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Author Topic: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Being Published  (Read 1361 times)
Mark A. Moore
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« on: May 17, 2022, 10:12:08 PM »

Apologies for the semi-off-topic post but there's a Brian Wilson connection here.

For the benefit of musicians who can read music and might be interested:

AUTHENTIC SHEET MUSIC — Fifty-six years after the car accident that changed his life forever, Jan Berry’s original music scores and charts from the 1960s still exist—the actual documents used by the Wrecking Crew to record the original songs. These fascinating manuscripts open an important window on Jan’s body of work for Jan & Dean and other artists.

In association with Jan’s estate, author Mark A. Moore has begun to transcribe and publish some of Jan’s best arrangements, to shed more light on him as a songwriter and arranger, and to invite further study of the music.

These transcribed scores will interest musicians, music educators, school ensembles, bands, and any musician/aficionado of the West Coast Sound and the Hollywood studio system of the 1960s.

First up is the classic “Dead Man’s Curve” . . . and more will soon follow:

Dead Man’s Curve
Jan Berry’s Authentic Original Music Score
Used by the Wrecking Crew to Record the Original Song (and for live performances).
Arranged by Jan Berry
Transcribed by Mark A. Moore

Size: 10″ x 14″
Length: 48 pages
Contents: Cover Page; Introductory Text; Full Score; Individual Charts; and End Page.
18 Parts: Alto Sax 1-2; Tenor Sax 1-2; Baritone Sax; Trumpet 1-3; Trombone 1-3; Bass; Guitars 1-3; Timpani; Drums; and Piano.

Distributed by: ArrangeMe and the Hal Leonard Corporation.
Licensed from: Screen Gems-EMI Music, Inc.
Available from: Sheet Music Direct, Hal Leonard’s premier outlet for digital sheet music.
Published: May 17, 2022.

BUY NOW






« Last Edit: May 18, 2022, 12:14:11 AM by Mark A. Moore » Logged

Joshilyn Hoisington
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« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2022, 02:12:20 PM »

This is great news, Mark -- thank you for doing this.  I will definitely be studying these as they are available.

I'm curious, if you're able to share, how you would assess the process for publishing these; I ask because I have been exploring trying to publish my own transcriptions of Brian Wilson arrangements (Wish that guy wrote his stuff down like Jan, would have saved me literally decades of work) and I'd be interested to hear if you think the route you are taking could work for the Beach Boys music as well.

But yeah, very happy to see these and I hope that a few people interested in the actual music and musicology of 60s popular music will find plenty of things to explore within Jan's scores.
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Mark A. Moore
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« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2022, 04:41:56 PM »


Joshilyn,

Yes, it would be a good avenue for you. You have complete control over your project while Hal Leonard handles the licensing and distribution. You can set your own price, too (at least to a degree).

They have loads of Brian Wilson's compositions in their system. You search for the song you want to do a custom arrangement for, and they give the specific copyright statement that must appear at the bottom of your piece.

Obviously, in my case, Jan is the arranger, and I'm just the transcriber, and the packaging reflects that. But I got the okay on it because I have permission from Jan's widow. I originally priced "Dead Man's Curve" at $199.99, because it's on par with what a school might pay for music. The instrumentation is the classic "big band" lineup, which is perfect for high school and college jazz ensembles. But Hal Leonard sets a minimum price of $49.99 for this kind of arrangement, so I just went ahead and re-set the price to the minimum. That way, anyone who is interested can have access at the lowest possible cost.

Hal Leonard has rights to some of Jan's compositions that weren't in the system, so I gave them the titles and they added them for me. It's a cool system and service.

On the down side, it's like any other publishing outlet, in that they make the most money on sales. But that's just the nature of the publishing business.



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« Reply #3 on: May 18, 2022, 07:45:18 PM »

While outside of my realm of expertise, congratulations, Mark! Definitely a worthwhile endeavour!
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Mark A. Moore
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« Reply #4 on: May 19, 2022, 04:03:17 PM »

While outside of my realm of expertise, congratulations, Mark! Definitely a worthwhile endeavour!

Thanks Mitchell. "Anaheim, Azusa" is on deck.
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« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2022, 02:09:28 AM »

Really cool.  "Anaheim, Azusa" is a crazy ride of a song.  While more obscure than something like Dead Man's Curve, I would think "It's As Easy As 1,2,3" and "Hawaii" would be interesting scores to see. 
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Mark A. Moore
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« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2022, 09:33:34 AM »

Really cool.  "Anaheim, Azusa" is a crazy ride of a song.  While more obscure than something like Dead Man's Curve, I would think "It's As Easy As 1,2,3" and "Hawaii" would be interesting scores to see. 

Shane, we're definitely doing "It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3."

"Batman" is on deck after "Anaheim, Azusa."
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« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2022, 11:35:28 AM »

A few questions, Mark -

I can't afford to buy the score as of now, but I was wondering, is the written piano part on Dead Man's Curve identical to what Brian plays on the recording? I've always been curious to know if it's something Jan made him play note-for-note, or if Brian deviated from the sheet music a bit. Since Brian had a hand in writing the song, and had his own unique way of playing, it would surprise me if he just read the part without throwing in his own ideas.

And speaking of "It's As Easy as 1, 2, 3", there isn't a piano on that, is there? Same question for Rockin' Little Roadster - did Brian get called in that day just to play on "Barons"?
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Mark A. Moore
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« Reply #8 on: June 02, 2022, 02:09:57 PM »

A few questions, Mark -

I can't afford to buy the score as of now, but I was wondering, is the written piano part on Dead Man's Curve identical to what Brian plays on the recording? I've always been curious to know if it's something Jan made him play note-for-note, or if Brian deviated from the sheet music a bit. Since Brian had a hand in writing the song, and had his own unique way of playing, it would surprise me if he just read the part without throwing in his own ideas.

And speaking of "It's As Easy as 1, 2, 3", there isn't a piano on that, is there? Same question for Rockin' Little Roadster - did Brian get called in that day just to play on "Barons"?


There were four songs on the November 14, 1963, session: “Dead Man’s Curve”; “Hot Stocker”; “Surf Route 101”; and “Drag Strip Girl”

Three keyboardists were present—Leon Russell, Al DeLory, and Brian Wilson—but all three may not have played on every track during the session (though that's possible). The division of labor is not entirely clear. We know Jan refers to Leon's playing during the recording of "Dead Man's Curve." Maybe Brian sat in on "Surf Route 101." He's credited as a co-writer of "Surf Route 101" on the Drag City album packaging but not in the copyright filing for the song. Maybe Brian was present as a consultant. Hard to say for sure.

The piano chart for "Dead Man's Curve" shows the chords, with slash notation in the treble clef. The bass clef (left hand) is pitch notation that doubles the bass line. Jan often did that for his piano charts. Sometimes they kept it, and sometimes they crossed it out. An arpeggio sweep is notated across bass and treble clefs leading to the recitation.

In general, the keyboard players would have played in their own way, based on the piano charts. They worked so much with Jan they knew what he liked and wanted. Jan often provided specific notation for certain piano parts (like when he wanted the whole ensemble to play the same rhythmic pattern). Otherwise, the pros did their thing. If Jan didn't like something, he'd stop them and they'd work it out.

Obviously, Jan's arrangements are not three-chord ditties. Depending on the song, you'll see 6th, 7th, minor 7th, 9th, diminished, augmented, etc.

"It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" and "Rockin' Little Roadster" do have piano parts (with Leon Russell and Brian Wilson listed on that session). Jan's arrangements always had a keyboard part. For "It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" it's a chord chart with no slash or pitch notation. For "Rockin' Little Roadster," it's a combination of chords and slash notation, with specific pitch notation in certain parts. ("Rockin' Little Roadster" is part of my publishing project).

"Barons, West L.A." is interesting because Jan assigned specific players to parts (in the score and consequently on the charts). He assigned the piano part to Brian Wilson and the organ part to Leon Russell. And Brian was listed on the session—so, strong documentary evidence that Brian played keys on "Barons, West L.A."

Two other items of note . . .

For "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Surfin' Wild," Jan wrote "Brian Wilson Left Hand" on the piano part, on the bass clef (score and chart)—a style instruction for the keyboard player on the sessions.

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« Reply #9 on: June 02, 2022, 03:29:39 PM »

A few questions, Mark -

I can't afford to buy the score as of now, but I was wondering, is the written piano part on Dead Man's Curve identical to what Brian plays on the recording? I've always been curious to know if it's something Jan made him play note-for-note, or if Brian deviated from the sheet music a bit. Since Brian had a hand in writing the song, and had his own unique way of playing, it would surprise me if he just read the part without throwing in his own ideas.

And speaking of "It's As Easy as 1, 2, 3", there isn't a piano on that, is there? Same question for Rockin' Little Roadster - did Brian get called in that day just to play on "Barons"?


There were four songs on the November 14, 1963, session: “Dead Man’s Curve”; “Hot Stocker”; “Surf Route 101”; and “Drag Strip Girl”

Three keyboardists were present—Leon Russell, Al DeLory, and Brian Wilson—but all three may not have played on every track during the session (though that's possible). The division of labor is not entirely clear. We know Jan refers to Leon's playing during the recording of "Dead Man's Curve." Maybe Brian sat in on "Surf Route 101." He's credited as a co-writer of "Surf Route 101" on the Drag City album packaging but not in the copyright filing for the song. Maybe Brian was present as a consultant. Hard to say for sure.

The piano chart for "Dead Man's Curve" shows the chords, with slash notation in the treble clef. The bass clef (left hand) is pitch notation that doubles the bass line. Jan often did that for his piano charts. Sometimes they kept it, and sometimes they crossed it out. An arpeggio sweep is notated across bass and treble clefs leading to the recitation.

In general, the keyboard players would have played in their own way, based on the piano charts. They worked so much with Jan they knew what he liked and wanted. Jan often provided specific notation for certain piano parts (like when he wanted the whole ensemble to play the same rhythmic pattern). Otherwise, the pros did their thing. If Jan didn't like something, he'd stop them and they'd work it out.

Obviously, Jan's arrangements are not three-chord ditties. Depending on the song, you'll see 6th, 7th, minor 7th, 9th, diminished, augmented, etc.

"It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" and "Rockin' Little Roadster" do have piano parts (with Leon Russell and Brian Wilson listed on that session). Jan's arrangements always had a keyboard part. For "It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" it's a chord chart with no slash or pitch notation. For "Rockin' Little Roadster," it's a combination of chords and slash notation, with specific pitch notation in certain parts. ("Rockin' Little Roadster" is part of my publishing project).

"Barons, West L.A." is interesting because Jan assigned specific players to parts (in the score and consequently on the charts). He assigned the piano part to Brian Wilson and the organ part to Leon Russell. And Brian was listed on the session—so, strong documentary evidence that Brian played keys on "Barons, West L.A."

Two other items of note . . .

For "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Surfin' Wild," Jan wrote "Brian Wilson Left Hand" on the piano part, on the bass clef (score and chart)—a style instruction for the keyboard player on the sessions.



Thanks for the response, Mark! Really valuable stuff. So if Brian was playing anything on that date, it wasn't Dead Man's Curve? You're right, Surf Route 101 seems most likely, since he co-wrote the song (By the way, like Dead Man's Curve, Brian's name wasn't on the initial copyright filing, but amendments were made to include his name).

Surf City also intrigues me. Have you heard that basic tracking session? Was the piano played live, or overdubbed? If it was live, is there a chance Brian played it? And, interesting on that last remark. Makes sense that Jan would notate that left hand part, since those are both songs they wrote together - he must've really liked the way Brian played them, and wanted to be sure they retained the same feeling in the studio!
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Mark A. Moore
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« Reply #10 on: June 02, 2022, 03:56:52 PM »

A few questions, Mark -

I can't afford to buy the score as of now, but I was wondering, is the written piano part on Dead Man's Curve identical to what Brian plays on the recording? I've always been curious to know if it's something Jan made him play note-for-note, or if Brian deviated from the sheet music a bit. Since Brian had a hand in writing the song, and had his own unique way of playing, it would surprise me if he just read the part without throwing in his own ideas.

And speaking of "It's As Easy as 1, 2, 3", there isn't a piano on that, is there? Same question for Rockin' Little Roadster - did Brian get called in that day just to play on "Barons"?


There were four songs on the November 14, 1963, session: “Dead Man’s Curve”; “Hot Stocker”; “Surf Route 101”; and “Drag Strip Girl”

Three keyboardists were present—Leon Russell, Al DeLory, and Brian Wilson—but all three may not have played on every track during the session (though that's possible). The division of labor is not entirely clear. We know Jan refers to Leon's playing during the recording of "Dead Man's Curve." Maybe Brian sat in on "Surf Route 101." He's credited as a co-writer of "Surf Route 101" on the Drag City album packaging but not in the copyright filing for the song. Maybe Brian was present as a consultant. Hard to say for sure.

The piano chart for "Dead Man's Curve" shows the chords, with slash notation in the treble clef. The bass clef (left hand) is pitch notation that doubles the bass line. Jan often did that for his piano charts. Sometimes they kept it, and sometimes they crossed it out. An arpeggio sweep is notated across bass and treble clefs leading to the recitation.

In general, the keyboard players would have played in their own way, based on the piano charts. They worked so much with Jan they knew what he liked and wanted. Jan often provided specific notation for certain piano parts (like when he wanted the whole ensemble to play the same rhythmic pattern). Otherwise, the pros did their thing. If Jan didn't like something, he'd stop them and they'd work it out.

Obviously, Jan's arrangements are not three-chord ditties. Depending on the song, you'll see 6th, 7th, minor 7th, 9th, diminished, augmented, etc.

"It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" and "Rockin' Little Roadster" do have piano parts (with Leon Russell and Brian Wilson listed on that session). Jan's arrangements always had a keyboard part. For "It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" it's a chord chart with no slash or pitch notation. For "Rockin' Little Roadster," it's a combination of chords and slash notation, with specific pitch notation in certain parts. ("Rockin' Little Roadster" is part of my publishing project).

"Barons, West L.A." is interesting because Jan assigned specific players to parts (in the score and consequently on the charts). He assigned the piano part to Brian Wilson and the organ part to Leon Russell. And Brian was listed on the session—so, strong documentary evidence that Brian played keys on "Barons, West L.A."

Two other items of note . . .

For "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Surfin' Wild," Jan wrote "Brian Wilson Left Hand" on the piano part, on the bass clef (score and chart)—a style instruction for the keyboard player on the sessions.



Thanks for the response, Mark! Really valuable stuff. So if Brian was playing anything on that date, it wasn't Dead Man's Curve? You're right, Surf Route 101 seems most likely, since he co-wrote the song (By the way, like Dead Man's Curve, Brian's name wasn't on the initial copyright filing, but amendments were made to include his name).

Surf City also intrigues me. Have you heard that basic tracking session? Was the piano played live, or overdubbed? If it was live, is there a chance Brian played it? And, interesting on that last remark. Makes sense that Jan would notate that left hand part, since those are both songs they wrote together - he must've really liked the way Brian played them, and wanted to be sure they retained the same feeling in the studio!


I think Leon Russell is on "Surf City," though he's not on the AFM contract (no keyboard player is listed). The piano becomes evident on the ending, with glissandos, etc. Not really Brian's style. Not really Jan's playing style, either.

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Joshilyn Hoisington
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« Reply #11 on: June 03, 2022, 12:02:41 PM »

Mark, can you clarify what exactly went down in terms of tracking between the first version of DMC and the later version?

Did Jan have the score as you've published it worked up for the initial version with plans to overdub from the get-go?  Or did he re-arrange the horns and produce new scores for the overdub session?

I can't quite tell -- did the additional horn overdub replace the horns from the basic session, or supplement them?  Since that track only mix from "All the Hits" was able to be produced, I'm assuming the original horn track was never taped over, at least.

Thanks -- I'm curious how Jan went about developing the arrangement.
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« Reply #12 on: June 03, 2022, 02:34:18 PM »

Mark, can you clarify what exactly went down in terms of tracking between the first version of DMC and the later version?

Did Jan have the score as you've published it worked up for the initial version with plans to overdub from the get-go?  Or did he re-arrange the horns and produce new scores for the overdub session?

I can't quite tell -- did the additional horn overdub replace the horns from the basic session, or supplement them?  Since that track only mix from "All the Hits" was able to be produced, I'm assuming the original horn track was never taped over, at least.

Thanks -- I'm curious how Jan went about developing the arrangement.


Well, it’s interesting. I’ve never seen any horn parts for the first version of “Dead Man’s Curve.” They aren’t in Jan’s archive. Lost? Stolen? Thrown away? Who knows?

The take we hear on All the Hits was from the November 14, 1963, session. And the few horn parts were played live with the rhythm section.

The “Taps” motif at the end is on the first version, which we also hear on the second version.

It’s possible Jan had the few horns playing live on the first version to provide a foundation for the overdubs (done on December 4, 1963, after the LP version was released). But I think the horns on the first version were sparse enough that Jan could have buried them with the overdubs for the second version. (Some of the parts on the first version are slightly different than parts in the final arrangement).

However, there would have been multiple takes at that November 14 session. Different parts of different takes could have been used. You’ll notice on the take on All the Hits that the drummers hit their bass drum/crash cymbal (loudly) on the downbeat during the recitation section. But that is missing on both the final LP version and the hit single.

I think the first version, with the subpar lead vocal, was a rush job to fill out the Drag City LP. The album’s official release date was November 27, 1963. Jan did the horn overdubs for the single version a week later, on December 4. He clearly had bigger plans for the song.
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« Reply #13 on: June 11, 2022, 01:00:15 AM »

Just now getting back here to read this.  Thanks so much for the discussion, especially to Mark.  I had no idea Brian Wilson (potentially) played piano on that many J&D tracks. 
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