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650717 Posts in 26004 Topics by 3711 Members - Latest Member: JPP4 September 21, 2019, 05:09:15 PM
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Author Topic: Sundazed: Albums from the Golden Age of Popular Music  (Read 1544 times)
JK
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« Reply #25 on: July 11, 2019, 07:03:52 AM »

Looking at CB's famous list, I see The Doors' third album Waiting for the Sun is high among her "Worth Another Listen"s. I loved their debut, liked most of Strange Days but this one flummoxed me from day one. In fact it was my last Doors purchase, the way that Weasels Ripped My Flesh became my last Zappa LP.

Looking through the track listing today, there's not that much I'd write home about. The opening big hit sounds dated and a lot of the rest sounds tired, at least to these ears. Eventually I chose "Not To Touch The Earth" for its exciting build-up and its connection with their big theatre piece "Celebration of the Lizard", of which it seems to have been part. Sticking my neck out here but this may be the closest The Doors came to reproducing their live act in the studio.

Later I came to love L.A. Woman so all's well that ends well (or something).

 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aAqx8y6mOFY



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Waiting_for_the_Sun
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« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2019, 02:09:33 PM »

Ramases' 1971 album Space Hymns gets the thumbs down from CB--except for this one track. I haven't checked out the rest of the album but "Life Child" sounds excellent to these ears. Indeed, the passage beginning at 3:40 is simply breath-taking. The band backing Ramases (real name Kimberly Barrington Frost) would go on to form 10cc. His wiki page is an enthralling if heart-breaking read. May the gods protect the eccentrics of this world. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T8HpI4QkaoI



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ramases

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JK
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« Reply #27 on: July 18, 2019, 06:47:51 AM »

It was only after I'd moved to NL that I discovered there was a Dutch band called The Outsiders (I'd bought the seriously tear-jerking "Girl In Love" by the US band of that name in 1966). Their 1968 album CQ (or C.Q., take your pick) is listed among my friend's "Wasn't Impressed With"s, although she describes two tracks, "Wish You Were Here With Me Today" (linked here) and "I Love You No. 2", as good. Assuming my spies have been doing their job properly, the lineup for this album is Wally Tax (vocals), Ronnie Splinter (guitar), Frank Beek (bass guitar) and Leendert "Buzz" Busch (drums). Actually I have CQ lined up for late night/early morning listening--it gets rave reviews, not what I'd expected at all. So I'm intrigued. Grin

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-ZBFYehg4Y



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Outsiders_(Dutch_band)
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« Reply #28 on: July 21, 2019, 05:38:56 AM »

Actually I have CQ lined up for late night/early morning listening--it gets rave reviews, not what I'd expected at all. So I'm intrigued. Grin

Curious album ^^, a bit on the uneven side. I most liked the one I linked (obviously), the noise-heavy "Doctor" and the driving "Happyville" (for harmonica fans only).

Now, I remember Chimera's unsettling cover being a subject of discussion across the road. I listened to this album all the way through yesterday and I'd say it's top-notch in all departments, not least in terms of sound quality. Lisa Bankoff and Francesca Garnett's two-part voicings are particularly strong.

The Youtube blurb is confusing. According to the sleeve notes, both Lisa and Francesca sing on all tracks except "Sad Song For Winter", which features just Lisa.

This is the opening track, "Come Into The Garden", followed by the goofy "Interlude #1":  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4g4teAExNoM



http://time-has-told-me.blogspot.com/2006/09/chimera-uk-acid-folkbaroque.html
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« Reply #29 on: August 03, 2019, 02:05:01 AM »

Some years ago I discovered this take on Richard Strauss's Also Sprach Zarathustra and posted it at a now-defunct forum. I rediscovered it last night with a lucky spell of googling and here it is again (now on two forums for safety's sake).

I remember giving the debut album by Ars Nova a brief listen in a record shop in 1968--it was on Elektra so I was immediately intrigued. I gave up after two or three tracks--it was too eclectic for my tastes in those days (and perhaps too frivolous). So I never got as far as "Zarathustra".

It seems this album and 2001: A Space Odyssey were released pretty well simultaneously so there was little question of the Kubrick film being an influence. As if to confirm this, the Ars Nova track includes a bizarre passage from Strauss's work that is nowhere to be found in Kubrick's OST, namely the twelve-tone "Of Science" fugue (here at 0:32; see the Strauss link).

This album by Ars Nova never made my friend's lists, probably because, being somewhat out on a limb, there were no YouTube comments that would have led her to it. Fifty years later, I can appreciate it more than I did then, having mellowed with age (or something). "Zarathustra" was the last track on side one of the original LP:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1RzNgjWg2Zw



http://therockasteria.blogspot.com/2017/10/ars-nova-ars-nova-1968-us-magnificent.html [please read but don't click on any links on this page!]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Also_sprach_Zarathustra

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« Reply #30 on: August 04, 2019, 04:11:42 AM »

Lacewing's lone 1971 album is tucked away towards the end of CB's "Wasn't Impressed With"s. She didn't single out "Paradox" as the standout track, which it most definitely is. It's understandable, as a gruelling three-year session of listening to some 300 albums would probably become more of an ordeal than a pleasure towards the end. It certainly shows stamina!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQKTs4JZsZA



http://badcatrecords.com/BadCat/LACEWING.htm

I must add that it was great fun going through these lists (for my own pleasure), standardizing the layout and checking dates and spelling. And most informative!
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« Reply #31 on: September 17, 2019, 02:42:32 AM »

One of the few UK albums I bought in the 1960s was Family's Music in a Doll's House. I'd heard many of its tracks on John Peel's radio show and was astonished by the sheer variety, something that (in ny view at least) successive Family albums failed to deliver. I used to take the needle off after "Voyage" (my favourite track) but these days I can appreciate the qualities of its two (on CD three) successors. I've linked "Peace Of Mind" as well because of the subtle transition between it and "Voyage" (here at 2:20), which has largely been lost in uploads of "Voyage" alone.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHFru3rfxK8



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Music_in_a_Doll%27s_House
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