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Author Topic: The 'Caribou' Album (1973-1975) Compilation Mix  (Read 1426 times)
shangaijoeBB
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« on: March 21, 2019, 06:32:48 PM »

As some of you might know, im' a big fan of this mostly unheard era of the group. This "missing link" unknown period between "Holland" and "15 Big Ones" is really fascinating. A while ago, I wondered why Rhino Handmade hasn't focused on a release of this yet.

So then, I made my own compilation from these sessions. I started working on this after completing my fan mix of the fake 1975 LP California Feeling (which you can find easily if you search a bit here). I wanted to recreate an early 1975 album with only (mostly) mixes from this era.

Maybe by 2024 or 2025, we'll get a similar release. But maybe we'll never get to hear songs like "Clangin","Why Don't You Try Me?", "Earthquake Time", "Don't Let Me Go", "You're Riding High On The Music", "Our Life, Our Love, Our Land and "Just An Imitation"...

So, I decided to use all the main available booted sessions from 73 to 75 to construct the "main album", while adding little bonus tracks from the same era at the end. Since the original LP was supposed to be released in early 1975, I didn't include later sessions from that year like "Back Home", "Carl's Song", "Everyone's In Love With You".
 
Anyway, here it is if you want a listen and my little comments for each tracks:

https://soundcloud.com/labriel-olvrette/the-beach-boys-the-caribou-album-unreleased-1973-1975



THE BEACH BOYS - THE LOST CARIBOU ALBUM ('73-'75)

1. Good Timing (Partial Mix) - Best mono mix of this I found on the Beach Boys Anthology bootleg
2. The River Song (Early Mix) - See last track
3. Shortening Bread (Mono Mix) - All This Is That boot. Why mono? 'Cause the drum sound is so much more kick-ass! (yeah, the vocal is from 1977, so sue me!)
4. Battle Hymn Of the Republic (Unedited Take) - The infamous cover song found on Get The Boot vol.2. Though by many to be an horrible cover, I personally think it's a real funny take on the song with a quirky arrangement. Imo, it's not really all that different from a quirky song like "H.E.L.P. Is On The Way". Maybe it was a joke made on Mike Love, but I still get a kick out of that silly piccolo-esque synth. Brian was already moving toward the weirdness of "Love You".
5. Barnyard Blues - The MIC mix. Love this Dennis and Carl number!
6. Brian's Tune (Rollin' Up To Heaven) - The great jiggy22 cleaned-up remix found on Youtube

7. It's OK (Single Mix) - This original 45 mix (with vocals from 1976) from Ten Years of Harmony. Love that extra synth overdub!
8. Pacific Ocean Blues (Backing Track) - From boot. Personnally, I think Mike Love would have nailed the lead on this. Maybe even Carl!
9. My Love Lives On (Demo) - From MIC. Such a beautiful song. Such a shame this was never released back then...
10. Lucy Jones (Demo) - From California Feeling vol.2 and featuring Steve Kalinich on vocals. Not a great song per se, but hey it's a demo. A more, fully-fleshed track similar to "Marcella" with an Al vocal could have turned this into a great fun romp!
11. California Feelin' (Demo) - Featuring Brian in one of his last clear vocals, this demo from MIC is a great vocal coda before…
12. Holy Man (Backing Track) - This Dennis track would have been an amazing album closer, of course featuring a lovely lead vocal from Carl.

Total running time: 36 min

BONUS TRACKS

13. Child Of Winter ('74 Xmas single A-side) - Original 45 Mix from the 70s WB compilation The Works
14. Ding Dang ('74 Xmas single B-side) - The "alternate mix" from boots
15. Good Timing (Backing Track) - Unknown mix from Youtube
16. In The Back Of My Mind ('75 Version)
- This heartwrenching rendition from Brian, featuring his last pre-15 Big Ones voice, close the whole mix with an emotional bang.

***********************************************

Additional liner notes (by user Peerke from Hoffman board):


The Beach Boys were hot in 1974. They were even elected "Band of the Year" in Rolling Stone, in their end of the year poll. But it was entirely on the strength of their live show….

There was no new material released during that period. Not that they didn't try: not one, but two more unreleased Beach Boys albums were attempted.
And then there are contributions to other people's singles.

After Beach Boys manager Jack Reilly wanted to stay in Holland, he was replaced by James William Guercio, producer and founder of the band Chicago. Guercio had recently built Caribou Ranch, a recording studio in a converted barn on ranch property in the Rocky Mountains near Nederland, Colorado.

So, when Elton John recorded his Caribou album, in the studio, in January 1974, Carl Wilson and Bruce Johnston were asked to contribute backing vocals to 'Don't Let The Sun Go Down On Me'. The song is released as the first single of the album, on June 10, 1974 in the US and reached # 2 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Obviously, when The Beach Boys, in the Fall of 1974 attempt to record a new studio album, Caribou Ranch is a natural choice.

According to Mike, some 40 songs were recorded: “Brian is very involved with the album. We did two tracks of his before we left to go on tour and he did three tracks while we were away. I’ve written about ten songs, Carl about five, and Al’s done a couple.

I have this one song ‘Our Life, Our Love and Our Land’, it’s kind of an ethnic thing and has the feeling of ‘Trader’ from Holland. Al has this incredible thing about a landslide… There’s a Carl song, ‘Don’t Let Me Go’, which I wrote lyrics to… There’s a Brian song that is reminiscent of ’Surfer Girl’, called ‘Good Timing’. He also wrote another tune, which is very up and bouncy. The album’s a combination of Sunflower and Holland.”

But, the recordings were continued in the brand new Brothers Studio in Santa Monica. Engineers Steve Moffitt and Gordon Rudd have equipped it with the newest 24- and 16-tracks recording equipment. "When we got back [from Holland]", Steve Moffitt explained, "the equipment went into storage for about a year before Carl and Dennis asked me to help put Brother together. Since then it’s been a twenty-hour-a-day job for me.”

Dennis produces an early version of his 'River Song' with the band and Brian still has the wildest ideas. Mike recalls a proposition to record an album full of “helpful hints”. How to get dressed quicker: practise you can get your arm faster in and out of your sleeve. With a lot of practise you can gain valuable seconds when you're late for work… And how to avoid falling objects… "The whole thing was typed out one night. He stayed up all night, that’s the kind of guy he is – completely maniacal, humorous, just deadpan… How you put it into an album, I’ll never know.”

As time went by it leaked out that the sessions produced mostly incomplete tracks.

To quote by Andrew G. Doe, author of "The Complete Guide To The Music Of The Beach Boys":

"'Good Timin'' surfaced on L.A. (Light Album) in a revised form but based on the 1974 tape while 'Ding Dang' (also referred to as 'Rolling Up To Heaven') was released on The Beach Boys Love You, albeit in a completely re-recorded version.

A completely new (2001) recording of 'California Feelin'' appeared on the 2002 compilation The Beach Boys Classics Selected By Brian Wilson. The 1978 Carl Wilson-sung version was released on the Made In California boxset.

The legendary 'Battle Hymn Of The Republic' was included on an initial lineup of Endless Harmony - that is, until the compilers actually heard it, whereupon it was swiftly dropped. The charitable opinion is that Brian was having one of his musical jokes and making lead vocalist Mike look a complete idiot in the process: it is truly, truly awful."

After the sessions Ricky Fataar leaves the band, joining Joe Walsh's Barnstorm.

During the Caribou sessions, the band Chicago was recording the album Chicago VII in one of the other studios. It was a dream come true for Peter Cetera: "There's two people that I always wanted to be, and that was a Beatle or a Beach Boy. I got to meet the Beach Boys at various times and got to be good friends with Carl Wilson."

So Peter asked Alan, Carl & Dennis to contribute backing vocals to the bridge and chorus of one his songs: 'Wishing You Were Here'.
"'They said, 'Yeah, we'd love to,'' he recalls. "So, I got to do the background harmonies with Carl and Dennis (Wilson) and Alan Jardine. For a night, I was a Beach Boy."

The song is released as a single and becomes #11 on the Billboard hit list.

The members of the two bands seem to like each other, so James Guercio suggests a national tour.
From May to June 1975, the Chicago-Beach Boys tour filled stadiums from coast to coast. During 12-city SRO series of shows - the 'Beachago' tour, each band did a set before combining in a joint finale, where Chicago performs a few of their song ('Wishing You Were Here' and 'Saturday In The Park' with Beach Boys on backing vocals, while the Beach Boys perform four songs with the Chicago horn section ('God Only Knows', 'Darlin', 'California Girls' and 'Fun, Fun, Fun'.

The last two songs are a combined effort: 'Feelin' Stronger Every Day', is performed as a duet with lead vocals by Mike Love and James Pankow and 'Jumpin' Jack Flash' is sung by Mike Love. Occasionally Bobby Lamm sang 'Surf's Up'.

Several shows are recorded for a possible live album, that, regretfully, never was released. Perhaps it was felt that two live albums back to back were too much of a good thing.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2019, 06:35:31 PM by shangaijoeBB » Logged
HeyJude
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« Reply #1 on: March 22, 2019, 01:30:34 PM »

I'm all for highlighting and examining this time period, and I think it's fun to kick around various track lineups and theories.

But, this album lineup is a mess, and I'm saying this as someone who is probably more into post-Holland 70s and 80s material than the typical fan.

I don't think, had the band put together an album, say, at the end of 1974, that it would have been much like this. And as a compilation of unreleased material, it's not particularly flattering for the band. I'm more forgiving of "Battle Hymn" than most fans, but album material it ain't.

Rough mixes of the actual good songs don't really help their cause either.

I think the underlying material from a given era/album project has to *really* good to warrant including incomplete sections, reconstructions, etc. It's why "The Smile Sessions" works. But giving that same treatment of doing a hodge podge of demos, half-finished songs, rough mixes, etc. to somewhat wonky material, it just doesn't work as an actual release unto itself.

To be clear, I've been the loudest advocate around of moving past the 60s stuff and doing a huge dump of archival material from the 70s and 80s. I'd be happy to see all of this Caribou material as part of such an opening of the floodgates of the archives.

But an actual, boutique 1 or 2-CD set focusing on unreleased material would have to cast a wider, different net to not get raked over the coals critically.

I think even the post-KTSA 1980-1983 era produced more interesting unreleased material and various flotsam and jetsam.

As for why Rhino Handmade hasn't touched on BB material, it's surely to do with Brother owning the material, having varying levels of licensing deals with Capitol/UMe, and both Brother and Capitol not exactly being pro-active about releasing post-60s archival material.

Hopefully that changes and we get all of this material and more.
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« Reply #2 on: March 22, 2019, 04:06:36 PM »

Mark and Alan confirmed that they DON'T have "Earthquake Time", "Our Life, Our Love, Our Land", "Don't Let Me Go", "You're Riding High on the Music", and "Just an Imitation" in the vaults. They are either missing, destroyed, or they weren't ever recorded in the first place. Stephen Kalinich pretty much confirmed "You're Riding High on the Music" wasn't ever recorded. The only things Mark and Alan have in the vaults include "River Song" (the multi-tracks are missing though), "The Battle Hymn of the Republic", "Good Timin'", "Honeycomb", "Lucy Jones", "California Feelin'", "Barnyard Blues", and "Brian's Tune". "Clangin'" is from 1976 BTW, there's of course "Ding Dang" which was done a couple times in 1973 and 1974, as well as "Clang", which was rehearsed in 1976 (same session where Brian performed "I'm Bugged at My Ol' Man"), featuring the "mow mama yama holy hallelujah" lyrics. "Clang" is in the vaults, having been recently found by Mark and Alan a couple years ago.

* Also, that early 1975 session for "Pacific Ocean Blues" was for an incomplete, unused version that has never circulated on boots before. The one you have here, being the backing track for the version used on the album, wasn't started until Fall 1975, and wasn't completed until February of 1977. A lot of overdubs for "Holy Man" weren't added until late 1975-1976 as well.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2019, 04:15:06 PM by jiggy22 » Logged

Do happy happy happy Mission Pak singing sound!

My blog, where I post my original Beach Boys mixes and whatnot:
http://www.jiggy22.blogspot.com
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« Reply #3 on: March 23, 2019, 08:20:37 AM »

Mark and Alan confirmed that they DON'T have "Earthquake Time", "Our Life, Our Love, Our Land", "Don't Let Me Go", "You're Riding High on the Music", and "Just an Imitation" in the vaults. They are either missing, destroyed, or they weren't ever recorded in the first place. Stephen Kalinich pretty much confirmed "You're Riding High on the Music" wasn't ever recorded. The only things Mark and Alan have in the vaults include "River Song" (the multi-tracks are missing though), "The Battle Hymn of the Republic", "Good Timin'", "Honeycomb", "Lucy Jones", "California Feelin'", "Barnyard Blues", and "Brian's Tune". "Clangin'" is from 1976 BTW, there's of course "Ding Dang" which was done a couple times in 1973 and 1974, as well as "Clang", which was rehearsed in 1976 (same session where Brian performed "I'm Bugged at My Ol' Man"), featuring the "mow mama yama holy hallelujah" lyrics. "Clang" is in the vaults, having been recently found by Mark and Alan a couple years ago.

I definitely believe you about all this, but where/when did Mark and Alan confirm that "Just an Imitation" and others aren't in the vault?

Also, the Kalinich thing about "You're Riding High on the Music" makes a lot of sense, but when was this from? I haven't heard about this either.
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« Reply #4 on: March 24, 2019, 05:21:37 AM »

Thanks for sharing!
The boys certainly had some moment during this time, and Dennis was writing very interesting stuff. "My love lives on" could be one of the best unreleased things of any artists imo. I said this before, I could see that song as the ending music to a season finale of some TV series. What a great tune, so beautiful. Brings tears to my eyes.

Re: "California feeling", it sounds very strange with Brian's demo mixed in and at times very off key. Maybe you just put his "can you feel it?" phrase in (I like how that sounds) and let the rest of the group version untouched?


Anyway, if you need a picture of Dennis at the Caribou Ranch, I believe this comes from those sessions:


« Last Edit: March 24, 2019, 05:32:47 AM by Rocker » Logged

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« Reply #5 on: March 25, 2019, 04:58:52 AM »

Additional liner notes (by user Peerke from Hoffman board):


The Beach Boys were hot in 1974. They were even elected "Band of the Year" in Rolling Stone, in their end of the year poll. But it was entirely on the strength of their live show….

There was no new material released during that period. Not that they didn't try: not one, but two more unreleased Beach Boys albums were attempted.
And then there are contributions to other people's singles.

After Beach Boys manager Jack Reilly wanted to stay in Holland, he was replaced by James William Guercio, producer and founder of the band Chicago. Guercio had recently built Caribou Ranch, a recording studio in a converted barn on ranch property in the Rocky Mountains near Nederland, Colorado.

So, when Elton John recorded his Caribou album, in the studio, in January 1974, Carl Wilson and Bruce Johnston were asked to contribute backing vocals to 'Don't Let The Sun Go Down On Me'. The song is released as the first single of the album, on June 10, 1974 in the US and reached # 2 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Obviously, when The Beach Boys, in the Fall of 1974 attempt to record a new studio album, Caribou Ranch is a natural choice.

According to Mike, some 40 songs were recorded: “Brian is very involved with the album. We did two tracks of his before we left to go on tour and he did three tracks while we were away. I’ve written about ten songs, Carl about five, and Al’s done a couple.

I have this one song ‘Our Life, Our Love and Our Land’, it’s kind of an ethnic thing and has the feeling of ‘Trader’ from Holland. Al has this incredible thing about a landslide… There’s a Carl song, ‘Don’t Let Me Go’, which I wrote lyrics to… There’s a Brian song that is reminiscent of ’Surfer Girl’, called ‘Good Timing’. He also wrote another tune, which is very up and bouncy. The album’s a combination of Sunflower and Holland.”

But, the recordings were continued in the brand new Brothers Studio in Santa Monica. Engineers Steve Moffitt and Gordon Rudd have equipped it with the newest 24- and 16-tracks recording equipment. "When we got back [from Holland]", Steve Moffitt explained, "the equipment went into storage for about a year before Carl and Dennis asked me to help put Brother together. Since then it’s been a twenty-hour-a-day job for me.”

Dennis produces an early version of his 'River Song' with the band and Brian still has the wildest ideas. Mike recalls a proposition to record an album full of “helpful hints”. How to get dressed quicker: practise you can get your arm faster in and out of your sleeve. With a lot of practise you can gain valuable seconds when you're late for work… And how to avoid falling objects… "The whole thing was typed out one night. He stayed up all night, that’s the kind of guy he is – completely maniacal, humorous, just deadpan… How you put it into an album, I’ll never know.”

As time went by it leaked out that the sessions produced mostly incomplete tracks.

To quote by Andrew G. Doe, author of "The Complete Guide To The Music Of The Beach Boys":

"'Good Timin'' surfaced on L.A. (Light Album) in a revised form but based on the 1974 tape while 'Ding Dang' (also referred to as 'Rolling Up To Heaven') was released on The Beach Boys Love You, albeit in a completely re-recorded version.

A completely new (2001) recording of 'California Feelin'' appeared on the 2002 compilation The Beach Boys Classics Selected By Brian Wilson. The 1978 Carl Wilson-sung version was released on the Made In California boxset.

The legendary 'Battle Hymn Of The Republic' was included on an initial lineup of Endless Harmony - that is, until the compilers actually heard it, whereupon it was swiftly dropped. The charitable opinion is that Brian was having one of his musical jokes and making lead vocalist Mike look a complete idiot in the process: it is truly, truly awful."

After the sessions Ricky Fataar leaves the band, joining Joe Walsh's Barnstorm.

During the Caribou sessions, the band Chicago was recording the album Chicago VII in one of the other studios. It was a dream come true for Peter Cetera: "There's two people that I always wanted to be, and that was a Beatle or a Beach Boy. I got to meet the Beach Boys at various times and got to be good friends with Carl Wilson."

So Peter asked Alan, Carl & Dennis to contribute backing vocals to the bridge and chorus of one his songs: 'Wishing You Were Here'.
"'They said, 'Yeah, we'd love to,'' he recalls. "So, I got to do the background harmonies with Carl and Dennis (Wilson) and Alan Jardine. For a night, I was a Beach Boy."

The song is released as a single and becomes #11 on the Billboard hit list.

The members of the two bands seem to like each other, so James Guercio suggests a national tour.
From May to June 1975, the Chicago-Beach Boys tour filled stadiums from coast to coast. During 12-city SRO series of shows - the 'Beachago' tour, each band did a set before combining in a joint finale, where Chicago performs a few of their song ('Wishing You Were Here' and 'Saturday In The Park' with Beach Boys on backing vocals, while the Beach Boys perform four songs with the Chicago horn section ('God Only Knows', 'Darlin', 'California Girls' and 'Fun, Fun, Fun'.

The last two songs are a combined effort: 'Feelin' Stronger Every Day', is performed as a duet with lead vocals by Mike Love and James Pankow and 'Jumpin' Jack Flash' is sung by Mike Love. Occasionally Bobby Lamm sang 'Surf's Up'.

Several shows are recorded for a possible live album, that, regretfully, never was released. Perhaps it was felt that two live albums back to back were too much of a good thing.


Nice to see me quoted.
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« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2019, 10:58:07 AM »

Thank you for sharing.  That being said, this doesn't work for me.  A lot of these songs are sub-par to begin with and with most in uncompleted form it doesn't feel like an album at all.  We'll see what we get to work with in 2024.
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« Reply #7 on: March 28, 2019, 12:56:58 PM »

I think that they had the material to release an album in early 1975 if they went for a 20/20-style bits and bops sort of release. The recordings are available for this to be made into a genuine listening experience.

The 1975 album, titled Caribou (or whatever) would then look something like this.

Side A

River Song
Good Timin'
Hard Times
Barnyard Blues
Out In The Country
Carry Me Home

Side B

It's O.K.
Susie Cincinnati
We Got Love
Rainbows
Holy Man
Rolling Up To Heaven (hidden track)

It contains several songs featuring Blondie and Ricky, so a big question is if their material could legally be released by the band after they left. Also, no demo's (e.g. Lucy Jones, California Feelin) - only roughly completed songs. BONUS: NO BATTLEHYMN IN SIGHT!

I might also create a youtube clip for this what-if album!
« Last Edit: March 28, 2019, 01:04:35 PM by Cabinessenceking » Logged
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« Reply #8 on: March 28, 2019, 01:17:40 PM »

I dunno, while again I think it's always fun to throw out theories, trying to formulate a 1975 BB album is sort of like trying to figure out what a 2004 "Beach Boys" album would have been like by cobbling together Brian tracks from "Gettin' in Over My Head", Mike's 2004 solo material, a couple Paley tracks, some Al demos, and so on. In both cases, it's not reflective in any way of what an album would have sounded like.

We just don't have enough recorded material to do anything but a compilation of scraps that circulate from the era. This is due both to some extant tapes not circulating, and also because the band never undertook a full-blown recording of an album during that time. Like most any era of the band, especially in the 70s and 80s, they were always recording something somewhere. There's enough post-KTSA, pre-BB'85 material to cobble together a "1983 album" too, but it wouldn't at all reflect an actual album that would have been released.

So for stuff like a "1975 album", you end up with a nearly Mike-less album. Even "Love You" featured Mike more prominently.
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« Reply #9 on: March 28, 2019, 02:45:32 PM »

I dunno, while again I think it's always fun to throw out theories, trying to formulate a 1975 BB album is sort of like trying to figure out what a 2004 "Beach Boys" album would have been like by cobbling together Brian tracks from "Gettin' in Over My Head", Mike's 2004 solo material, a couple Paley tracks, some Al demos, and so on. In both cases, it's not reflective in any way of what an album would have sounded like.

We just don't have enough recorded material to do anything but a compilation of scraps that circulate from the era. This is due both to some extant tapes not circulating, and also because the band never undertook a full-blown recording of an album during that time. Like most any era of the band, especially in the 70s and 80s, they were always recording something somewhere. There's enough post-KTSA, pre-BB'85 material to cobble together a "1983 album" too, but it wouldn't at all reflect an actual album that would have been released.

So for stuff like a "1975 album", you end up with a nearly Mike-less album. Even "Love You" featured Mike more prominently.

Of course this type of album reconstruction is very challenging given that there was no concerted effort to actually record an album. We have these various other titles circulating around but next to nothing is known about them. However, I think the 20/20 album is a good comparison for a 1975 album, itself being a mix of purposefully recorded songs, some Smile fragments, a Manson collaboration, various covers and a Wild Honey outtake.

For the 1975 album the confirmed titles available from the 1974 sessions at the Caribou ranch and in L.A are Good Timin', It's O.K., California Feelin', Ding Dang, Holy Man, Barnyard Blues and Battlehymn. Rainbows and Pacific Ocean Blues (early versions) were recorded in 1975. Hard Times, We Got Love, River Song were almost completed in 1972/1973 and certainly warranted release. They even toured with the two latter ones in their set lists in 1973. Reusing the 1969 outtakes Susie Cincinnati or Back Home is reasonable to assume as a similar decision was made for the 15 Big Ones (where both appeared) and Love You albums ("Good Time"). I do think that having Out In The Country included on a 1975 album is a stretch.

Regarding songwriting distribution; it's clear Dennis was the prominent creative force during this period, but Mike is represented by his songwriting on "It's O.K." and "We Got Love". Al doesn't have much because his songwriting during this period is undocumented at this point. This is why he would be represented by something like "Susie" provided he didn't contribute fresher material. Mike mentioned a Holland meets Sunflower sound in an interview from this period.

The real misfortune is that Carl doesn't have more leads from this period. I believe I read somewhere he did a scratch vocal for "Holy Man"? Perhaps the group would've rerecorded the leads for the Blondie songs since he had long since departed the group? Brian's involvement at this point would not be counted on.
« Last Edit: March 29, 2019, 02:13:42 AM by Cabinessenceking » Logged
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« Reply #10 on: April 01, 2019, 05:11:53 PM »

What you see as sh*t I see as art. What you think is BW's descend into madness following the death of Murry is to me a extremely fascinating glimpse into the unknown of the human psyche. Pretty much like Love You, it is "Art Brut". DW was also hitting his peak as an artist.

I love this period, that I why I wanted to share this here, because I find artistic value in it even if im' alone in this. If someone like John Cale would have released something as weird as "Shortenin' Bread" back then, it would have become an art rock classic. To each his own, I suppose...cheers!
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« Reply #11 on: April 02, 2019, 10:50:33 AM »

What you see as sh*t I see as art. What you think is BW's descend into madness following the death of Murry is to me a extremely fascinating glimpse into the unknown of the human psyche. Pretty much like Love You, it is "Art Brut". DW was also hitting his peak as an artist.

I love this period, that I why I wanted to share this here, because I find artistic value in it even if im' alone in this. If someone like John Cale would have released something as weird as "Shortenin' Bread" back then, it would have become an art rock classic. To each his own, I suppose...cheers!

Who is calling anything sh*t? I surely don't find most of the material mentioned to be sh*t.

However, I do have a problem with the phrase "BW's descend [sic] into madness." Saying he descended into madness after his father died is offensive to me. He didn't "go mad" - he had undiagnosed mental illness that was not taken care of and therefore  it affected his work, or in the case of '73 through '75, the lack of it. However, even in the era we are talking about, where is this super weird material you are talking about? "It's OK"? "California Feelin'"? "Good Timin'"? The 1975 version of "In The Back Of My Mind"? All of those sound like the work of a thirty something artist. Even "Shortenin' Bread" isn't some nutty thing. It's surely an interesting and idiosyncratic choice, but not the efforts of a mad person.
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