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Author Topic: Dean Torrence joining Mike's band?  (Read 7084 times)
Steve Mayo
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« Reply #50 on: February 20, 2019, 12:40:18 PM »

Dropped in to add that the vet in the photo was part of a contest when the cassette was released. One had to cut out the license plate on the vet and send it in. They gave away something like five or six cars. Notice the plate has six T’s on it. As in the ‘60’s. Where the songs came from.  You cut out the plate from the card board holder that contained the cassette.
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« Reply #51 on: February 20, 2019, 12:59:43 PM »

Jim V,

While you were thorough in your analysis and obviously know your stuff, I disagree with you on some points.

As for Jan and the war, I can understand your frustration. Here's a Mark A Moore (J&D historian) quote from the J&D board that should clear everything up. "Both sides were fair game. I mean, we're talking about Jan & Dean here. "In my view, the personal political leanings of J&D in 1965-66 are of little consequence. Universal Coward poked fun at the anti-war movement -- and Eve of Destruction was -- to quote a phrase I've used before -- delivered with exaggerated angst... According to Roger Christian -- who was as close to Jan as anyone -- the establishment viewed Only A Boy as an anti-war song -- because it was soliciting sympathy for a kid (a soldier) who's life had been snuffed out before it really began."

As for Dean's feelings about J&D's music, I'd say it's much more complicated than you make it out to be. Jan was 100% in control from 1963-1966 with the production of those records. He had total say over every note committed to tape. Dean was merely the sideman. I remember Dean saying something like "You either did it Jan's way or you didn't do it. I was just happy to do it." But many people close to the situation have expressed that Dean would have liked more creative input during Phase I. Perhaps his dislike of some of Jan's work was similar to Mike's alleged dislike of Brian's--- the fear of not being needed anymore. I'm sure it was frightening, in a way, for guys like Mike and Dean (talented, but not mega hit producers) to watch their peers grow into Singer/Songwriter/Instrumentalist/Producer/Arrangers while Mike and Dean were singers and lyricists at most, with limited instrumental proficiency. Both Mike and Dean helped bring their respective groups to fame, but it was Jan and Brian who were the masterminds. Jan and Brian could have used anyone. (Jan, did, with Arnie in 1958) Mike and Dean were probably scared that their careers were at stake. With that in mind, it's much easier to wrap your head around why they would have negative feelings towards a song or an era of artistic growth (SMiLE for Mike, Folk N Roll for Dean)  To simply sum up Dean as a money hungry douche, when you don't know the guy is a little absurd. I met Dean and he couldn't be more gracious. We talked about Jan's arranging skills his great use of harmony. Dean isn't oblivious to all this. He appreciates the artistic side of the music. In retrospect, maybe it was wise of him to think kids were going to buy You Really Know How To Hurt a Guy as an A side single in 1965 or that 2019 audiences would rather hear him sing "Do It Again" than "Horace, Swinging School Bus Driver"

My personal opinion is that J&D are more than "somewhat worthwhile". I think there's a lot to be learned about production and arranging from J&D's songs. Many classic tunes like Anaheim and Honolulu Lulu were pretty innovative with their layers of vocal harmonies, three or four guitars, two basses, two drum kits, keys, horns, etc.. Those songs sound powerful no matter the medium. Especially in mono. Jan also used a lot of compression and limiting on those songs. I think these production techniques and aesthetics are why he often gets compared to Brian Wilson and Phil Spector, aside from the obvious genre/regional overlaps.

As for the humor, to each his own. I find it laugh out loud funny. There must have been something memorable about their humor, if people still remember it 50+ years on.

Thanks for acknowledging the tribal nature between BBs and J&D fans. There definitely is a middle ground. You can appreciate one group, without diminishing your love for the other. Actually the opposite happens. I think hearing the differences between the groups made me appreciate each other more. J&D's (often times off-key) crooning has made me appreciate the BBs immaculate pitch and intonation. Brian's sometimes thin-sounding surf-era arrangements have made me appreciate Jan's powerful dual-drum tracks. Both bands compliment each other perfectly. Brian's music can often be categorized as introspective and personal, whereas Jan's leaned towards the goofy side. That's why hearing Little Old Lady at a BBs show or Sail On Sailor at a J&D show, doesn't upset me and actually, when played well, brings a smile to my face. Fortunately, J&D and The BBs have always had great musicians, so I'm rarely left in disappointment.

Thanks for the response Nate! And I dig that you're a fan of Jan & Dean. Perhaps if I find the time I'll respond a bit more thoroughly at some point!
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« Reply #52 on: February 20, 2019, 01:05:54 PM »

Dropped in to add that the vet in the photo was part of a contest when the cassette was released. One had to cut out the license plate on the vet and send it in. They gave away something like five or six cars. Notice the plate has six T’s on it. As in the ‘60’s. Where the songs came from.  You cut out the plate from the card board holder that contained the cassette.
Nice! How you doing Steve?
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And production aside, I’d so much rather hear a 14 year old David Marks shred some guitar on Chug-a-lug than hear a 51 year old Mike Love sing about bangin some chick in a swimming pool.-rab2591
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« Reply #53 on: February 20, 2019, 01:53:59 PM »

Doing ok smile brian. last august had to spend eight days in hospital.  had a blood clot inside my heart. on blood thinners now. had another heart cath that showed i have lost some heart function since the heart attack back in 2010. doing ok right now. off work because of it. thanks for asking. how are you doing?
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« Reply #54 on: February 20, 2019, 02:08:09 PM »

I didn't know you 2 were friends. Then again, SB is 1st-class lickspittle, so...  Tongue
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« Reply #55 on: February 20, 2019, 02:14:21 PM »

Was there a need for that?
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« Reply #56 on: February 20, 2019, 02:18:30 PM »

Should I edit it? Smiley
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« Reply #57 on: February 20, 2019, 02:19:35 PM »

Doing ok smile brian. last august had to spend eight days in hospital.  had a blood clot inside my heart. on blood thinners now. had another heart cath that showed i have lost some heart function since the heart attack back in 2010. doing ok right now. off work because of it. thanks for asking. how are you doing?
Not too much, L&M to your recovery!
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And production aside, I’d so much rather hear a 14 year old David Marks shred some guitar on Chug-a-lug than hear a 51 year old Mike Love sing about bangin some chick in a swimming pool.-rab2591
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« Reply #58 on: February 20, 2019, 02:31:07 PM »

Dropped in to add that the vet in the photo was part of a contest when the cassette was released. One had to cut out the license plate on the vet and send it in. They gave away something like five or six cars. Notice the plate has six T’s on it. As in the ‘60’s. Where the songs came from.  You cut out the plate from the card board holder that contained the cassette.

Interesting. I did notice the plate to be a personalized plate, which must've been a fake one because you were then not able to order a black personalized plate (black personalized plates did not exist until the mid-2010s); personalized plates first started in the 1970s once California plates had switched to blue… It's only in recent years that you can special order California custom personalized reissue type plates in black.

I wonder who won the Corvette? It's crazy that there were not one, but two contests in the history of this band to win Corvettes.

Now I suppose the real baffling question is why the New York skyline?
« Last Edit: February 20, 2019, 04:05:04 PM by CenturyDeprived » Logged
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« Reply #59 on: February 20, 2019, 03:43:35 PM »

According to one of the articles posted, Dean himself did the graphic design - Perhaps he can answer why the NYC skyline and backdrop. But it looks like a cut-and-paste deal, because the same Vette photo was used in the magazine article sans NYC background.

What's confusing is (or was) the packaging. What they did was affix the actual cassette and case to a larger LP-sized cardboard back piece, and that's what was in the Radio Shack stores. There are not many of these original copies around, but I do have shots of it from Radio Shack catalogs showing that setup. Also, Paul Revere & The Raiders had a release on "Hitbound" that was packaged the same way. What a waste of packaging and money...but I digress.

What I did not see nor could find was a Radio Shack print ad for this Vette contest, but I'm sure someone has one somewhere. These "Hitbound" releases were indeed being listed and sold in Radio Shack catalogs alongside other somewhat generic comps featuring everyone from Doc Severinson to Willie Nelson to Linda Rondstadt.

One of the last releases was The Association, who had a full synth and drum machine driven album (with production from Curt Boettcher) on Hitbound, as part of the Radio Shack deal and the deal with Mike Love. That was the last recording by the Association in any original lineup, and the results were pretty poor...even the band badmouthed it later.

Note too that all the artists featured in "Scrooge's Rock And Roll Christmas" were part of this Radio Shack-Hitbound-Mike Love partnership deal, and had releases full of "updated" oldies with synths and drum machines on the label and sold through Radio Shack.

I don't think any of them were successful enough to note. "Scrooge's Rock And Roll Christmas" was the only video/multimedia project to see release. I have TV listings showing that it aired in syndication in November and December 1984, then it saw some limited VHS and Betamax home video releases, along with a few versions of the official soundtrack. But no other "holiday" themed videos which Mike plugged in the interview like a Halloween video ever materialized, and Hitbound bit the dust soon after.

All of this came from a budget-line Beach Boys/Jan & Dean hits comp that was in Radio Shack's catalogs and stores, catalog item 51-9010 on cassette if you have it. But that was the original tracks from the 60's, and indications are it sold pretty well. That was the catalyst for Mike Love and "Hitbound" to try recording these covers and doing a whole multimedia promo blitz behind Mike's label.

What was funny to read was some original PR blurbs and notes from the "Rock And Roll City" release, the one with the Cali Vette pasted in front of the NYC skyline:

"First we listened to the original versions of hundreds of the hits of the 60's. Very few were as good as we remembered. We decided we shouldn't "cover" these old hits, unless the new versions were better, a lot better than the originals. That's what "Rock And Roll City" is - Better than the original."



So using that logic, and that comment, when you listen back to the Mike & Dean tracks on "Rock And Roll City" and other artists' synth-driven covers and remakes of some of the best records ever made...Mike and Dean's new versions are better. According to Hitbound Records.

Another, and perhaps the biggest, head-scratching eye-rolling WTF moment of the whole project, and "Hitbound" in general. It's absurd.
« Last Edit: February 20, 2019, 03:46:35 PM by guitarfool2002 » Logged

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« Reply #60 on: February 20, 2019, 07:07:41 PM »

Guitarfool the contest was a radio shack promotion. i think six vets were to be given away. best i remember the contest details and entry form were on the back of the cardboard package. There was a piece in print about it also, i used to have it. i even entered but obviously didn’t win one.  Smiley
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« Reply #61 on: February 21, 2019, 07:08:03 PM »

Guitarfool the contest was a radio shack promotion. i think six vets were to be given away. best i remember the contest details and entry form were on the back of the cardboard package. There was a piece in print about it also, i used to have it. i even entered but obviously didn’t win one.  Smiley

Great info Steve! It explained that license plate, six T's, and I had never heard of this promotion until you mentioned it. Yes, I was looking around for some kind of promotional ads or even a TV commercial that Radio Shack would have done for this contest in their flyers or catalogs (the ones that I could find), but I couldn't find any mentions of the Vette giveaway. Too bad you didn't win one of the Vettes - Seems like a pretty expensive contest and promotional tie-in for Radio Shack to run, but I guess they had the budget to do so.

On a personal note, I was sorry to hear about your health issues, but you have my best wishes for a continued speedy and full recovery.  Smiley

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« Reply #62 on: February 22, 2019, 01:22:09 PM »


One of the last releases was The Association, who had a full synth and drum machine driven album (with production from Curt Boettcher) on Hitbound, as part of the Radio Shack deal and the deal with Mike Love. That was the last recording by the Association in any original lineup, and the results were pretty poor...even the band badmouthed it later.


Just picking up on this GF, but The Association issued one more album after their Hitbound release, 1995s 'A Little Bit More' which still had Larry Ramos and Russ Giguere fronting the band, albeit alongside a new supporting lineup.
As for the 'New Memories' album for Hitbound - initial production on the album was afforded to a youthful Jeffrey Foskett, whilst final credit went to the band themselves. Boettcher had only contributed to the earlier recording of 'Walk Away Renee'.
Terry Kirkman's quote on the release, when I asked about it, summed it up nicely... "Radio Shack! I thought 'oh, this is where my illustrious career has gone...!'"
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« Reply #63 on: February 26, 2019, 05:25:59 PM »

Say what you will about Mike’s Radio Shack dealings, but they did give the Beach Boys the excuse to head into the studio in early ’80s and cut “California Dreamin’,” laying the foundation for their 1986 version which didn’t do too bad as a single. In all, the Radio Shack deal lead to a net gain for the BBs legacy by eventually resulting in that recording IMO.
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« Reply #64 on: February 26, 2019, 07:29:54 PM »

A net gain? I think they should have thanked Terry Melcher profusely for scrapping Mike's "these are better than the originals" notions, scrapping the all-covers, 250 songs/50 artists/20 producers nonsense, letting Radio Shack get back to selling CB Radios and resistors to science teachers, cutting Dean loose to do his own stuff, and get some musicians like Roger McGuinn involved so they could do it the right way and cut a respectable Beach Boys record. I don't know how the Radio Shack deal could be called a net gain since the entire thing flopped and folded up.

Who has seen or heard "Scrooge's Rock And Roll Christmas"? Can you imagine the Beach Boys being subjected to that kind of project?
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« Reply #65 on: February 26, 2019, 08:14:56 PM »

I perhaps worded poorly but I was intending to say that since nobody really remembers the Radio Shack ordeal and it paved the way for a minor hit, so it could be argued as a positive thing for the legacy at the end of the day. I agree the deal was a flop on its own merits.
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« Reply #66 on: February 26, 2019, 09:29:36 PM »

Most of what Mike Love touches is and will be a miserable flop. His unsuccessful, futile ham fisted attempt to rewrite history/rerecord songs has been a dismal failure and no matter who he brings up on the stage, it sucks, unless it's Brian, Al, Dave or Blondie. It's so great to see Love's attempts die an early death, but incredibly sad to see the legacy dragged through Mike Love's muck.
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« Reply #67 on: February 27, 2019, 01:23:22 AM »

was califronia deamin directly part of the radio shack thing?
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« Reply #68 on: February 27, 2019, 07:19:14 AM »

First of all, even if “California Dreamin’” was executed from the beginning specifically for the Radio Shack project, it’s a pretty sad stretch to try to credit the Radio Shack project with an unintended, inadvertent, eventual, four-years-later, above-average cover recording being widely released.

Having said that, I’m not so certain it was recorded expressly for the Radio Shack project (or rather, the germ of the idea to record it may not have been at the behest of a potential Radio Shack compilation). Now, available info indicates it may have been recorded around the same time as some other “Rock and Roll City” tracks in late 1982. But I also see an older post from c-man referencing the Summer ’82 issue of “Add Some Music” reporting on a *May 1982” vocal session for “California Dreamin’” that included all of the BBs including Carl and Brian.

The “CD” track seems to be somewhat anomalous compared to the other “Rock and Roll City” songs, sonically if nothing else. While “CD” did use most if not entirely session musicians on those 1982 sessions, the *sound* of the track is not the same as the other R&R City tracks. The other R&R City tracks sound *super* cheap and synthetic; lots of early drum sequencer bits and cheap keyboard sounds. While even the ’82 version of “CD” exhibits some early 80s synthetic sound, it sounds much more “organic” than the other R&R City tracks.

I also recall that there was some reported disagreement/controversy within the band regarding that ’82 version of “California Dreamin’” being released on the 1983 “Rock and Roll City” cassette album. I recall a suggestion that Carl disagreed with its release, feeling the track wasn’t complete.

It’s also worth noting that when the “Rock and Roll City” album was issued a bit later on vinyl as “Rock and Roll Again” (or something like that), the “California Dreamin’” track was NOT included.

Another indicator Carl didn’t want that ’82 version out is that when they re-dubbed the song in 1986, Carl re-recorded his lead (though, I have to say both performances are of essentially identical quality).
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 07:20:01 AM by HeyJude » Logged

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« Reply #69 on: February 27, 2019, 07:29:19 AM »

Regarding the whole “Radio Shack” association with Mike and Dean, while it’s certainly a curious bit of trivia/history for band scholars/researchers (I tend to find that seemingly-but-not-actually dead period between post-KTSA and pre-BB'85 to be fascinating), I don’t think it’s out of line to point out the obvious; that it was a cheesy, cynical, more-corporate-than-usual idea/project throughout its execution. AND, it should be noted that it wasn’t even successful as a cynical, career-enhancing project. Unlike 10-20 years later when some artists got some traction with Hallmark-exclusive CD releases (though the BB attempt at a Hallmark CD in 2006 wasn’t similarly successful), Radio Shack was a weird fit and even if some of the cassettes sold in decent numbers, it clearly wasn’t enough of a success to continue on. Nobody’s career was given a huge bump thanks to the project. Dean did some corporate gigs with Mike that nobody remembers, and then went back to the parking lot concert circuit. Mike always had the Beach Boys.

More people remember the BBs association with Sunkist than they do any tangential relationship with Radio Shack.

I sense Mike approached that Radio Shack stuff the same way he did his “Endless Summer Beach Band” side gigs. It was a potential way to make a little extra money and stay busy. You can see that Mike executed other relatively similar projects in the 90s with those Adrian Baker tracks that were used and re-used on several low-key compilations.
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« Reply #70 on: February 27, 2019, 10:11:03 AM »

I agree on Mike Love's various side projects being some hair-brained (in retrospect and perhaps at the time of conception) schemes to make a few extra bucks, and that issue alone brings up a ton of side issues to go over. Which will come later.

But this specific Radio Shack and Hitbound project, look at how Mike described it in those promotional interviews and articles. The "Be True To Your Bud" debacle was a side project designed to basically sell out a BB's classic hit to a shitty beer company and make money playing to drunken spring breakers.

However, whether it was a case of Mike slinging more than his usual bullshit in promoting one of his grand ideas or not, I cannot get past his description of 250 songs by 50 artists helmed by 20 producers, leading to multimedia projects for films and TV, and the notion of Mike's own high standards dictating that he'd agree on no song for his projects unless the cover update version was better than the original recording. And, note how Mike also slags off on some of the original records suggesting they didn't hold up...

As if some of the finest records cut in the 60's needed Mike's touch to update them in 1983? Seriously, the arrogance and pure bullshit in all of that is literally off the charts. In Mike's mind, based on his statements in those interviews, "Da Doo Ron Ron" and "Walk Away Renee" weren't holding up so Mike and his project for Radio Shack were going to update AND improve them. Oh, please.  Roll Eyes


Getting back to the earlier point, when Mike outlines such details involving that many people and multimedia projects based on his concepts and involving his Hitbound enterprise...does it sound like he was thinking of this like a "side project" to make a quick buck? I can see that with Budweiser, that spring break campaign had a "set end date" (I know, kick me in the ass using that phrase... LOL LOL LOL  )

But Mike for all the world sounded like he was trying to become a record company mogul through these Radio Shack-Hitbound projects. And barely anything came of the deals, except what we've outlined above. And the only video project that ever saw an actual broadcast/release was the Scrooge Christmas syndicated special, and again if you haven't seen it, give it a view just so you know what kind of stuff was on the table moving forward.

Following soon, the notion that Mike Love is either stubborn, tenacious beyond anyone's grasp, or was just not good at knowing what music audiences wanted to hear based on his future releases that are more or less copying what the Radio Shack project was, which failed and sank like a stone.

Thankfully, as lukewarm as the BB '85 album was, Mike's idea to cut a cover of "At The Hop" never made it to that disc...But where do we think that idea came from? Yep.

« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 10:14:24 AM by guitarfool2002 » Logged

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« Reply #71 on: February 27, 2019, 11:05:06 AM »

I have mixed feelings about Rock N Roll City (and the various re-releases/updates that followed like Listen To The Air and Be True To Your Bud). There are some pretty good moments. I really enjoy Bruce & Terry's version of Sealed With A Kiss. I like the electric keys and Bruce's lead vocal. California Dreamin (Beach Boys), Baby Talk (Dean/Mike&Dean?) Lightning Strikes (Mike & Dean) and The Letter (Mike & Dean) are all solid recordings that I'm happy to hear come on. The other songs however, are pretty low quality. It's not the production that bothers me. There's lots of music with questionable cheesy 80's synths/drum machines/samples that I love (BW88 for example). I guess the songs that I didn't mention in the above list just aren't inspired. Dean sounds bored on Wild Thing for example. There's a lotta weird early pitch shifting on the vocals of The Locomotion to perhaps try to fix what was a rushed take.

I'm not so turned off by the idea of revisiting oldies on stage or in the studio. Hell, oldies are the reason The Beach Boys played stadiums in the 80's. There are a lot of people who want to hear the great oldies music they grew up with. The idea isn't too far fetched. Even iconic bands like The Beach Boys and The Beatles have iconic songs that were covers of what were oldies to them at the time... for example Til There Was You and Why Do Fools Fall In Love respectively.

The production could either be a result of rush job (why hire a band when you can use a drum machine, samplers, and a synthesizer?) or the producer(s?) made a conscious choice to utilize what was then cutting edge technology, ideally for a "new" or "improved" sound. Of course, the technology had a long way to go. I'm going to assume the first assumption is true.

I think if more effort was put in, and perhaps with a savvy promotional person, the Hit-Bound/Radio Shack thing could have had some success. I mean, the talent was there. Dean Torrence, Mike Love, Curt Boettcher (who I believe produced the album), Bruce Johnston, Terry Melcher, etc... were all very capable and talented musicians.
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« Reply #72 on: February 27, 2019, 11:19:20 AM »

Nate - It's getting into some topics I wanted to address when I had more time, but I did want to reply on a few points.

The production issue is a big one: If Mike's intentions were to "update and improve" classic 60's records with new technology and new sounds that would be comfortable alongside other hit records from 1982-83, he failed. Take a look at the bigger radio and MTV hits from 1983 when the Radio Shack project launched, and you'll hear some synth-driven hits that sound a thousand times better than what Mike was doing, and also hit records that successfully blended live instruments with synths. I don't know where Mike's mindset was in thinking "R&R City" had a current, hit sound that would get radio airplay, but he was way, way off. The tracks sound like they were cut on low-level equipment and done hastily to where some of the textures in the backing tracks are so cheesy it's almost comical.

And I have to ask - Have you seen "Scrooge's Rock And Roll Christmas"? I have a soft spot in my heart for Christmas specials, cheesy or not, so I'm not going to slag off on this one overall. It actually could have been a neat storyline...but the music itself, and some of the vignettes featuring these classic bands and artists, are so cheesy it's almost bordering on self-parody. Again, I won't rip the whole thing apart, but this special was pretty universally ripped apart by various fans, critics, etc...and I think a lot has to do with the spectacle of seeing and hearing some pretty top-notch acts miming to tracks that sound cheap.

As the Scrooge video exists in being the only result we can see of Mike's multimedia plans with Radio Shack, do you think the results seen in that special were a success? Or something that would have demanded more follow-up projects of the kind Mike described in the interview?
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HeyJude
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« Reply #73 on: February 27, 2019, 12:09:28 PM »

The initial wave of each release, for instance the "Rock and Roll City" cassette release, was only sold in Radio Shack stores, right? Was that *ever* going to make it a huge hit? I know there were a ton of Radio Shack locations in 1983, but that's still a relatively narrow market to sell music to.

I've never sensed any subsequent semi-reissues of those hand full of Radio Shack projects were given particularly wide distribution either.

I'd also question how successful something like "Rock and Roll City" could have been given the crew behind it (Mike, Dean, Boettcher, Bruce, Melcher, etc.). How many hits were those guys involved with around that time, and how many projects were they involved in around that time that were receiving high critical marks? Boettcher had a few production-related gigs that some folks liked. He and Melcher had some industry cred, but even they weren't like top-of-the-line producers of that era. They weren't Chris Thomas or Roy Thomas Baker or Phil Ramone, etc. Nor were they of the caliber of then up-and-coming big 80s producers like Hugh Padgham, etc.

Apart from a hand full of BB rip-off productions in the 60s, I don't think Bruce as a producer (or solo artist) had seen great critical or commercial success. His own solo album, released in the relative immediate aftermath of "I Write the Songs", wasn't a critical or commercial success. His other 70s productions I don't believe were particularly successful, and he met with mixed, at best, results co-producing the BBs "LA (Light Album)" and producing KTSA.

If someone was looking to really re-emerge with a cutting edge new sound in 1983, I don't think they'd hire the guy that produced the "Keepin' the Summer Alive" album.

Melcher's best attribute that I've noticed was his knack for catchy melodies. And he was able to score the BBs gigs getting songs on movie soundtracks. But on the production side of things, Melcher wasn't an A-lister either.
« Last Edit: February 27, 2019, 12:10:33 PM by HeyJude » Logged

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« Reply #74 on: February 27, 2019, 12:32:01 PM »

Guitarfool the contest was a radio shack promotion. i think six vets were to be given away. best i remember the contest details and entry form were on the back of the cardboard package. There was a piece in print about it also, i used to have it. i even entered but obviously didn’t win one.  Smiley

Great info Steve! It explained that license plate, six T's, and I had never heard of this promotion until you mentioned it. Yes, I was looking around for some kind of promotional ads or even a TV commercial that Radio Shack would have done for this contest in their flyers or catalogs (the ones that I could find), but I couldn't find any mentions of the Vette giveaway. Too bad you didn't win one of the Vettes - Seems like a pretty expensive contest and promotional tie-in for Radio Shack to run, but I guess they had the budget to do so.

On a personal note, I was sorry to hear about your health issues, but you have my best wishes for a continued speedy and full recovery.  Smiley



thanks for the well wishes.

you know, 36 years is a long time. not exactly sure where that entry form came from but it was something put out by radio shack. if not on the back of the cardboard holder then some other radio shack publication. I do remember cutting it out along with the license plate and sending it in. where does the time go?

also I had scanned a lot of articles before the fire destroyed them. I have an article about this release on hard drive published in a may 1983 issue of bam. 2 pages. but I've long since forgotten how to post picutres. if someone wants to see this and wants to upload these to the thread just pm me a message with an email abby. i'll send them along. nothing earthshaking in it but maybe some would want to read it along with the other articles posted earlier in this thread.
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