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Author Topic: Sundazed: Albums from the Golden Age of Popular Music  (Read 475 times)
JK
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« on: May 21, 2019, 07:29:22 AM »

This topic takes its name from "a saintly label that makes it their business to rerelease amazing but forgotten albums". It takes its cue from this list (a true labour of love) and this commentary, which is where the above quote comes from. Unlike the blogger, I was in my teens and twenties during the years 1966-1975. So many of the names in her list were familiar to me although many of the actual albums were not. For me it has been a fascinating trip of discovery and rediscovery down... well, Memory Lane is perhaps a misnomer but you get the idea. My grateful thanks to that lovely person for dozens of hours of listening pleasure!

First up, for many reasons, is a track from the 1968 album The United States of America. Out of many I love on this album, "Cloud Song" is probably my favourite. "Blissed out" is an overused cliché but never was it more apposite than here. And I'm a sucker for wordless sung lines--they often say more than the lyrics!  

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Yqr4UK41GM



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_United_States_of_America_(album)
« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 04:26:55 AM by JK » Logged

JK
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« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2019, 05:36:03 AM »

Not sure whether I'll always be doing this but for the moment at least I shall work my way down this wondrous list.

I used to own Love's Forever Changes on vinyl for a while but never really warmed to it (unlike their debut and side one of Da Capo). Forever evidently does change because now I think it's a thing of wonder, every song a gem. This is "Andmoreagain", an Arthur Lee composition and the first track to be committed to tape:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b9vfx72gqvI



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forever_Changes
« Last Edit: May 27, 2019, 04:25:16 AM by JK » Logged

JK
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« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2019, 01:48:47 AM »

Out of all the "Keepers", I shall forever associate Gandalf with my blogger friend. In some ways it's an unlikely candidate for a list of psychedelic albums--eight of the ten songs are covers, including the seriously non-psychedelic likes of "Scarlet Ribbons". But it works wonderfully well--and the cover is stunning in itself. I know this is her favourite track, "Can You Travel In The Dark Alone":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WRlCXFUoT7Y



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gandalf_(American_band)
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JK
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« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2019, 04:22:58 AM »

Brainticket's Cottonwoodhill is another highly original psychedelic album I would never have come across if it weren't for the many hours my blogger friend diligently spent scouring YouTube looking for gems like this. The album opens with the stunning "Black Sand". And the quality never lets up! Roll Eyes

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HjC_V-P3Ndg



http://www.progarchives.com/album.asp?id=3608
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JK
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« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2019, 05:40:08 AM »

A complete switch of style and mood now. Bonnie Dobson is probably best known for writing "Morning Dew", astonishingly her first ever composition. From her self-titled 1969 album this is the closing track, "Winter's Going":

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvoDy0yTEyQ



http://rockasteria.blogspot.com/2019/03/bonnie-dobson-bonnie-dobson-1969-canada.html
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JK
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« Reply #5 on: May 30, 2019, 06:19:15 AM »

Tangerine Dream is the 1967 debut album by Kaleidoscope, the UK band that later changed its name to Fairfield Parlour. I remember from my first encounter with this album at PSF (thank you again, my friend) that my favourite track was the wonderfully named "[Further Reflections] In The Room Of Percussion" ("My god, the spiders are everywhere..."):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UbF4yslRhy4



I see Tangerine Dream is now held in the highest esteem and has been compared to the likes of The Piper at the Gates Of Dawn. I also recall being impressed with Fairfield Parlour's 1970 album From Home to Home.

http://www.vcn.bc.ca/~htmlsig/peter.htm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kaleidoscope_(UK_band)
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JK
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« Reply #6 on: June 01, 2019, 06:52:57 AM »

Tim Hollier should be much better known than is the case. His stunning if criminally unknown 1968 album Message to a Harlequin features its arranger "John Cameron on harpsichord, organ and piano, Harold McNair on flute, Danny Thompson on bass and Tony Carr on drums, and Tim sings and wrote the songs--this makes for a colourful combination of instruments which give the album a ‘folky’, baroque feel."

This is the hypnotic title track, "a fantastic display of psychedelic acid-folk, with dreamy lyrics, 'by the silver palace tower in the wild sunlight swaying… in his robes of silk and satin, trimmed with juniper and lime, he tells his timeless story to the quiet of the mind,' transporting the listener to a pre-raphaelite, Arthurian world, smothered in a psychedelic haze." [Source]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DiFdxC6wsfM



I see the opening sentence in the article by Melanie Xulu quoted above is: "Would recommend if you’re a fan of: Tim Buckley, Pat Kilroy, Bonnie Dobson, Wendy & Bonnie, Chrysalis, Donovan". That makes sense. Wink
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« Reply #7 on: June 03, 2019, 06:05:56 AM »

One of the most unlikely candidates for psych rock fame is Dantalion's Chariot, who mere months earlier had been called Zoot Money's Big Roll Band and played the soul-struttin' likes of this:     

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxgVlcKgkCU

"Big Time Operator" (which I remember well) was Zoot's biggest hit, reaching #25 in the UK in July 1966. (Interestingly, both bands included future Police guitarist Andy Summers.) 

All the music on Chariot Rising was recorded in 1967 (the year of the Roundhouse/U.F.O. poster) but the album was compiled 29 years later. It's among the "Not Impressed With"s in my blogger friend's list of obscure psychedelic albums, of which she says the "last two tracks are good". I listened to it all the way through just now and I disagree (it happens)--my two choices are the album's single and opening track, the UK psychedelic classic "Madman Running Through The Fields", and "Soma", a sitar guitar and flute fuelled instrumental. I've linked the entire album as the blurb is most illuminating. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CUgDeTH1p6o



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dantalian%27s_Chariot
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JK
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« Reply #8 on: June 05, 2019, 02:02:22 PM »

I couldn't remember anything about this self-titled 1968 album by Ivory (I can't believe I skipped it last year) so I listened to it again tonight. Ivory is a trio (see below) so would be cool to learn who played bass and drums--maybe this will come to light some time. I must admit much of it is a little too Airplaney for my liking, although I do like "Free And Easy", "Laugh" and the stunning closer, the piano and fuzz guitar heavy "Grey November" (maybe the rest of the album will grow on me):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2ooMUHva0E



This blurb comes from near the bottom of a long page so it's more practical to reproduce it here (I won't make a habit of this!):

"Ivory is one of those fascinating California rock bands that seemed to spontaneously materialize in the heady psychedelic days of late '60s, making a brief but outstanding impression before just as quickly fading along with its music into the headless 1970s, never to be heard from again. Most such artists rarely merit rescuing from obscurity, but Ivory is one of the few that deserves what little belated acclaim might come its way in the era of CD reissue.

"Guitarist and songwriter Ken Thomure spent his high-school years playing in any number of amateur and semi-professional combos with friend, classmate, and keyboardist Mike McCauley in Boron, CA, a town situated next door to Edwards Air Force Base about 90 miles outside Los Angeles. Their various aggregates played military clubs, teen hangouts, schools, battle-of-bands, and just about anywhere else that would have them. Upon graduation, the duo decided to move to Hollywood together to give the music business a shot. By chance, while hitchhiking, they ran into Chris Christman on the Sunset Strip one day shortly after arriving, and asked her, partly on the basis of her blonde good looks, to audition for them. As it turned out, she was also a burgeoning songwriter and vocalist of considerable, Grace Slick-like skill. The newly formed trio moved into a downtown loft with a group of art students and made its living playing nearby small clubs in the Hollywood and Santa Monica areas, as well as throwing occasional "rent parties" by enlisting a number of other bands to play and help publicize the events. This makeshift apprenticeship in enterprise led to the formation of a legitimate production company and offers for out-of-town concerts.

"Ivory began landing auditions and were hired to create the soundtrack for an underground film. The band also earned a recording contract and, under the tutelage of well-known producers Al Schmitt and Les Brown Jr., recorded the Ivory album, a dead ringer for fellow Schmitt-production the Jefferson Airplane. This brought the band an agent and bigger concerts and gigs, including an appearance on The Tonight Show. Ivory's first promotional tour took them to almost every city in Colorado. It also, however, turned out to be the band's only tour. Upon the trio's return to Los Angeles, McCauley was drafted, sent to Vietmam, and wounded, in effect, breaking up Ivory. Christman did make a solo album in the early '70s, but then married and moved out of state. Thomure and McCauley dropped out of music altogether but continued to play together occasionally."

Source: http://fantasy0807.blogspot.com/2008/04/june-2007-pt2.html
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« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2019, 03:36:44 AM »

In 1967, NYC quintet The Third Bardo paid a one-off visit to the studio where they recorded six tracks, including a criminally underexposed single, "Five Years Ahead Of My Time" (love those triplets!). And then they broke up. In 2000 (and again in 2018) Sundazed released everything from that session on a 10" EP. Two other tracks from it I'd recommend are "Lose Your Mind" (here at 7:05) and "I Can Understand Your Problem" (11:50). All good stuff, once again thanks to my blogger friend. Smiley

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TrnQCE8ksbI



https://www.discogs.com/The-Third-Bardo-Im-Five-Years-Ahead-Of-My-Time-5/release/11813793

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Third_Bardo
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« Reply #10 on: June 09, 2019, 12:17:40 PM »

This is the first of two PSF posts I wisely copied to my "hobby" forum before PSF died:

The mysterious Garrett Lund released just one solo album. This is the opening track from Almost Grown, a gem entitled "The Only Turnaround". There's something magical about the three-bar pattern in 3/4 metre, best noted in the solo. Great guitar work all round from the late Jimmy Jerviss:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oqRRHeZbG-U

Since then (March 2018), I've learned a little more about the man:



"Bruce Robertson aka Garrett Lund was and still is a mysterious person. In the early ‘70s he was singer in the L.A. group The Caretakers.
"From what is known, he was born in the early ‘50s. His father deserted Garrett and his mother before he was born and in his teens his beloved mother died. Garrett’s audition and acceptance as a member of The Caretakers, was a step up from his first local band to evolved into Trane, and became an instant success, playing the southwest of the US.
"Trane appeared at numerous rock festivals and large clubs, opening for Led Zeppelin, Cream, Eric Burdon & The Animals, Jefferson Airplane and The Who. Almost immediately Trane was headlining their own sold-out shows. What happened then is unclear, except that Garrett began a solo career and three years after Trane completed Almost Grown which was promptly rejected by 22 record labels. [!!!]
"Convinced that the album could and should be an artistic and commercial success, Garrett’s manager/producer, along with friends and family, set out to independently release Almost Grown with the help of record promoter, John Holcomb, succeeded in achieving rotation on nine radio stations and selling 2000 units in less than two weeks. Armed with the independently released success, the record companies were once again given the chance to sign Garrett and once again they passed. Since then, there's virtually no information on Almost Grown or Garrett Lund until 2001." [Source]

http://rockasteria.blogspot.nl/2011/05/garrett-lund-almost-grown-1975-us.html
 
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JK
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« Reply #11 on: June 12, 2019, 07:51:31 AM »

This is another that was first posted at PSF and (happily) a second time at my "hobby" forum:  

1970 was the year Kapp Records released Parallelograms by Linda Perhacs. It's not surprising if it means nothing to you--the album sank without a trace. In a just world, it would been hailed as a masterpiece. Luckily, it is getting more attention now. Thanks to my blogger friend (again) for showering us PSF'ers with amazing obscure stuff from the late '60s, early '70s. This is the title track (check out Linda's BB connection at her wiki page).

The lineup on this track would appear to be as follows (new information I found today):

Linda Perhacs--vocals, guitar, electronic effects
Leonard Rosenman--electronic effects
Steve Cohn--lead guitar
John Neufield--flute
Milt Holland and Shelley Mann--percussion
[Source]

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z9VbJmbtMW8



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linda_Perhacs
« Last Edit: June 12, 2019, 12:53:29 PM by JK » Logged

JK
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« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2019, 02:22:23 AM »

This is arguably the last one to be lifted (verbatim in this case) from my "hobby forum" (23 April 2018):

Here's a track from a band whose name would probably have put me off ever dipping into, had it not been mentioned in a PSF topic dedicated to obscure albums from the late '60s, early '70s. Mom's Apple Pie do this great cover of Etta James's "I Just Wanna Make Love To You", which still features in my former band's repertoire (in a medley with "Born To Be Wild"). Another great track on their debut album is "Lay Your Money Down". Thank you, that person. Smiley

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkHF-Cb4QlM



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mom%27s_Apple_Pie
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« Reply #13 on: June 17, 2019, 06:34:52 AM »

Speaking of Brainticket and "highly original psychedelic albums", have you listened to "Edge of Time" by Dom? I think it's one of the best headtrips out there.

Also nice to see Garrett Lund! Some of it is a bit too pro-sounding and not far out enough for my taste, but a few of the songs are right up there with the best of Michael Angelo's 1977 LP!
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« Reply #14 on: June 17, 2019, 12:16:08 PM »

Speaking of Brainticket and "highly original psychedelic albums", have you listened to "Edge of Time" by Dom? I think it's one of the best headtrips out there.

Also nice to see Garrett Lund! Some of it is a bit too pro-sounding and not far out enough for my taste, but a few of the songs are right up there with the best of Michael Angelo's 1977 LP!

Hi, hb. Wow, I see you've been away for six years! Welcome back. Smiley

Thanks for the tip. I have Edge of Time lined up for late-night/early-morning listening. Wink

Glad you like the Garrett L album. If you have any more suggestions, fire away. And don't be afraid to link the videos and any information you think is relevant.
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« Reply #15 on: June 18, 2019, 07:01:36 AM »

Thanks for the tip. I have Edge of Time lined up for late-night/early-morning listening. Wink

I gave the four official tracks a listen last night. I'm afraid I couldn't warm to the album. It's not that I've got anything against "Krautrock"--I love Popol Vuh, for example. Perhaps one needs to indulge in psychs or weed to appreciate it--and I'm an abstainer in both departments. Grin

While at YouTube I did notice this self-titled album by Five Day Rain. Unlike Dom, this one is on my friend's list, in the "Worth Another Listen" section. And it's a great listen so far. "Rough Cut Marmalade" (I can relate to the title alone!) is an eleven-minute guitar-fuelled instrumental:   

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KfNh_6liNao



http://www.silentstudios.org.uk/page2fdr.htm
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« Reply #16 on: Yesterday at 03:11:25 AM »

From Within (1969) isn't in my friend's list either. (I'll get back to her selections after this--promise!) I saw Sapphire Thinkers mentioned in a YouTube comment on the Five Day Rain album so I followed it up. The standout feature of this "West Coast sunny psych" band is the distinctive vocal harmonizing, shown off to full effect in "I Got To You"--some stunning harmonic progressions in there. The entire album is worth checking out. They've been compared to the Airplane but they are very much their own band, to these ears at least.

The link is most informative but don't click on anything while you're there!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u7X4_PWe-YE



http://therockasteria.blogspot.com/2012/10/sapphire-thinkers-from-within-1968-us.html
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