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Author Topic: Greg Jacobson - Dennis weed gofer who claimed...  (Read 2315 times)
ReggieDunbar
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« on: January 04, 2019, 10:27:42 AM »



Just found this in a thread on facebook. Anyone got more details or can shine a light on this??!

Everything else was concocted and just grabbed in our absence. Dennis’s drinking buddy Greg Jacobson (who claimed later to have produced it) was an occasional visitor and weed gofer for Dennis.

//RD
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The pine-scented air smells so good in the snow, in our toboggan well go
screaming down the mountainside. The touch of your cheeks when theyre rosy and cold, feels so cozy to hold. Just to take you close and make you warm and...
Jim V.
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« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2019, 12:11:54 PM »

Ouch. I'm pretty sure Munoz is credited accurately on the Bambu. Whatever the issue is, he seems to have some major issue with Gregg Jakobson.
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SBonilla
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« Reply #2 on: January 04, 2019, 12:57:35 PM »

It would be interesting to know what Dennis and Gregg's arrangement was. It may be that Gregg was part of Dennis's deal and that Gregg would have received a producer credit for any recordings delivered to the label, whether he had a direct hand in the production , or not.
It seems that Dennis took care of Gregg over the years, with regard to co-writing and co-production credits. It might have been that their creative relationship was based on a gentleman's agreement.

I can't identify Jakobson's creative stamp on any of the songs where he is credited as a co-writer or co-producer.


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c-man
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2019, 07:07:07 AM »

It would be interesting to know what Dennis and Gregg's arrangement was. It may be that Gregg was part of Dennis's deal and that Gregg would have received a producer credit for any recordings delivered to the label, whether he had a direct hand in the production , or not.
It seems that Dennis took care of Gregg over the years, with regard to co-writing and co-production credits. It might have been that their creative relationship was based on a gentleman's agreement.

I can't identify Jakobson's creative stamp on any of the songs where he is credited as a co-writer or co-producer.




Well, it's reportedly Gregg's voice heard saying "Rollin'" at the start of "Time For Bed". And, per David Leaf's article in Issue 3 of his Pet Sounds fanzine, Gregg was present in a co-producer capacity for the "He's A Bum" vocal session. Looking at the timeline on Bellagio (compiled from my collection of AFM contracts), it's clear that with one exception (that being "I Love You"), all of the Jakobson sessions occurred prior to the start of the Muñoz sessions - and Gregg has stated that he pretty much stopped working with Dennis at a certain point. From this, we can conclude that Dennis invited Carli to co-produce his next album with him AFTER the end of the Jakobson era, and if he did so without mentioning that he also intended to use the stuff he and Gregg had co-produced, then that would explain why Carli would be unaware of Gregg's status as Dennis' co-producer. It's also highly possible that Dennis intended his co-productions with Gregg (however unfinished they may have been at the time) for his SECOND solo album, and intended his collaborations with Carli to be for his THIRD solo album (by this time, he was telling people that he had actually started his third).
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Jim V.
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« Reply #4 on: January 10, 2019, 08:49:31 PM »

It would be interesting to know what Dennis and Gregg's arrangement was. It may be that Gregg was part of Dennis's deal and that Gregg would have received a producer credit for any recordings delivered to the label, whether he had a direct hand in the production , or not.
It seems that Dennis took care of Gregg over the years, with regard to co-writing and co-production credits. It might have been that their creative relationship was based on a gentleman's agreement.

I can't identify Jakobson's creative stamp on any of the songs where he is credited as a co-writer or co-producer.




Well, it's reportedly Gregg's voice heard saying "Rollin'" at the start of "Time For Bed". And, per David Leaf's article in Issue 3 of his Pet Sounds fanzine, Gregg was present in a co-producer capacity for the "He's A Bum" vocal session. Looking at the timeline on Bellagio (compiled from my collection of AFM contracts), it's clear that with one exception (that being "I Love You"), all of the Jakobson sessions occurred prior to the start of the Muñoz sessions - and Gregg has stated that he pretty much stopped working with Dennis at a certain point. From this, we can conclude that Dennis invited Carli to co-produce his next album with him AFTER the end of the Jakobson era, and if he did so without mentioning that he also intended to use the stuff he and Gregg had co-produced, then that would explain why Carli would be unaware of Gregg's status as Dennis' co-producer. It's also highly possible that Dennis intended his co-productions with Gregg (however unfinished they may have been at the time) for his SECOND solo album, and intended his collaborations with Carli to be for his THIRD solo album (by this time, he was telling people that he had actually started his third).

Speaking of a "third" Denny solo album, whatever happened to the possible release of an album called Tornado that Jim Guercio was talking about? It was supposed to be a follow up to the reissue of Pacific Ocean Blue and was even mentioned in Mark Dillon's 2012 Beach Boys book (can't remember the name) but nothing has ever been said about it since if I'm correct. While many in the Beach Boys fan community are clamoring for a release of early '70s Denny material, I personally think something that grabbed the rest of the good stuff from 1975 thru 1978, along with whatever is useable from 1979 thru 1982 (maybe "Labor Day" and also some of those supposed collaborations with Christine McVie*).



*Do we actually have any proof Denny and Christine ever did any real serious recording together? I can't imagine it, but as a major fan of both artists it would be amazing to hear.
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SBonilla
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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2019, 05:25:08 AM »

It would be interesting to know what Dennis and Gregg's arrangement was. It may be that Gregg was part of Dennis's deal and that Gregg would have received a producer credit for any recordings delivered to the label, whether he had a direct hand in the production , or not.
It seems that Dennis took care of Gregg over the years, with regard to co-writing and co-production credits. It might have been that their creative relationship was based on a gentleman's agreement.

I can't identify Jakobson's creative stamp on any of the songs where he is credited as a co-writer or co-producer.




Well, it's reportedly Gregg's voice heard saying "Rollin'" at the start of "Time For Bed". And, per David Leaf's article in Issue 3 of his Pet Sounds fanzine, Gregg was present in a co-producer capacity for the "He's A Bum" vocal session. Looking at the timeline on Bellagio (compiled from my collection of AFM contracts), it's clear that with one exception (that being "I Love You"), all of the Jakobson sessions occurred prior to the start of the Muñoz sessions - and Gregg has stated that he pretty much stopped working with Dennis at a certain point. From this, we can conclude that Dennis invited Carli to co-produce his next album with him AFTER the end of the Jakobson era, and if he did so without mentioning that he also intended to use the stuff he and Gregg had co-produced, then that would explain why Carli would be unaware of Gregg's status as Dennis' co-producer. It's also highly possible that Dennis intended his co-productions with Gregg (however unfinished they may have been at the time) for his SECOND solo album, and intended his collaborations with Carli to be for his THIRD solo album (by this time, he was telling people that he had actually started his third).

Speaking of a "third" Denny solo album, whatever happened to the possible release of an album called Tornado that Jim Guercio was talking about? It was supposed to be a follow up to the reissue of Pacific Ocean Blue and was even mentioned in Mark Dillon's 2012 Beach Boys book (can't remember the name) but nothing has ever been said about it since if I'm correct. While many in the Beach Boys fan community are clamoring for a release of early '70s Denny material, I personally think something that grabbed the rest of the good stuff from 1975 thru 1978, along with whatever is useable from 1979 thru 1982 (maybe "Labor Day" and also some of those supposed collaborations with Christine McVie*).



*Do we actually have any proof Denny and Christine ever did any real serious recording together? I can't imagine it, but as a major fan of both artists it would be amazing to hear.

In the early 80's I produced some sessions at Tom Murphy's TRACK RECORD on Melrose Ave. I remember seeing a box of 2" tape, with Dennis Wilson/Christine McVie written on its spine, on the shelf in the control room. I asked Tom about it. He told me that Dennis and Christine had been recording there.
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Jim V.
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« Reply #6 on: January 11, 2019, 06:13:11 AM »

In the early 80's I produced some sessions at Tom Murphy's TRACK RECORD on Melrose Ave. I remember seeing a box of 2" tape, with Dennis Wilson/Christine McVie written on its spine, on the shelf in the control room. I asked Tom about it. He told me that Dennis and Christine had been recording there.

Well then, that's pretty awesome! Thank you very much for that info SBonilla!

I wonder what's the chances are that we ever hear it. I suppose really it might be up to Christine, and if she wanted it released, I'm sure she could work something out with Denny's estate.
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c-man
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« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2019, 10:34:09 AM »

It would be interesting to know what Dennis and Gregg's arrangement was. It may be that Gregg was part of Dennis's deal and that Gregg would have received a producer credit for any recordings delivered to the label, whether he had a direct hand in the production , or not.
It seems that Dennis took care of Gregg over the years, with regard to co-writing and co-production credits. It might have been that their creative relationship was based on a gentleman's agreement.

I can't identify Jakobson's creative stamp on any of the songs where he is credited as a co-writer or co-producer.




Well, it's reportedly Gregg's voice heard saying "Rollin'" at the start of "Time For Bed". And, per David Leaf's article in Issue 3 of his Pet Sounds fanzine, Gregg was present in a co-producer capacity for the "He's A Bum" vocal session. Looking at the timeline on Bellagio (compiled from my collection of AFM contracts), it's clear that with one exception (that being "I Love You"), all of the Jakobson sessions occurred prior to the start of the Muñoz sessions - and Gregg has stated that he pretty much stopped working with Dennis at a certain point. From this, we can conclude that Dennis invited Carli to co-produce his next album with him AFTER the end of the Jakobson era, and if he did so without mentioning that he also intended to use the stuff he and Gregg had co-produced, then that would explain why Carli would be unaware of Gregg's status as Dennis' co-producer. It's also highly possible that Dennis intended his co-productions with Gregg (however unfinished they may have been at the time) for his SECOND solo album, and intended his collaborations with Carli to be for his THIRD solo album (by this time, he was telling people that he had actually started his third).

Speaking of a "third" Denny solo album, whatever happened to the possible release of an album called Tornado that Jim Guercio was talking about? It was supposed to be a follow up to the reissue of Pacific Ocean Blue and was even mentioned in Mark Dillon's 2012 Beach Boys book (can't remember the name) but nothing has ever been said about it since if I'm correct. While many in the Beach Boys fan community are clamoring for a release of early '70s Denny material, I personally think something that grabbed the rest of the good stuff from 1975 thru 1978, along with whatever is useable from 1979 thru 1982 (maybe "Labor Day" and also some of those supposed collaborations with Christine McVie*).



*Do we actually have any proof Denny and Christine ever did any real serious recording together? I can't imagine it, but as a major fan of both artists it would be amazing to hear.

In the early 80's I produced some sessions at Tom Murphy's TRACK RECORD on Melrose Ave. I remember seeing a box of 2" tape, with Dennis Wilson/Christine McVie written on its spine, on the shelf in the control room. I asked Tom about it. He told me that Dennis and Christine had been recording there.


Wow...did you summon the courage to ask him to play the tape for you?  The answer would probably have been "No", but if it'd been me, I would've asked...even if it meant paying for the studio time to hear it!

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SBonilla
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« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2019, 02:22:48 PM »

It would be interesting to know what Dennis and Gregg's arrangement was. It may be that Gregg was part of Dennis's deal and that Gregg would have received a producer credit for any recordings delivered to the label, whether he had a direct hand in the production , or not.
It seems that Dennis took care of Gregg over the years, with regard to co-writing and co-production credits. It might have been that their creative relationship was based on a gentleman's agreement.

I can't identify Jakobson's creative stamp on any of the songs where he is credited as a co-writer or co-producer.




Well, it's reportedly Gregg's voice heard saying "Rollin'" at the start of "Time For Bed". And, per David Leaf's article in Issue 3 of his Pet Sounds fanzine, Gregg was present in a co-producer capacity for the "He's A Bum" vocal session. Looking at the timeline on Bellagio (compiled from my collection of AFM contracts), it's clear that with one exception (that being "I Love You"), all of the Jakobson sessions occurred prior to the start of the Muñoz sessions - and Gregg has stated that he pretty much stopped working with Dennis at a certain point. From this, we can conclude that Dennis invited Carli to co-produce his next album with him AFTER the end of the Jakobson era, and if he did so without mentioning that he also intended to use the stuff he and Gregg had co-produced, then that would explain why Carli would be unaware of Gregg's status as Dennis' co-producer. It's also highly possible that Dennis intended his co-productions with Gregg (however unfinished they may have been at the time) for his SECOND solo album, and intended his collaborations with Carli to be for his THIRD solo album (by this time, he was telling people that he had actually started his third).

Speaking of a "third" Denny solo album, whatever happened to the possible release of an album called Tornado that Jim Guercio was talking about? It was supposed to be a follow up to the reissue of Pacific Ocean Blue and was even mentioned in Mark Dillon's 2012 Beach Boys book (can't remember the name) but nothing has ever been said about it since if I'm correct. While many in the Beach Boys fan community are clamoring for a release of early '70s Denny material, I personally think something that grabbed the rest of the good stuff from 1975 thru 1978, along with whatever is useable from 1979 thru 1982 (maybe "Labor Day" and also some of those supposed collaborations with Christine McVie*).



*Do we actually have any proof Denny and Christine ever did any real serious recording together? I can't imagine it, but as a major fan of both artists it would be amazing to hear.

In the early 80's I produced some sessions at Tom Murphy's TRACK RECORD on Melrose Ave. I remember seeing a box of 2" tape, with Dennis Wilson/Christine McVie written on its spine, on the shelf in the control room. I asked Tom about it. He told me that Dennis and Christine had been recording there.


Wow...did you summon the courage to ask him to play the tape for you?  The answer would probably have been "No", but if it'd been me, I would've asked...even if it meant paying for the studio time to hear it!


No. As curious as I was, I would never have asked. I wasn't that bold, but I know what you mean! I did get to hear one doozy of a tape, though.

A friend of mine worked there as receptionist. He told me, that at the time, there were a number of Beach Boys live reels in their tape room; things that Stephen Moffett had worked on.

[/quote]
« Last Edit: January 13, 2019, 02:23:32 PM by SBonilla » Logged
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