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Author Topic: Rocky Pamplin's THE BEACH BOYS' ENDLESS WAVE completed and published  (Read 7032 times)
JakeH
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« Reply #50 on: November 29, 2018, 09:08:30 AM »

I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...
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« Reply #51 on: November 30, 2018, 06:53:15 AM »

I cold use some help. There was a TV movie made about the Beach Boys broadcast on network TV back around 2000. Has anyone seen this?
It's titled "The Beach Boys An American Family." It was a 2 parter and now it's no longer easily available.
I got a copy from a sketchy website and the quality is bad, but I suspect the movie is really good.
I'd be interested in anyone's thoughts about it and if anyone actually has an accurate copy.
Thanks,
Ron
« Last Edit: November 30, 2018, 06:57:38 AM by Reynaldo » Logged
HeyJude
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« Reply #52 on: November 30, 2018, 07:56:32 AM »

I cold use some help. There was a TV movie made about the Beach Boys broadcast on network TV back around 2000. Has anyone seen this?
It's titled "The Beach Boys An American Family." It was a 2 parter and now it's no longer easily available.
I got a copy from a sketchy website and the quality is bad, but I suspect the movie is really good.
I'd be interested in anyone's thoughts about it and if anyone actually has an accurate copy.
Thanks,
Ron


The 2000 TV movie was *not* received well by fans. The first part wasn't too awful, but the second part was ridiculous and embarrassing. Even the movie's figurehead/producer John Stamos admitted years later in an interview that the movie didn't go over well with some of the BB camp (read: everybody but Mike; and especially Brian). There is even an interview from back around 2000 with Darian Sahanaja detailing Melinda arguing with someone (producers? network?) over the movie and Brian getting stressed about the whole thing.

Setting aside group politics, the second part especially is just way off. Brian comes off like a babbling, drooling idiot, the movie ends on the wrong date (Brian's "comeback" is for no apparent reason shown to be 1974).

There's one infamous scene (from circa '66, so I don't remember if that's part one or two) where the actor playing Mike's glue-on beard is peeling off during a scene, and they just left it in.

There's a Van Dyke Parks interview where he had to call in favors to get them to add a disclaimer to the front of the second part of the film because the guy who was essentially supposed to be VDP (though going by another name) was grossly misrepresented in the film.

I believe others involved in the film ended up regretting participating.

I think there's also a fun story also of Stebbins and Ed Roach visiting the set floating around somwhere.

Apparently, BRI (or at least Capitol) and Brian participated to some degree initially, as they supplied remixed BB tracks and Brian re-recorded a version of "In My Room", but seeing as how Mike was allegedly an informal "advisor" on the film (he and Bruce were the only BBs who went out and promoted the movie with Stamos on talk shows), the film goes off the rails the more it tries to portray Mike as saving the group and Brian as a babbling lunatic frothing at the mouth.

IN PARTICULAR, both Brian and fans were offended at the portrayal of Brian being dismissive and unsupportive of Dennis's music. This was offensive to the Wilson family, and just grossly incorrect considering how much Brian was involved in stuff like Dennis's tracks from "Sunflower."

That Stamos would support putting *that* incorrect garbage in the film, but conveniently avoid things like depicting Brian being strong-armed into not working with Redwood/Three Dog Night, is not surprising.

The movie was never commercially released, but screener VHS copies were made "For Emmy Consideration" (no, I don't believe it won any Emmys), and they are up on eBay from time to time. Here's one now:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/THE-BEACH-BOYS-AN-AMERICAN-FAMILY-2-vhs-videos-FREDERICK-WELLER-KEVIN-DUNN/283275006532?hash=item41f4819244:g:GfwAAOSwBLlVLD8h:rk:1:pf:0

I think the film was aired back around 2012 on cable on the back of the BB reunion.
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« Reply #53 on: November 30, 2018, 08:01:37 AM »

I cold use some help. There was a TV movie made about the Beach Boys broadcast on network TV back around 2000. Has anyone seen this?
It's titled "The Beach Boys An American Family." It was a 2 parter and now it's no longer easily available.
I got a copy from a sketchy website and the quality is bad, but I suspect the movie is really good.
I'd be interested in anyone's thoughts about it and if anyone actually has an accurate copy.
Thanks,
Ron


Here's a 2000 LA Times article touching on the problems with the 2000 movie:

from The Los Angeles New Times 4/6/2000
Heroes and Villains
Brian Wilson's back, recording a live album at the Roxy this week and preparing for a summer tour with symphony orchestras throughout the U.S. So isn't it time to address the lies and half-truths depicted on ABC's recent Beach Boys miniseries?

By Bill Holdship

They say that history belongs to the victors. In the case of the Beach Boys' always strange Southern California saga,  the term boils down to two survivors -- namely, Mike Love, the group's cocky lead singer, and Brian Wilson, the group's musical architect and resident genius -- and their often distorted memories.

Brian Wilson, as you're apt to have read somewhere by now, has been on a solo tour for the past year, which has taken him through the U.S., as well as in front of hysterical, ecstatic Japanese fans, and to a showstopping performance at Neil Young's annual Bridge Concert in San Francisco late last year. On Friday and Saturday nights of this week, he'll be recording a live album at the Roxy, which will be released via his Web site (BrianWilson.com) later this year.

"I'm thoroughly convinced that nothing in the world makes him happier than being around a group of people performing vocal harmonies," says Darian Sahanaja, co-leader, singer, and keyboardist of the Wondermints, who make up the core of Wilson's backing band. "I think it's a very spiritual thing. It's his very favorite thing -- that and food!" He laughs.

"Going into this, we already knew Brian Wilson is not Bruce Springsteen," Sahanaja continues. "He's never been a performer, so it's never really been about that. It's always been about his vision, creativity, his songs, his arrangements, and his sensibility. So the shows have basically been to showcase the legacy of the music with the man himself -- the actual composer -- present."

"I'm a pretty happy guy," Wilson says during a brief interview between rehearsals for the shows. "In fact, I'm as happy as hell!"

Nevertheless, even current information continues to get distorted in this musical saga, sometimes coming from the main surviving source himself. It's little wonder, then, that historical facts get blurred. For instance, Brian claims: "I haven't been able to write anything new in over a year, but I have been playing a lot of piano. I've been at the piano every day, two or three times a day -- trying to keep alive, keep my voice alive. But I haven't been able to get any new melodies going. I've had writer's block, I guess." Yet, Sahanaja reveals that in addition to a new version of Wilson's gorgeous "Till I Die," the Roxy shows will be augmented by two brand-new Wilson originals, including a tune titled "This Isn't Love."

Of course, this type of distortion is basically minute detail, based on Wilson's whim of the moment, and ultimately harmless. When it comes to Beach Boy Mike Love's selective memories, however, things get a little more complicated and a lot more damaging. In fact, perversion may be a preferable word to distortion when it comes to Love's version of the truth.

During the last several months, there have been several television specials examining the Beach Boys phenomenon. In the last three weeks alone, Court TV ran a special documenting the various Beach Boys lawsuits involving Brian (and usually his cousin Mike Love) over the last decade, while American Movie Classics just hosted a Saturday night Beach Boys marathon, The Beach Boys: Then & Now, which included a rebroadcast of Endless Harmony, a documentary originally made for VH1 and recently released commercially on VHS and DVD by Capitol Records. Not coincidentally, when Mike Love offers a sound bite in the documentary, presenting himself as the "bright, positive" counterpart to Brian's "dark" side, history has a way of suddenly being rewritten. For instance, in a new scene added to the DVD version, Love suddenly takes credit for suggesting that Paul McCartney write a Beach Boys-like song about Ukraine girls, which, of course, became "Back in the USSR" -- and which is news to any rock historian who's followed the story throughout the years.

The worst example of Love's revisionism, however, was the ABC-TV miniseries, The Beach Boys: An American Family, which ran two nights in late February as part of sweeps month. Produced by actor John Stamos (who frequently drummed for the Love-fronted nostalgia unit calling itself the Beach Boys in the years following Dennis Wilson's death), the film could have listed a credit for Minister of Propaganda to Love. As an angry review on a Beach Boys-related Web site explained: "[The film was] a monstrously vile, twisted perversion of the truth...It's Mike's version of what happened, told with a huge smirk at all the so-called 'Brian freaks' he so deeply disdains."

The ironic thing is that when Wouldn't It Be Nice, the Brian Wilson autobiography written with Todd Gold (and, many argue, Dr. Eugene Landy, Wilson's controversial psychotherapist), was published in the mid-'90s, the ever-litigious Love was part of a libel suit against Wilson, Gold, and the publishers over objectionable material in that book. Shortly after that suit (and after Landy was out of the picture), Love was awarded $5 million from Wilson following a suit he filed over cosongwriting credits he claimed he never received; Love is currently suing former Beach Boy Al Jardine over the name "The Beach Boys' Family & Friends," which Jardine has been using to bill his current touring group, which includes Brian's daughters, Carnie and Wendy. It's almost as though Love has tried to claim his legacy via the American judicial system. And when that wasn't enough, he created a miniseries to claim his glory, presenting himself as the true vision behind the  Beach Boys. The sad fact, though, is that the TV movie now exists forever as a strong public record -- in other words, to be believed as history by those who don't know any better.

"I didn't like the second part," Brian hesitantly says of the miniseries. "It wasn't really true to the way things were. I'd like to see another movie if it was done right. But I just sort of turned my back to this one, or my other cheek, or whatever you wanna call it. It was best just to ignore it because it really wasn't true to life."

Sahanaja remembers a rehearsal last summer when Wilson's wife and comanager, Melinda, was on the phone with a copy of the script in front of her, yelling at one of Love's representatives over certain questionable content. Brian was so upset that he asked for the keys to the car and sat in the parking lot until the incident was over. "It was so sad," says Sahanaja, "because Brian's happier now, trying to move on -- and yet this stuff from the past keeps popping up to haunt him. My theory is that Brian and Melinda were most disturbed, apart from all the Mike Love propaganda at Brian's expense, by a scene that depicted Dennis Wilson screaming, 'You never supported me as an artist,' at his older brother. From everything I've read and everyone I've ever talked to, Dennis was the one guy -- perhaps the only guy -- who always stood by Brian."



In fact, the miniseries begins by portraying Dennis (who reportedly despised Love; legend has it that   the two were once involved in a fistfight onstage at the Greek Theatre in the '70s) and Love surfing together as best friends -- the two studs on the beach -- even though every Beach Boys history to date claims Dennis was the band's only surfer. The film then depicts it being Love's idea to form the band, and as the miniseries progresses, Mike comes up with nearly every brilliant idea -- from creating the titles Pet Sounds and Endless Summer to "jamming with John and Paul" in India -- as Brian rapidly becomes a slobbering, drug-crazed idiot. It's almost comical. Accordingly, a German-based Web site devoted to the work of Wilson collaborator Van Dyke Parks (www.vandykeparks.com) is currently hosting a "Best Mike Love Joke" contest. One of the funniest is a short story in which Love takes credit for writing songs with Bruce Springsteen, creating Live Aid, reuniting the Eagles and Fleetwood Mac, directing Schindler's List, and creating Windows 95 ("Bill Gates didn't give me credit!"), among other things.

"There are two sides to every story," concludes Sahanaja, "and I'm sure some of what Mike claims is legit. But I'm also a believer in it's all about how you present yourself. I think he could get his due, but I don't think people are willing to give it to him just because of the way Mike is."

It's perhaps fitting that the Love joke page should be found on a Van Dyke Parks Web site, since -- next to the three Wilson brothers themselves -- Parks was the historical figure most maligned by the ABC miniseries. Parks, Brian Wilson's musical collaborator on the ill-fated and ultimately aborted Smile LP (the planned follow-up to Pet Sounds),  was depicted as a drug-addled hippie, only several steps removed from Charles Manson, and a key figure in Brian's eventual breakdown and decline.

Of course, the movie makes no mention of Parks' subsequent substantial career -- he's worked with everyone from the Byrds, Paul Revere & the Raiders, and his friend Harry Nilsson to, more recently, Fiona Apple, U2, Sam Phillips, and Rufus Wainwright, the latter whose debut LP he coproduced. The telepic also makes no note of his movie or TV soundtracks, nor seems to consider his collaboration with Brian Wilson several years ago on the wonderful Orange Crate Art album. But in a gallant move that totally counterbalances Parks' portrayal in Love's film, Brian and Melinda recently asked Parks to do the orchestration for a proposed tour this summer that will have him and the Wondermints performing Pet Sounds in its entirety, with symphonies, throughout the country. (The show is scheduled to play the Hollywood Bowl on September 24th.)

"As I understand it, Pet Sounds wasn't done with an orchestra for the record," says a concerned Parks. "So the point here wouldn't be to get a whole bunch of people together to play Brian's music simply for the bravado of it. It's not about what can be added to the music, but what can be done to confirm what's already on the record. I wouldn't want to intrude too much, but I would work very hard to layer [the orchestration] correctly. So I'm hoping that I can do it. But the fact that I'm being considered to work on Brian's summer tour is a positive confirmation of the real value he places on me and the value I place on him."

Nevertheless, Parks -- ever the Southern gentleman -- remains flabbergasted by his portrayal in the movie, as he sits in the quiet Hancock Park home he shares with his wife, Sally. The composer claims that he's asked the ABC legal department to delete the eight mentions of his name before they "exploit" the film again, although "the jury's still out and the damage has already been done."

He also claims that it was his phone call to old friend Lucy Fisher, cochairperson of Sony Entertainment, that got the network to run a disclaimer about the show often being "a work of fiction with much dramatic license." Parks claims the Sony executive called him seven minutes before the telecast to let him know what she'd been able to do. "She's a very decent person," says Parks. "I'd phoned her to express the Wilsons' dismay at the tenor of the show, and when she called me back she said it was the least she could do for all the pleasure she'd received over the years from Brian Wilson's music. She didn't say the Beach Boys. She may have meant the Beach Boys, but she said Brian Wilson."

He reflects a moment. "What's amazing to me -- and in a way, it's a compliment -- is that Mike Love has borne -- and I'm sure it cost him some great effort -- such an animosity toward me for so many years."


It's especially ironic in light of the fact that Wilson's other lyrical collaborators -- Roger Christian, Tony Asher, Gary Usher -- were never even mentioned in the film. After all these years, Parks -- and his "acid alliteration," as Love once termed it -- obviously still pose some sort of threat to Love. "It astonished me," says Parks. "Likewise, seven of Mike Love's wives were not named in his autobiographical television project. I thought that was a big slight. I was actually embarrassed by the time Mike Love devoted on his anger toward me.

"I finally needed to investigate, in my own mind, the basis of Mike Love's adolescent animosity because, quite simply, I was blindsided by it. What exactly did I do? Well, many years ago, I suggested to Brian Wilson that he put a cello on 'Good Vibrations.' He did, and it became a signature sound of that song. I also suggested the triplet fundamentals in the music. I did that. And I admit that Brian then offered me the lyrics to that song because he was embarrassed with the 'excitation' part Mike Love had insisted on adding. But I told Brian that I wouldn't touch it with a 10-foot pole and that nobody'd be listening to the lyrics anyway once they heard that music. Besides, why should I make an enemy of Mike Love?

"So I turned down Brian's kind offer to cowrite 'Good Vibrations.' I was more interested in a long-term relationship with Brian. And it was one of the few times I've actually been smart in my career because it ensured I'd work with Brian again in other ways. And when I later found out that the lyrics that I was writing for Brian Wilson were a matter of great concern amongst the other Beach Boys, particularly Mike, I walked away from the opportunity. And I did so because I thought it might ease Brian's anxieties. I hoped it might make his life better.

"That wasn't depicted in the film. Nor was the question: 'Who was Van Dyke Parks to the Beach Boys?' Well, for one thing, I co-wrote the song that brought Brian to Carnegie Hall when Leonard  Bernstein called 'Surf's Up' one of the great songs of the 20th century. I did that by relieving Brian of the lyrical juvenilia of fast cars and faster women. That image was very much perplexing Brian at that time. He wanted a more poetic vision in his music. Now, it wasn't necessary, but it was his individual right. So I helped him explore that. And happily so! And then I left that world for a career as an executive at Warner Bros. Records.

"The Beach Boys were at a very low point in their career. They'd left Capitol Records, but they ended up at Warner Bros. because I personally begged [then Warner chief] Mo Ostin to sign them. And they were considered a problem at that time. They were an industry albatross, simply because there were so many egos involved. Everyone at the label just wanted Brian Wilson to come over and write some songs. Well, the Beach Boys were in Holland and had recorded what the label called 'an unreleasable album.' I still had a demo tape of 'Sail On, Sailor.' I came up with that lyric when I was working with Brian, as well as the [musical] pitches those words reside on. I did nothing with that tape until I saw the Beach Boys crisis at the company where I was working, earning $350 a week.

"Well, they recorded the song, and it was a hit. And I'm glad that everyone then came out of their little rooms to claim cowriting credit on that song. But I never questioned it, just as I never questioned the various claims on the residuals. You could say I did the Beach Boys a nice turn there. It was just a nice thing to do.

"Many years later, when [producer] Terry Melcher wanted to take the song 'Kokomo' to the tropical islands, he called me and wanted to use my Rolodex, so to speak. So, I brought some great   musician friends -- people who'd played with Sinatra, Fitzgerald, Cecil Taylor -- to play with me on that session. I was paid well for my work, although it was a nonunion session -- no hospitalization, no dental, nothing extra if it went   commercial. The Beach Boys, after all, were Republicans -- unions weren't something to mention to them. We weren't dealing with Studs Terkel. We were dealing with Bruce Johnston and Mike Love, who'd become the entity known as the Beach Boys. Of course, the song went to number one, and Mike Love always made a very big deal out of the fact that it was made without Brian Wilson. And that was always very alarming to me because beyond the Beach Boys' beautiful music, my allegiance has always been to Brian Wilson, who hired me years ago and told me he'd give me 50 percent of anything we wrote together. He said that speaking from his throne at a time when I was nobody. Isn't that the sign of a marvelous person?"

Parks recalls he saw Love one final time when Melcher called him to Monterey to play synthesizer on the Beach Boys' final album, recorded without Brian, 1992's dreadful Summer in Paradise. A neighbor offered to fly the musician to Monterey in his one-engine plane if Parks agreed to cover gas and other expenses. When he got there, Love was meditating in Melcher's living room. "For the first time in 30 years, he was able to ask me directly, once again, 'What do those lyrics -- Over and over the crow flies, uncover the cornfield -- mean?'" Parks said about that meeting in '95. "And I was  able to tell him, once again, 'I don't know.' I have no idea what those words mean. I was perhaps thinking of Van Gogh's wheat field or an idealized agrarian environment. Maybe I meant nothing, but I was trying to follow Brian Wilson's vision at that time." Parks says Love asked if he could fly back to L.A. in the plane with him. "We had a nice chat and he insisted that he wanted to split the cost of the flight with me, so he gave me a card with his number on it. The next morning, I called to discover it was a disconnected number. And that was the last time I saw Mike Love."

As for the druggy way Parks was portrayed in the film, "I'd already told my young children years before that unlike Bill Clinton, I did inhale. Unlike Mike Love, I did inhale. But unlike George W. Bush, I also grew up in the '60s, which were a time for renewal and revelation. It's not theoretical. The night I was out in Hollywood with Phil Ochs and we got beat up by policeman because we were part of a group pressuring Lyndon Johnson not to run again, well, that was the night Johnson decided not to run. So the '60s were not theoretical. I associated with people who had courage back then and people who were beautiful. I saw the beautiful people -- and, believe me, Brian was one of them. I'm very sorry about the way that show portrayed him and -- let me be very emphatic here -- that was not the Brian Wilson I knew.

"I never took a joint to Brian's house, just as I'd never offer drugs to any employer. It's just not prudent! One thing that was true was I never went into [Brian's living room] sandbox, but that's only because there was dog sh*t in it. It wasn't because I was too good or arrogant to do it. But I never went into that [marijuana] tepee, because I didn't want to be smoking a joint when Mike Love walked into the room. I was working for the most powerful man in the American music business at the time. I was very aware of that fact and had no desire to spoil it.

"The lyrics ultimately just got out of my hands. I was not a Dadaist. I didn't sit in on the [Smile] 'Fire' sessions [the night Brian reportedly went insane]. By then, he was surrounded by so many people that I knew my opportunity to do this little American quilt work with him called Smile was over and done with.Mike ultimately put a stop to it. And yet the movie brought into question a certain amount of work I did for Brian many years ago, most of which was never commercially released, due in large part to Mike Love's objections. I'm very proud of the music I made with Brian Wilson. But I'm also proud that I walked away from a great opportunity at the time to maintain peace."

Parks wasn't pleased how the other Wilson brothers were portrayed in the film, either. Carl Wilson -- often credited with keeping the band together after Brian's breakdown -- hardly existed in the flick. "I thought a great deal of Carl Wilson," says Parks. "He was a really nice guy. I didn't do a lot with him, but he was always very nice to me and extended himself to me in very subtle ways. He was a very gifted man. The last time I saw Carl, I played 'Ave Maria' at his mother's funeral, and he embraced me afterwards. To be with him and Brian at Audrey's funeral was a very big deal to me, personally."

As for Dennis, Parks offers one telling anecdote. "That movie showed Dennis Wilson cowering in front of Charles Manson!" says Parks. "Well, I'll tell you what really happened. One day, Charles Manson brought a bullet out and showed it to Dennis, who asked, 'What's this?' And Manson replied, 'It's a bullet. Every time you look at it, I want you to think how nice it is your kids are still safe.' Well, Dennis grabbed Manson by the head and threw him to the ground and began pummeling him until Charlie said, 'Ouch!' He beat the living sh*t out of him. 'How dare you!' was Dennis' reaction. Charlie Manson was weeping openly in front of a lot of hip people. I heard about it, but I wasn't there. The point is, though, Dennis Wilson wasn't afraid of anybody! Dennis was a total alpha male -- something Mike Love wants to be but isn't ."

Parks understands that An American Family will stand as a legacy for Beach Boys fans who don't know the history, but he's hoping that the music will ultimately stand as the stronger legacy. "What I saw on that show about Brian Wilson was false, and   that's all I really need to say," he concludes. "I guarantee you it was a pack of lies. And I'll tell you something -- I'll give you one final clean piece of evidence. The audience was led to believe by that movie that John Lennon wanted to jam with Mike Love. Well, I was with John Lennon one time, and he told me that he and Paul thought that Mike Love was -- and these are the words John Lennon used -- 'a jerk.' The Beatles thought Mike Love was a jerk. So there are obviously two different impressions of that meeting. Mike Love has one and John Lennon had another. So, I'm submitting John Lennon's recollection to you since he's no longer here to do it himself."

It's nice to know that history can sometimes be redeemed by the survivors on the sidelines.

Brian Wilson and the Wondermints play the Roxy, 9009 Sunset Blvd., West Hollywood, on Friday and Saturday, April 7 and 8. Both shows are sold out.
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« Reply #54 on: November 30, 2018, 09:03:26 AM »

Over the last couple of years it has been shown on the AXS network.
Yes, the early parts are okay. It really starts going off the rails when Brian goes into a room and meets the VDP character for the first time. I cant stomach it after that scene.
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"(Brian) got into this really touching music with songs like 'In My Room', and 'Good Vibrations' was amazing. The melodies are so beautiful, almost perfect. I began to realize he was one of the most gifted writers of our generation." - Paul Simon
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« Reply #55 on: November 30, 2018, 10:08:39 AM »


There's one infamous scene (from circa '66, so I don't remember if that's part one or two) where the actor playing Mike's glue-on beard is peeling off during a scene, and they just left it in.
 

I haven't seen the film in ages, so I don't recall this scene.

But a high-quality screenshot needs to be taken of this; this could be meme gold.
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« Reply #56 on: November 30, 2018, 11:31:21 AM »


There's one infamous scene (from circa '66, so I don't remember if that's part one or two) where the actor playing Mike's glue-on beard is peeling off during a scene, and they just left it in.
 

I haven't seen the film in ages, so I don't recall this scene.

But a high-quality screenshot needs to be taken of this; this could be meme gold.

My recollection is that it's a scene from circa 1967 or so where Mike is talking to his wife in a door way and the mustache and/or beard starts peeling off. If I'm recalling correctly, the actor can tell it's happening and tries to nonchalantly push it back on during the course of the conversation.

But, for all the talk back at the time of the "high budget and production values", the fact that they *didn't* reshoot this scene tells me they were running a lean, quick operation. It surely had a higher budget than the 1990 "Summer Dreams" movie, but they couldn't waste a little more celluloid redoing that one scene apparently.

Video or screencaps of the movie are somewhat hard to come by. There are some, but that Mike scene is not exactly one of the scintillating moments of the movie, so it doesn't make the "highlights" compilations on YouTube.

Somebody posted a pic years and years ago if I recall correctly, on one of the boards.
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« Reply #57 on: November 30, 2018, 02:28:09 PM »


There's one infamous scene (from circa '66, so I don't remember if that's part one or two) where the actor playing Mike's glue-on beard is peeling off during a scene, and they just left it in.
 

I haven't seen the film in ages, so I don't recall this scene.

But a high-quality screenshot needs to be taken of this; this could be meme gold.

My recollection is that it's a scene from circa 1967 or so where Mike is talking to his wife in a door way and the mustache and/or beard starts peeling off. If I'm recalling correctly, the actor can tell it's happening and tries to nonchalantly push it back on during the course of the conversation.



Something to consider here that everyone seems to be missing.  It could very well be that this scene is the most accurate in the entire 2 part trip to 'la toilette'...aka the 'movie'.  This was a recreation of the time when Mike's beard and moustache rejected him.  Similar thing happened to 'Tricky Dicky' only a few years later when he went in for an asshole transplant and the asshole quickly rejected him.  sh*t happens. Wink
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« Reply #58 on: November 30, 2018, 02:37:16 PM »


There's one infamous scene (from circa '66, so I don't remember if that's part one or two) where the actor playing Mike's glue-on beard is peeling off during a scene, and they just left it in.
 

I haven't seen the film in ages, so I don't recall this scene.

But a high-quality screenshot needs to be taken of this; this could be meme gold.

My recollection is that it's a scene from circa 1967 or so where Mike is talking to his wife in a door way and the mustache and/or beard starts peeling off. If I'm recalling correctly, the actor can tell it's happening and tries to nonchalantly push it back on during the course of the conversation.



Something to consider here that everyone seems to be missing.  It could very well be that this scene is the most accurate in the entire 2 part trip to 'la toilette'...aka the 'movie'.  This was a recreation of the time when Mike's beard and moustache rejected him.  Similar thing happened to 'Tricky Dicky' only a few years later when he went in for an asshole transplant and the asshole quickly rejected him.  sh*t happens. Wink

Thx, Lee. "Sh*t happens" as you said. Is anything else needed to be known about this cornucopia of crap?  I remember people hiding it from Brian (protecting him) thru part of the series. When he actually saw it, he had a "so what" attitude because it was such ridiculous tripe. But in protecting his own interests, he did note what a load of manure it was.
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« Reply #59 on: December 01, 2018, 10:17:28 AM »

I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...
I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...

I wrote a long response to this yesterday and I guess I'm not too swift at posting stuff. It never showed up so I'm gonna give it another try and see if it shows up this time.
Maybe someone didn't like it and simply removed it? Is that possible? I could have sworn that I hit both "post" and "save" as I fashioned a response. (sigh)
BTW, thank you everyone for all the responses and info on "The Beach Boys, An American Family."
Here' my response to the above quote:

I respectfully disagree with the suggestion that this story is about the Wilson family and am surprised that it is characterized that way.
Much of the book's  focus is, in fact, on the Love brothers, Mike, Stan and Steve. The relationship of the Love brothers is often overlooked in the Beach Boys "oeuvre" and it is a fascinating recounting that we accomplish in this book. Over time, Mike helped established Steve as the manager, and it was Steve along with Marylin and Mike who hired Stan to help out with Brian who was slipping into a disastrous condition. Stan then brought Rocky, his college roommate and friend, aboard to join the "save Brian" team. This set the sage for a lot. All four of these guys, Mike, Steve, Stan and Rocky were each "bigger than life" in their own ways. Mike was Mike, superstar since forever, Steve was an accomplished scholar, (magna at USC)  and manager of one of the biggest bands in the world for nearly a decade with great success all around. Stan was a professional basketball player and Rocky was drafted by the NFL and became an international model (Playgirl centerfold and Camel Man). No lightweights in that bunch. Add sibling rivalry, band loyalty and the age old rift between management and talent, then sprinkle Carl and Dennis Wilson on the whole concoction, and "look out Cleveland," stuff was bound to happen and it did! To me, it is this explored interaction that makes the read so interesting and previously, in many ways, untold.
The technical part we left out was where Steve was fired, and even charged with felony embezzlement. Steve was later completely exonerated legally (I've seen the court docs) and additionally,  "forgiven" by everyone, as I understand it. It was a a dark alleyway we chose not to go down. I'm guessing here, but I bet there were huge regrets on all sides for the whole incident. Tough stuff.
 

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« Reply #60 on: December 01, 2018, 12:00:09 PM »

Oh, how I wish Doe were here for this.  Evil
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« Reply #61 on: December 01, 2018, 03:43:32 PM »

Oh, how I wish Doe were here for this.  Evil

It would be entertaining. Is he around somewhere, BTW? Haven't seen or heard from him for awhile.
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« Reply #62 on: December 01, 2018, 04:08:22 PM »

Oh, how I wish Doe were here for this.  Evil

It would be entertaining. Is he around somewhere, BTW? Haven't seen or heard from him for awhile.

Hmm, why do I get the idea that I'm perhaps being served up for lunch to someone named Doe. Hello Doe. Me, friend. You?
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« Reply #63 on: December 01, 2018, 05:05:48 PM »

Oh, how I wish Doe were here for this.  Evil

It would be entertaining. Is he around somewhere, BTW? Haven't seen or heard from him for awhile.

Yes, hes big on the Pet Sounds Forum.
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« Reply #64 on: December 01, 2018, 05:28:10 PM »

I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...
I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...

I wrote a long response to this yesterday and I guess I'm not too swift at posting stuff. It never showed up so I'm gonna give it another try and see if it shows up this time.
Maybe someone didn't like it and simply removed it? Is that possible? I could have sworn that I hit both "post" and "save" as I fashioned a response. (sigh)
BTW, thank you everyone for all the responses and info on "The Beach Boys, An American Family."
Here' my response to the above quote:

I respectfully disagree with the suggestion that this story is about the Wilson family and am surprised that it is characterized that way.
Much of the book's  focus is, in fact, on the Love brothers, Mike, Stan and Steve. The relationship of the Love brothers is often overlooked in the Beach Boys "oeuvre" and it is a fascinating recounting that we accomplish in this book. Over time, Mike helped established Steve as the manager, and it was Steve along with Marylin and Mike who hired Stan to help out with Brian who was slipping into a disastrous condition. Stan then brought Rocky, his college roommate and friend, aboard to join the "save Brian" team. This set the sage for a lot. All four of these guys, Mike, Steve, Stan and Rocky were each "bigger than life" in their own ways. Mike was Mike, superstar since forever, Steve was an accomplished scholar, (magna at USC)  and manager of one of the biggest bands in the world for nearly a decade with great success all around. Stan was a professional basketball player and Rocky was drafted by the NFL and became an international model (Playgirl centerfold and Camel Man). No lightweights in that bunch. Add sibling rivalry, band loyalty and the age old rift between management and talent, then sprinkle Carl and Dennis Wilson on the whole concoction, and "look out Cleveland," stuff was bound to happen and it did! To me, it is this explored interaction that makes the read so interesting and previously, in many ways, untold.
The technical part we left out was where Steve was fired, and even charged with felony embezzlement. Steve was later completely exonerated legally (I've seen the court docs) and additionally,  "forgiven" by everyone, as I understand it. It was a a dark alleyway we chose not to go down. I'm guessing here, but I bet there were huge regrets on all sides for the whole incident. Tough stuff.
 

What I said above was not communicated with clarity - "Wilson family", in this context, was meant to include the Brothers Love.  I'm not an expert in genealogy, but I do believe that the Love bros. and the Wilson bros. all carry the same proportion of the controversial "Wilson blood."  The book was about 6 cousins - two sets of three brothers.  The core cousins who figure in the book are Brian, Dennis, Stan and Steve. Mike barely figures into it and Carl pops up to get cold-cocked, but otherwise doesn't play into it.  Rocky himself is (almost literally) the wild card and or joker in the deck.  The book was about family - however that's defined - more than it is about a rock 'n' roll band.  If the band is a family, and the family is a band, then it may that - at least in some isolated instances - Steve Love and Stan Love are "Beach Boys" just as much as, say, Bruce J. and Al J.  Just throwing that out there, not sure I agree with it. 

I don't think this forum is the right place to get into the ins-and-outs of the complicated issues that are (inadvertently?) raised in this book.  While I continue to believe that "nobody comes off well," I could have been nicer and clarified that (a) that's the nature of life and people are people, we're all human, etc. (b) The book is wrong in its value judgments and, like so much other Beach Boys commentary, operates on the basis of shaky core assumptions that should be questioned (c) the book is still good, in that it succeeds in what it seems to want to do and want to say.  That is, a book like this can be both honest, and wrong.  That is, heavily biased, but honest and transparent in its biases and subjective outlook.

Ron did a good job translating from the original RockRush into English. 
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« Reply #65 on: December 01, 2018, 06:39:30 PM »

I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...
I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...

I wrote a long response to this yesterday and I guess I'm not too swift at posting stuff. It never showed up so I'm gonna give it another try and see if it shows up this time.
Maybe someone didn't like it and simply removed it? Is that possible? I could have sworn that I hit both "post" and "save" as I fashioned a response. (sigh)
BTW, thank you everyone for all the responses and info on "The Beach Boys, An American Family."
Here' my response to the above quote:

I respectfully disagree with the suggestion that this story is about the Wilson family and am surprised that it is characterized that way.
Much of the book's  focus is, in fact, on the Love brothers, Mike, Stan and Steve. The relationship of the Love brothers is often overlooked in the Beach Boys "oeuvre" and it is a fascinating recounting that we accomplish in this book. Over time, Mike helped established Steve as the manager, and it was Steve along with Marylin and Mike who hired Stan to help out with Brian who was slipping into a disastrous condition. Stan then brought Rocky, his college roommate and friend, aboard to join the "save Brian" team. This set the sage for a lot. All four of these guys, Mike, Steve, Stan and Rocky were each "bigger than life" in their own ways. Mike was Mike, superstar since forever, Steve was an accomplished scholar, (magna at USC)  and manager of one of the biggest bands in the world for nearly a decade with great success all around. Stan was a professional basketball player and Rocky was drafted by the NFL and became an international model (Playgirl centerfold and Camel Man). No lightweights in that bunch. Add sibling rivalry, band loyalty and the age old rift between management and talent, then sprinkle Carl and Dennis Wilson on the whole concoction, and "look out Cleveland," stuff was bound to happen and it did! To me, it is this explored interaction that makes the read so interesting and previously, in many ways, untold.
The technical part we left out was where Steve was fired, and even charged with felony embezzlement. Steve was later completely exonerated legally (I've seen the court docs) and additionally,  "forgiven" by everyone, as I understand it. It was a a dark alleyway we chose not to go down. I'm guessing here, but I bet there were huge regrets on all sides for the whole incident. Tough stuff.
 



"Mike was Mike superstar since forever"Huh?? Huh?? Huh Huh Huh What the hey you talkin' 'bout, boy?? More like embarrassing clown forever. Razz
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« Reply #66 on: December 01, 2018, 08:26:32 PM »

Have to agree with OSD.  Leave that Kool-Aid alone boy.  You've been badly [and easily ... apparently] conned.
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"Add Some...Music...To Your Day.  I do.  It's the only way to fly.  Well...what was I gonna put here?  An apple a day keeps the doctor away?  Hum me a few bars."   Lee Marshall [2014]

Donald  TRUMP!  ...  Is TOAST.  "What a disaster."  "Overrated?"... ... ..."BIG LEAGUE."  "Lots of people are saying it"  "I will tell you that."   Collusion, Money Laundering, Treason.   B'Bye Dirty Donnie!!!  Adios!!!  Bon Voyage!!!  Toodles!!!  Move yourself...SPANKY!!!  Jail awaits.  It's NO "Witch Hunt". There IS Collusion...and worse.  The Russian Mafia!!  Conspiracies!!  Fraud!!  This racist is goin' down...and soon.  Good Riddance.  And take the kids.
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« Reply #67 on: December 01, 2018, 08:51:45 PM »

Oh, how I wish Doe were here for this.  Evil

It would be entertaining. Is he around somewhere, BTW? Haven't seen or heard from him for awhile.

Yes, hes big on the Pet Sounds Forum.

Big??, Oh, you would be referring to the Doester's girth predicament.  LOL LOL
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« Reply #68 on: December 02, 2018, 11:14:19 AM »

I cold use some help. There was a TV movie made about the Beach Boys broadcast on network TV back around 2000. Has anyone seen this?
It's titled "The Beach Boys An American Family." It was a 2 parter and now it's no longer easily available.
I got a copy from a sketchy website and the quality is bad, but I suspect the movie is really good.
I'd be interested in anyone's thoughts about it and if anyone actually has an accurate copy.
Thanks,
Ron


The 2000 TV movie was *not* received well by fans. The first part wasn't too awful, but the second part was ridiculous and embarrassing. Even the movie's figurehead/producer John Stamos admitted years later in an interview that the movie didn't go over well with some of the BB camp (read: everybody but Mike; and especially Brian). There is even an interview from back around 2000 with Darian Sahanaja detailing Melinda arguing with someone (producers? network?) over the movie and Brian getting stressed about the whole thing.

Setting aside group politics, the second part especially is just way off. Brian comes off like a babbling, drooling idiot, the movie ends on the wrong date (Brian's "comeback" is for no apparent reason shown to be 1974).

There's one infamous scene (from circa '66, so I don't remember if that's part one or two) where the actor playing Mike's glue-on beard is peeling off during a scene, and they just left it in.

There's a Van Dyke Parks interview where he had to call in favors to get them to add a disclaimer to the front of the second part of the film because the guy who was essentially supposed to be VDP (though going by another name) was grossly misrepresented in the film.

I believe others involved in the film ended up regretting participating.

I think there's also a fun story also of Stebbins and Ed Roach visiting the set floating around somwhere.

Apparently, BRI (or at least Capitol) and Brian participated to some degree initially, as they supplied remixed BB tracks and Brian re-recorded a version of "In My Room", but seeing as how Mike was allegedly an informal "advisor" on the film (he and Bruce were the only BBs who went out and promoted the movie with Stamos on talk shows), the film goes off the rails the more it tries to portray Mike as saving the group and Brian as a babbling lunatic frothing at the mouth.

IN PARTICULAR, both Brian and fans were offended at the portrayal of Brian being dismissive and unsupportive of Dennis's music. This was offensive to the Wilson family, and just grossly incorrect considering how much Brian was involved in stuff like Dennis's tracks from "Sunflower."

That Stamos would support putting *that* incorrect garbage in the film, but conveniently avoid things like depicting Brian being strong-armed into not working with Redwood/Three Dog Night, is not surprising.

The movie was never commercially released, but screener VHS copies were made "For Emmy Consideration" (no, I don't believe it won any Emmys), and they are up on eBay from time to time. Here's one now:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/THE-BEACH-BOYS-AN-AMERICAN-FAMILY-2-vhs-videos-FREDERICK-WELLER-KEVIN-DUNN/283275006532?hash=item41f4819244:g:GfwAAOSwBLlVLD8h:rk:1:pf:0

I think the film was aired back around 2012 on cable on the back of the BB reunion.

Thinking of that awful movie I always remember the Good Vibrations session scene where Brian is sitting at the piano in a daze before Mike arrives just in the nick of time, says "Here's the hook" and sings the I'm pickin' up Good Vibrations line. Like magic the entire work springs out of that moment, and we think gosh what would Brian have ever done without Mike.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2018, 05:02:15 PM by jparis51 » Logged
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« Reply #69 on: December 02, 2018, 11:46:28 AM »

I just read the foreword, called "Call us the Guardian Angels", which should tell you something right there, on Amazon.  "The Beach Boys stayed alive on the back of Mike Love's charismatic lead singing and hard-working stage presence, becoming widely respected for their constant touring and great concerts".  

Are you ****ing kidding me?  

I guess Carl's singing had nothing to do with it.  Nor did his producing, arranging, guitar-playing or band-leading.  

what kind of hot steaming garbage is this? when has pop culture ever embraced Mike as anything more than the awkwardly coordinated, money-loving singer in the band who didn't play an instrument and never knew what to do with his hands? let alone the sole reason the band kept going, considering they "stayed alive" on his back.
I know you wrote a book, and that's cool, but that is straight up not true, especially when Carl has been recognized for decades as the musical director for the touring Beach Boys who worked his ass off to make those shows rock. He is not the equivalent of Mick Jagger in the Stones. He is the opposite of Mick Jagger.

It's certainly true what you say about Carl - just listening to the '73 In Concert album, his influence is obvious throughout, especially taking into account how many of those songs were rearranged or reinterpreted and made to work in a live '70s setting. Even when he was sick with cancer, he still led the band onstage, doing all the count-ins and driving the tempo with his guitar (and singing great, to boot). Not mentioning his role in the band's revival, legitimacy and consistent popularity as a live act is neglectful.

However, regarding Mike - everyone is entitled to their opinion, and opinions will always differ on this subject, but watching how he works the stage in the opening sequence of the '76 "It's OK" TV special is evidence of Mike's abilities as a frontman (as opposed to "band leader", which was Carl's role). Even David Leaf acknowledged as much when he wrote in his book, "Mike is the man who makes the live shows work" (while rightfully acknowledging elsewhere in the book how Carl took over the role of onstage leader when Brian quit the road). And when Carl left the group in '81, he spoke of having a newfound respect for Michael and his role. Finally, on the 2012 reunion tour (by which time, of course, Mike was no longer strutting and prancing the stage like he did in his thirties), Brian praised Mike as a great front man (if memory serves, this was in a one-on-one interview, rather than an appearance with Mike and the other guys present - so it's not as if he was simply saying something nice for Mike to hear). The fact that both Carl and Brian, after having toured on their own without Mike, expressed an even greater appreciation of what he brings to the live act, says something.

If you ask me (someone who's studied dozens of live recordings and numerous reviews from this era), there were many factors contributing to the success the Boys enjoyed as a live act in the seventies:  Carl's musical leadership skills, Mike's stage presence, Dennis' stage presence, Al's impeccable singing, the magic of Brian's timeless compositions, and the management skills of first Jack Reiley and then James Guercio.


Speaking only as a 60's Beach Boys fan who rediscovered them in the 70's at those incredible concerts, one of the great things about the band in 1972 was that there was no front man. Knowing little to nothing about Mike, me and my friends thought it was cool the way he stayed out of the way during some of the songs, even sitting down on the side of the stage at times. We thought he was some kind of stoned California hippie who maybe lived in a hut on the beach and taught meditation classes, but when the band finally broke into Surfin' USA and that unmistakable voice came through we were like "Oh God he's that guy from the 60's records!"

Just a young (at the time) fan's perspective from the audience. Mike's thing back then was just one more layer of magic from this mind-blowing band on top of all the amazing songs and performances from everybody else onstage. The music was progressive and the surf and car hits at the end were just a "Oh hey, we can still do these too." When I listen to the music from those Jack Rieley years I still like to think of the band in that way, a Grateful Dead kind of musical democracy that happened to have a string of hits in the 60's but grew up to become cool California hippies. And although I love Brian's comeback and the Love You album, I wish that vision was closer to the truth and that they had continued developing the kind of music on Holland. By the time of the '76 "It's OK" TV special that magic was long gone.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2018, 05:06:42 PM by jparis51 » Logged
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« Reply #70 on: December 02, 2018, 08:16:35 PM »

Oh, how I wish Doe were here for this.  Evil
Oh God no.
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« Reply #71 on: December 03, 2018, 01:12:36 AM »

About 8 mins into part two, Mike kisses his wife - and off it comes.

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« Reply #72 on: December 03, 2018, 07:39:17 AM »

About 8 mins into part two, Mike kisses his wife - and off it comes.



Oh Brother, there's one born every moment. I just ordered for the 2ed time a copy of the 2 part movie. The first version I had was so grainy and badly copied, I could barely watch it.
After hearing all of Smile site's educated comments, it sounds like a clean copy will be just as useless.
I was seduced by the clips on YouTube and wanted to be familiar with all the dramatic versions of the band history. I thought the actors were actually pretty good when I saw those clips.
I had occasion to talk to Marilyn to whom we had sent a copy of the book and when I asked her if she had a copy of the 2 parter she just laughed and said it was just "made up."

She had not finished the book yet but was reading it and we agreed to talk again.

Stan Love, who for reasons still murky to me does not communicate with Rocky, really liked the book and asked for more copies to help promote it and gave us his Mike's address to get a copy to him. Wow. I was very pleased about that.
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« Reply #73 on: December 03, 2018, 08:10:57 AM »

I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...
I read the book.  I would imagine Jardine would be pleased to find that he doesn't figure into this particular tale, as written. Nobody comes off very well, including the narrator.
Keep in mind that this is about family relationships - the story is about the Wilson family, not the "Beach Boys" band. Jardine is a Beach Boy, but - as he could probably tell you - he is not a Wilson...

I wrote a long response to this yesterday and I guess I'm not too swift at posting stuff. It never showed up so I'm gonna give it another try and see if it shows up this time.
Maybe someone didn't like it and simply removed it? Is that possible? I could have sworn that I hit both "post" and "save" as I fashioned a response. (sigh)
BTW, thank you everyone for all the responses and info on "The Beach Boys, An American Family."
Here' my response to the above quote:

I respectfully disagree with the suggestion that this story is about the Wilson family and am surprised that it is characterized that way.
Much of the book's  focus is, in fact, on the Love brothers, Mike, Stan and Steve. The relationship of the Love brothers is often overlooked in the Beach Boys "oeuvre" and it is a fascinating recounting that we accomplish in this book. Over time, Mike helped established Steve as the manager, and it was Steve along with Marylin and Mike who hired Stan to help out with Brian who was slipping into a disastrous condition. Stan then brought Rocky, his college roommate and friend, aboard to join the "save Brian" team. This set the sage for a lot. All four of these guys, Mike, Steve, Stan and Rocky were each "bigger than life" in their own ways. Mike was Mike, superstar since forever, Steve was an accomplished scholar, (magna at USC)  and manager of one of the biggest bands in the world for nearly a decade with great success all around. Stan was a professional basketball player and Rocky was drafted by the NFL and became an international model (Playgirl centerfold and Camel Man). No lightweights in that bunch. Add sibling rivalry, band loyalty and the age old rift between management and talent, then sprinkle Carl and Dennis Wilson on the whole concoction, and "look out Cleveland," stuff was bound to happen and it did! To me, it is this explored interaction that makes the read so interesting and previously, in many ways, untold.
The technical part we left out was where Steve was fired, and even charged with felony embezzlement. Steve was later completely exonerated legally (I've seen the court docs) and additionally,  "forgiven" by everyone, as I understand it. It was a a dark alleyway we chose not to go down. I'm guessing here, but I bet there were huge regrets on all sides for the whole incident. Tough stuff.
 



"Mike was Mike superstar since forever"Huh?? Huh?? Huh Huh Huh What the hey you talkin' 'bout, boy?? More like embarrassing clown forever. Razz

Wait a minute. "Embarrassing clown forever." Was it you singing harmony and keeping it together day after day, night after night, massive crowd after massive crowd, show after show?
I'm always a little amused when people bash Mike Love. Here's why;

Imagine you are Mike Love, backstage wherever, a huge crowd is waiting to be entertained. NOW I'M MAKING THIS UP, mind you, flight of fancy, if you will, but just stay with me for a moment.
You check out the guys you're about to walk out there with:

Brian : Not "what city are we in?" like Dennis or Carl who were often barley sober enough to stand up, but "what planet are we on?"
Carl and Dennis, "whoopee, can I get a drink on stage with me?" Carl actually fell into the drum set on one occasion and a stand by drummer was continually on the road with them because Dennis was often incapable of "going on with the show" at all. Mike Kowalski had to slip on stage to play drums. Now, there's no doubt that Carl and Dennis were talented and both superior musicians, but they were not consummate professional entertainers consistently. Say what you will. MIKE LOVE WAS.
Al Jardine : "Whew, someone I can count on. THANK GOD."

The "crazies" outnumbered the sobers by at least three to two. That can't have been easy.

I think we can all thankful and certainly all the myriad fans can be thankful that Mike Love, meditator, sober, present and capable was there day in and day out.

Youse pays for a ticket, youse wants to see a show. Mike delivered, always! So says his brother Steve Love to this day, and, sadly, there has been no love lost there for quite some time.

Jus sayin.

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mtaber
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« Reply #74 on: December 03, 2018, 08:23:30 AM »

Ron, you've obviously been drinking Rocky's Kool-Aid.  You are obviously only seeing things through the "Rocky and the Love's" lens.  Carl, not Mike, was the driving force on the road, he held the band together and made them put on a professional show, save for a few exceptions (like Perth). Brian, Dennis and Carl were the driving force in the studio.  Mike's contributions were to front the band on stage (though Carl also filled that role to a large degree in the '70's and into the '80's) and try to self-promote in any way imaginable.  Mike is a rooster without a henhouse.
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