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Author Topic: This week in BB history June 20-30  (Read 554 times)
Ian
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« on: June 20, 2019, 11:12:21 AM »

June 20 1963-The Beach Boys were on tour in Hawaii on a bill with Dee-Dee Sharp, the Treniers and Jackie De Shannon that was advertised as the “Show of Stars.” David Marks recalled that the Beach Boys backed up Dee-Dee Sharp and Jackie De Shannon. They were at Baldwin Auditorium in Maui on June 20, Hilo Civic Auditorium on June 21 and Bloch Arena at Pearl Harbor on June 22.  As Elmer Marks home movies (seen in the American Band and Endless Harmony documentaries) illustrate Al was on this tour in place of Brian.  Audree was also there as a chaperone. When the BBs eventually headed home, they played at the Las Vegas Convention Center, with the Teen Beats on June 29 1963.

June 22 1964-The BBs were working on possible singles and they held a session for what became Don’t Hurt My Little Sister. The next day they added background vocals to Little Honda for a possible single release before returning to work on the Christmas LP on June 24 and 25.  They then played a concert in San Jose on June 26 with Bobby Freeman, Rene and Rene and the Paris Sisters before heading back to the studio to complete the Christmas sessions on June 27 to 30 1964.

June 24 1966- Irving Granz and his assistant, future BB road manager Jack Lloyd produced a concert at the Cow Palace in San Francisco. Murry Wilson was in attendance to support his new protégés the Sunrays, whom he’d managed to get onto the bill. Also on the bill were the Lovin’ Spoonful, Chad and Jeremy, Percy Sledge, The Outsiders (Time Won’t Let Me), The Leaves (Hey Joe), Sir Douglas Quintet (She’s A Mover), Neil Diamond, The Byrds and The Jefferson Airplane.  Now that’s a concert!!!! The next night the BBs played the Hollywood Bowl with Brian in attendance (he was photographed backstage for KRLA Beat). The bill featured Love, Percy Sledge, Captain Beefheart and his Magic Band, The Outsiders, Neil Diamond, The Leaves, Chad and Jeremy, Byrds, The Sunrays, The Lovin’ Spoonful and the New Motown Sound.

June 20-21, 1967 the BBs worked on the Hawaiian Song (we now know this was part of the track to Little Pad) On June 25 and 26 they recorded “Good Time Mama”, which remains unreleased as the tape box is missing (However-Howie Edelson posited that it was a working title for She’s Going Bald) On June 28 they worked on Little Pad and then the next day was devoted to Fall Breaks (Woody Woodpecker Symphony). On June 30 they worked on With Me Tonight.

Jun 20 1968- Bruce tinkered with The Nearest Faraway Place. Dennis held a session on June 26 for an untitled song. June 28 1968-Brian produced the single-I’ll Keep On Loving You/As Tears Go By for Ron Wilson at ID Sound. It would be interesting to see a photo of this session or even a photo of Brian and Ron together.

June 20 1969 the BBs made their second trip to Finland to play the Keimolan Juhannus Juhla in Vantaa (near Helsinki), Finland. On June 21 they played at the Antwerp Pop Festival and then returned to England for two encore shows by popular demand at the Finsbury Park Astoria with Marmalade and the Rainbow People.  Mike Ledgerwood of Disc and Music Echo reported, “the Beach Boys certainly left us with some good vibrations.  A full blooded, power packed bumper programme which included most of their big hits and Carl Wilson’s clever, if at times a tiny bit flat, rendering of ‘God Only Knows.’ …Musically they might not exactly reproduce their famous studio sounds, but they have a damned good try and the result is not disappointing.” The Flame apparently departed for the States with Carl after the 69-tour and he then produced their first album that fall.  Mike and Bruce remained in England to tape an appearance on Top of the Pops on July 25-where they introduced film footage shot at Leeds. Bruce also spent time working on a single for his pal Graham Bonney.

June 20 1971-A session was held for Fourth of July, which took place in the midst of the legendary Rolling Stone Magazine article being written-with interviews of Brian and Murray.  June 24 1971 the BBs began a tour at Celebration Island in Pointe Coupee, LA without Dennis, who was still recovering from a hand injury that left him unable to drum for three years. Pink Floyd, Miles Davis and BB King were also on this Festival bill.  The BBs then headed to another Festival in Toronto-The Beggars Banquet Festival with Alice Cooper, Bread, Chilliwack, Steppenwolf, Blood Rock, and Lighthouse on June 26.   They then played at the closing of Bill Graham’s legendary Fillmore East on June 27 with Mountain, the Allman Brothers, J Geils Band, Albert King, Edgar Winters and County Joe McDonald.  I recounted in my book that the BBs almost didn’t appear at this highly publicized event because of Jack Rieley’s demands to be top billed. Fortunately their agents talked them out of walking out. The BBs then played at Theatre Maisonneuve in Montreal on June 30, where Dennis rejoined the tour-though he now mainly wandered the stage singing a bit or noodling on the piano.  While the BBs were on tour Steve Desper was back in LA producing the second (unreleased) LP for the Flame.

June 26 1972-The Marcella/Hold on Dear Brother single was released, while the BBs were working on the Holland LP in the Netherlands. Around this time the American Spring LP was released as well.  June 20 1974 the BBs played in Bangor Maine with The Apple Butter Band. On June 21 they appeared at the Civic Centre in Ottawa. The reviewer noted, “At different times, five Beach Boys played keyboard instruments, often four at one time, as in the case of the highlights of the opening half: We Got Love, Marcella and Sail on Sailor, all equally exuberant and all recent Beach Boys products. But the audience was happiest with the hits.” Dennis had still not returned to drums and the reviewer noted, “Everything but contributing musically, Dennis, who still at least looks like a Beach Boy with his relatively short hair, jeans and muscle shirt, wandered around aimlessly, and occasionally flexed his pectorals.” The BBs then played the Memorial Arena in Binghamton on June 22 and at the “World Series of Rock” at Municipal Auditorium in Cleveland with REO Speedwagon, Lynyrd Skynyrd and Joe Walsh with Barnstorm on June 23 1974.

June 21, 1975 The BBs played at Wembley Stadium with Elton John, Joe Walsh, the Eagles, and Rufus with Chaka Khan.  NME declared, “In soccer terms, it was Elton John 1, Beach Boys 3.  Where the Beach Boys, with their close harmony, good time sounds and gospel of nothing more profound than the joys of teenage love, immediately connected with the audience, Elton John seemed obsessed with piano dominated, moody music and was for most of the time on a cloud of his own.”  June 24-28 1975 the BBs returned to the Beachago tour for five nights at the Capitol Center, Landover, MD. These shows were taped for a live album, which I assume will someday come out if all the tapes can be found and rights obtained.  Jun 1975, Beach Boys-Chicago TV Special, Various locations

William Reid produced a TV special about the Beachago tour called “Fun, Fun, Fun” that featured footage from Madison Square Garden and the Capitol Centre in Largo, Maryland. The Beach Boys are seen performing “Catch a Wave”, “Good Vibrations”, and “Fun, Fun, Fun.”  While the BBs were in the DC area they visited the White House as guests of Susan Ford on June 24 1975
The following night members of the BBs, Chicago and the Pointer Sisters all attended a screening of Jaws after the show.  On Jun 29 Beachago played the Schaeffer Center, Foxboro, MA.  The reviewer noted “Here is a group that is obviously proud of its past. It reeled off 19 songs spanning all phases of a long and successful career, all performed with adolescent enthusiasm and genuine style.”

June 20 1976- Scenes were filmed of Brian’s birthday party, attended by the McCartney’s, for the Beach Boys It’s OK TV Show that aired in August. Possibly the scenes of Brian surfing with Belushi and Ackroyd were also filmed this day.  June 23 1977-Brian recorded a version of Gimme Some Lovin.  Four days later a master of the Adult Child album was assembled.  This was a highly productive period for Brian-who’d really slimmed down-it’s evident in retrospect that things might have been different if he’d received encouragement at this time-but the band was in a dysfunctional place and this was really the peak of “Brian’s Back”.  This was as “Back” as he’d get.

June 20 1978-The BBs played the Spectrum in Philadelphia-with Charles Lloyd, which was recorded for radio. Jack Lloyd of the Philadelphia Inquirer noted, “There was a time when the Beach Boys rebelled at the thought of being regarded more in terms of nostalgia than musical growth, but now it appears that they have gracefully accepted their fate. The emphasis in concert is certainly on the vintage biggies that bring the audience to its collective feet and spark the cheering and hand clapping.” The next night they were in Rochester, NY and then played the Forum in Montreal (22) Ottawa (23) and the CNE Grandstand, Toronto- with Steve Miller, Journey and Pablo Cruise on June 24.  According to a fan, Brian fainted onstage during "Good Vibrations" due to the heat and “Mike strapped on a green electric guitar. I'm not sure if he played it or not, also not sure if it was a bass or a six-string (I think the latter). It would have been for Barbara Ann and Fun, Fun, Fun.” Typically the reviewers didn’t remark on this unusual occurrence. 

June 25 1978 the BBs played before a massive crowd of 61,128 at the first concert held at the newly constructed Giants Stadium with Stanky Brown, Steve Miller and Pablo Cruise. The reviewer noted “(Mike) Love made a costly mistake when he threw back the first Frisbee that landed on stage. The group was bombarded with missiles from all directions after that and one well-aimed roll of toilet paper wrapped itself around Brian’s bass.”  There was still tension in the band at this time. In an interview, Carl was asked why he Dennis left the stage when Mike did a “TM song” and stated Dennis’s “attitude is that we should be doing Beach Boys music-a collaboration.  I thought we were just taking a break.” Asked about Celebration, his anger flared “Love’s project doesn’t mean s….”.  Jun 27 and 28 1978-The BBs worked on Santa Ana Winds and Winds of Change. The next day the MIU album was mastered.

June 19 and 20 1979 the BBs played at Red Rock in Denver with Ironhorse. This was right after Dennis had been suspended from the band. They then played the Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas, and then spend two days at the Greek Theater at UC Berkeley. June 21 1980-The BBs played at Knebworth. The concert was simulcast on radio and then “Sweetened” before being sold on home video and LP: new vocals and instrumental parts were added. It was of course the last UK concert played by all five original members.  Although Brian participated little vocally, he’d temporarily shaved off his beard and looked much as he did around 1968.  Karl Dallas of Melody Maker noted, "The Beach Boys...seemed as if they could have gone on all night and still have the audience, if not all the local burghers, crying for more.  Not that they were flawless. Perhaps it was the brotherly burden of having Brian Wilson on stage with them, but the Beach Boys are nothing if their harmonies are less then perfect, and there were times ('In My Room', their fifth number, was where the rot began to set in) when the discords were positively painful. On the other hand they sailed through the complexities of 'Good Vibrations', the second of four encores, with hardly a note out of place.”

June 20 1981 the BBs played at Poplar Creek in Chicago and then played three nights at Pine Knob near Detroit. John Laycock of the Windsor Star, commented: "Technically speaking they didn't play all that well. I've heard bar bands with half as many members get more fidelity out of these numbers.  But never mind. By now the songs have their own life. They have such independent presence they let Mike Love serve as front man with his hoarse voice, mincing around the pristine white stage in front of the matching white instruments. And they let Brian Wilson sit like an unhappy Buddha at the baby grand, chain smoking and staring at the keyboard.” The BBs then played Six Flags in Atlanta (24), Butler University in Indianapolis, IN (25), Blossom Music Center in Cleveland (26), Nashville (27), Charlotte, NC (28) and Charleston, SC on June 30 1981.

Meanwhile Carl was on the road with the Doobie Brothers, serving as their opener.  In a not untypical review of the show in Cedar Rapids on June 25 the reviewer commented, “Wilson had better keep his Beach Boys slot intact. His thing seems to be heavy-metal rock, with a rhythm and blues influence.  That’s OK but Wilson just didn’t pull it off at the Five Seasons, receiving only polite acceptance from the crowd. Many of his vocals were distorted and the music selection was poor for a live concert. Wilson did inject a couple of Beach Boys songs into the act, most notably Darlin’ but it was done with a much heavier beat than the original. A version of Sam and Dave’s “I Thank You” showed promise, featuring some fine bass by Gerald Johnson and lead guitar by John Daley but towards the end of the song it sounded as though the band strayed from the melody.”

Another BB tour took place in June 1982 but Carl participated in this one and the now increasingly dysfunctional Dennis and Brian didn’t-which made a big difference. Commenting on the Six Flags Over Texas show on June 20 the reviewer stated “The lineup was much stronger than the one that came through in March...The Beach Boys that played Fort Worth in March were fun, but they weren't too cohesive.  This time the boys were fun and a lot tighter." The tour continued through the south and Midwest till June 27. The tour ender in Charlotte was reviewed by Charles Johnson of the Observer who was disappointed by the group's insistence on only playing hits. "That emphasis ignored the group's inventive work that followed 'Good Vibrations,' a No. 1 hit in 1966. After repeated commercial and artistic failures in the 1970s, the Beach Boys in concert have returned to their oldest and safest material. Although three of the group's original members... appeared at Carowinds, the group often sounded as if it were only a shadow of it's former self...But Carl Wilson injected style and emotion into his few lead vocals, especially on the lovely 'God Only Knows' and 'Good Vibrations.'”

June 22 1983 Carl embarked on a short solo tour to promote his second solo album Youngblood.  He played in Seattle at Parker’s that night and then opened for America at the Greek Theater in LA on June 24 and 25, the Irvine Meadows Amphitheater on June 26 and the Old Waldorf Club in San Francisco on June 29. Reviewing the June 26 show Veronica Young of the Orange County Register attended commented that Carl “appeared to be having more fun than he has at most Beach Boys concerts…Wilson’s material ranged from mellow originals, strongly affected by a Beach Boys’ influence from the album eras of Pet Sounds, Surf’s Up and the more recent MIU, to some rocky remakes, ranging from a 1957 hit by the Coasters, ‘Youngblood,’ (also the title song from Wilson’s latest LP) to a 1970 gold record by Sly and the Family Stone, ‘Thank You.’”

June 20-25 1984-Carl traveled to Red Bus Studios in London to work on The Beach Boys LP with Steve Levine. He worked on Where I Belong, It’s getting Late, Maybe I Don’t Know, Down by the Pier and I Do Love You.  Carl was back in the States by June 28 to appear with the BBs on the NBC TV Tonight Show, hosted that night by Joan Rivers. They Sang Graduation Day and discussed Brian’s weight loss, groupies and the upcoming July 4 show, as well as the James Watt controversy.  The next night the Beach Boys, minus Brian, played before a near capacity crowd at The Pacific Amphitheater. Jim Washburn of the Orange County Register singled out Carl’s vocal contributions as “the only proof that the group is still capable of being more than just human jukeboxes.  His hauntingly beautiful ballad ‘Heaven,’ dedicated to his brother Dennis, carried an emotional spark the Beach Boys could certainly use more of.” The BBs played in Candlestick Park the next night.

June 1985 the BBs again were on tour. The June 23 show in Memphis got a nice review from Michael Donahue of the Commercial Appeal: “The Beach Boys delighted the audience with a range of their unique California sound songs…The Beach Boys aren’t content to rest on their numerous hits of the past.  They recently showed that they could still make hits with Getcha Back.  They performed this song, which has the Beach Boys ingredients including the wailing vocals.  It would have been hard for a Beach Boys fan to walk away unsatisfied.” Think I’ll stop there, as this could go on forever-as they basically have been on tour in June every year!!
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Ian
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« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2019, 04:58:26 AM »

In 1978 it should say "he and Dennis left the stage"
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Jim V.
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« Reply #2 on: June 21, 2019, 07:42:47 AM »

Thank you so much for these "week in BB history" posts Ian. Please keep 'em coming if you can!

Now the real interesting thing is Carl (?) apparently saying that Mike Love's Celebration project "doesn't mean sh*t." Kinda doesn't jibe with the "go along to get along" Carl we think we know, though I guess I'd say this is still a late '70s quote, so it makes sense.
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Ian
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« Reply #3 on: June 21, 2019, 10:23:25 AM »

Right-Carl was a real diplomat but occasionally he let out a little frustration come out in unguarded moments
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HeyJude
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« Reply #4 on: June 21, 2019, 11:59:52 AM »

It's interesting too that Carl felt that way about the "Celebration" stuff in light of his having sat in for a Celebration gig (along with Brian) when Celebration did that gig at USC in April.

I think Carl was just in a rare sometimes drunk, surly mood in 1977/78, and probably didn't have his usual filter. Think about the turmoil just between mid-1977 and mid-1978. Carl was drinking more at gigs, then the September "Tarmac Incident" where the band nearly broke up, and then early 1978 saw the Australia debacle.

That the band was alive, active, and doing gigs in the summer of 1978 was arguably a small miracle.
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Needleinthehay
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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2019, 01:39:38 PM »

Agreed that he might not have had his usual filter. While he was usually positive about stuff he also was the “quality control” guy and of course he knew deep down that celebration was crap. He probably just had an honest moment and actually said it by accident. I mean would anyone on this board say celebration was great? I doubt it.

Ps love these posts keep them coming!
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HeyJude
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« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2019, 01:44:10 PM »

Agreed that he might not have had his usual filter. While he was usually positive about stuff he also was the “quality control” guy and of course he knew deep down that celebration was crap. He probably just had an honest moment and actually said it by accident

Ps love these posts keep them coming!

Carl was the QC guy indeed. But he certainly wasn't filling that role in 1977/78; it's telling that we have pro-shot shows on video over a year apart (Largo, MD from January 1977 and Australia 1978), and Carl is toasted at both shows ("78 more so of course).

As even attested to in Jon Stebbins's "Real Beach Boy" Dennis bio, Al Jardine was about the only person holding that 1978 Australia/New Zealand tour together. Carl was out of it, Brian was head-in-the-clouds at best, Dennis seemed relatively together ironically but was embroiled in all of the politics, and Mike was doing his usual schlock stuff, like trying to teach multiple lines of lyrics to an audience that had never heard the song in question ("Country Pie').

I'd also argue that while Carl, as musical director, kept the Beach Boys generally very professional sounding through his tenure in 1997, the band got pretty stale and rote.

Just imagine a band *with* Carl and the rest of the guys, but with Mertens and Totten as musical directors really motivating everybody to up their game.
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Ian
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« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2019, 02:09:38 PM »

 It’s 100% true that Carl was still pretty screwed up in early 78 but he was in much better shape by 1979-by which time the other two Wilson were in poor shape! I’m sure this contributed to his desire to branch out and do a solo album in 1980
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tpesky
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« Reply #8 on: June 23, 2019, 05:35:38 PM »

Agreed that he might not have had his usual filter. While he was usually positive about stuff he also was the “quality control” guy and of course he knew deep down that celebration was crap. He probably just had an honest moment and actually said it by accident

Ps love these posts keep them coming!

Carl was the QC guy indeed. But he certainly wasn't filling that role in 1977/78; it's telling that we have pro-shot shows on video over a year apart (Largo, MD from January 1977 and Australia 1978), and Carl is toasted at both shows ("78 more so of course).

As even attested to in Jon Stebbins's "Real Beach Boy" Dennis bio, Al Jardine was about the only person holding that 1978 Australia/New Zealand tour together. Carl was out of it, Brian was head-in-the-clouds at best, Dennis seemed relatively together ironically but was embroiled in all of the politics, and Mike was doing his usual schlock stuff, like trying to teach multiple lines of lyrics to an audience that had never heard the song in question ("Country Pie').

I'd also argue that while Carl, as musical director, kept the Beach Boys generally very professional sounding through his tenure in 1997, the band got pretty stale and rote.

Just imagine a band *with* Carl and the rest of the guys, but with Mertens and Totten as musical directors really motivating everybody to up their game.

The slowed down arrangements and toy keyboard heavy sound they were doing at the end of Carl's tenure were abysmal. I will never figure out why he did that.
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Ian
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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2019, 12:05:49 PM »

Well Carl was a very private person and to this day remains a bit of an enigma as a result but my own feeling is that he kind of surrendered in the late 80s and mike kind of took control. It’s well known that Carl didn’t love playing the resorts in Tahoe and Vegas and absented himself from what he perceived as embarrassments like wipe out with the fat boys
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« Reply #10 on: Yesterday at 11:21:41 AM »

I actually think the band sounded the way they did toward the end of Carl's tenure was because Carl thought that's how contemporary music should sound...listen to that Wilson-Beckley-Lam album and you'll know what I mean. Some great songs and vocals there, but the instrumentation, arrangements and production are kinda bland on much of it.
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« Reply #11 on: Yesterday at 11:22:32 AM »

Another milestone date from this week: June 24, 1974: Capitol released the double-compilation album Endless Summer. On the very same day, Dennis was in the studio, laying down the piano track for "Holy Man". I find it rather ironic that the very day Capitol released a compilation of great, but older songs, very much from another era in rock music - Dennis began recording this inspired, forward-looking piece. Don't get me wrong...I love Endless Summer, and really dig the idea that all these '70s kids (like myself) turned on to the great sounds of the BBs. But unfortunately, its success pretty much buried any newer music the group did. Maybe if "Holy Man" had seen contemporary release as a group single, things would have been different...or maybe not. We'll never know!
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HeyJude
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« Reply #12 on: Yesterday at 11:52:22 AM »

I actually think the band sounded the way they did toward the end of Carl's tenure was because Carl thought that's how contemporary music should sound...listen to that Wilson-Beckley-Lam album and you'll know what I mean. Some great songs and vocals there, but the instrumentation, arrangements and production are kinda bland on much of it.

The 90s touring band sound was just the next extension of what had been going on in the 80s, which was paring *down* the extra instrumentation (especially acoustic instruments) and going more streamlined. The 90s band sounded about as good as a band could with a problematic drummer (no offense to Kowalski, who was by all accounts a great drummer in the late 60s and into the 70s), and only two keyboardists doing both "rhythm" piano and then the orchestrated bits, and kind of 1 and 1/2 guitarists once Foskett/Baker left, as Al and Carl's guitars were not at the forefront of the band sound apart from Carl's solos. Carter was always solid in bass.

They added Cannata on sax (and some keyboards) into the 90s, but that was about it. No acoustic pianos on stage. Eventually no Hammond organ. No horn section (which admittedly was only a sporadic thing that stopped by the late 70s for the most part).

I think a combination of contentment/attrition and indeed Carl's preference for that David Foster-Chicago-ish adult contemporary sound did lead to the band sounding the way it did.

Listening to something like the great setlist on the '93 Paramount NYC show, the main problems are the drumming and the tinkly (aka "toy keyboard" as someone else put it) keyboards.

I think the touring band through the end of Carl's life was just playing in a different fan/critic atmosphere as well. The sort of indie/nerd Brian/PetSounds/Smile stuff had only started to be a "thing." I don't think Carl would have found it logical prior to 1998 to either shift the band to a big, lush, ensemble the way Brian did in 1999,  nor to truly drastically change up the setlist to add either later-era or even earlier-era deep cuts. I'm also not sure Carl would have been on board for essentially wiping the slate clean of a bunch of the "live" arrangements he had honed over all those years, and going back to playing the early-mid 60s stuff "just like the record."

Look at mid 90s setlists. They weren't even doing stuff like "Kiss Me Baby" or "Don't Back Down", rarely did even things like "Please Let Me Wonder." It's supremely odd Carl *never* once sang "Good Timin'" on stage for the last 15 years of his touring career.

There were a *few* brief moments where they tried a *few* odd things. For some reason, in pre-Kokomo 1988 they all of a sudden got *crazy* and added "This Whole World", "Forever", and "Caroline No" to the setlist. They didn't even last the year.

I think Carl was locked into the idea that the masses woudln't go for anything but the 90-minute-ish meat-and-potatoes setlist and presentation, outside of a few things here and there. And I think he was partially right. While I've always advocated that it woudln't have ended the Beach Boys' touring career to like swap out five songs now and then for something else, I don't think even a Mike/Bruce 2019 setlist would have gone over the same in a Mike/Carl/Al/Bruce 1995 Beach Boys show, let alone stuff like Brian doing the entirety of PS or Smile, etc.

Apart from the blink-and-you'll-miss-it late 1993 "boxed set tour", about the craziest the touring band got was finally adding the staccato bridge bit to "God Only Knows" after all those years.

Now, I think with some inventiveness and imagination, even in the early-mid 90s, the Beach Boys could have done more interesting things in the studio and in concert. Solo members could have found time to do "passion projects" on the side. They could have done like a one-shot "Pet Sounds" concert for PBS or whatever.
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« Reply #13 on: Yesterday at 11:55:51 AM »

Well Carl was a very private person and to this day remains a bit of an enigma as a result but my own feeling is that he kind of surrendered in the late 80s and mike kind of took control. It’s well known that Carl didn’t love playing the resorts in Tahoe and Vegas and absented himself from what he perceived as embarrassments like wipe out with the fat boys

That Dutch 1989 Carl interview is telling; he specifically says he envisions that Mike will still be out there touring after everybody else is gone for one reason or another.

Carl didn't like the casino shows, and in prior years had wanted something more like the band touring less often, maybe every other year, and then they would do more arenas and amphitheaters and less casinos and fairs and whatnot. But that never happened, and Carl continued to do all those gigs.

Even when Carl had more leverage and was more motivated to stand up, he quickly gave in to some demands. Supposedly, one of the conditions of returning in 1982 was to stop booking casino gigs. But a quick look at the touring schedule tells us that didn't last long. He kept the band rehearsed enough to sound solid. But he also pretty much gave in to any elaborate setlist changes eventually.
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