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Poll
Question: Which do you think did better in 1965?
The Beach Boys
The Beatles

Pages: [1] 2 Go Down Print
Author Topic: 1965: The Beach Boys vs. The Beatles  (Read 2922 times)
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« on: January 13, 2018, 12:12:14 AM »

I was surprised to see The Beatles won by a landslide on the last round.  Anyway, here's next round:

three albums (Today!, Summer Days and Party) and one non-album single (The Little Girl I Once Knew)

vs. two albums (Help! and Rubber Soul), one non-album single (Day Tripper c/w We Can Work It Out) and two B-sides (I'm Down, Yes It Is)


Now, which band do you think did better in 1965? Look forward to seeing how the result comes out.

In voting, make sure you go only by your personal preference (not the historical significance, critical or commercial success) and only consider the released tracks/albums  listed above.
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« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2018, 04:30:17 AM »

I was surprised to see The Beatles won by a landslide on the last round.
Suspect some posters - not everybody - voted Beatles being influenced by the debate in favor of Beatles. People like sheep, as I usually say.

"We Can Work It Out" is really good, ditto "I'm Down". Paul-written singles were definitely the best. Still, Today's Side A, Summer Days, Party, TLGIOK win. Don't especially like Rubber Soul & Help. "Yes It Is" snoozer.
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« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2018, 07:10:49 AM »

Beatles...Why?  Rubber Soul.  Collectively?  Rubber Soul is A Home Run.  Brian provided plenty of wonderful elements in 1965.  But ... The Beatles nailed it.  [and in doing so they would launch Brian into a creative orbit.]

Much of Today was prepped in '64.  Party was recorded to buy time and satiate Capital by putting something 'out' in time for Xmas [sales].  Summer Days is a fine album...but it isn't the quantum leap which was achieved by Rubber Soul
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« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2018, 08:44:01 AM »

I was surprised to see The Beatles won by a landslide on the last round.  Anyway, here's next round:

three albums (Today!, Summer Days and Party) and one non-album single (The Little Girl I Once Knew)

vs. two albums (Help! and Rubber Soul), one non-album single (Day Tripper c/w We Can Work It Out) and two B-sides (I'm Down, Yes It Is)


Now, which band do you think did better in 1965? Look forward to seeing how the result comes out.

In voting, make sure you go only by your personal preference (not the historical significance, critical or commercial success) and only consider the released tracks/albums  listed above.

You're forgetting the song "Yesterday", which was released in '65 on the Help soundtrack and as a single on Capitol in the US.

It went on to become a listing in the Guinness Book of World Records as the most-covered song of all time, and has received a handful of awards, accolades, and inductions into various Halls of Fame as one of the most popular songs ever written.

And...this is the key for me in terms of history...it was literally *the song* which saw the Beatles cross over from a teen pop novelty and into other worlds of music, from Classical to light pop where the demographics all bought the song and liked it whether they were teen girls or people in their 50's.

The BB's never had such a crossover hit on the level of "Yesterday" that literally blurred the lines between rock, pop, light/easy listening, and even classical genres to where everyone was digging the same tune. At least in the 60's.

So this round goes to The Beatles. They also had another feature film that year, their second featuring all original songs in the film, which is what the Beach Boys never did despite having one in the works. It never came to fruition, which may have been a good thing.

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« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2018, 09:32:15 AM »

Just a suggestion - It's a bit confusing when setting the parameters for these kinds of things due to the Beatles catalog and discography being so different depending on the country where the music was released. Maybe consider using both US and UK stats for releases, because there were different experiences among the fans in terms of what they heard and bought at the time and up to when the UK albums came out on CD in the late 80's.

I'm just thinking, whether non-album or not, The Beatles had *five* number one singles released on Capitol in the year 1965, which is still staggering the year after a lot of revisionists seem to want to suggest was hype and hoopla that drove "Beatlemania" in the US.

I mean...a band puts out *five* singles in the same year on Capitol, and they all reach #1. Apart from purely personal opinions and preferences, what other artist in 1965 came close to touching that level of success in terms of pop music and sales/chart success? It's not even a contest. The Beach Boys released five singles in the US that year too, of the 5 there were two covers (one which peaked at #2) and three originals, the two best hit #1 and #3 respectively, Help Me Rhonda and California Girls.

And "Rhonda" technically was a non-album single too, since the rerecord that hit #1 was not on any album.

But it still doesn't touch the Beatles record of 5 releases in the US in 1965 and 5 #1 singles in the charts. It's unreal what they did in those few years in terms of consistent success and quality too.
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« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2018, 09:33:39 AM »

You're forgetting the song "Yesterday", which was released in '65 on the Help soundtrack and as a single on Capitol in the US.

It went on to become a listing in the Guinness Book of World Records as the most-covered song of all time, and has received a handful of awards, accolades, and inductions into various Halls of Fame as one of the most popular songs ever written.

And...this is the key for me in terms of history...it was literally *the song* which saw the Beatles cross over from a teen pop novelty and into other worlds of music, from Classical to light pop where the demographics all bought the song and liked it whether they were teen girls or people in their 50's.

The BB's never had such a crossover hit on the level of "Yesterday" that literally blurred the lines between rock, pop, light/easy listening, and even classical genres to where everyone was digging the same tune. At least in the 60's.

So this round goes to The Beatles. They also had another feature film that year, their second featuring all original songs in the film, which is what the Beach Boys never did despite having one in the works. It never came to fruition, which may have been a good thing.

It's interesting that they didn't release it as a single in the UK. Still, is this the beginning of the end for The Beatles? The birth of Paul's ego? Grin You inspired me to watch The Beatles Sept. '65 Ed Sullivan show performance of Yesterday and I had completely forgotten John's quip after the rest of the band returned from hiding, "Thanks, Paul... that was just like him." I do prefer a Paul solo performance like that though than seeing the rest of the guys just strumming along in the background. That totally kills the rock and roll vibe of the group.
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« Reply #6 on: January 13, 2018, 09:48:18 AM »

You're forgetting the song "Yesterday", which was released in '65 on the Help soundtrack and as a single on Capitol in the US.

It went on to become a listing in the Guinness Book of World Records as the most-covered song of all time, and has received a handful of awards, accolades, and inductions into various Halls of Fame as one of the most popular songs ever written.

And...this is the key for me in terms of history...it was literally *the song* which saw the Beatles cross over from a teen pop novelty and into other worlds of music, from Classical to light pop where the demographics all bought the song and liked it whether they were teen girls or people in their 50's.

The BB's never had such a crossover hit on the level of "Yesterday" that literally blurred the lines between rock, pop, light/easy listening, and even classical genres to where everyone was digging the same tune. At least in the 60's.

So this round goes to The Beatles. They also had another feature film that year, their second featuring all original songs in the film, which is what the Beach Boys never did despite having one in the works. It never came to fruition, which may have been a good thing.

It's interesting that they didn't release it as a single in the UK. Still, is this the beginning of the end for The Beatles? The birth of Paul's ego? Grin You inspired me to watch The Beatles Sept. '65 Ed Sullivan show performance of Yesterday and I had completely forgotten John's quip after the rest of the band returned from hiding, "Thanks, Paul... that was just like him." I do prefer a Paul solo performance like that though than seeing the rest of the guys just strumming along in the background. That totally kills the rock and roll vibe of the group.

That's an interesting point! I was just reading about the decision to release Yesterday as a Beatles single...credit to the band and Brian Epstein, they held firm on the decision that anything be released as The Beatles and in terms of writing, that it be credited as Lennon/McCartney. I think EMI and George Martin wanted to label it as a Paul release since no other Beatles are heard or involved. But the agreement was that everything be released as the band, not individuals. That was the right decision.

It did cause some tension though, as it naturally would. From a pure ego standpoint, yes - I could see where it would go to anyone's head when their basically solo song blows up to the degree "Yesterday" changed the game in '65 and into '66.

But it's also funny how the band would take the piss out of McCartney on the example like you mentioned with Lennon's televised quip...and don't forget Harrison's masterful quip introducing solo Paul doing Yesterday on a TV appearance by saying along the lines of "and now for Paul McCartney, Opportunity Knocks!" before he came out with his guitar. Opportunity Knocks was an amateur hour type program like the current ones "The Voice", "Got Talent", etc.

If McCartney's head did start to swell, his bandmates were there to keep him in check, and did so publicly in front of millions watching on TV.  Grin

Now the question could also be, did this inspire Capitol's release of Caroline No as a Brian Wilson solo release rather than a Beach Boys single? It's basically the same parameters and they went with giving BW a solo rather than a band credit. Did it help or hurt?
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« Reply #7 on: January 13, 2018, 10:05:58 AM »

You're forgetting the song "Yesterday", which was released in '65 on the Help soundtrack and as a single on Capitol in the US.

It went on to become a listing in the Guinness Book of World Records as the most-covered song of all time, and has received a handful of awards, accolades, and inductions into various Halls of Fame as one of the most popular songs ever written.

And...this is the key for me in terms of history...it was literally *the song* which saw the Beatles cross over from a teen pop novelty and into other worlds of music, from Classical to light pop where the demographics all bought the song and liked it whether they were teen girls or people in their 50's.

The BB's never had such a crossover hit on the level of "Yesterday" that literally blurred the lines between rock, pop, light/easy listening, and even classical genres to where everyone was digging the same tune. At least in the 60's.

So this round goes to The Beatles. They also had another feature film that year, their second featuring all original songs in the film, which is what the Beach Boys never did despite having one in the works. It never came to fruition, which may have been a good thing.

It's interesting that they didn't release it as a single in the UK. Still, is this the beginning of the end for The Beatles? The birth of Paul's ego? Grin You inspired me to watch The Beatles Sept. '65 Ed Sullivan show performance of Yesterday and I had completely forgotten John's quip after the rest of the band returned from hiding, "Thanks, Paul... that was just like him." I do prefer a Paul solo performance like that though than seeing the rest of the guys just strumming along in the background. That totally kills the rock and roll vibe of the group.

That's an interesting point! I was just reading about the decision to release Yesterday as a Beatles single...credit to the band and Brian Epstein, they held firm on the decision that anything be released as The Beatles and in terms of writing, that it be credited as Lennon/McCartney. I think EMI and George Martin wanted to label it as a Paul release since no other Beatles are heard or involved. But the agreement was that everything be released as the band, not individuals. That was the right decision.

It did cause some tension though, as it naturally would. From a pure ego standpoint, yes - I could see where it would go to anyone's head when their basically solo song blows up to the degree "Yesterday" changed the game in '65 and into '66.

But it's also funny how the band would take the piss out of McCartney on the example like you mentioned with Lennon's televised quip...and don't forget Harrison's masterful quip introducing solo Paul doing Yesterday on a TV appearance by saying along the lines of "and now for Paul McCartney, Opportunity Knocks!" before he came out with his guitar. Opportunity Knocks was an amateur hour type program like the current ones "The Voice", "Got Talent", etc.

If McCartney's head did start to swell, his bandmates were there to keep him in check, and did so publicly in front of millions watching on TV.  Grin

Now the question could also be, did this inspire Capitol's release of Caroline No as a Brian Wilson solo release rather than a Beach Boys single? It's basically the same parameters and they went with giving BW a solo rather than a band credit. Did it help or hurt?

Interesting. I'm not surprised that the band was on the side of releasing it as a Beatles single. I've read Paul quotes where he's stated that none of the guys (himself included) would have entertained releasing a solo effort at that time (despite prodding from outsiders). I always liked how John gave the Lennon/McCartney credit to Give Peace A Chance. That always seemed like a nice gesture at a rough time.

And YES! I love George's "opportunity knocks" bit. That was all part of their presentation, but it was genuine. That's part of what made them so special. I'm sure Brian loved their humor too. He really took it a step further and infused it into their records.

As for Capitol's mindset... I have no idea. But releasing Caroline, No as a Brian Wilson single and including it on a Beach Boys album makes zero sense to me. Same for Gettin' Hungry. Is there really any doubt that any Beach Boys solo release wouldn't fair better on the charts if it had The Beach Boys name on it? I don't think so.
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« Reply #8 on: January 13, 2018, 11:06:41 AM »

...You inspired me to watch The Beatles Sept. '65 Ed Sullivan show performance of Yesterday and I had completely forgotten John's quip after the rest of the band returned from hiding, "Thanks, Paul... that was just like him." I do prefer a Paul solo performance like that though than seeing the rest of the guys just strumming along in the background. That totally kills the rock and roll vibe of the group.

I remember watching that Ed Sullivan 1965 Beatles performance. After Paul finished Yesterday, my Mom quipped, "Why can't all their songs be like that?"  Grin
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« Reply #9 on: January 13, 2018, 11:40:45 AM »



I mean...a band puts out *five* singles in the same year on Capitol, and they all reach #1. Apart from purely personal opinions and preferences, what other artist in 1965 came close to touching that level of success in terms of pop music and sales/chart success? It's not even a contest. The Beach Boys released five singles in the US that year too, of the 5 there were two covers (one which peaked at #2) and three originals, the two best hit #1 and #3 respectively, Help Me Rhonda and California Girls.

And "Rhonda" technically was a non-album single too, since the rerecord that hit #1 was not on any album.


Help Me Rhonda wasn't on Summer Days?

Depending on your metrics, Hermans Hermits came close to touching that level of success.  If you choose the year-end Billboard Hot 100 for 1965 as your metric they had 8, 19, 22, 46, and 67.  The Beatles had 7, 31, and 55.  It would be dumb to argue that HH were better or whatever, but you could argue that they weren't-not-even-close.

Something else to think about is Bob Dylan's 1965.  Look at these singles: The Times They Are A Changin, Subterranean Homesick Blues, Maggie's Farm (UK), Like A Rolling Stone, Positively 4th Street (non-album), and Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window.  As parts of 2 huge LPs that year.  He also recorded Mr Tambourine Man that year, and the Byrds version was released as a single in April.  Also the whole going electric thing, which was maybe the biggest story in music that year.  He had an absolutely massive 1965, actually maybe bigger than the Beatles.
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« Reply #10 on: January 13, 2018, 12:05:58 PM »



I mean...a band puts out *five* singles in the same year on Capitol, and they all reach #1. Apart from purely personal opinions and preferences, what other artist in 1965 came close to touching that level of success in terms of pop music and sales/chart success? It's not even a contest. The Beach Boys released five singles in the US that year too, of the 5 there were two covers (one which peaked at #2) and three originals, the two best hit #1 and #3 respectively, Help Me Rhonda and California Girls.

And "Rhonda" technically was a non-album single too, since the rerecord that hit #1 was not on any album.


Help Me Rhonda wasn't on Summer Days?

Depending on your metrics, Hermans Hermits came close to touching that level of success.  If you choose the year-end Billboard Hot 100 for 1965 as your metric they had 8, 19, 22, 46, and 67.  The Beatles had 7, 31, and 55.  It would be dumb to argue that HH were better or whatever, but you could argue that they weren't-not-even-close.

Something else to think about is Bob Dylan's 1965.  Look at these singles: The Times They Are A Changin, Subterranean Homesick Blues, Maggie's Farm (UK), Like A Rolling Stone, Positively 4th Street (non-album), and Can You Please Crawl Out Your Window.  As parts of 2 huge LPs that year.  He also recorded Mr Tambourine Man that year, and the Byrds version was released as a single in April.  Also the whole going electric thing, which was maybe the biggest story in music that year.  He had an absolutely massive 1965, actually maybe bigger than the Beatles.

Yes, the Hermits had a terrific year in 1965 but they only scored two #1 singles in the US, Mrs Brown and Henry The VIII. The Beatles had 5. Scoring a #1 single was pretty much the apex of success in terms of pop/teen music in 1965 and the Beatles had 5 of them. There is no way to diminish that and no other band touched it that year. It was a case where every single Capitol released by The Beatles reached the #1 spot - is there anything to compare if that was the gold standard in the industry at that time?

I agree with Dylan, in terms of sheer influence. Yes, he did in fact change the game in many ways, and it was palpable at the time. In recent years and historical reviews of the era that are worth a salt, the impact and influence Dylan had on popular music of the time even more specific to 1965 has been getting more weight than it had been previously. Again, he did change the game but so did his compositions in the hands of other artists who set that lyricism to a rock beat with electric instruments and broke new ground in the process. But, he did not have 5 number one hits.

The issue of Rhonda, yes it did appear on Summer Days but after it had hit #1...the song was first released as a single in March 65 and the album that tacked it on was released late June 65. So it's getting into semantics about non-album singles versus standalone singles - I think it is a moot point especially looking at a song like Rhonda which was re-recorded specifically to be released as a single, and was to where it reached #1 well before anyone could buy it on an album, then tacked onto the next BB album months after the single first appeared.

The Beatles US singles and albums make the waters even more murky considering it was not long after into early '66 that The Beatles themselves revolted and decided to use the "butcher cover" on the same album in the US that would offer their fans a chance to actually buy the crossover smash hit #1 Yesterday on a full Beatles album, again months after it hit the US as a Capitol single. So I'd suggest what was actually released as a single is as much a valid point in these polls as determining what was a non-album single, considering many like Rhonda and Yesterday hit #1 weeks or months before an album containing the songs came out.
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« Reply #11 on: January 13, 2018, 12:37:04 PM »

The Beatles.   Rubber Soul is a killer album and Help is almost as good.
 
Today and SDSN each have top notch material.  Party was just a fun time filler.
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« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2018, 01:19:44 PM »

1965?
No contest - this is why Brian did Pet Sounds - to raise his game up to the level he knew he could, and should, work at.
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« Reply #13 on: January 13, 2018, 01:31:11 PM »

Disclaimer: the following is my personal opinion based on the recommendations for the poll provided by the original poster himself. My opinion is not meant to offend the Beatles sales records, prior chart positions, or their feelings. Nor is my opinion meant to stifle any objective discussion about the Beatles. God bless the Beatles.

Rubber Soul: one of my favorite albums ever. Every song is a masterpiece - ĎNowhere Maní has some of the best harmonies Iíve heard in a 1960s pop song (which kinda means some of the best harmonies in any song period). ĎIn My Lifeí has that amazing piano solo in the middle eight which blows my mind no matter how many times I hear it. ĎThe Wordí, ĎWhat Goes Oní, ĎYou Wonít See Meí all phenomenal.

I find it awesome to think about Brian listening to this album and what must have gone through his mind during and after the listen. Also, was it ever settled as to what version (UK or US) Brian first heard?

Help: Not my favorite album but itís got some great songs on it.

Today!: I carry the opinion that the Surfer Girl album was Brianís first attempt to create a seemless work of art. There really isnít much filler on it, and every song has such attention to detail (same with LDC). Today! Seems to pick that stride back up after several albums with meaningless filler. Of course Bull Sessions is on here but that seems more of a ďbonusĒ track to me than an album cut. Every one of these songs will either make you dance or ponder your inner feelings. Itís superb. Personally, I think the backing track to ĎIn The Back Of My Mindí is the most beautiful thing created by either band in this year.

SDSN: A powerhouse of hits and potential hits. Itís Brian firing on all cylinders creatively. Seriously, the transition of creativity from Today to SDSN is like going from a black and white television to a 100Ē color LCD TV. The evidence being the sonic difference between the two Help Me Rhondas. I mean, you can almost hear colors coming through your ears listening to California Girls.

Iím saying The Beach Boys won. Brian created an almost filler-less masterpiece with Today! that makes one question their adulthood, love life, it also makes you want to get up and dance. Itís got Dennis singing one hell of a great lead on Do You Wanna Dance. Itís got everything. Not only that but you can see an amazing transition from that masterpiece to another with Summer Days - itís in another universe of beautiful.

Iím also gonna say the Beatles won, because Rubber Soul is one of the greatest albums ever - every damn song is great on it. Also Yesterday is almost unbeatable in style and subject.

Iíll just refuse to cast a vote for this one.

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« Reply #14 on: January 13, 2018, 01:35:29 PM »

Also. The Party album doesnít get much love but no one can deny just how great the vocals are on there. Itís probably one of their best albums vocally, IMO.
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« Reply #15 on: January 13, 2018, 05:34:34 PM »

I was surprised to see The Beatles won by a landslide on the last round.
Suspect some posters - not everybody - voted Beatles being influenced by the debate in favor of Beatles. People like sheep, as I usually say.

That's pretty insulting to the entire board frankly.

Also, why would the debate influencing someone's vote be a bad thing? 
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« Reply #16 on: January 13, 2018, 06:35:22 PM »

I was surprised to see The Beatles won by a landslide on the last round.  Anyway, here's next round:

three albums (Today!, Summer Days and Party) and one non-album single (The Little Girl I Once Knew)

vs. two albums (Help! and Rubber Soul), one non-album single (Day Tripper c/w We Can Work It Out) and two B-sides (I'm Down, Yes It Is)


Now, which band do you think did better in 1965? Look forward to seeing how the result comes out.

In voting, make sure you go only by your personal preference (not the historical significance, critical or commercial success) and only consider the released tracks/albums  listed above.

You're forgetting the song "Yesterday", which was released in '65 on the Help soundtrack and as a single on Capitol in the US.
Yeah, Yesterday is a song that should never be forgotten, but I already included it above as a part of Help! album.
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« Reply #17 on: January 13, 2018, 07:14:19 PM »

Just because the Beatles may have been more popular at the time doesn't mean that they actually achieved what the Beach Boys did.

I may be biased (this is a Beach Boys forum and I'm a Beach Boys fan) but in 1965, the Beatles were very good, and essentially great, and the  Beach Boys were also good and essentially great. The difference being that the Beach Boys, at their best, were  celestial/divine, and the Beatles were merely great.
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« Reply #18 on: January 14, 2018, 12:57:44 AM »

The Beatles had Ticket to Ride, Help!, You've Got To Hide Your Love Away, Yesterday, Day Tripper, We Can Work It Out and the watershed Rubber Soul.

The Beach Boys had one great (but mostly forgotten) album (Today!), two or three iconic singles (if we want to include Barbara Ann), and a covers album which has not aged well.

Certainly The Beach Boys had their moments, but 1966 was really their year.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 12:58:28 AM by Gabo » Logged
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« Reply #19 on: January 14, 2018, 02:16:47 AM »

I voted for The Beach Boys, going with my personal preference.

IMO BB always did much better than The Beatles in terms of production during 1964-66. Listen to "The Little Girl I Once Knew" and "We Can Work It Out" - I actually prefer the later in this case, but production-wise it is no contest - "Little Girl" has far more complex, interesting production.
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« Reply #20 on: January 14, 2018, 04:12:51 AM »

That's pretty insulting to the entire board frankly.

Also, why would the debate influencing someone's vote be a bad thing?
I'd appreciate it if people didn't exaggerate things I say & if they read it carefully before replying.

Well Beatles is ubiquitous band, there's plenty information, books about it. Everybody knows at least the Abc. In 1963 thread, BBs won. It's 1st year comparison. Then 1964, you & others started bringing up the well-known facts about Beatles' influential status, greatest band, best selling music act etc. that the pendulum swang towards Beatles. So, the way I see it is some people chose Beatles after re-reading these documented facts. It made me suspicious that they could've picked the BBs but didn't/ hesitated to do. I.e. these posts opened their eyes & they suddenly see they're wrong when, again, the points raised in Beatles' favor were just mention of old facts written elsewhere. If they like BBs' 1964 stuff better, they should stick to BBs. You ask why is it bad thing - but, is it good thing if people change minds fast, not really reliable?
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« Reply #21 on: January 14, 2018, 04:43:20 AM »

I am curious as to what language you count as your mother tongue.
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« Reply #22 on: January 14, 2018, 05:35:21 AM »

This thread, and the last couple of threads on Beatles vs Beach Boys has got me thinking about their legacies.

My two favourite groups, as I'm sure is the case with a hell of a lot of fans of both bands.

Ideally, you would think this poll would be a win for The Beatles. It definitely is that case in terms of how you look at the albums and singles as they came out in 1965. However, when you compile 'the best' of the individual years of The Beach Boys, adding in unreleased choice cuts and using the best fidelity possible it comes across much, much closer than originally assumed in terms of musical value. In most other areas where it counts, in terms of live performances, star power, chart placements ect. The fabs knock the Beach Boys out cold.

But when you get to the heart of the best of Brian's studio work for the group, (not just starting with the coveted Pet Sounds, "Good Vibrations" and SMiLE stuff but throughout everything he/they have produced from 1961 to now) you see a sense of musical development , that is similarly awe-inspiring to The Beatles discography. The main difference when comparing both groups against each other is that the fab four distilled all of their best work between 1962-1970 into their 217 studio recordings plus maybe a mere dozen or so of their outtakes. When they broke up in April 1970 that was it, all their albums were out there in perfect fidelity. The recorded work already speaks for itself. Stuff like 'Leave My Kitten Alone', 'Come and Get It' and even the 'Strawberry Fields Demo' is fantastic but if it wasn't available it wouldn't alter the groups legacy in quite the same way that say, 40-50 of the best Beach Boys unreleased material can literally change the way you might look at their entire oeuvre. The BB's also had the unfortunate habit of spoiling a lot of would be out and out classic albums with filler and spoken word tracks with little musical value.

The Beach Boys are different, in that their musical legacy is still evolving in a way that is kind of impossible for John, Paul, George & Ringo. When John died in 1980, everyone and their mother was already familiar with everything Beatles. It took a long time, decades even, for Brian Wilson/Beach Boys music to get many of the plaudits from a musical perspective that they've always deserved. (Not saying that they weren't appreciated a hell of a lot, just saying that for years people have taken for granted just how perfect and absolutely thrilling their best work can be) Often it's seen as a case of the group sticking around and diluting their 'brand' for way, way, way, way too long,

But even as of 2018, whilst we are still getting incredible new stereo mixes, unreleased recordings, and their are accolades and exposure to new generations of fans and critics, the groups legacy will keep evolving in a way that was unprecedented even in the sixties. In this decade alone we've had the likes of, 'The SMiLE Sessions', 'Made In California', 'Sunshine Tomorrow', 'Party! Unplugged' and Live recordings from 1964, 1965 & 1966!

In quantity, the Beach Boys discography doesn't compare extremely favourably to the lads from liverpool, but separate the wheat from the chaff in The Beach Boys discography of say, '61-'71, (let's say the equivalent 217 recordings, distilled to the best available released and unreleased recordings. and you have a staggering catalog of music.

Below are my favourite BB recordings of 1965, ideally The Beatles would probably win for this year in terms of lyrics and influence alone. But in terms of exhilarating studio performances, and musicality which do I get more enjoyment out of? It depends on the day. That these recordings were largely the work of one man's enormous vision probably seals the deal for me.

God bless The Beach Boys for all that wonderful music.

My choice cuts from 1965 (using sparkling Stereo mixes where applicable)

1. Dance, Dance, Dance
2. Do You Wanna Dance?
3. Please Let Me Wonder
4. Good To My Baby
5. Don't Hurt My Little Sister
6. I'm So Young
7. Kiss Me, Baby
8. In The Back Of My Mind
9. Guess I'm Dumb (Instrumental)
10. All Dressed Up For School
11. Help Me, Rhonda
12. You're So Good To Me
13. The Girl From New York City
14. Amusement Parks U.S.A.
15. Then I Kissed Her
16. Salt Lake City
17. Girl Don't Tell Me
18. California Girls
19. Let Him Run Wild
20. Summer Means New Love
21. And Your Dreams Come True
22. Sandy, She Needs Me
23. The Little Girl I Once Knew
24. Graduation Day
25. Tell Me Why (Party! Sessions mix) *
26. Devoted to You (Party! Sessions mix)
27. There's No Other (Like My Baby) (Party! Sessions mix)
28. Barbara Ann (Single Version)


*Yeah I see the irony of including a Beatles cover, but it's so much fun to listen to, especially in its sessions form, that I almost like it as much as the original! LOL
« Last Edit: January 14, 2018, 05:41:10 AM by SamMcK » Logged
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« Reply #23 on: January 14, 2018, 09:17:34 AM »

This is a tough year to compare. Both groups did amazing things. Brian, sonically, was begging to hit his peak period. On the other side, the Beatles really started to dig deep for their songs.

In order to judge I have to reduce things to my favorite songs from each band for this year:

ďIn My LifeĒ and ďKiss Me BabyĒ

The former is the winner for me. So in 1965 I have to vote....

The Beatles.
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« Reply #24 on: January 14, 2018, 10:50:05 AM »

This was the year that the Beatles started to catch up to e Beach Boys artistically. But the Beach Boys were still ahead in my opinion. Bass lines had already become more interesting in Summer Days/Nights.
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Mike Love autobiography (pg 242-243)
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