gfxgfx
 
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
logo
 
gfx gfx
gfx
649704 Posts in 25975 Topics by 3702 Members - Latest Member: GV August 21, 2019, 02:20:17 AM
*
gfx*HomeHelpSearchCalendarLoginRegistergfx
gfxgfx
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.       « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Echo in the Canyon (New documentary w/ Brian interview)  (Read 3898 times)
“Big Daddy”
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 326



View Profile
« Reply #25 on: June 05, 2019, 05:48:52 PM »

Just saw the film, pretty solid watch. As noted, there is a nice segment of the film dedicated to The Beach Boys/Brian, and they include a couple of clips from an interview Jakob did with Brian. They also brought Brian into the studio to play piano on “I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times” with Jakob and his backing band, although it’s unclear if any of the recording was used in the movie or the soundtrack, they quickly cut to different footage that didn’t have Brian there. If anyone picked up the soundtrack please report back if Brian is credited as playing on that version. Also, oddly enough, the film includes Roger McGuinn briefly recounting the story of “Ding Dang” which was pretty funny. Not sure it was an essential inclusion in the film but I appreciated it. Also at one point, Lou Adler takes credit for bringing an acetate of Pet Sounds to England and playing it to Andrew Loog-Oldham and Paul McCartney, which I don’t think I have heard offered up before.
Logged

For those who believe that Brian walks on water, I will always be the Antichrist.
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8684


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #26 on: June 06, 2019, 06:37:37 AM »

Just saw the film, pretty solid watch. As noted, there is a nice segment of the film dedicated to The Beach Boys/Brian, and they include a couple of clips from an interview Jakob did with Brian. They also brought Brian into the studio to play piano on “I Just Wasn’t Made For These Times” with Jakob and his backing band, although it’s unclear if any of the recording was used in the movie or the soundtrack, they quickly cut to different footage that didn’t have Brian there. If anyone picked up the soundtrack please report back if Brian is credited as playing on that version. Also, oddly enough, the film includes Roger McGuinn briefly recounting the story of “Ding Dang” which was pretty funny. Not sure it was an essential inclusion in the film but I appreciated it. Also at one point, Lou Adler takes credit for bringing an acetate of Pet Sounds to England and playing it to Andrew Loog-Oldham and Paul McCartney, which I don’t think I have heard offered up before.

That is true about Lou Adler, and it has been reported before. Adler himself took a copy over and played it for Paul at Andrew Loog-Oldham's place, then Kim Fowley and Keith Moon set up the listening session with McCartney AND Lennon, with that acetate copy delivered by Bruce, that has been well documented. So yes, Lou Adler had premiered it for Paul, and it had been reported previously.
« Last Edit: June 06, 2019, 06:38:33 AM by guitarfool2002 » Logged

"All of us have the privilege of making music that helps and heals - to make music that makes people happier, stronger, and kinder. Don't forget: Music is God's voice." - Brian Wilson
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8684


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #27 on: July 22, 2019, 11:33:08 AM »

First, apologies that this thread somehow got locked, for no reason. No clue how that happened but it's open again.

I finally saw the film in a theater yesterday, and would recommend everyone go see it while it's in the theaters (check your local independent and arthouse type theaters, I don't think it's on any theater chains' billings), or catch it when it comes out on streaming or DVD, etc.  It's a very interesting journey through some great music and musicians.

I thought it felt a little short, especially in how they focused in on only a few musicians from the scene, while leaving out others, but that's as much a time limitation as it could have been artists refusing to appear. I don't know. But what was there was pretty good. Plenty of time devoted to the Byrds, Buffalo Springfield, CSN (with all three giving interviews, kind of sad to see Crosby and Nash still separated by their feud).

McGuinn's story about "Ding Dang" brought out one of the biggest laughs from the crowd.

I won't give spoilers, but another laugh came when Brian told Jakob Dylan "you're in the wrong key!" after Dylan told Brian how they had been running down the tune before Brian arrived at the piano. Then Brian told them to play it in E or E-flat, whatever key you guys are doing it...

It is always great to see Brian interviewed for projects like this. Throughout the film, quite a few nods of appreciation and respect are given to Brian and what he was doing with The Beach Boys. As much as Brian's sounds and the BB's pretty much planted the seed for this scene, the credit for planting that seed seemed to go as much to The Byrds, which is true in terms of "folk rock" and poetry in rock/pop but not entirely their credit.

One example: "Mr Tambourine Man", which obviously changed the game a bit with a Rickenbacker 12-string sonic hook from McGuinn taking the idea after seeing George Harrison playing one in Hard Day's Night and Dylan's poetry set to a "rock beat"...but that very same rock beat was in McGuinn's own admission through the years taken from Brian's "Don't Worry Baby". Listen to the two grooves, and also listen to a lot of the hits Hal Blaine used that same beat to drive the song...That was Brian's DWB groove driving the grooves. It would have been nice to spend 15 seconds pointing that out in this film. The Byrd's breakthrough hit owed its pulse and groove to DWB and Brian.

A cool scene that gets cut in and out of throughout is Jakob, Beck, Regina Spektor, and Cat Power sitting around a coffee table piled high with classic albums. Among those on the table are Pet Sounds, Smiley Smile, and the Smile Sessions box set...along with titles from the Springfield, Byrds, and even More Of The Monkees! I wonder if there are outtakes where they talk more about those albums piled up on that table, even though Pet Sounds did get more screen time and much deserved accolades.

For fans of studios and classic sessions, yes they did discover and screen parts of that Mamas And Papas session filmed at Western #3, as described in a Universal Audio company newsletter and used for an ABC-TV special. And yes, there they are in Western 3 cutting a record, with Hal and Tommy Tedesco and all others in full color working in Western 3 just as it looked when Brian was cutting there.

*That* bit of film from the TV special needs a full release! Very, very cool to see more of what has previously come out in dribs and drabs.

And there are some nice shots of people like Lou Adler coming back to Western 3 and other rooms, talking about the records they made there.

The music was good in terms of the remakes, but some of the liberties the artists took with the melodies, especially Brian's melodies, can be a little jarring. Not bad, but there is that element of not messing with perfection in play when listening.

I do wish they had included Flo & Eddie or even Chip Douglas in the film, since one of the lead singles on the soundtrack was "You Showed Me", and The Turtles have a very big footprint on that scene as we all know. But for whatever reasons, they weren't included.

I'll have to stop there, otherwise I'll describe the whole film.

But...stay through the end credits, you'll see Neil Young doing something that I found very emotional and joyous, a neat end to the film. Neil is featured a lot but has no modern interview segments at all, except for what happens at the end credits. It's bittersweet and joyous at the same time...Neil doing what we all want to do as we get older with the sheer joy of playing music like no one is watching. I'll leave it there.  Smiley

Also bittersweet to see Tom Petty in some of the final appearances he ever made on camera, Tom is above all a big fan and a music lover as we discussed when he passed away: He talks like a lot of us talk about this music, and how much it means to him. It's infectious, and he knows it all. One highlight was Tom describing seeing The Beach Boys and Buffalo Springfield together on tour, and thinking this is the best a concert can get...Hard to disagree with the man.  Smiley  Also funny to hear him explain how "Rickenbacker" should be pronounced.

See the film when you can. It's very cool.



Logged

"All of us have the privilege of making music that helps and heals - to make music that makes people happier, stronger, and kinder. Don't forget: Music is God's voice." - Brian Wilson
Don Malcolm
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 801



View Profile
« Reply #28 on: July 22, 2019, 12:02:52 PM »

Seconding GF's fine review, definitely a feel-good film made with love and respect, even if those young folks are a little vapid when they sit around discussing those LPs as if they are from the Jurassic period or something. As always their odd lack of articulation is more than compensated for by the voluble David Crosby, who can be seen here warming up for his own documentary (which will be out shortly).
Logged
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8684


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #29 on: July 22, 2019, 12:09:57 PM »

Seconding GF's fine review, definitely a feel-good film made with love and respect, even if those young folks are a little vapid when they sit around discussing those LPs as if they are from the Jurassic period or something. As always their odd lack of articulation is more than compensated for by the voluble David Crosby, who can be seen here warming up for his own documentary (which will be out shortly).

Thanks Don, and yes despite some of the flaws there is the undercurrent of love and respect along with the effort of trying to get younger listeners in the YouTube generation to check out some of this amazing music and these artists. It is a very reverential film to those classic songs and artists without being too sappy or turning into a lecture. Very cool experience overall, although I can't wait to see the outtakes!  Grin
« Last Edit: July 22, 2019, 12:13:12 PM by guitarfool2002 » Logged

"All of us have the privilege of making music that helps and heals - to make music that makes people happier, stronger, and kinder. Don't forget: Music is God's voice." - Brian Wilson
guitarfool2002
Global Moderator
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 8684


"Barba non facit aliam historici"


View Profile WWW
« Reply #30 on: July 23, 2019, 08:09:36 AM »

Reminded of this by the thread just started on Terry Melcher, but the film does spend a convincing amount of time focusing on The Byrds, specifically Mr Tambourine Man, as one of the hallmark recordings that changed the game, bringing poetry and the new folk-rock scene into the Top-10 singles charts and therefore the public consciousness. Yet unless I missed the references, they barely mention Terry Melcher's contributions as producer to those hallmark Byrds singles that became smash hits.

Just thinking out loud how it may have been a more accurate balance if they had leveled up McGuinn's credits with Melcher's and given Terry more screen mentions, since ultimately they both were responsible for bringing *that sound* to one of Dylan's folk songs in order to get it on the radio and in the charts. I'd wager if Terry were not producing those early Byrds hits, they would not have had the same impact. I doubt they would have done what they did with McGuinn's Rickenbacker sonically if they had an old-school staff producer on those sessions, for one example.
Logged

"All of us have the privilege of making music that helps and heals - to make music that makes people happier, stronger, and kinder. Don't forget: Music is God's voice." - Brian Wilson
CenturyDeprived
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 4873



View Profile
« Reply #31 on: July 23, 2019, 10:42:03 AM »

Recently saw this documentary and I absolutely loved it.

Side note, which will tie back into The BBs:

I also recently saw the new David Crosby documentary, and it's mindblowingly good. Crosby is so, so honest and brutally real in discussing his failings and how he acted like a dick; it's mighty brave of him to do so, and I'm sure he'll get a bunch of new fans or at least people (like me) who were already casual fans, but are now more incentivized to want to seek out his past works and learn more about the guy and his music.

Bravo to Cameron Crowe for being a part of such a film that just has such a real point of view. Crosby talks about how many people he worked with don't like him, how he's made enemies, etc. But of course, the film is not just a piece of work to discuss Crosby's failings, it wisely balances positives and negatives without seeming like a propaganda piece in any way, shape, or form. Crosby did not have final cut over the film, but apparently after being initially bugged by the released cut, Crosby has made peace with it and is enjoying people being newly fascinated by him and his work.

I could not help but think that it's a damn shame that no film like this has been made about Mike Love. Love him or hate him (or somewhere between), the ins and outs of Mike's massive amount of touring is certainly something that would make for interesting documentary material. The Crosby film goes into lots of little nuts and bolts of what Crosby has to deal with day to day health-wise, how he has to make tough decisions on when/how he is going to tour at this age, etc., and I have to think that while Mike's story would undoubtedly be different, there's got to be a lot of very interesting material that could make for a great documentary, especially if Mike opened up about his past regrets in the manner that Crosby did, and if Mike also relinquished any notion of having final cut over such as doc.

I feel as though this will never, ever happen, but damn if it isn't a missed opportunity because Mike could really benefit from something like this if he'd be even half as open/honest/real as Crosby is in the Crosby doc.
« Last Edit: July 23, 2019, 10:43:05 AM by CenturyDeprived » Logged
Juice Brohnston
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 580



View Profile
« Reply #32 on: July 23, 2019, 03:41:58 PM »

Reminded of this by the thread just started on Terry Melcher, but the film does spend a convincing amount of time focusing on The Byrds, specifically Mr Tambourine Man, as one of the hallmark recordings that changed the game, bringing poetry and the new folk-rock scene into the Top-10 singles charts and therefore the public consciousness. Yet unless I missed the references, they barely mention Terry Melcher's contributions as producer to those hallmark Byrds singles that became smash hits.

Just thinking out loud how it may have been a more accurate balance if they had leveled up McGuinn's credits with Melcher's and given Terry more screen mentions, since ultimately they both were responsible for bringing *that sound* to one of Dylan's folk songs in order to get it on the radio and in the charts. I'd wager if Terry were not producing those early Byrds hits, they would not have had the same impact. I doubt they would have done what they did with McGuinn's Rickenbacker sonically if they had an old-school staff producer on those sessions, for one example.

So if you take what you are saying here, and cross reference your earlier comments about Don't Worry Baby also adding to the propulsion of the Byrds sound, and of course, the relationship of Terry and Brian pre dating it all, does the Melcher influence loom even larger??
Logged
juggler
Smiley Smile Associate
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 520


View Profile
« Reply #33 on: July 23, 2019, 11:26:33 PM »

Saw the film back in early June.  Walked out of the theater thinking, how do you make this film and basically ignore the role of Terry Melcher?   Terry was right at the center of that scene and was a link between many of the groups featured.  A 4-5 minute segment about Terry would have been a lot more relevant to the film than the Ding-Dang anecdote.

Nice to see the Smile box set get a cameo, though, when the Gen Xers were leafing through classic albums.
Logged
gfx
Pages: 1 [2] Go Up Print 
gfx
Jump to:  
gfx
Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2015, Simple Machines Page created in 0.097 seconds with 21 queries.
Helios Multi design by Bloc
gfx
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!