated by nearly two decades that look differently on romances of yore.

"Shooting Star" savors the sweetness of what once was, while "Nettie Moore" becomes immersed in the loss: "I loved you then and ever shall/But there's no one here that's left to tell/The world has gone black before my eyes."

His sly sense of humor came through in subtle ways. "My Wife's Home Town," from "Together Through Life" is savagely funny on its own -- the hometown in question is Hell -- but segueing directly from that wicked sentiment into "Stuck Inside of Mobile With the Memphis Blues Again" added extra sting to that bluesy lament from the mid-'60s.

Many of the "Together Through Life" songs are rooted in the blues, a form his five-piece band excels at. Guitarist Charlie Sexton, who had been in Dylan's touring band nearly a decade ago, has returned to the fold and reeled out some fat rhythm support and a couple of nicely stinging solos. Drummer George Recile supplied much of the instrumental magic on several numbers with consistently surprising rhythmic accents that kept the musical train jumping.

And even though the momentum built inexorably toward the powerful finale combination that included "Ballad of a Thin Man," "Like a Rolling Stone" and "All Along the Watchtower," Dylan again defied any attempts for singalongs with his off-kilter phrasing of his signature tunes.

He piled the words in the verses of "Rolling Stone" into the front half of each measure, then allowed for a pregnant pause before dropping the last few words in behind the beat at the end of the musical phrase. It's as if he was going through that old enunciation exercise where you repeat a sentence multiple times, putting the accent on a different word with each repetition to see how it changes the emphasis in meaning.

Meanwhile, from his station at the keyboard, he pounded out descending notes during "Watchtower" that created the impression of soldiers marching down a castle staircase on the way to carrying out their duties. The band filled out the arrangement with a suitably thick, thunderous accompaniment.

Who needs Christmas carols anyway?

randy.lewis@latimes.com
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« Reply #153 on: October 16, 2009, 09:21:40 AM »

I really love his new Christmas album, but I can see why people wouldn't like it.  I'm not really a big Dylan fan either, but I think he sounds pretty good on this release.  In fact, if I had to own a modern day Dylan record it would be this one.  Does anyone know if vinyl copies of this will be on sale at his current shows?  I'd rather pick up a copy for a bit cheaper and not worry about the post if I can.  Too bad he's not doing a Christmas tour really, I'd love to hear these songs live.
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« Reply #154 on: October 17, 2009, 07:18:09 AM »

Too bad he's not doing a Christmas tour really, I'd love to hear these songs live.

That would be a interesting change for the "never-ending tour".

Dylan's last date on this current tour is 11/20/09, close to Thanksgiving, so you never know. Wouldn't it be cool if, at the last show, after the final encore, which is usually "All Along The Watchtower", Dylan would uncharacteristicly say, "Have a Merry Christmas everybody", and go into a rousing "Must Be Santa", complete with a hot guitar solo from Charlie Sexton! police
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« Reply #155 on: October 17, 2009, 12:16:56 PM »

I think it's nice when Bob Dylan surprises us, and a small Christmas tour would be nice I think.  Yeah, it might be uncharacteristic of him, but he did release a Christmas album.  Now if only he would play some of it for us. 
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« Reply #156 on: October 17, 2009, 05:23:42 PM »

I was at the Palladium show on Tuesday. It was the first time I've seen Dylan live and I was really disappointed. I don't like his band, they're just really loud, but then again the sound system at the Palladium sucks. Also, Bob Dylan has a strange way of performing songs, they don't sound anything like the songs he originally recorded. I guess I'm living in the past, because through the entire show I was watching Dylan on stage and thinking "what happened to this guy?"
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« Reply #157 on: February 12, 2010, 09:29:52 PM »

Anybody catch Dylan on the recent PBS telecast of Music From The Civil Rights Movement from The White House. Bob sang "The Times They Are A-Changin'" with a small band while playing acoustic guitar. I thought he sounded quite good, singing in a mellow, almost tender voice. Played some interesting guitar, didn't miss a word...
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« Reply #158 on: October 09, 2017, 12:42:03 PM »

It's bizarre to see that this topic was last posted in more than seven and a half years ago!!!

This is a cover of "Like A Rolling Stone" by Dutch talent Jett Rebel. I hope the link works. With a bit of luck someone will transfer it to YouTube soon...

https://dewerelddraaitdoor.bnnvara.nl/media/377923

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jett_Rebel
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« Reply #159 on: November 16, 2017, 02:41:51 AM »

Here's the new arrangement  for 'Thunder on the Mountain', Dylan uses during his US Fall tour: https://youtu.be/CZN3SEgPtg8

Sounds familiar to Beach Boys fans, doesn't it.

(Whistles 'Shut Down, Part II' while leaving.)
 
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« Reply #160 on: November 16, 2017, 09:10:50 PM »

Yes it is wild that there hasn’t been an up to date Dylan thread here, although there are a number on SS who have said that they don’t care for him.
I just finished reading Bob Dylan - A Spiritual Life. It focuses mainly on the period starting in the late 70s when he “found religion” (although spiritual/religious references can be found in his earliest songs).
I didn’t listen to his songs from the late ‘70s to mid 80s because music critics said the music wasn’t any good. Turns out those critics simply couldn’t stand the thought of Dylan expressing his strong beliefs in song. When will I learn not to listen to “experts” but find out for myself if there’s something to like.

The new “bootleg”series (no 13) just came out and focuses on this period. I heard a few tracks from these and liked them, so today I bought the 2 CD set. I listened to the first CD today and really enjoyed it. Guess it helps that I am not turned off by people singing religious/Spiritual songs, whether they be Christian, Jewish, Hindu , etc. everybody’s got to find their own way.
At least I know one person on SS who likes this period in Dylan’s musical career - Watamushi (as indicated by his present avatar).

Oh, on that Rolling Thunder Video, while listening to Shut Down Part II: that song works very well with Elvis’ Little Sister.  Smiley
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« Reply #161 on: November 16, 2017, 11:02:29 PM »

Yes it is wild that there hasn’t been an up to date Dylan thread here, although there are a number on SS who have said that they don’t care for him.
I just finished reading Bob Dylan - A Spiritual Life. It focuses mainly on the period starting in the late 70s when he “found religion” (although spiritual/religious references can be found in his earliest songs).
I didn’t listen to his songs from the late ‘70s to mid 80s because music critics said the music wasn’t any good. Turns out those critics simply couldn’t stand the thought of Dylan expressing his strong beliefs in song. When will I learn not to listen to “experts” but find out for myself if there’s something to like.

The new “bootleg”series (no 13) just came out and focuses on this period. I heard a few tracks from these and liked them, so today I bought the 2 CD set. I listened to the first CD today and really enjoyed it. Guess it helps that I am not turned off by people singing religious/Spiritual songs, whether they be Christian, Jewish, Hindu , etc. everybody’s got to find their own way.
At least I know one person on SS who likes this period in Dylan’s musical career - Watamushi (as indicated by his present avatar).

Oh, on that Rolling Thunder Video, while listening to Shut Down Part II: that song works very well with Elvis’ Little Sister.  Smiley

Although most of the stuff on the new cd is from soundboard cassettes, some of these songs sound much more energized in the live versions. I think it would be hard to improve upon Slow Train Coming as an album, but Saved always felt comparatively lifeless to me. I was lucky to see Bob twice in 1980 - January and November in Seattle at the Paramount. The first show was very moving, just the idea of Bob dropping all the older material, doing a complete concert of just his new songs. It was very passionate, with, of course, a few catcalls from the nonbelievers in the crowd. The November show was, musically, the best show I've ever seen him do. There were still plenty of the new gospel songs in the show, but he'd also brought back a lot of the older songs, and a few covers. Bob and the musicians just seemed to really be enjoying what they were doing that night.
BTW, love the avatar.
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« Reply #162 on: November 17, 2017, 04:41:24 AM »

Yes it is wild that there hasn’t been an up to date Dylan thread here, although there are a number on SS who have said that they don’t care for him.
I just finished reading Bob Dylan - A Spiritual Life. It focuses mainly on the period starting in the late 70s when he “found religion” (although spiritual/religious references can be found in his earliest songs).
I didn’t listen to his songs from the late ‘70s to mid 80s because music critics said the music wasn’t any good. Turns out those critics simply couldn’t stand the thought of Dylan expressing his strong beliefs in song. When will I learn not to listen to “experts” but find out for myself if there’s something to like.

The new “bootleg”series (no 13) just came out and focuses on this period. I heard a few tracks from these and liked them, so today I bought the 2 CD set. I listened to the first CD today and really enjoyed it. Guess it helps that I am not turned off by people singing religious/Spiritual songs, whether they be Christian, Jewish, Hindu , etc. everybody’s got to find their own way.
At least I know one person on SS who likes this period in Dylan’s musical career - Watamushi (as indicated by his present avatar).

Oh, on that Rolling Thunder Video, while listening to Shut Down Part II: that song works very well with Elvis’ Little Sister.  Smiley

Yeah, I dig Dylan in that period. Slow Train Coming and Shot of Love are one of (a lot of) fave Dylan albums of mine. I have only listened to Saved once and didn't like it very much, but I feel I need to give it another listens.

My favorite tracks from the era are: Gotta Serve Somebody, Precious Angel, I Believe in You, Do Right to Me Baby, Heart of Mine, Property of Jesus, Every Grain of Sand, You Changed My Life.

I'm not a Christian, but I always enjoy gospel-influenced stuff from anyone-Brian(He Come Down, That Same Song), Dylan, Paul Simon (Love Me Like a Rock, Gone at Last) , Paul McCartney(That Day is Done from Flowers in the Dirt is one of my favorite and I think there's gospel influence, but it isn't quite obvious), etc. I don't know much about the culture of Christians or the historical background behind gospel music, but I can't help loving a certain sense of magnificence in this kind of music.

And yeah, I need to give the BS13 a chance, but there's been so much on my wish list lately. I listened to the samples on spotify yesterday, and they sounded quite good though.

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« Reply #163 on: November 17, 2017, 09:44:51 PM »

Yes it is wild that there hasn’t been an up to date Dylan thread here, although there are a number on SS who have said that they don’t care for him.
I just finished reading Bob Dylan - A Spiritual Life. It focuses mainly on the period starting in the late 70s when he “found religion” (although spiritual/religious references can be found in his earliest songs).
I didn’t listen to his songs from the late ‘70s to mid 80s because music critics said the music wasn’t any good. Turns out those critics simply couldn’t stand the thought of Dylan expressing his strong beliefs in song. When will I learn not to listen to “experts” but find out for myself if there’s something to like.

The new “bootleg”series (no 13) just came out and focuses on this period. I heard a few tracks from these and liked them, so today I bought the 2 CD set. I listened to the first CD today and really enjoyed it. Guess it helps that I am not turned off by people singing religious/Spiritual songs, whether they be Christian, Jewish, Hindu , etc. everybody’s got to find their own way.
At least I know one person on SS who likes this period in Dylan’s musical career - Watamushi (as indicated by his present avatar).

Oh, on that Rolling Thunder Video, while listening to Shut Down Part II: that song works very well with Elvis’ Little Sister.  Smiley

Yeah, I dig Dylan in that period. Slow Train Coming and Shot of Love are one of (a lot of) fave Dylan albums of mine. I have only listened to Saved once and didn't like it very much, but I feel I need to give it another listens.

My favorite tracks from the era are: Gotta Serve Somebody, Precious Angel, I Believe in You, Do Right to Me Baby, Heart of Mine, Property of Jesus, Every Grain of Sand, You Changed My Life.

I'm not a Christian, but I always enjoy gospel-influenced stuff from anyone-Brian(He Come Down, That Same Song), Dylan, Paul Simon (Love Me Like a Rock, Gone at Last) , Paul McCartney(That Day is Done from Flowers in the Dirt is one of my favorite and I think there's gospel influence, but it isn't quite obvious), etc. I don't know much about the culture of Christians or the historical background behind gospel music, but I can't help loving a certain sense of magnificence in this kind of music.

And yeah, I need to give the BS13 a chance, but there's been so much on my wish list lately. I listened to the samples on spotify yesterday, and they sounded quite good though.


I only have the 2 cd version; hoping our local library gets the big box, cause I can't afford it. And there's nothing wrong with non Christians listening to gospel. I'm not a Hindu, but I love George Harrison's religious songs.
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« Reply #164 on: November 18, 2017, 04:45:11 AM »

Yes it is wild that there hasn’t been an up to date Dylan thread here, although there are a number on SS who have said that they don’t care for him.
I just finished reading Bob Dylan - A Spiritual Life. It focuses mainly on the period starting in the late 70s when he “found religion” (although spiritual/religious references can be found in his earliest songs).
I didn’t listen to his songs from the late ‘70s to mid 80s because music critics said the music wasn’t any good. Turns out those critics simply couldn’t stand the thought of Dylan expressing his strong beliefs in song. When will I learn not to listen to “experts” but find out for myself if there’s something to like.

The new “bootleg”series (no 13) just came out and focuses on this period. I heard a few tracks from these and liked them, so today I bought the 2 CD set. I listened to the first CD today and really enjoyed it. Guess it helps that I am not turned off by people singing religious/Spiritual songs, whether they be Christian, Jewish, Hindu , etc. everybody’s got to find their own way.
At least I know one person on SS who likes this period in Dylan’s musical career - Watamushi (as indicated by his present avatar).

Oh, on that Rolling Thunder Video, while listening to Shut Down Part II: that song works very well with Elvis’ Little Sister.  Smiley

Yeah, I dig Dylan in that period. Slow Train Coming and Shot of Love are one of (a lot of) fave Dylan albums of mine. I have only listened to Saved once and didn't like it very much, but I feel I need to give it another listens.

My favorite tracks from the era are: Gotta Serve Somebody, Precious Angel, I Believe in You, Do Right to Me Baby, Heart of Mine, Property of Jesus, Every Grain of Sand, You Changed My Life.

I'm not a Christian, but I always enjoy gospel-influenced stuff from anyone-Brian(He Come Down, That Same Song), Dylan, Paul Simon (Love Me Like a Rock, Gone at Last) , Paul McCartney(That Day is Done from Flowers in the Dirt is one of my favorite and I think there's gospel influence, but it isn't quite obvious), etc. I don't know much about the culture of Christians or the historical background behind gospel music, but I can't help loving a certain sense of magnificence in this kind of music.

And yeah, I need to give the BS13 a chance, but there's been so much on my wish list lately. I listened to the samples on spotify yesterday, and they sounded quite good though.


I only have the 2 cd version; hoping our local library gets the big box, cause I can't afford it. And there's nothing wrong with non Christians listening to gospel. I'm not a Hindu, but I love George Harrison's religious songs.
I can't afford it either, but my local library wouldn't get it, so I'll be waiting till the price goes lower so that I can buy it.  I'd go with 2 Cd version before that, though.
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« Reply #165 on: November 18, 2017, 11:35:54 PM »

Yes it is wild that there hasn’t been an up to date Dylan thread here, although there are a number on SS who have said that they don’t care for him.
I just finished reading Bob Dylan - A Spiritual Life. It focuses mainly on the period starting in the late 70s when he “found religion” (although spiritual/religious references can be found in his earliest songs).
I didn’t listen to his songs from the late ‘70s to mid 80s because music critics said the music wasn’t any good. Turns out those critics simply couldn’t stand the thought of Dylan expressing his strong beliefs in song. When will I learn not to listen to “experts” but find out for myself if there’s something to like.

The new “bootleg”series (no 13) just came out and focuses on this period. I heard a few tracks from these and liked them, so today I bought the 2 CD set. I listened to the first CD today and really enjoyed it. Guess it helps that I am not turned off by people singing religious/Spiritual songs, whether they be Christian, Jewish, Hindu , etc. everybody’s got to find their own way.
At least I know one person on SS who likes this period in Dylan’s musical career - Watamushi (as indicated by his present avatar).

Oh, on that Rolling Thunder Video, while listening to Shut Down Part II: that song works very well with Elvis’ Little Sister.  Smiley

Yeah, I dig Dylan in that period. Slow Train Coming and Shot of Love are one of (a lot of) fave Dylan albums of mine. I have only listened to Saved once and didn't like it very much, but I feel I need to give it another listens.

My favorite tracks from the era are: Gotta Serve Somebody, Precious Angel, I Believe in You, Do Right to Me Baby, Heart of Mine, Property of Jesus, Every Grain of Sand, You Changed My Life.

I'm not a Christian, but I always enjoy gospel-influenced stuff from anyone-Brian(He Come Down, That Same Song), Dylan, Paul Simon (Love Me Like a Rock, Gone at Last) , Paul McCartney(That Day is Done from Flowers in the Dirt is one of my favorite and I think there's gospel influence, but it isn't quite obvious), etc. I don't know much about the culture of Christians or the historical background behind gospel music, but I can't help loving a certain sense of magnificence in this kind of music.

And yeah, I need to give the BS13 a chance, but there's been so much on my wish list lately. I listened to the samples on spotify yesterday, and they sounded quite good though.


I only have the 2 cd version; hoping our local library gets the big box, cause I can't afford it. And there's nothing wrong with non Christians listening to gospel. I'm not a Hindu, but I love George Harrison's religious songs.
I can't afford it either, but my local library wouldn't get it, so I'll be waiting till the price goes lower so that I can buy it.  I'd go with 2 Cd version before that, though.
Some of the stuff that didn't make it to the 2 cd version is turning up on Spotify and youtube. I'll take it anyway I can get it.
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« Reply #166 on: November 19, 2017, 11:29:33 AM »

I generally don’t get Concert  box sets - I usually can’t afford them and I am not interested to hear the same or nearly the same set list every night.
But f I had the funds I’d probably consider this one. What I like about Dylan is how he changes up songs. I’ve heard several completely different takes on In the Garden, plus 2 totally different versions of Solid Rock, to give 2 examples. He follows his muse with great results.

In contrast, the BBs have done things the same way over the years. Darlin in 1969 sounds the same as in the 80s. One of the few songs they fooled around with was Help Me Rhonda.
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« Reply #167 on: November 19, 2017, 11:50:57 AM »

I generally don’t get Concert  box sets - I usually can’t afford them and I am not interested to hear the same or nearly the same set list every night.
But f I had the funds I’d probably consider this one. What I like about Dylan is how he changes up songs. I’ve heard several completely different takes on In the Garden, plus 2 totally different versions of Solid Rock, to give 2 examples. He follows his muse with great results.

In contrast, the BBs have done things the same way over the years. Darlin in 1969 sounds the same as in the 80s. One of the few songs they fooled around with was Help Me Rhonda.

I totally get what you’re saying regarding The Beach Boys....because much of their sound does seem to have stayed the same. But I think us hardcore fans deserve a nice 2 disc album that features some of the crazier and good renditions The Beach Boys have done throughout the years.

Take the Lei’d In Hawaii takes we just got with the Wild Honey set. They sound completely different from anything we’ve heard from them since and it’s still great. Or that crazy rock version of ‘Lookin At Tomorrow’ HeyJude posted recently. It’s really rare, but they have some some really out-there renditions of their songs that should deserve to be on a compilation album.
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« Reply #168 on: November 21, 2017, 12:14:20 AM »

I generally don’t get Concert  box sets - I usually can’t afford them and I am not interested to hear the same or nearly the same set list every night.
But f I had the funds I’d probably consider this one. What I like about Dylan is how he changes up songs. I’ve heard several completely different takes on In the Garden, plus 2 totally different versions of Solid Rock, to give 2 examples. He follows his muse with great results.

In contrast, the BBs have done things the same way over the years. Darlin in 1969 sounds the same as in the 80s. One of the few songs they fooled around with was Help Me Rhonda.

I totally get what you’re saying regarding The Beach Boys....because much of their sound does seem to have stayed the same. But I think us hardcore fans deserve a nice 2 disc album that features some of the crazier and good renditions The Beach Boys have done throughout the years.

Take the Lei’d In Hawaii takes we just got with the Wild Honey set. They sound completely different from anything we’ve heard from them since and it’s still great. Or that crazy rock version of ‘Lookin At Tomorrow’ HeyJude posted recently. It’s really rare, but they have some some really out-there renditions of their songs that should deserve to be on a compilation album.
It can work both ways. They can get positive reviews for trying new versions of old songs; or people can complain that "they changed my favorite song!" I think the BB's were more open to new arrangements in the 70's. By the 80's, they were back to doing the songs as close to the records as possible.
Some Bob fans loved his new arrangements of songs; some didn't. I recall there being some talk of people walking out during his 78 world tour because he wasn't playing them the way they were on the records. The following year, even more people were booing or walking out because he wasn't doing those old songs. Sometimes you just can't win.
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« Reply #169 on: November 25, 2017, 12:23:13 PM »

The AXS network will be showing The Last Waltz tonight at 8:00 pm and 10:15 pm Central time tonight and at 11:00 am tomorrow morning.
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« Reply #170 on: November 25, 2017, 12:44:39 PM »

The AXS network will be showing The Last Waltz tonight at 8:00 pm and 10:15 pm Central time tonight and at 11:00 am tomorrow morning.

So there's no excuse for missing it. Brilliant film----very funny at times and incredibly musical!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-WoI95PTizs

Saw it at the time. I was jigging around in my seat so much when this song was playing that my better half moved to another row. LOL
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« Reply #171 on: November 29, 2017, 04:50:58 PM »

Listened to some Dylan stuff over the past few days.

Heard Oh Mercy after reading his account of getting it recorded in his Chronicles Volume I. A whole chapter devoted to the recording process where things didn't seem to be working at first - Dylan, Lanois and the musicians didn't seem to be on the same page. Dylan left town for a while, cleared his head and at his return things fell into place and a well received album was the result.
I read that the musicians were told to go to some recording sessions. One of them, Mason Ruffner, walked into the room and freaked out when he saw that he would be recording with Dylan.

My favorite on that album is Ring Them Bells.

Listened to the first 2 discs (of 3) of Bootlegs 1-3. Absolutely loved it and it had some surprises - an acoustic version of Subterranean Homesick Blues, a piano (demo?) Of Like a Rolling Stone, in waltz time. Also Tangled Up in Blue with some different lyrics on one of the verses, having him going somewhere else other then fishing outside of Delacroix.
About Like a Rolling Stone, on the deluxe set of Bootlegs Vol 12 there's a full disc devoted to the development of that song.

He shows up in other places. I watched the documentary I Am Not Your Negro a couple of days ago. It showed him singing Only a Pawn in Their Game on the occasion of Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers' assassination. The film also showed Dylan in Washington DC in August 1963 (when Martin Luther King made his immortal I Have A Dream speech).

Today I listened to part of a show Dylan did down here in May 1976 with the Rolling Thunder Revue. Would like to listen to all at once but it's hard to get that much uninterrupted time (concert is over 3 1/2 hours long).

I'm very much a novice in regards to Bob Dylan but the process of learning has so far been a good experience.
« Last Edit: November 29, 2017, 04:54:39 PM by NOLA BB Fan » Logged

"No White Flags." - Team Gleason

"Someone...handed me a Leadbelly record with the song "Cottonfields" on it. And that record changed my life right then and there. Transported me into a world I'd never known." - Bob Dylan, Nobel Prize Speech.
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« Reply #172 on: November 30, 2017, 09:43:05 PM »

Listened to some Dylan stuff over the past few days.

Heard Oh Mercy after reading his account of getting it recorded in his Chronicles Volume I. A whole chapter devoted to the recording process where things didn't seem to be working at first - Dylan, Lanois and the musicians didn't seem to be on the same page. Dylan left town for a while, cleared his head and at his return things fell into place and a well received album was the result.
I read that the musicians were told to go to some recording sessions. One of them, Mason Ruffner, walked into the room and freaked out when he saw that he would be recording with Dylan.

My favorite on that album is Ring Them Bells.

Listened to the first 2 discs (of 3) of Bootlegs 1-3. Absolutely loved it and it had some surprises - an acoustic version of Subterranean Homesick Blues, a piano (demo?) Of Like a Rolling Stone, in waltz time. Also Tangled Up in Blue with some different lyrics on one of the verses, having him going somewhere else other then fishing outside of Delacroix.
About Like a Rolling Stone, on the deluxe set of Bootlegs Vol 12 there's a full disc devoted to the development of that song.

He shows up in other places. I watched the documentary I Am Not Your Negro a couple of days ago. It showed him singing Only a Pawn in Their Game on the occasion of Civil Rights leader Medgar Evers' assassination. The film also showed Dylan in Washington DC in August 1963 (when Martin Luther King made his immortal I Have A Dream speech).

Today I listened to part of a show Dylan did down here in May 1976 with the Rolling Thunder Revue. Would like to listen to all at once but it's hard to get that much uninterrupted time (concert is over 3 1/2 hours long).

I'm very much a novice in regards to Bob Dylan but the process of learning has so far been a good experience.

And you like Fats, so it's all good!
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« Reply #173 on: December 01, 2017, 03:28:34 PM »

Yes indeedy.
Antoine Domino has been, is, and will always be a treasure.
A great singer/musician and an even greater human being.
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"No White Flags." - Team Gleason

"Someone...handed me a Leadbelly record with the song "Cottonfields" on it. And that record changed my life right then and there. Transported me into a world I'd never known." - Bob Dylan, Nobel Prize Speech.
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« Reply #174 on: December 01, 2017, 08:27:02 PM »

Yes indeedy.
Antoine Domino has been, is, and will always be a treasure.
A great singer/musician and an even greater human being.
Agreed.  Cool
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