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Author Topic: Al Jardine "A Postcard From California" To Be Released on Vinyl 11/2018  (Read 1316 times)
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« on: September 21, 2018, 10:49:47 AM »

Just posted to Al's Facebook page:

http://www.aljardine.com/news.html

"A Postcard from California on Vinyl

After many requests from the fans, Al Jardine's debut studio solo release A Postcard from California will finally be released on vinyl. Look for a limited-edition 180gram audiophile record, which will also include a little surprise from Al himself, on a certain day around Thanksgiving. More info coming soon! "
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« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2018, 11:46:26 AM »


Just posted to Al's Facebook page:

http://www.aljardine.com/news.html

"A Postcard from California on Vinyl

After many requests from the fans, Al Jardine's debut studio solo release A Postcard from California will finally be released on vinyl. Look for a limited-edition 180gram audiophile record, which will also include a little surprise from Al himself, on a certain day around Thanksgiving. More info coming soon! "

COMMENT to guitarfool2002:

I never understood the reason for cutting a digital signal onto vinyl. Why not just burn the file in high-res and keep it in the digital domain?  Or is this a collector thing?
  ~swd
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« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2018, 01:21:18 PM »

The vinyl thing is largely a trend. Check out a "Barnes & Noble" store; there's more vinyl than CDs now.

I think it's a "collector" thing to some degree, and also an (often, not always) incorrect perception that the vinyl is going to sound "better." It's kind of a hipster/status thing.

To be clear, there are genuinely well-done pressings (e.g. vinyl reissues of old albums cut through a true analog chain and not mastered from a digital source, etc.), but even those are often only going to sound better if the actual pressing quality is up to snuff, and if the listener has a pretty good set up. A $50 turntable with a built-in pre-amp bought at Target or Sharper Image isn't that.

And I think at least some vinyl is still cut not even from high-rez digital sources but from 16/44.1 CD masterings.

For the most part, vinyl is still awesome if you want big, 12-inch artwork.

Ironically, a lot of stuff now is making it out as "vinyl only." I recently had to purchase a deluxe "Unsolved Mysteries" soundtrack release, and it was only released on vinyl. No CD, and not even any digital download option. The license was for vinyl only.

In the case of Al's "Postcards", it is essentially out of print now. I don't believe it's available to purchase digitally, may or may not even be on streaming sites, and can only be purchased on CD if you go to one of his club gigs (I'm guessing it's not currently in print, and Al simply has boxes of the CD at home to bring with him for his tours).

Hopefully he'll get at least a digital download version (if not a CD) back in print by the time the vinyl comes out.

Also not a fan of adding something extra just for the vinyl release. If it's Al reading a greeting or something, then fine. But if he's adding a new song (or songs), that would be extremely annoying if a digital download isn't at least also offered.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2018, 01:22:47 PM by HeyJude » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: September 21, 2018, 02:16:13 PM »

The vinyl thing is largely a trend. Check out a "Barnes & Noble" store; there's more vinyl than CDs now.

I think it's a "collector" thing to some degree, and also an (often, not always) incorrect perception that the vinyl is going to sound "better." It's kind of a hipster/status thing.

To be clear, there are genuinely well-done pressings (e.g. vinyl reissues of old albums cut through a true analog chain and not mastered from a digital source, etc.), but even those are often only going to sound better if the actual pressing quality is up to snuff, and if the listener has a pretty good set up. A $50 turntable with a built-in pre-amp bought at Target or Sharper Image isn't that.

And I think at least some vinyl is still cut not even from high-rez digital sources but from 16/44.1 CD masterings.

For the most part, vinyl is still awesome if you want big, 12-inch artwork.

Ironically, a lot of stuff now is making it out as "vinyl only." I recently had to purchase a deluxe "Unsolved Mysteries" soundtrack release, and it was only released on vinyl. No CD, and not even any digital download option. The license was for vinyl only.

In the case of Al's "Postcards", it is essentially out of print now. I don't believe it's available to purchase digitally, may or may not even be on streaming sites, and can only be purchased on CD if you go to one of his club gigs (I'm guessing it's not currently in print, and Al simply has boxes of the CD at home to bring with him for his tours).

Hopefully he'll get at least a digital download version (if not a CD) back in print by the time the vinyl comes out.

Also not a fan of adding something extra just for the vinyl release. If it's Al reading a greeting or something, then fine. But if he's adding a new song (or songs), that would be extremely annoying if a digital download isn't at least also offered.

COMMENT to HeyJude:   I can see the 12 inch art work advantage, but no sonic advantage unless you are listening to a pre-1980 vinyl LP.  After 1980 the dirty little secret is that any so-called analog recording cut to vinyl is first converted to digital before being sent to the cutting head. I don't care what the album claims, the analog advance-head was replaced with a (internal within the cutting lathe) digital delay line around 1980. ALL VINYL ISSUES AFTER ~1980 have been passed through an analog to digital converter -- delayed one LP revolution at 33 1/3 rpm -- then re-converted to analog MAKING THEM DIGITAL. If you buy a modern LP (no matter the weight) it is NOT pure analog. If you want real analog you must shop for records cut prior to 1980 or so.  Given that realization, if it's the sound you are interested in, stay with digital high-res releases and let your own DVD or CD player do the conversion from digital to analog, if the original recording is digital.  If the original master is analog, look for the best pre-1980 album you can find and that is about the only source of real analog available to the public now. ~swd
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« Reply #4 on: September 21, 2018, 05:32:12 PM »


Just posted to Al's Facebook page:

http://www.aljardine.com/news.html

"A Postcard from California on Vinyl

After many requests from the fans, Al Jardine's debut studio solo release A Postcard from California will finally be released on vinyl. Look for a limited-edition 180gram audiophile record, which will also include a little surprise from Al himself, on a certain day around Thanksgiving. More info coming soon! "

COMMENT to guitarfool2002:

I never understood the reason for cutting a digital signal onto vinyl. Why not just burn the file in high-res and keep it in the digital domain?  Or is this a collector thing?
  ~swd

Like HJ said in his reply, it is a fad or trend to press vinyl. Obviously as your reply states, it's not exactly what consumers think they're buying when they are hearing the process you described, in that it is not 100% analog for the majority of these releases.

I do think there are a handful of artists though who are pressing pure analog throughout the chain as a form of being purists, I believe someone like Jack White had done this in the past using analog gear from the first reels of tape on the session (I could be wrong...). But from what I understand, the cost of going full-on old-school doesn't justify most artists doing it and they go back to "normal" as in normal for 2018 where digital tech does enter the process.

The collector aspect is there too - I do not understand buying and hoarding dozens of copies of a vinyl pressing then keeping them sealed in a box...but whatever makes people happy I guess.

For Al's release, it is good because the original is out of print, so no matter what format it is good to have it available for fans to buy and listen who missed the original runs.

One of the more absurd aspects of the vinyl "trend" for me is and has been the way a lot of consumers actually play the vinyl. Granted, not everyone can afford a decent turntable. But I think about the tens of thousands of consumers who buy one of these new turntables, like the "suitcase" models or even models designed to rip to their computers or whatever...then they buy audiophile grade pressings of albums and pay at least 30 bucks a pop because of the "gram" quality of the pressing...

...and then they play it on a turntable with a lightweight plastic tone arm, a shoddy mass-produced stylus, and no control over the balancing of the arm, tracking, anti-skating, or more precise adjustments of the speed. All of those features on even the more entry-level standalone component turntables back in 1980 or so.

They are effectively playing a lot of cash for new vinyl, and effectively destroying the actual record every time they play it on these plastic turntables which sell like hotcakes.

Never made sense to me, but neither did the Pet Rock, and that sold millions.
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« Reply #5 on: September 21, 2018, 06:18:01 PM »

Wish he would re release the live album with a bonus track or two.
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« Reply #6 on: September 21, 2018, 06:31:50 PM »


Just posted to Al's Facebook page:

http://www.aljardine.com/news.html

"A Postcard from California on Vinyl

After many requests from the fans, Al Jardine's debut studio solo release A Postcard from California will finally be released on vinyl. Look for a limited-edition 180gram audiophile record, which will also include a little surprise from Al himself, on a certain day around Thanksgiving. More info coming soon! "

COMMENT to guitarfool2002:

I never understood the reason for cutting a digital signal onto vinyl. Why not just burn the file in high-res and keep it in the digital domain?  Or is this a collector thing?
 ~swd

Like HJ said in his reply, it is a fad or trend to press vinyl. Obviously as your reply states, it's not exactly what consumers think they're buying when they are hearing the process you described, in that it is not 100% analog for the majority of these releases.

I do think there are a handful of artists though who are pressing pure analog throughout the chain as a form of being purists, I believe someone like Jack White had done this in the past using analog gear from the first reels of tape on the session (I could be wrong...). But from what I understand, the cost of going full-on old-school doesn't justify most artists doing it and they go back to "normal" as in normal for 2018 where digital tech does enter the process.

The collector aspect is there too - I do not understand buying and hoarding dozens of copies of a vinyl pressing then keeping them sealed in a box...but whatever makes people happy I guess.

For Al's release, it is good because the original is out of print, so no matter what format it is good to have it available for fans to buy and listen who missed the original runs.

One of the more absurd aspects of the vinyl "trend" for me is and has been the way a lot of consumers actually play the vinyl. Granted, not everyone can afford a decent turntable. But I think about the tens of thousands of consumers who buy one of these new turntables, like the "suitcase" models or even models designed to rip to their computers or whatever...then they buy audiophile grade pressings of albums and pay at least 30 bucks a pop because of the "gram" quality of the pressing...

...and then they play it on a turntable with a lightweight plastic tone arm, a shoddy mass-produced stylus, and no control over the balancing of the arm, tracking, anti-skating, or more precise adjustments of the speed. All of those features on even the more entry-level standalone component turntables back in 1980 or so.

They are effectively playing a lot of cash for new vinyl, and effectively destroying the actual record every time they play it on these plastic turntables which sell like hotcakes.

Never made sense to me, but neither did the Pet Rock, and that sold millions.

COMMENT to  guitarfool2002:  If the listener likes what he or she hears, that is really all the matters. For me, I've got around $35,000 invested in a two-channel playback system to which my record player is connected. So with that grade of resolution in the system I need more than a "plastic tone arm" to spin records.  I've get around $3,500 invested in a turntable, another $1,500 in the arm, $700 in the pickup and $300 in the stylus. Someone gave me a $15,000 preamp for the turntable -- in exchange for a listening room design project -- so pure analog discs do sound better than modern vinyl LP's over my system. Audiophile friends of mine invest much more to get a sound they like. One friend has a $100,000 turntable that is about the best on the market (Air Force One) and that's just the turntable -- no arm. So in the audiophile world, my system is considered average. I once designed a listening room for a Doctor who spent $500,000 on the room and filled it with around $300,000 worth of gear.  And that was only a two-channel stereo system.

In any case, if you place a pet rock on top of the preamp if will definitely improve the resolution.   Wink
   ~swd
« Last Edit: September 21, 2018, 06:35:32 PM by Stephen W. Desper » Logged
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« Reply #7 on: September 21, 2018, 06:53:03 PM »

Quote
author=guitarfool2002 link
The collector aspect is there too - I do not understand buying and hoarding dozens of copies of a vinyl pressing then keeping them sealed in a box...but whatever makes people happy I guess.

COMMENT to guitarfool2002:  Yes, I must admit to being one of those collectors too. I still have several sealed copies of Pet Sounds (original mono release) on the shelf.  Actually about a dozen or so BB originals are still sealed.

When I lived in California a long time ago, a friend of mine and I bought a vacuum sealing machine from a butcher that was going out of business. We modified it to seal 12 inch jackets. We would buy used LPs from thrift stores that were in decent shape, bring them home and seal them with our machine. Then take them to other used record stores and sell them for a nifty profit. Like a fifty cent LP re-sealed brought $25 for the sealed album. Most of the records we re-sealed were never opened anyway, and like you say, it made some people happy.
~swd
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« Reply #8 on: September 21, 2018, 07:02:01 PM »


Just posted to Al's Facebook page:

http://www.aljardine.com/news.html

"A Postcard from California on Vinyl

After many requests from the fans, Al Jardine's debut studio solo release A Postcard from California will finally be released on vinyl. Look for a limited-edition 180gram audiophile record, which will also include a little surprise from Al himself, on a certain day around Thanksgiving. More info coming soon! "

COMMENT to guitarfool2002:

I never understood the reason for cutting a digital signal onto vinyl. Why not just burn the file in high-res and keep it in the digital domain?  Or is this a collector thing?
 ~swd

Like HJ said in his reply, it is a fad or trend to press vinyl. Obviously as your reply states, it's not exactly what consumers think they're buying when they are hearing the process you described, in that it is not 100% analog for the majority of these releases.

I do think there are a handful of artists though who are pressing pure analog throughout the chain as a form of being purists, I believe someone like Jack White had done this in the past using analog gear from the first reels of tape on the session (I could be wrong...). But from what I understand, the cost of going full-on old-school doesn't justify most artists doing it and they go back to "normal" as in normal for 2018 where digital tech does enter the process.

The collector aspect is there too - I do not understand buying and hoarding dozens of copies of a vinyl pressing then keeping them sealed in a box...but whatever makes people happy I guess.

For Al's release, it is good because the original is out of print, so no matter what format it is good to have it available for fans to buy and listen who missed the original runs.

One of the more absurd aspects of the vinyl "trend" for me is and has been the way a lot of consumers actually play the vinyl. Granted, not everyone can afford a decent turntable. But I think about the tens of thousands of consumers who buy one of these new turntables, like the "suitcase" models or even models designed to rip to their computers or whatever...then they buy audiophile grade pressings of albums and pay at least 30 bucks a pop because of the "gram" quality of the pressing...

...and then they play it on a turntable with a lightweight plastic tone arm, a shoddy mass-produced stylus, and no control over the balancing of the arm, tracking, anti-skating, or more precise adjustments of the speed. All of those features on even the more entry-level standalone component turntables back in 1980 or so.

They are effectively playing a lot of cash for new vinyl, and effectively destroying the actual record every time they play it on these plastic turntables which sell like hotcakes.

Never made sense to me, but neither did the Pet Rock, and that sold millions.

COMMENT to  guitarfool2002:  If the listener likes what he or she hears, that is really all the matters. For me, I've got around $35,000 invested in a two-channel playback system to which my record player is connected. So with that grade of resolution in the system I need more than a "plastic tone arm" to spin records.  I've get around $3,500 invested in a turntable, another $1,500 in the arm, $700 in the pickup and $300 in the stylus. Someone gave me a $15,000 preamp for the turntable -- in exchange for a listening room design project -- so pure analog discs do sound better than modern vinyl LP's over my system. Audiophile friends of mine invest much more to get a sound they like. One friend has a $100,000 turntable that is about the best on the market (Air Force One) and that's just the turntable -- no arm. So in the audiophile world, my system is considered average. I once designed a listening room for a Doctor who spent $500,000 on the room and filled it with around $300,000 worth of gear.  And that was only a two-channel stereo system.

In any case, if you place a pet rock on top of the preamp if will definitely improve the resolution.   Wink
   ~swd

Very nice! And I will be scouring the yard sales for a Pet Rock tomorrow, anything to improve the sound...  LOL

It is true if it makes the listener happy, it's all good. I just don't know why people out there investing extra for audiophile grade vinyl pressings or spending a lot on vinyl in general wouldn't take some time to research how much a bad stylus and cheap tone arm can damage a record with repeated plays - They're investing more in higher quality pressings in some cases yet playing them on inferior equipment that is harming their investment.
« Last Edit: September 21, 2018, 07:14:08 PM by guitarfool2002 » Logged

ďSome people think you have to knock somebody down in order to build yourself up, I donít look at it that way. To the mentality that likes to disparage other people, I say perhaps you should get a life. Itís just wrong thinking in my opinion and I donít mind saying that.Ē - Mike Love

"Every single person who criticized Brian for having She & Him, Kacey Musgraves, Sebu and Nate Ruess guesting on his solo album can now officially go heartily f*** themselves." - Wirestone
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« Reply #9 on: September 21, 2018, 07:13:37 PM »

Quote
author=guitarfool2002 link
The collector aspect is there too - I do not understand buying and hoarding dozens of copies of a vinyl pressing then keeping them sealed in a box...but whatever makes people happy I guess.

COMMENT to guitarfool2002:  Yes, I must admit to being one of those collectors too. I still have several sealed copies of Pet Sounds (original mono release) on the shelf.  Actually about a dozen or so BB originals are still sealed.

When I lived in California a long time ago, a friend of mine and I bought a vacuum sealing machine from a butcher that was going out of business. We modified it to seal 12 inch jackets. We would buy used LPs from thrift stores that were in decent shape, bring them home and seal them with our machine. Then take them to other used record stores and sell them for a nifty profit. Like a fifty cent LP re-sealed brought $25 for the sealed album. Most of the records we re-sealed were never opened anyway, and like you say, it made some people happy.
~swd

Haha, that's classic. I wonder how many of them are still circulating as sealed copies with origins from that butcher's sealing machine.  Grin

I collect as well, but just things that catch my eye or which I want, like my favorite artists and albums. Or if I see a deal too good to pass up. I understand the business element as some people do it both for a business and a hobby, but it's the extreme collecting where someone would buy 2 dozen copies of Al's vinyl just to say they bought and have 2 dozen copies. A few tucked away, yes, and one to actually spin on the turntable to enjoy. But I think sometimes it gets a little extreme, like collectors who buy out exclusive items at "Record Store Day" to where people who want to actually listen can't get them.

Keep in mind I am speaking as someone who has what some would call too many copies of Mancini's "Peter Gunn" soundtrack in the collection.  Smiley  But I love it, as one of the best sounding live-in-studio jazz albums of that era with some of the best players in LA, and I can hear the differences in various pressings, remasterings, etc. 
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ďSome people think you have to knock somebody down in order to build yourself up, I donít look at it that way. To the mentality that likes to disparage other people, I say perhaps you should get a life. Itís just wrong thinking in my opinion and I donít mind saying that.Ē - Mike Love

"Every single person who criticized Brian for having She & Him, Kacey Musgraves, Sebu and Nate Ruess guesting on his solo album can now officially go heartily f*** themselves." - Wirestone
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« Reply #10 on: September 22, 2018, 07:42:28 AM »

Keep in mind I am speaking as someone who has what some would call too many copies of Mancini's "Peter Gunn" soundtrack in the collection.  Smiley  But I love it, as one of the best sounding live-in-studio jazz albums of that era with some of the best players in LA, and I can hear the differences in various pressings, remasterings, etc. 

COMMENT:  You might consider a high-resolution copy (96/24 in several formats) of Peter Gunn for $18.00.  That would probably provide you with the best sound of that production. Check it out.

Peter Gunn, soundtrack >>> http://www.hdtracks.com/henry-mancini-peter-gunn


~swd
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« Reply #11 on: October 12, 2018, 02:49:18 PM »

Any idea of the MSRP of this? The first 1000 copies for RSD included a signed postcard.
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« Reply #12 on: October 12, 2018, 06:32:34 PM »

Any idea of the MSRP of this? The first 1000 copies for RSD included a signed postcard.

Bull Moose has a price of $28.97 listed
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« Reply #13 on: October 12, 2018, 09:29:16 PM »



The vinyl fad=let's go backwards and have party lines on rotary dial land line phones that are heavier than a brick and only come in one color. Ditch the smart TV and go back to black and white and muffled mono sound. How about cars with no power steering and no a/c with bias ply tires? And at the same time, let's pay much more for these antiquated items. Possibly one of the, no not possibly, it is the dumbest thing to come down the pike I've ever seen.
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« Reply #14 on: October 14, 2018, 08:49:45 PM »

I don't mind the sound of vinyl even if it can't match the fidelity that modern technology possesses.  I have my share of vinyl if the album doesn't have too many tracks I would skip.  What I don't understand is why cassette tapes are making a comeback...
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« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2018, 09:12:06 PM »



The vinyl fad=let's go backwards and have party lines on rotary dial land line phones that are heavier than a brick and only come in one color. Ditch the smart TV and go back to black and white and muffled mono sound. How about cars with no power steering and no a/c with bias ply tires? And at the same time, let's pay much more for these antiquated items. Possibly one of the, no not possibly, it is the dumbest thing to come down the pike I've ever seen.
I tend to think it's understandable that people are obsessed with vinyls - it's a nostalgia thing. The same goes for cassette comeback.

But I feel pretty much the same way as you as to those who deliberately trash CD's as if they're dated and not cool at all, in favor of vinyls.

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« Reply #16 on: November 02, 2018, 03:37:23 PM »

Here's the press release:

AL JARDINE, FOUNDING MEMBER OF THE BEACH BOYS, RELEASES DEBUT SOLO ALBUM ON VINYL


Limited edition vinyl album to be released for first 
time on Record Store Day Black Friday: Nov. 23, 2018


Big Sur, CA: The legendary Al Jardine, guitarist, vocalist and songwriter, best known for being one of the founding members of The Beach Boys, is releasing his debut studio album A Postcard from California, on vinyl for the first time.  Mastered impeccably by Joe Reagoso at Friday Music, the album will be released in 180 gram audiophile translucent blue vinyl with a gatefold cover on Record Store Day Black Friday November 23, 2018.  Limited to 1,000 copies, each album will also contain a limited-edition postcard signed by Al and be available at participating Record Store Day Black Friday record stores only.



A Postcard from California
, originally released digitally and on CD in 2010, touches upon Californiaís history, natural beauty and other environmental issues and features guest appearances from David Crosby, Steve Miller, Neil Young, Stephen Stills, Gerry Beckley and Dewey Bunnell (America), Flea (Red Hot Chili Peppers), Neil Young, Alec Baldwin and the late great Glen Campbell along with Brian Wilson and The Beach Boys. The album also includes the song "Don't Fight the Sea" (released as a 7-inch single on white vinyl on Record Store Day 2011 to help raise funds for Japan disaster relief) and features one of the last studio vocal recordings from the late Carl Wilson, along with new versions of 
The Beach Boys classics "Help Me, Rhonda" and "A California Saga" and a heartfelt rendition of The Mamas & The Papasí biggest hit "California Dreamin'." 



Says Al Jardine, "Thank you vinyl world, it's so nice to hear A Postcard from California in this classic format -- it gives my ideas and thoughts in music a whole new warmth and feeling, my songs were truly intended to be heard this way.  I think this will be a great Black Friday buy but please don't fight over it though you may want to get in line early at your local record store.  This Thanksgiving in addition to my family, friends and fans, I'm thankful for Record Store Day!"



For more info, please contact Spud (spud@driftingsand.com) or visit www.fridaymusic.com and Al Jardineís official website: www.aljardine.com
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