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Author Topic: Danelectro 6 on BBs records - a video introduction  (Read 1307 times)
aeijtzsche
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« Reply #25 on: May 13, 2020, 11:01:32 AM »

Finally, after years of reading about Danelectro basses - mainly on this board - I know how they look like!  Cheesy
I knew that picture of Elvis but didn't know it was a Danelectro he was playing. After getting an idea of it's sound through this video I now believe that the intro to 1960s "Elvis is back" album's "Like a baby" is played by a Danelectro. The sound seems to line up with what you showed in the video.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkIx9TLjNZo

Good call, and then it goes on to play tic-tac with the string bass!
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« Reply #26 on: May 13, 2020, 11:07:46 AM »

Finally, after years of reading about Danelectro basses - mainly on this board - I know how they look like!  Cheesy
I knew that picture of Elvis but didn't know it was a Danelectro he was playing. After getting an idea of it's sound through this video I now believe that the intro to 1960s "Elvis is back" album's "Like a baby" is played by a Danelectro. The sound seems to line up with what you showed in the video.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jkIx9TLjNZo

The Danelectro 6-string bass sound we're discussing was practically invented in Nashville - According to Harold Bradley, both he and Hank Garland bought the first 2 Danelectro baritone/6-string bass guitars that came to Nashville in the mid-50's. The producers back then would call it "tic-tac bass" or "tic-tock bass" when they'd double an upright bass with the 6-string muted.

That sound is literally a defining sound of records made in Nashville in the mid to late 50's, it's all over the big hits...no coincidence that also all over that incredible run of hits are also guitarists Hank Garland and Harold Bradley! Often if one of them was on regular guitar, the other would be on Danelectro or "tic-tac". Other producers called it "dead string" guitar...same effect, same recipe.

So yes, what you hear on those tracks Elvis cut in Nashville both immediately before he went into the army and immediately after he got out - featuring Hank Garland, Floyd Cramer, and the other Nashville A-Team session cats - is a Danelectro baritone/6-string bass/tic-tac bass.

Interesting side note that doesn't get mentioned as much related to Hank Garland:

He had an endorsement deal with Gibson, and with Gibson being close to all the action, Hank had a working relationship with the factory and designers who he'd give ideas and feedback to almost instantly after coming up with ideas for features and designs, or feedback on road-testing a new Gibson. Hank and Billy Byrd got their signature "Byrdland" into the Gibson model line this way.

But what is lesser known is how Hank was also involved with - and owned - a prototype of the Gibson EB6 6-string bass, which was Gibson's answer to the Danelectro model that was being used all over Nashville's hit records as I mentioned earlier. It was built around the Gibson ES-345 body design and had similar features like PAF pickups...and this also lines up because one of Hank's main go-to guitars, and one which he played on and can be heard all over his tracks with Elvis, was a prototype of what would become the Gibson ES-345.

So Hank Garland had and was actively playing a Gibson version of the Danelectro 6-string bass, and this Gibson EB6 is the one heard on Elvis' records like "I Got Stung" and "Stuck On You".

Gibson wanted their own entry into the 6-string bass market, which in Nashville was *booming* in the late 50's before it even got to Los Angeles' studios in the 60's, and they had one of their main endorsers in that area and one of the busiest and best guitarists in Nashville to road-test their prototypes and get instant feedback from Hank.

So it's nearly impossible to tell without documentation, but a lot of what you hear on those Elvis records up to 1961 and Hank's accident was likely Hank's Gibson prototype rather than the Danelectro, although Hank owned and used both instruments. And on at least one of those famous Elvis Nashville cuts, Little Sister, Hank borrowed a Fender Jazzmaster from Harold Bradley (or in another version Bradley says it was his Fender Strat) to get a more twangy and piercing sound on the solo after his Gibson wasn't making the cut.

So when you hear that sound on Elvis' records from the Nashville sessions and that era of Elvis in general, consider it's more than likely Hank Garland playing tic-tac bass on either that original Danelectro he and Bradley bought in the mid-50's when they were literally brand new to Nashville, or Hank's Gibson prototype EB6 built on the ES-345 body shape.

Oh...for the musicians, the EB6 had a *metal* wraparound bridge design even on the 1958-ish prototype which could be an indication that even when the Danelectros were only a few years old, that wooden bridge design was something the regular, full-time pros like Hank did not prefer.

EDIT to add: Hank's prototype also had an adjustable felt piece under the strings, near the bridge, which could be raised in order to mute the strings for that signature muted sound on the tic-tac. Fender later incorporated this feature too as a flip-up mute near their bridges on certain models. So the Gibson version Hank played had some features that clearly came from a working player who used such an instrument and asked for these features. But this was on a prototype in 1958...
« Last Edit: May 13, 2020, 11:27:13 AM by guitarfool2002 » Logged

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« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2020, 11:23:23 AM »

Just as a comparison to the BB's sessions of the mid-60's and what Elvis was cutting in Nashville a few years earlier, this is a session tape of Elvis and the Nashville cats recording "His Latest Flame" in 1961. If you listen up to 5:30 or so, you hear them working out the tune on multiple takes, but then starting around 5:30 you'll hear Hank Garland start playing the Danelectro/Gibson EB6 (anyone's guess) "tic tac bass" part, and you can hear where and how the instrument sat in the full arrangement and mix of that hit song as soon as Hank started playing the part. You get to hear, via this one session out of many Nashville sessions during this era, how the "tic-tac bass" sounded in the context of these hit records before and after it was added.

Here's the track:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E3B5ysbInu0
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« Reply #28 on: May 13, 2020, 11:47:30 AM »

For reference:

The EB-6 actually owned by Hank Garland



Here's some more info about the instrument.
https://cartervintage.com/products/gibson-eb-6-1960

Duane Eddy might have encountered the EB-6 because his signature six-string bass is more like it than a Dano or Fender VI:

https://www.gretschguitars.com/gear/build/bass/g6120tb-de-duane-eddy-6-string-bass/2406264806
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« Reply #29 on: May 13, 2020, 11:53:34 AM »

Great infos, guys! Thanks!
I always loved that percussive sound of what I now know is the Danelectro/Gibson EB 6. I never knew how they would get that sound out of a regular guitar. Now I understand, they didn't.  Grin Also I of course knew the phrase "tic-tac-bass" but never could really make much sense out of it.
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« Reply #30 on: May 13, 2020, 12:08:37 PM »

For reference:

The EB-6 actually owned by Hank Garland


Here's some more info about the instrument.
https://cartervintage.com/products/gibson-eb-6-1960

Duane Eddy might have encountered the EB-6 because his signature six-string bass is more like it than a Dano or Fender VI:

https://www.gretschguitars.com/gear/build/bass/g6120tb-de-duane-eddy-6-string-bass/2406264806

Yes - There was a major sale listing a few months ago for Hank's guitar collection, through his estate, which had his key guitars that had been stored and mostly unseen for decades...it was February and kind of got lost in the shuffle, but Hank's prototype EB6 was listed as part of that sale. Very, very, very cool and amazing lot of guitars!

I'm sure Duane had his own specs when it came to his later signature model, but Duane's *original* baritone was a Danelectro, and it's that signature sound he got on one of his best records, "Because They're Young" - just classic 6-string bass lead right up front in the mix atop a full string orchestra! It's mentioned in his interview with Premier Guitar:

Are some of the songs played on a baritone or 6-string bass?
They were. In ’59, I discovered a Danelectro 6-string bass, which is an octave lower than a regular guitar. I thought, “This was made for me.” I used it on one of my bigger hits called “Because They’re Young.” On my third album, I used 6-string bass on all the songs except two.

What amp were you playing through onstage?
We all had these Magnatones with two 12" Jensens. They were about the best on the market at the time, unless you went for a really expensive amp, like the Standels that Chet used.

Did you ever use a Fender amp?
The Magnatone was bigger—65 watts or something. These two local guys would boost it up over 100 watts through a single JBL 15" speaker and a tweeter. They would cover the amp with Naugahyde and a white grille cloth and charge us $100. That’s where my sound came from. It wouldn’t break up no matter how hard you hit it. I compared it to a Standel at Manny’s Music in New York one time. I would hit the Standel real hard with a note, or turn it up beyond a certain point, and it would break up. I plugged back into mine and turned it up even louder and it would not break up. I realized I had the best amp in the world.

What gauge strings were you using at that time?
Medium gauge.

Were they flatwound or roundwound?
Roundwound.


I'd have to say that in terms of hearing the baritone or 6-string bass in that kind of context, both Duane's "Because They're Young" and especially (since it's one of my favorite records of all time that sometimes makes my cry when I hear it...) "The Lonely Surfer" by Jack Nitzsche pretty much nailed and defined the sound of a baritone/6-string lead part playing the melody on a fully orchestrated record. Simply amazing, both of those tracks...and it was Bill Pitman playing lead with his Danelectro on Lonely Surfer!

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« Reply #31 on: May 13, 2020, 12:31:26 PM »

Not to muddy the waters more, but there are likely a good number of post-1961 sessions (more likely LA) to feature the Fender Bass VI too. Probably significantly less often, as the Fender was a fairly expensive instrument compared to the cheaper Danelectro.

Case in point (you don't go on the Smothers Brothers with a Dano!) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qoymGCDYzU
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« Reply #32 on: May 13, 2020, 12:35:18 PM »

Also want to take a minute to recognize Lee Hazlewood, a man who blended the West Coast and Nashville sounds into one!:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlhJx_b3g8A
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« Reply #33 on: May 13, 2020, 12:38:00 PM »

Not to muddy the waters more, but there are likely a good number of post-1961 sessions (more likely LA) to feature the Fender Bass VI too. Probably significantly less often, as the Fender was a fairly expensive instrument compared to the cheaper Danelectro.

Case in point (you don't go on the Smothers Brothers with a Dano!) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qoymGCDYzU

They were definitely around -- we've discussed a few times how, indeed, muddy the waters are for the Fender VI.  Because as you say, more expensive and with a potentially iffy set-up, would a pro choose it over a Dano?  I'm sure Fender gave some to their affiliates, of course.  In fact, a few months ago, somewhere, we were speculating whether the Beach Boys might have just used a Fender VI for their self-contained uses of Six-string bass because of their connection to Fender.  I wonder if Al would remember.  
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« Reply #34 on: May 13, 2020, 12:39:46 PM »

Also want to take a minute to recognize Lee Hazlewood, a man who blended the West Coast and Nashville sounds into one!:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlhJx_b3g8A

Oh, yeah -- and now we're getting way off but it's my topic: Have you friends seen this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDW2K4zxkXw

Sadly it's not in an LA studio, but it is some great colour footage of some of our fave dudes.
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« Reply #35 on: May 13, 2020, 04:09:26 PM »

Also want to take a minute to recognize Lee Hazlewood, a man who blended the West Coast and Nashville sounds into one!:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlhJx_b3g8A

Oh, yeah -- and now we're getting way off but it's my topic: Have you friends seen this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDW2K4zxkXw

Sadly it's not in an LA studio, but it is some great colour footage of some of our fave dudes.

yep been watching that for years! Love and Other Crimes is one of my all-time favorite records by anyone.

Also the Nancy Sinatra TV special from '68 or so has a studio session w/ Lee Hazlewood, Billy Strange, and Frank Sinatra. Not sure if that's on Youtube. Also looks to be somewhat staged but might be a real session.

found it
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IL50Yoi0V_0
« Last Edit: May 13, 2020, 04:13:45 PM by DonnyL » Logged

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« Reply #36 on: May 13, 2020, 04:30:50 PM »

Not to muddy the waters more, but there are likely a good number of post-1961 sessions (more likely LA) to feature the Fender Bass VI too. Probably significantly less often, as the Fender was a fairly expensive instrument compared to the cheaper Danelectro.

Case in point (you don't go on the Smothers Brothers with a Dano!) - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4qoymGCDYzU

They were definitely around -- we've discussed a few times how, indeed, muddy the waters are for the Fender VI.  Because as you say, more expensive and with a potentially iffy set-up, would a pro choose it over a Dano?  I'm sure Fender gave some to their affiliates, of course.  In fact, a few months ago, somewhere, we were speculating whether the Beach Boys might have just used a Fender VI for their self-contained uses of Six-string bass because of their connection to Fender.  I wonder if Al would remember.  

Here's a little more lesser-known info on the origins of the Bass VI. There was definitely someone playing one who was very visible on weekly TV at the time - The late, great Neil LeVang through his work as guitarist on the Lawrence Welk show after Buddy Merrill left, then shared guitar duties with Neil when he came back in the mid-60's. I remember reaching out to C-Man when Neil passed away, as he was and is one of my favorite guitarists of all time, and Neil also played on at least one later Beach Boys session...

So Neil was directly involved with Leo Fender and specific to the Bass VI, Neil helped design an original prototype design which was more of a Telecaster shape, then later with Leo had a role in what became the offset-body Bass VI we all know. I did not know that until reading this interview with Neil which I'll post. Both Neil and Buddy Merrill would be seen and heard playing the new Bass VI on the Welk show during the 60's.

But keep in mind how the Welk weekly program showcased quite a few of the "new" Fender designs, from Buddy's original Strat in the 50's to the various new models like the Jazzmaster and Bass VI which Neil would play every week on TV. What gets written out of the so-called rock history is how many kids watching Welk with their parents were inspired to buy these new Fender products when they were new as much from watching Neil and Buddy Merrill on Welk as they were seeing, say, Buddy Holly playing his Strat on Sullivan.

It just doesn't get written as much because it's not as cool to say, but I've never been cool as much as psyched about seeing and hearing great players playing awesome guitars.  Smiley

Here's the interview with Neil with a lot of cool information and an aside from Seymour Duncan...

https://www.vintageguitar.com/20125/neil-levang/

Anyone interested in great guitar playing, check out Neil LeVang's work.
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« Reply #37 on: May 13, 2020, 07:02:37 PM »

Jimmy Bond is on more of the late '60s/early '70s Beach Boys records than you might think...from Friends, he's on the title track and the outtake "Our Happy Home". From 20/20, he's on "Be With Me" and "I Went To Sleep" (as well as "Cabinessence", cut two years earlier). From Sunflower, he's on "Deirdre", "It's About Time", "All I Wanna Do", and "Forever". He's also on "Break Away", "Celebrate The News", and "Loop de Loop". And years later, he turns up as part of the string section on Pacific Ocean Blue!

There’s a double bass in It’s About Time? I learn something new every day on this board.

Well yes - it's the only bass on the basic track. But, there's also an electric bass overdubbed, according to the track sheet. But that part where everything drops out except for the bass and Mike's bass vocal - that sounds to me like just upright bass.
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« Reply #38 on: May 13, 2020, 10:01:22 PM »

Also want to take a minute to recognize Lee Hazlewood, a man who blended the West Coast and Nashville sounds into one!:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FlhJx_b3g8A

Oh, yeah -- and now we're getting way off but it's my topic: Have you friends seen this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EDW2K4zxkXw

Sadly it's not in an LA studio, but it is some great colour footage of some of our fave dudes.

yep been watching that for years! Love and Other Crimes is one of my all-time favorite records by anyone.

Also the Nancy Sinatra TV special from '68 or so has a studio session w/ Lee Hazlewood, Billy Strange, and Frank Sinatra. Not sure if that's on Youtube. Also looks to be somewhat staged but might be a real session.

found it
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IL50Yoi0V_0

That's great--I'd not seen that,I don't think.  Staged or not, it's real enough.  Great shots of Western 1 full of great people.
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« Reply #39 on: May 15, 2020, 08:25:16 PM »

Off topic, but Jan Berry used the Dano 6-string bass a lot for Jan & Dean sessions, usually played by Bill Pitman.

The Dano parts were written in the treble clef, as opposed to bass clef, and they usually doubled the main bass line, note for note.

Jan's original music scores and charts from the '60s still exist. All of the bass lines for his sessions were written out, exactly as you hear them on the records.
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« Reply #40 on: May 15, 2020, 08:42:23 PM »

Off topic, but Jan Berry used the Dano 6-string bass a lot for Jan & Dean sessions, usually played by Bill Pitman.

The Dano parts were written in the treble clef, as opposed to bass clef, and they usually doubled the main bass line, note for note.

Jan's original music scores and charts from the '60s still exist. All of the bass lines for his sessions were written out, exactly as you hear them on the records.

Ooh, hey Mark -- I have been hoping you'd visit because I actually have some questions for you along this line:

One, when Jan wrote for Dano was the part labelled "Danelectro 6-string Bass" or "6-string Bass" or "dano" or what?

And also - slightly more off topic but again, it's my topic:  When he wrote for 12-string electric guitar did he differentiate between Bellzouki and generic 12-string?  I know you told me once that AACSCBRTA specifically calls for Bellzouki; was that an isolated incident or did he ever write for generic electric 12-string?

Thanks!!!
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« Reply #41 on: May 15, 2020, 09:39:45 PM »

Man this thread is fascinating . I’m learning a lot and it’s making me want to go back and listen with a different ear, so to speak
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« Reply #42 on: May 15, 2020, 09:47:39 PM »

Off topic, but Jan Berry used the Dano 6-string bass a lot for Jan & Dean sessions, usually played by Bill Pitman.

The Dano parts were written in the treble clef, as opposed to bass clef, and they usually doubled the main bass line, note for note.

Jan's original music scores and charts from the '60s still exist. All of the bass lines for his sessions were written out, exactly as you hear them on the records.

Ooh, hey Mark -- I have been hoping you'd visit because I actually have some questions for you along this line:

One, when Jan wrote for Dano was the part labelled "Danelectro 6-string Bass" or "6-string Bass" or "dano" or what?

And also - slightly more off topic but again, it's my topic:  When he wrote for 12-string electric guitar did he differentiate between Bellzouki and generic 12-string?  I know you told me once that AACSCBRTA specifically calls for Bellzouki; was that an isolated incident or did he ever write for generic electric 12-string?

Thanks!!!

aeijtzsche,

“Anaheim” example . . .

“ANAHEIM, AZUSA” (1964)

Three guitar parts:

Guitar I — Features chords with rhythm slashes when needed, when certain combinations of quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes were required. Certain lead licks are also written in pitch notation.

Guitar II — Dano Bellzouki 12-String. This is also a combination lead and rhythm part, but not the same as Guitar I. The lead licks are written in pitch notation, supplemented by rhythm slashes. Obviously, the chord progressions are the same on each guitar chart.

Guitar III — Labeled as “Bass Guitar.” Written in the treble clef, entirely in pitch notation. This was the Dano Six-String, which doubled the bass line.


Two Bass Parts:

Written in the bass clef, entirely in pitch notation. The parts were String Bass and Fender Bass. The two bass players read from the same chart. They played in unison except where the notes indicated an octave. When octaves were required, the Fender played the higher notes. Jan’s instructions on the score and charts were, “Fender Take Top Notes” and “Fender – Top Notes.”

The above example is easily at hand. Without going back and looking, I recall that Jan’s bass guitar charts are labeled in various ways. For example, “Dano,” “Bass Guitar,” and “6-String.” And sometimes just “Guitar III” or “Guitar 3.” The third guitar part is usually a dead giveaway, regardless of labeling, because it doubles the bass line in pitch notation.

“Guitar II” was not always Bellzouki, of course, which Jan used sparingly.

But he did like 12-String guitar in general, and he used it a lot in 1965. For example, the guitar opening to the hit single “I Found a Girl” is 12-String, played by P. F. Sloan.

The opening of Jan’s cover of “Norwegian Wood” (signature riff), which he began recording in late ’65, is also 12-String, played by Don Peake.

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« Reply #43 on: May 15, 2020, 10:15:56 PM »

Off topic, but Jan Berry used the Dano 6-string bass a lot for Jan & Dean sessions, usually played by Bill Pitman.

The Dano parts were written in the treble clef, as opposed to bass clef, and they usually doubled the main bass line, note for note.

Jan's original music scores and charts from the '60s still exist. All of the bass lines for his sessions were written out, exactly as you hear them on the records.

Ooh, hey Mark -- I have been hoping you'd visit because I actually have some questions for you along this line:

One, when Jan wrote for Dano was the part labelled "Danelectro 6-string Bass" or "6-string Bass" or "dano" or what?

And also - slightly more off topic but again, it's my topic:  When he wrote for 12-string electric guitar did he differentiate between Bellzouki and generic 12-string?  I know you told me once that AACSCBRTA specifically calls for Bellzouki; was that an isolated incident or did he ever write for generic electric 12-string?

Thanks!!!

aeijtzsche,

“Anaheim” example . . .

“ANAHEIM, AZUSA” (1964)

Three guitar parts:

Guitar I — Features chords with rhythm slashes when needed, when certain combinations of quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes were required. Certain lead licks are also written in pitch notation.

Guitar II — Dano Bellzouki 12-String. This is also a combination lead and rhythm part, but not the same as Guitar I. The lead licks are written in pitch notation, supplemented by rhythm slashes. Obviously, the chord progressions are the same on each guitar chart.

Guitar III — Labeled as “Bass Guitar.” Written in the treble clef, entirely in pitch notation. This was the Dano Six-String, which doubled the bass line.


Two Bass Parts:

Written in the bass clef, entirely in pitch notation. The parts were String Bass and Fender Bass. The two bass players read from the same chart. They played in unison except where the notes indicated an octave. When octaves were required, the Fender played the higher notes. Jan’s instructions on the score and charts were, “Fender Take Top Notes” and “Fender – Top Notes.”

The above example is easily at hand. Without going back and looking, I recall that Jan’s bass guitar charts are labeled in various ways. For example, “Dano,” “Bass Guitar,” and “6-String.” And sometimes just “Guitar III” or “Guitar 3.” The third guitar part is usually a dead giveaway, regardless of labeling, because it doubles the bass line in pitch notation.

“Guitar II” was not always Bellzouki, of course, which Jan used sparingly.

But he did like 12-String guitar in general, and he used it a lot in 1965. For example, the guitar opening to the hit single “I Found a Girl” is 12-String, played by P. F. Sloan.

The opening of Jan’s cover of “Norwegian Wood” (signature riff), which he began recording in late ’65, is also 12-String, played by Don Peake.



This is fascinating - I had not known about any of this. I’m a mega fan of PF Sloan however and have read his book too ... while Jan & Dean’s version of “I Found A Girl” is one of their greatest cuts IMO, I do prefer the PF Sloan version! But that’s the case with most of his songs for me.

PF did claim that he sang some major parts on many Jan & Dean records. Is this validated?
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« Reply #44 on: May 15, 2020, 10:30:53 PM »

Off topic, but Jan Berry used the Dano 6-string bass a lot for Jan & Dean sessions, usually played by Bill Pitman.

The Dano parts were written in the treble clef, as opposed to bass clef, and they usually doubled the main bass line, note for note.

Jan's original music scores and charts from the '60s still exist. All of the bass lines for his sessions were written out, exactly as you hear them on the records.

Ooh, hey Mark -- I have been hoping you'd visit because I actually have some questions for you along this line:

One, when Jan wrote for Dano was the part labelled "Danelectro 6-string Bass" or "6-string Bass" or "dano" or what?

And also - slightly more off topic but again, it's my topic:  When he wrote for 12-string electric guitar did he differentiate between Bellzouki and generic 12-string?  I know you told me once that AACSCBRTA specifically calls for Bellzouki; was that an isolated incident or did he ever write for generic electric 12-string?

Thanks!!!

aeijtzsche,

“Anaheim” example . . .

“ANAHEIM, AZUSA” (1964)

Three guitar parts:

Guitar I — Features chords with rhythm slashes when needed, when certain combinations of quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes were required. Certain lead licks are also written in pitch notation.

Guitar II — Dano Bellzouki 12-String. This is also a combination lead and rhythm part, but not the same as Guitar I. The lead licks are written in pitch notation, supplemented by rhythm slashes. Obviously, the chord progressions are the same on each guitar chart.

Guitar III — Labeled as “Bass Guitar.” Written in the treble clef, entirely in pitch notation. This was the Dano Six-String, which doubled the bass line.


Two Bass Parts:

Written in the bass clef, entirely in pitch notation. The parts were String Bass and Fender Bass. The two bass players read from the same chart. They played in unison except where the notes indicated an octave. When octaves were required, the Fender played the higher notes. Jan’s instructions on the score and charts were, “Fender Take Top Notes” and “Fender – Top Notes.”

The above example is easily at hand. Without going back and looking, I recall that Jan’s bass guitar charts are labeled in various ways. For example, “Dano,” “Bass Guitar,” and “6-String.” And sometimes just “Guitar III” or “Guitar 3.” The third guitar part is usually a dead giveaway, regardless of labeling, because it doubles the bass line in pitch notation.

“Guitar II” was not always Bellzouki, of course, which Jan used sparingly.

But he did like 12-String guitar in general, and he used it a lot in 1965. For example, the guitar opening to the hit single “I Found a Girl” is 12-String, played by P. F. Sloan.

The opening of Jan’s cover of “Norwegian Wood” (signature riff), which he began recording in late ’65, is also 12-String, played by Don Peake.



This is fascinating - I had not known about any of this. I’m a mega fan of PF Sloan however and have read his book too ... while Jan & Dean’s version of “I Found A Girl” is one of their greatest cuts IMO, I do prefer the PF Sloan version! But that’s the case with most of his songs for me.

PF did claim that he sang some major parts on many Jan & Dean records. Is this validated?

P. F. Sloan and Steve Barri were Screen Gems songwriters hired by Lou Adler, Jan & Dean’s manager and head of the West Coast Office of Screen Gems. They later followed Adler to Dunhill Productions and Trousdale Music.

Jan Berry was signed to Screen Gems, with three separate contracts as an artist, songwriter, and record producer.

Sloan and Barri began singing harmonies for Jan & Dean in 1964 while still at Screen Gems, after the Matadors—who sang harmonies on the Surf City and Drag City LPs—went their separate way.

Jan Berry tapped Sloan to sing the falsetto lead on several well-known Jan & Dean tracks, including “The Little Old Lady (from Pasadena),” “Anaheim, Azusa,” “Sidewalk Surfin’,” “Hey Little Freshman,” and “Freeway Flyer.”
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« Reply #45 on: May 15, 2020, 10:37:37 PM »

Off topic, but Jan Berry used the Dano 6-string bass a lot for Jan & Dean sessions, usually played by Bill Pitman.

The Dano parts were written in the treble clef, as opposed to bass clef, and they usually doubled the main bass line, note for note.

Jan's original music scores and charts from the '60s still exist. All of the bass lines for his sessions were written out, exactly as you hear them on the records.

Ooh, hey Mark -- I have been hoping you'd visit because I actually have some questions for you along this line:

One, when Jan wrote for Dano was the part labelled "Danelectro 6-string Bass" or "6-string Bass" or "dano" or what?

And also - slightly more off topic but again, it's my topic:  When he wrote for 12-string electric guitar did he differentiate between Bellzouki and generic 12-string?  I know you told me once that AACSCBRTA specifically calls for Bellzouki; was that an isolated incident or did he ever write for generic electric 12-string?

Thanks!!!

aeijtzsche,

“Anaheim” example . . .

“ANAHEIM, AZUSA” (1964)

Three guitar parts:

Guitar I — Features chords with rhythm slashes when needed, when certain combinations of quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes were required. Certain lead licks are also written in pitch notation.

Guitar II — Dano Bellzouki 12-String. This is also a combination lead and rhythm part, but not the same as Guitar I. The lead licks are written in pitch notation, supplemented by rhythm slashes. Obviously, the chord progressions are the same on each guitar chart.

Guitar III — Labeled as “Bass Guitar.” Written in the treble clef, entirely in pitch notation. This was the Dano Six-String, which doubled the bass line.


Two Bass Parts:

Written in the bass clef, entirely in pitch notation. The parts were String Bass and Fender Bass. The two bass players read from the same chart. They played in unison except where the notes indicated an octave. When octaves were required, the Fender played the higher notes. Jan’s instructions on the score and charts were, “Fender Take Top Notes” and “Fender – Top Notes.”

The above example is easily at hand. Without going back and looking, I recall that Jan’s bass guitar charts are labeled in various ways. For example, “Dano,” “Bass Guitar,” and “6-String.” And sometimes just “Guitar III” or “Guitar 3.” The third guitar part is usually a dead giveaway, regardless of labeling, because it doubles the bass line in pitch notation.

“Guitar II” was not always Bellzouki, of course, which Jan used sparingly.

But he did like 12-String guitar in general, and he used it a lot in 1965. For example, the guitar opening to the hit single “I Found a Girl” is 12-String, played by P. F. Sloan.

The opening of Jan’s cover of “Norwegian Wood” (signature riff), which he began recording in late ’65, is also 12-String, played by Don Peake.



Thanks, Mark -- that's helpful.

What I'm after in particular is to get a sense of how people, arrangers, producers, etc, thought about these instruments.  The Bellzouki, for example--when it essentially was the only commercially available electric 12-string guitar out there, did that carry over to when more of those became available so that arrangers were still calling for the Bellzouki as a sort of catch-all term for electric 12?  And as such, on the sort of negative side of that, did people like Jan consider the Bellzouki unique enough that it could not have a substitute 12-string stand in for it on a session.
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« Reply #46 on: May 15, 2020, 10:39:49 PM »

Also, who played Bellzouki on Anaheim?
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« Reply #47 on: May 15, 2020, 10:49:25 PM »

Off topic, but Jan Berry used the Dano 6-string bass a lot for Jan & Dean sessions, usually played by Bill Pitman.

The Dano parts were written in the treble clef, as opposed to bass clef, and they usually doubled the main bass line, note for note.

Jan's original music scores and charts from the '60s still exist. All of the bass lines for his sessions were written out, exactly as you hear them on the records.

Ooh, hey Mark -- I have been hoping you'd visit because I actually have some questions for you along this line:

One, when Jan wrote for Dano was the part labelled "Danelectro 6-string Bass" or "6-string Bass" or "dano" or what?

And also - slightly more off topic but again, it's my topic:  When he wrote for 12-string electric guitar did he differentiate between Bellzouki and generic 12-string?  I know you told me once that AACSCBRTA specifically calls for Bellzouki; was that an isolated incident or did he ever write for generic electric 12-string?

Thanks!!!

aeijtzsche,

“Anaheim” example . . .

“ANAHEIM, AZUSA” (1964)

Three guitar parts:

Guitar I — Features chords with rhythm slashes when needed, when certain combinations of quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes were required. Certain lead licks are also written in pitch notation.

Guitar II — Dano Bellzouki 12-String. This is also a combination lead and rhythm part, but not the same as Guitar I. The lead licks are written in pitch notation, supplemented by rhythm slashes. Obviously, the chord progressions are the same on each guitar chart.

Guitar III — Labeled as “Bass Guitar.” Written in the treble clef, entirely in pitch notation. This was the Dano Six-String, which doubled the bass line.


Two Bass Parts:

Written in the bass clef, entirely in pitch notation. The parts were String Bass and Fender Bass. The two bass players read from the same chart. They played in unison except where the notes indicated an octave. When octaves were required, the Fender played the higher notes. Jan’s instructions on the score and charts were, “Fender Take Top Notes” and “Fender – Top Notes.”

The above example is easily at hand. Without going back and looking, I recall that Jan’s bass guitar charts are labeled in various ways. For example, “Dano,” “Bass Guitar,” and “6-String.” And sometimes just “Guitar III” or “Guitar 3.” The third guitar part is usually a dead giveaway, regardless of labeling, because it doubles the bass line in pitch notation.

“Guitar II” was not always Bellzouki, of course, which Jan used sparingly.

But he did like 12-String guitar in general, and he used it a lot in 1965. For example, the guitar opening to the hit single “I Found a Girl” is 12-String, played by P. F. Sloan.

The opening of Jan’s cover of “Norwegian Wood” (signature riff), which he began recording in late ’65, is also 12-String, played by Don Peake.



This is fascinating - I had not known about any of this. I’m a mega fan of PF Sloan however and have read his book too ... while Jan & Dean’s version of “I Found A Girl” is one of their greatest cuts IMO, I do prefer the PF Sloan version! But that’s the case with most of his songs for me.

PF did claim that he sang some major parts on many Jan & Dean records. Is this validated?

P. F. Sloan and Steve Barri were Screen Gems songwriters hired by Lou Adler, Jan & Dean’s manager and head of the West Coast Office of Screen Gems. They later followed Adler to Dunhill Productions and Trousdale Music.

Jan Berry was signed to Screen Gems, with three separate contracts as an artist, songwriter, and record producer.

Sloan and Barri began singing harmonies for Jan & Dean in 1964 while still at Screen Gems, after the Matadors—who sang harmonies on the Surf City and Drag City LPs—went their separate way.

Jan Berry tapped Sloan to sing the falsetto lead on several well-known Jan & Dean tracks, including “The Little Old Lady (from Pasadena),” “Anaheim, Azusa,” “Sidewalk Surfin’,” “Hey Little Freshman,” and “Freeway Flyer.”


Sweet - thanks for that quick and informative response. Sounds like Sloan was well within his rights to note his contributions.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2020, 10:50:02 PM by DonnyL » Logged

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« Reply #48 on: May 15, 2020, 10:55:52 PM »

Off topic, but Jan Berry used the Dano 6-string bass a lot for Jan & Dean sessions, usually played by Bill Pitman.

The Dano parts were written in the treble clef, as opposed to bass clef, and they usually doubled the main bass line, note for note.

Jan's original music scores and charts from the '60s still exist. All of the bass lines for his sessions were written out, exactly as you hear them on the records.

Ooh, hey Mark -- I have been hoping you'd visit because I actually have some questions for you along this line:

One, when Jan wrote for Dano was the part labelled "Danelectro 6-string Bass" or "6-string Bass" or "dano" or what?

And also - slightly more off topic but again, it's my topic:  When he wrote for 12-string electric guitar did he differentiate between Bellzouki and generic 12-string?  I know you told me once that AACSCBRTA specifically calls for Bellzouki; was that an isolated incident or did he ever write for generic electric 12-string?

Thanks!!!

aeijtzsche,

“Anaheim” example . . .

“ANAHEIM, AZUSA” (1964)

Three guitar parts:

Guitar I — Features chords with rhythm slashes when needed, when certain combinations of quarter, eighth, and sixteenth notes were required. Certain lead licks are also written in pitch notation.

Guitar II — Dano Bellzouki 12-String. This is also a combination lead and rhythm part, but not the same as Guitar I. The lead licks are written in pitch notation, supplemented by rhythm slashes. Obviously, the chord progressions are the same on each guitar chart.

Guitar III — Labeled as “Bass Guitar.” Written in the treble clef, entirely in pitch notation. This was the Dano Six-String, which doubled the bass line.


Two Bass Parts:

Written in the bass clef, entirely in pitch notation. The parts were String Bass and Fender Bass. The two bass players read from the same chart. They played in unison except where the notes indicated an octave. When octaves were required, the Fender played the higher notes. Jan’s instructions on the score and charts were, “Fender Take Top Notes” and “Fender – Top Notes.”

The above example is easily at hand. Without going back and looking, I recall that Jan’s bass guitar charts are labeled in various ways. For example, “Dano,” “Bass Guitar,” and “6-String.” And sometimes just “Guitar III” or “Guitar 3.” The third guitar part is usually a dead giveaway, regardless of labeling, because it doubles the bass line in pitch notation.

“Guitar II” was not always Bellzouki, of course, which Jan used sparingly.

But he did like 12-String guitar in general, and he used it a lot in 1965. For example, the guitar opening to the hit single “I Found a Girl” is 12-String, played by P. F. Sloan.

The opening of Jan’s cover of “Norwegian Wood” (signature riff), which he began recording in late ’65, is also 12-String, played by Don Peake.



This is fascinating - I had not known about any of this. I’m a mega fan of PF Sloan however and have read his book too ... while Jan & Dean’s version of “I Found A Girl” is one of their greatest cuts IMO, I do prefer the PF Sloan version! But that’s the case with most of his songs for me.

PF did claim that he sang some major parts on many Jan & Dean records. Is this validated?

P. F. Sloan and Steve Barri were Screen Gems songwriters hired by Lou Adler, Jan & Dean’s manager and head of the West Coast Office of Screen Gems. They later followed Adler to Dunhill Productions and Trousdale Music.

Jan Berry was signed to Screen Gems, with three separate contracts as an artist, songwriter, and record producer.

Sloan and Barri began singing harmonies for Jan & Dean in 1964 while still at Screen Gems, after the Matadors—who sang harmonies on the Surf City and Drag City LPs—went their separate way.

Jan Berry tapped Sloan to sing the falsetto lead on several well-known Jan & Dean tracks, including “The Little Old Lady (from Pasadena),” “Anaheim, Azusa,” “Sidewalk Surfin’,” “Hey Little Freshman,” and “Freeway Flyer.”


Sweet - thanks for that quick and informative response. Sounds like Sloan was well within his rights to note his contributions.

I corresponded a lot with Sloan over the years. He was always good to me. His contributions to Jan & Dean are indelible. But in terms of bragging, he went too far in his memoir. For example, he claimed that Dean never sang falsetto again after Sloan did, and that simply was not true.

I'm not sure why Sloan felt the need to inflate and embellish his accomplishments, but I strongly suspect it was rooted in his bitter conflict with Lou Adler.

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« Reply #49 on: May 15, 2020, 11:15:04 PM »

Also, who played Bellzouki on Anaheim?

Looking at the session contract, we can narrow it down.

Bass — Jimmy Bond, Lyle Ritz

Keyboards — Leon Russell (tack piano, and later harpsichord)

Drums — Earl Palmer, Hal Blaine (playing in tandem, in unison)

Guitars — Glen Campbell, Billy Strange, Tommy Tedesco, Bill Pitman


Looking at the guitar players . . .

Bill Pitman played Dano . . . reading Guitar III.

Glen Campbell could not read music, so he likely played chords, looking at Guitar I . . . That's not to say Campbell could not rip a lead solo with the best of them. He could. But these parts were specific.

That leaves Billy Strange and Tommy Tedesco. It's been a while since I listened to the session tape, but both of these guys were capable of doing it. It was one of these two, reading Guitar II. And the one who did not play Bellzouki would have read from either Guitar I or Guitar !!, as both charts had the chord progressions.





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