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671923 Posts in 27044 Topics by 3973 Members - Latest Member: Tante September 22, 2021, 10:55:11 PM
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Author Topic: New book: Hollywood Eden  (Read 4552 times)
juggler
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« Reply #25 on: May 30, 2021, 07:04:37 AM »

I remember a newspaper blurb in 1995 alleging that longtime Rolling Stones collaborator Don Was had just cooked up a documentary called 'I Just Wasn't Made for These Times' about deceased guitarist Brian Jones.


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Aum Bop Diddit
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« Reply #26 on: June 13, 2021, 05:34:52 PM »

Bruce is much more interesting than his latter day stage persona, his solo records, or his loyalty to Mike would suggest. I'd love to read his autobiography but he's said several times over the years that he's not going to write one.

He's only famous for being in the band.


Obviously being a Beach Boy is not a bad thing in my eyes. But you'd be surprised how many times Bruce's name comes up in (californian) music history.

Exactly! I remember reading a book called 'Waiting For The Sun' ? Many years ago, and it was the same deal.... Bruce is all over that book.

I'm about a third of the way through -- yeah Bruce is prominent and an interesting character.  As a teenager he witnessed a murder while him and his group were trying to get a record deal!
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Gerry
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« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2021, 07:22:06 AM »

I lived in the Bay area in the 1970's through the 1990's and was a regular reader of the San Francisco Chronicle. Joel Selvin was a music critic for them and a rather harsh critic of the Beach Boys. Even when he praised them it was backhanded. You see, this was San Francisco and it was way too hip for the Beach Boys, I caught a lot of flack for my obsession but I did win some people over. I would take whatever Selvin says with a grain of salt
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Ian
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« Reply #28 on: June 27, 2021, 06:19:29 PM »

I finished it and it was a good read but no revelations for those of us who’ve read other books over the years. Seems like he got some good interviews from Jill Gibson and Lou Adler but the info on the BBs is outdated.
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Juice Brohnston
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« Reply #29 on: August 30, 2021, 08:09:43 AM »

I finally got around to reading this, and I was quite entertained.

Of course, it covers ground that has been scoured over for years, and some people have noted here that Slevin includes some glaring errors in fact here.

That said, you can always learn something, and I found it was a unique take, as it covers a certain time frame, and really uses Uni High as the ground zero for this emergence of the California Sound. It sure sounded like an idyllic time and place.

Bruce has said many times, re: the early days, 'We just wanted to sound like the Radio' and you can understand that quote a bit more, after reading this. I always was interested in learning more info from the Bruce and Terry era, and we get a little glimpse of it here.

The main takeaway for me, I guess, is the books ends as the curtain comes down on, say, the 'first wave'. Jan's accident means he is out of the game. Spector feels River Deep-Mountain High is his absolute peak and sees nowhere to go, and slides deeper into his idiosyncratic world. And Brian, with Good Vibrations such a grand achievement, well we know what happens next. The creative forces all almost simultaneously have major set backs. Meanwhile the hustlers in this story; The Adlers and Fowleys etc keep moving right along.

And that Brian quote to Marilyn as he lands back in LA after flying off to teach the guys how to handle Good Vibrations live, and has requested all his friends come out to the airport...'I don't know whether to say Hello, or say Goodbye...' That is really stuck in my head currently.

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guitarfool2002
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« Reply #30 on: August 31, 2021, 09:12:58 AM »

I finally got around to reading this, and I was quite entertained.

Of course, it covers ground that has been scoured over for years, and some people have noted here that Slevin includes some glaring errors in fact here.

That said, you can always learn something, and I found it was a unique take, as it covers a certain time frame, and really uses Uni High as the ground zero for this emergence of the California Sound. It sure sounded like an idyllic time and place.

Bruce has said many times, re: the early days, 'We just wanted to sound like the Radio' and you can understand that quote a bit more, after reading this. I always was interested in learning more info from the Bruce and Terry era, and we get a little glimpse of it here.

The main takeaway for me, I guess, is the books ends as the curtain comes down on, say, the 'first wave'. Jan's accident means he is out of the game. Spector feels River Deep-Mountain High is his absolute peak and sees nowhere to go, and slides deeper into his idiosyncratic world. And Brian, with Good Vibrations such a grand achievement, well we know what happens next. The creative forces all almost simultaneously have major set backs. Meanwhile the hustlers in this story; The Adlers and Fowleys etc keep moving right along.

And that Brian quote to Marilyn as he lands back in LA after flying off to teach the guys how to handle Good Vibrations live, and has requested all his friends come out to the airport...'I don't know whether to say Hello, or say Goodbye...' That is really stuck in my head currently.



Great post and thoughts. I've felt the same about the airport photo saga since digging deeper into it, and what was happening. That quote really does bring it home, and I didn't used to as much but now think more and more that Brian wanted to capture the moment on film because he had a feeling it was a passing moment in time that only comes once in a lifetime, when possibilities are endless and no one says no to ideas and challenging the status quo. That photo was the support mechanism in place in Fall '66 and along with it came the endless imagination which the support inspires. And in that photo, specifically the back row in the most famous versions, is the late 1966 condensed LA version of an Algonquin round table of musicians who would sell over a combined 100 million records both before and over the next several years in pop music. Then it all changed.
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"All of us have the privilege of making music that helps and heals - to make music that makes people happier, stronger, and kinder. Don't forget: Music is God's voice." - Brian Wilson
Lonely Summer
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« Reply #31 on: August 31, 2021, 07:25:41 PM »

In the book, Joel misdates the Kingsmen's Louie Louie to 1965. Makes you wonder how many other things he got unforgivably wrong
Lots.
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Ian
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« Reply #32 on: September 01, 2021, 03:49:29 AM »

Mark Moore’s book on Jan berry is a lot better
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