gfxgfx
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
logo
 
gfx gfx
gfx
659543 Posts in 26425 Topics by 3756 Members - Latest Member: My Smile Solution July 11, 2020, 06:51:18 AM
*
gfx*HomeHelpSearchCalendarLoginRegistergfx
gfxgfx
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.       « previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Mono Basic Track Mixes Used For Columbia 8-Track Overdubs  (Read 2261 times)
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« on: June 04, 2020, 06:36:07 AM »

I can't remember which thread we discussed this in, but remember how we wondered whether Brian took the original 3- and 4-track masters of songs for which the basic tracks were cut at Western, Gold Star, and Sunset, to Columbia and mixed down to one track of their 8-track with the CBS house engineers...or whether instead, he mixed down to 1/4" mono at Western with Chuck, and used THAT tape for a "bounce up" to a single track on Columbia's 8-track? Well, the latter would seem to be the case, at least for two Pet Sounds songs (and, most likely for ALL songs recorded in this manner).

Per a very interesting discussion on the Hoffman board, we've come not only to that conclusion, but identified which tape is being rewound in the mono mix of "I Just Wasn't Made For These Times" (from about 0:05-0:09). If one listens to Track 5 of SOT Vol. 14, Disc 1 ("1st lead vocal overdub"), one can hear bleed-through of the Everly Brothers track "(You Got) The Power Of Love" (specifically the bass riff)! That tune was apparently recorded at United studios in early February '66, and the 1/4" mixdown session tape with early mixes of the song was apparently recycled at Western for instrumental dubdowns of "IJWMFTT"! (The final mix of the Everlys tune was obviously cut out of the session tape for use in mastering the record.) In other words, that tape was not properly erased before recycling, and some bleed-through remains on Brian's mono basic track mix (hence, it's not on Mark's 1996 stereo remix of the backing track). Apparently, you can also hear the Everlys mix bleeding through on the mono instrumental mix of "I'm Waiting For The Day", but I haven't been able to detect that myself!

Incidentally - on the same SOT Vol. 14, Disc 1, Track 5 - at the very end, you can also hear Brian demonstrating the "IJWMFTT" vocal hook, and Dennis singing it, from an earlier vocal take (obviously on the Columbia 8-track)! Remember, Dennis was to be the song's lead vocalist, but in the end Brian wiped his lead and replaced it with his own. Sorry if that's already been pointed out on another thread!
Logged
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9040


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 04, 2020, 08:10:12 AM »

Very interesting! For the record, I think part of that discussion was here: http://smileysmile.net/board/index.php/topic,27135.0.html

A few things jump out immediately. First, at least in these instances it confirms Brian was mixing with Chuck at Western for at least the instrumental tracks. So he had to lock those in before adding the vocals on top. If he did that, the instrumental tracks were literally locked in after that point and no effects could be added to individual tracks. If he did go to Columbia for vocals, that engineer at Columbia would probably balance out the vocals and do a mix of those...so the question is did Brian return to give it final touches with Chuck at Western, or even add parts like a guitar solo or an extra vocal part at Western, after leaving Columbia with what would be ostensibly a mix of his vocals down to one track and his previous instrumentals on another, which could free up even more tracks? One description we have of Brian doing what we'd call a final mix or even mastering was done at *Capitol*. Confusing.  Smiley

The other is reusing tape reels. I just can't believe they'd be reusing tape for tracking sessions like that. 1/4" tape was not that expensive in 1966 to be honest, and it was part of the budget either paid by the artist or the label if used for the tracking sessions. I can't believe United would reuse other artists' tapes in that way for tracking.

Has the possibility been raised that such tape was being reused for the tape delay reel rather than for tracking new material for a client? There is one Beatles tune - can't recall which one - where the tape delay reel ran out while they were jamming, and you can hear the tape op rewinding it on the session. One of the long Helter Skelter or Revolution jams perhaps? Anyway, *that* would make more sense in terms of reusing tape, especially from a totally different client.

Not saying the audio isn't there as evidence, but it's the way it was being reused that I'd question. Consider the tape delay machine option...and I'm sure some clients might be pretty upset if their discarded tapes were being reused for tracking other artists, not to mention the artist who was paying for reused tape with compromised sound.

Very interesting.
Logged

"All of us have the privilege of making music that helps and heals - to make music that makes people happier, stronger, and kinder. Don't forget: Music is God's voice." - Brian Wilson
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 9040


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2020, 08:15:21 AM »

Just an addendum to the Western process which I was reminded of watching Joe Osborn interviews on YouTube this week: According to Joe, for Mamas and Papas sessions at Western, they would have two separate 3-track machines in the room. They'd record to the first 3-track, then bounce down to the other 3-track to open more tracks for overdubs, and possibly even bounce more after that. So Papa John and Bones and whoever else was there for those sessions in 65-66 were using multiple 3-tracks for their sessions, and as Joe said doing these bounces would cause a loss in the treble frequencies which the engineers would compensate for to some degree, but in Joe's case his playing style and tone (Jazz Bass with pick through Fender guitar amp) helped his bass lines jump out of those mixes because his tone already had an extra boost in the high end.

Just an aside semi-related.
Logged

"All of us have the privilege of making music that helps and heals - to make music that makes people happier, stronger, and kinder. Don't forget: Music is God's voice." - Brian Wilson
aeijtzsche
Honored Guest
******
Online Online

Gender: Female
Posts: 2929



View Profile
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2020, 12:54:03 PM »

Here's what I'd like to know:

Is/are the ghost sound/sounds in question:

On an initial reference mix to the 4th track of the original session tape?

or

On the new mono track from the 8-track CBS reel?

or

Neither of these?


We could discern what stage the sound was locked into the mix.  Mark Linett?Huh
Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #4 on: June 04, 2020, 08:03:10 PM »


Has the possibility been raised that such tape was being reused for the tape delay reel rather than for tracking new material for a client?


Well, that would mean that tape delay was used on the instrumental sub-mix...I don't detect any on the final 1966 mono mixdowns, and I don't notice any missing from the 1996 stereo remixes of the instrumental tracks (just the missing "artifacts" like the screeching rewound sound mentioned).
Logged
CenturyDeprived
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 5196



View Profile
« Reply #5 on: June 04, 2020, 08:04:53 PM »

Can I just say… I am not nearly as technologically inclined as all of you in this thread, but I immensely enjoy reading all the nerdy talk about this subject. Grateful for conversations like these.

Maybe one day I will get more educated about the technical stuff and be able to understand it all better. Actually, that might be a pretty cool video that somebody could make, the beginners guide to understanding all of the intricate methodologies of BBs tape recording of the era. I'm sure it's a lot to injest, no doubt. A Dummies book is perhaps needed.
Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #6 on: June 04, 2020, 08:05:49 PM »

Here's what I'd like to know:

Is/are the ghost sound/sounds in question:

On an initial reference mix to the 4th track of the original session tape?


Nope, because the track breakdown for "IWFTD" is this:
1 - FI & E. Hrn
2 - FBs & Dr. Piano w/reverb
3 - Bs, org, piano, guitar
4 - vln ss at end

And "IJWMFTT" was cut on 3-track, so there is no 4th track.  Smiley
Logged
aeijtzsche
Honored Guest
******
Online Online

Gender: Female
Posts: 2929



View Profile
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2020, 09:01:12 PM »

Here's what I'd like to know:

Is/are the ghost sound/sounds in question:

On an initial reference mix to the 4th track of the original session tape?


Nope, because the track breakdown for "IWFTD" is this:
1 - FI & E. Hrn
2 - FBs & Dr. Piano w/reverb
3 - Bs, org, piano, guitar
4 - vln ss at end

And "IJWMFTT" was cut on 3-track, so there is no 4th track.  Smiley


Great, so next we'd need to consult the mono backing track mixes from the CBS 8-track multis.


Has the possibility been raised that such tape was being reused for the tape delay reel rather than for tracking new material for a client?


Well, that would mean that tape delay was used on the instrumental sub-mix...I don't detect any on the final 1966 mono mixdowns, and I don't notice any missing from the 1996 stereo remixes of the instrumental tracks (just the missing "artifacts" like the screeching rewound sound mentioned).

Let's not rule that out yet, though.
Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2020, 09:16:20 PM »

Here's what I'd like to know:

Is/are the ghost sound/sounds in question:

On an initial reference mix to the 4th track of the original session tape?


Nope, because the track breakdown for "IWFTD" is this:
1 - FI & E. Hrn
2 - FBs & Dr. Piano w/reverb
3 - Bs, org, piano, guitar
4 - vln ss at end

And "IJWMFTT" was cut on 3-track, so there is no 4th track.  Smiley


Great, so next we'd need to consult the mono backing track mixes from the CBS 8-track multis.


Well, those unintentional sounds are clearly there - since they're on the final mono mixes. And, they're present on the S.O.T. tracks (including the aforementioned "1st lead vocal overdub"), which were sourced from the 8-tracks.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2020, 09:17:09 PM by c-man » Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #9 on: June 04, 2020, 09:20:34 PM »


Well, that would mean that tape delay was used on the instrumental sub-mix...I don't detect any on the final 1966 mono mixdowns, and I don't notice any missing from the 1996 stereo remixes of the instrumental tracks (just the missing "artifacts" like the screeching rewound sound mentioned).
[/quote]

Let's not rule that out yet, though.
[/quote]

That would mean that the tape used for echo was being rewound after the mix had started - I can't imagine Chuck or whoever the tape op was (Winston Wong?) not stopping the mix and saying, "Hey, I wasn't ready yet!".
Logged
aeijtzsche
Honored Guest
******
Online Online

Gender: Female
Posts: 2929



View Profile
« Reply #10 on: June 04, 2020, 09:29:56 PM »

Here's what I'd like to know:

Is/are the ghost sound/sounds in question:

On an initial reference mix to the 4th track of the original session tape?


Nope, because the track breakdown for "IWFTD" is this:
1 - FI & E. Hrn
2 - FBs & Dr. Piano w/reverb
3 - Bs, org, piano, guitar
4 - vln ss at end

And "IJWMFTT" was cut on 3-track, so there is no 4th track.  Smiley


Great, so next we'd need to consult the mono backing track mixes from the CBS 8-track multis.


Well, those unintentional sounds are clearly there - since they're on the final mono mixes. And, they're present on the S.O.T. tracks (including the aforementioned "1st lead vocal overdub"), which were sourced from the 8-tracks.

But they could conceivably not be on the mono track mix and gotten added at the final mix stage.  It's unlikely, but plausible.
Logged
aeijtzsche
Honored Guest
******
Online Online

Gender: Female
Posts: 2929



View Profile
« Reply #11 on: June 04, 2020, 09:31:17 PM »

Quote
Quote

Well, that would mean that tape delay was used on the instrumental sub-mix...I don't detect any on the final 1966 mono mixdowns, and I don't notice any missing from the 1996 stereo remixes of the instrumental tracks (just the missing "artifacts" like the screeching rewound sound mentioned).

Let's not rule that out yet, though.

That would mean that the tape used for echo was being rewound after the mix had started - I can't imagine Chuck or whoever the tape op was (Winston Wong?) not stopping the mix and saying, "Hey, I wasn't ready yet!".



It wouldn't have to be rewinding, in fact I think it's pretty clear the ghost sound is playing roughly at pitch.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2020, 09:31:56 PM by aeijtzsche » Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #12 on: June 04, 2020, 09:33:12 PM »

Here's what I'd like to know:

Is/are the ghost sound/sounds in question:

On an initial reference mix to the 4th track of the original session tape?


Nope, because the track breakdown for "IWFTD" is this:
1 - FI & E. Hrn
2 - FBs & Dr. Piano w/reverb
3 - Bs, org, piano, guitar
4 - vln ss at end

And "IJWMFTT" was cut on 3-track, so there is no 4th track.  Smiley


Great, so next we'd need to consult the mono backing track mixes from the CBS 8-track multis.


Well, those unintentional sounds are clearly there - since they're on the final mono mixes. And, they're present on the S.O.T. tracks (including the aforementioned "1st lead vocal overdub"), which were sourced from the 8-tracks.

But they could conceivably not be on the mono track mix and gotten added at the final mix stage.  It's unlikely, but plausible.

But they ARE on the mono track mix, since they're present on the S.O.T. boot, the mix of which is just the mono backing track and lead vocal overdub(s), mixed from the 8-track.
Logged
aeijtzsche
Honored Guest
******
Online Online

Gender: Female
Posts: 2929



View Profile
« Reply #13 on: June 04, 2020, 09:55:16 PM »

Here's what I'd like to know:

Is/are the ghost sound/sounds in question:

On an initial reference mix to the 4th track of the original session tape?


Nope, because the track breakdown for "IWFTD" is this:
1 - FI & E. Hrn
2 - FBs & Dr. Piano w/reverb
3 - Bs, org, piano, guitar
4 - vln ss at end

And "IJWMFTT" was cut on 3-track, so there is no 4th track.  Smiley


Great, so next we'd need to consult the mono backing track mixes from the CBS 8-track multis.


Well, those unintentional sounds are clearly there - since they're on the final mono mixes. And, they're present on the S.O.T. tracks (including the aforementioned "1st lead vocal overdub"), which were sourced from the 8-tracks.

But they could conceivably not be on the mono track mix and gotten added at the final mix stage.  It's unlikely, but plausible.

But they ARE on the mono track mix, since they're present on the S.O.T. boot, the mix of which is just the mono backing track and lead vocal overdub(s), mixed from the 8-track.

Oh, good call.  OK, so then here's another question -- since there's no reference mix on a non-existent 4th track, and the sounds exist on the mono backing track as it exists on the CBS originated 8-track...then either the sounds were picked up at CBS *OR* there was another intermediate dubdown between the backing track three-track and the CBS tape.  If the latter scenario is not the case, how would the Everly's end up getting mixed into the Beach Boys AT CBS?
Logged
zaval80
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 61


View Profile
« Reply #14 on: June 05, 2020, 03:20:05 AM »

Probably the heads of one of the Columbia machines were misaligned versus the others. It is possible that when they've made the mono mix of the backing track there was nothing wrong with it, as the heads of this machine and the one used for erasing were in alignment with each other. But when they transferred it later at Columbia, that machine's heads caught the remnants of sound from the incompletely erased tape. And it was too late to cancel the Columbia session because of this imperfection.
Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #15 on: June 05, 2020, 05:55:01 AM »

Probably the heads of one of the Columbia machines were misaligned versus the others. It is possible that when they've made the mono mix of the backing track there was nothing wrong with it, as the heads of this machine and the one used for erasing were in alignment with each other. But when they transferred it later at Columbia, that machine's heads caught the remnants of sound from the incompletely erased tape. And it was too late to cancel the Columbia session because of this imperfection.

That would make the most sense, it seems - meaning, the dubdown from 3- and 4-track was done to 1/4" mono at Western, with no discernable anomalies present (no ghost artifacts from the Everlys mix session - the tape of which came from United and was recycled at Western, since the two studios had joint ownership/management). However, when it was "bounced up" to 8-track at Columbia, those sounds became evident on mis-aligned heads. I think we have a winner!  Smiley
Logged
zaval80
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 61


View Profile
« Reply #16 on: June 05, 2020, 06:43:32 AM »

Actually, this needs to be thought up in more detail. Obviously the sounds from the erased tape were caught up by some other machine, one at Columbia or the second one used for bouncing at Western. So: the machine at United used for THE EVERLYS RECORDING was misaligned, thus remnants of the original sound remained on the tape. And if that tape received the 1-track mono mix at the second one used for bouncing at Western, I wonder if the engineer had to listen to the result of that bounce, to ensure there are no dropouts before taking it to another session at Columbia? or did they just rely on the overall quality of their machines and tapes. As an owner of a domestic reel-to-reel some decades ago, I remember well the left channel of my stereo was always a pain in the ass regarding the possibility of a drop-out, because that's where the corresponding head was, against the very edge of the tape. Probably the studio engineers, minding this, transferred a mono backing track to a track not on the edge? But, had they a listen to the result or not?

P.S. Not "the machine at United used for THE EVERLYS RECORDING was misaligned", but a machine that was used for ERASING that tape.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2020, 07:06:32 AM by zaval80 » Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #17 on: June 05, 2020, 06:49:02 AM »

More observations - as I stated, I can't hear bleed-through on the final mix of "IWFTD", but I DO hear the same Everlys track on the SOT presentation of the vocal overdubs for that song, again mixed from the Columbia 8-track. But regarding that - the mono instrumental dubdown present on the 8-track also seems to include a layer of backing vocals (the "ahhs" starting in the second verse, which really seem locked-in with that band track). Which seems to indicate that those vocals were done at Western - possibly as the instrumental tracks were dubbed to 1/4" mono - and then doubled (or tripled) at Columbia, on their own discrete tracks...interesting!

Regardless, I'm not hearing any extra tape delay that's not present on the un-dubbed instrumental tracks as presented on SOT (earlier takes, or final takes). The only instrument I really hear that on is the Fender bass (for the "tic-tac" effect) - it's readily apparent on the multiple takes of "IWFTD", and less so on "IJWMFTT", but on the latter song, I don't hear any more added to the dubdown on the 8-track...I think it's just that they used a slightly longer delay time on the Fender bass for "IWFTD" than on "IJWMFTT". So, even if they did use tape delay for that first layer of vocal "ahhs" on "IWFTD" when dubbing it down to mono, there's no use of it (that I can hear) on the mono dub of "IJWMFTT". So again, I'm inclined to think of zaval80's theory of tape head mis-alignment as the likely culprit.
Logged
aeijtzsche
Honored Guest
******
Online Online

Gender: Female
Posts: 2929



View Profile
« Reply #18 on: June 05, 2020, 06:54:27 AM »

Probably the heads of one of the Columbia machines were misaligned versus the others. It is possible that when they've made the mono mix of the backing track there was nothing wrong with it, as the heads of this machine and the one used for erasing were in alignment with each other. But when they transferred it later at Columbia, that machine's heads caught the remnants of sound from the incompletely erased tape. And it was too late to cancel the Columbia session because of this imperfection.

That would make the most sense, it seems - meaning, the dubdown from 3- and 4-track was done to 1/4" mono at Western, with no discernable anomalies present (no ghost artifacts from the Everlys mix session - the tape of which came from United and was recycled at Western, since the two studios had joint ownership/management). However, when it was "bounced up" to 8-track at Columbia, those sounds became evident on mis-aligned heads. I think we have a winner!  Smiley


That's a lot of supposition.  Lots of questions we have to answer before a winner can be decided.  First, if that's what happened, why and how did a tape from United by a different artist get reused?  Second, IF the sound got picked up at Unite Western, this requires the fairly bold assumption that they did a mix essentially for no reason, sacrificing a whole tape generation in exchange for what?  Portability?  I'd be more willing to buy that if we knew of some 4-track reels with a bunch of the mono backing tracks.  

And then there's the whole issue of how professional engineers are letting this happen.  CBS seems very unlikely to have misaligned machines--they probably had boffins do that every day (as I'd expect U/W did, despite being more of a mom & pop kinda place.)

Lots of important questions -- not really to find out about an isolated ghost sound, as interesting as that is, but to gain more insight into the working methods of the 3- and 4-track era.
« Last Edit: June 05, 2020, 06:57:52 AM by aeijtzsche » Logged
zaval80
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 61


View Profile
« Reply #19 on: June 05, 2020, 06:56:35 AM »

It could be that they caught the problem at Columbia, and an engineer did a temporary alignment change of the heads on a Columbia machine, the 4-track one, so they'd be able to rid of the unwanted sound.
Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #20 on: June 05, 2020, 06:58:23 AM »

It could be that they caught the problem at Columbia, and an engineer did a temporary alignment change of the heads on a Columbia machine, the 4-track one, so they'd be able to rid of the unwanted sound.

Huh? The unwanted sound is there on the final mix, do I don't think they got rid of it...
Logged
zaval80
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 61


View Profile
« Reply #21 on: June 05, 2020, 07:02:31 AM »

That's a lot of supposition.  Lots of questions we have to answer before a winner can be decided.  First, if that's what happened, why and how did a tape from United by a different artist get reused?  Second, IF the sound got picked up at Unite Western, this requires the fairly bold assumption that they did a mix essentially for no reason, sacrificing a whole tape generation in exchange for what?  Portability?  I'd be more willing to buy that if we knew of some 4-track reels with a bunch of the mono backing tracks.  

And then there's the whole issue of how professional engineers are letting this happen.  CBS seems very unlikely to have misaligned machines--they probably had boffins do that every day (as I'd expect U/W did, despite being more of a mom & pop kinda place.)


If the Everlys cut out their final mix off that tape, as C-man suggested, the rest of the tape most likely was binned for less important uses.

I've rethought my initial suggestion. It was not the Columbia machine but some machine that was used for erasing the United recording by the Everlys.
Logged
zaval80
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 61


View Profile
« Reply #22 on: June 05, 2020, 07:05:00 AM »

It could be that they caught the problem at Columbia, and an engineer did a temporary alignment change of the heads on a Columbia machine, the 4-track one, so they'd be able to rid of the unwanted sound.

Huh? The unwanted sound is there on the final mix, do I don't think they got rid of it...

Oh, I've meant, they caught the problem in time for "IWFTD". In what order were the songs recorded?
Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #23 on: June 05, 2020, 07:05:23 AM »


That's a lot of supposition.  Lots of questions we have to answer before a winner can be decided.  First, if that's what happened, why and how did a tape from United by a different artist get reused?  Second, IF the sound got picked up at Unite Western, this requires the fairly bold assumption that they did a mix essentially for no reason, sacrificing a whole tape generation in exchange for what?  Portability?  I'd be more willing to buy that if we knew of some 4-track reels with a bunch of the mono backing tracks.  


Well, regardless of the why and how, it seems fairly clear that this DID happen - I don't know how else to explain the presence of the Everlys song bleeding through. And, as to why they did this mix at Western, sacrificing a whole tape generation - this seems to answer our earlier question of whether Brian did his instrumental dub-downs at Western with Chuck, or relied on the Columbia engineers to get it just right. Since he knew and trusted Chuck to get the sounds he wanted, that seems to explain it. And it seems Brian was less concerned about generation loss as he was about getting the "right" sounds, especially as everything was being dubbed down to mono anyway (I'm trying to think like he did here). And, as zaval80 theorizes, the Columbia engineers would have noticed the bleedthrough (I'm wondering how easy it was to align a 1" 8-track head stack exactly the way a 1/4" mono machine would have been), but Brian told them not to worry about it, and press on. To me, that makes sense.
Logged
c-man
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Online Online

Gender: Male
Posts: 4662


View Profile WWW
« Reply #24 on: June 05, 2020, 07:06:32 AM »

It could be that they caught the problem at Columbia, and an engineer did a temporary alignment change of the heads on a Columbia machine, the 4-track one, so they'd be able to rid of the unwanted sound.

Huh? The unwanted sound is there on the final mix, do I don't think they got rid of it...

Oh, I've meant, they caught the problem in time for "IWFTD". In what order were the songs recorded?

The bleed-through is also present on the 8-track session tape for "IWFTD" - it's audible on the S.O.T. boot before the song starts, I just don't hear it in the final mix.
Logged
gfx
Pages: [1] 2 3 4 Go Up Print 
gfx
Jump to:  
gfx
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Page created in 0.243 seconds with 21 queries.
Helios Multi design by Bloc
gfx
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!