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Author Topic: The Beach Boys Wild Honey(Sunshine Tomorrow) 2CD Set?  (Read 71991 times)
JK
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« Reply #475 on: July 01, 2017, 01:47:16 AM »

I want to hold this little gem when it arrives today or tomorrow.
Delayed for a week! Thud

Still, there are so many great, often ecstatic posts on the subject (most notably those by Matt B) to read while I'm waiting.

Christmas is going to be such an anti-climax this year!
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« Reply #476 on: July 01, 2017, 02:15:59 AM »

8.1 out of 10 in Pitchfork:
http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/the-beach-boys-1967-sunshine-tomorrow/
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JK
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« Reply #477 on: July 01, 2017, 02:47:58 AM »

My mind is so completely blown by listening to this set. Cheers to whoever made the decision to just have the stereo version of the album, as opposed to both the stereo and mono versions, since that leaves more room for extra tracks which we have been gifted with.

I cannot imagine ever wanting to listen to the mono version again.

While I agree 100% with your first comment (everyone has the mono version already) your second comment has me baffled.

Whenever I play PS these days, it's always the mono version. These labour-of-love stereo remixes open up the music wonderfully but at the end of the day the original mono version is definitive.

So I shall certainly want to listen to mine again. :=)
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« Reply #478 on: July 01, 2017, 03:50:55 AM »

Jann Wenner was right about one thing -- the BBs weren't much of a live unit in 1967. Listening to the Detroit recordings here, I keep thinking, surely these are just rehearsals -- but no, there's applause at the end.
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« Reply #479 on: July 01, 2017, 05:11:35 AM »

Jann Wenner was right about one thing -- the BBs weren't much of a live unit in 1967. Listening to the Detroit recordings here, I keep thinking, surely these are just rehearsals -- but no, there's applause at the end.

William; I started seeing the band in 1965, Brooklyn Academy of Music. They were great. Saw them several times 66/67/68.  They were great.  Jann Wenner, in my opinion, at that time was in the "The Beach Boys are irrelevant; they are not The Beatles " San Francisco camp.  I am not sure if this is his quote but it sums up that period :" I would rather "Get Back" with The Beatles than "Do it Again" with The Beach Boys "

I disagree wholeheartedly with Jann Wenner circa late 60's !
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The LEGENDARY OSD
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« Reply #480 on: July 01, 2017, 06:38:15 AM »

My mind is so completely blown by listening to this set. Cheers to whoever made the decision to just have the stereo version of the album, as opposed to both the stereo and mono versions, since that leaves more room for extra tracks which we have been gifted with.

I cannot imagine ever wanting to listen to the mono version again.

While I agree 100% with your first comment (everyone has the mono version already) your second comment has me baffled.

Whenever I play PS these days, it's always the mono version. These labour-of-love stereo remixes open up the music wonderfully but at the end of the day the original mono version is definitive.

So I shall certainly want to listen to mine again. :=)

After 50 years of listening to the mono version of PS, definitive or not, I welcomed with open ears the stereo version of the album. Quite honestly, I'd categorize the stereo version as the genuine "definitive" version based on the fact that we get to hear everything that was involved with the recording. Since 1996, my days of listening to the mono version are long gone and it will be the same deal for anything that eventually gets released in the stereo format. For relatively new fans,
don't waste your hard earned cash on buying the mono version. Just throw a thick blanket over your speakers while listening to the stereo version and you'll have the full mono effect.
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« Reply #481 on: July 01, 2017, 06:55:01 AM »

Could they make a new PS CD release from OSD's idea? Grin
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« Reply #482 on: July 01, 2017, 07:28:17 AM »

Jann Wenner was right about one thing -- the BBs weren't much of a live unit in 1967. Listening to the Detroit recordings here, I keep thinking, surely these are just rehearsals -- but no, there's applause at the end.

William; I started seeing the band in 1965, Brooklyn Academy of Music. They were great. Saw them several times 66/67/68.  They were great.  Jann Wenner, in my opinion, at that time was in the "The Beach Boys are irrelevant; they are not The Beatles " San Francisco camp.  I am not sure if this is his quote but it sums up that period :" I would rather "Get Back" with The Beatles than "Do it Again" with The Beach Boys "

I disagree wholeheartedly with Jann Wenner circa late 60's !

Take these comments of mine with a pinch of salt, as I'm not much of a fan of live recordings, as I've often said here. I'm not very taken with the live recordings on ST either, but that's prolly just me. Live tracks have to be truly stellar to get me going... all too often, they just sound to me, at best, like slightly shoddily performed versions of the studio recordings, with mistakes, flubs, out-of-time performances, wonky vocals and irritating interjections by the crowd (er... or the band, shall we say...).

[I did say to take what I say with a pinch of salt... I am quite hard to please when it comes to live recordings].

But here's the thing. You can go and see a band and come away thinking they're great. And then listen to live recordings *from the same concert* and they don't sound half as hot. Actually BEING there live seems to, in my experience, smooth over some of the rough corners in a live performance. When you listen in your house in the cold light of day, the fluffed guitar solo seems to leap out at you more. Or that's what I've always found, anyway. (Brian is far from immune to this effect. When I listened to audience recordings of some of the SMiLE concerts I attended, I couldn't believe I hadn't heard some of the instrumental and vocal flubs on the night... the performances seemed blemishless when I was actually there).

So I actually agree with William and Ray above simultaneously. And I will say this about the Beatles and Jan Wenner: at least the Beach Boys were ANY kind of live outfit in 1967 and beyond (and arguably, had their finest days of live performances still to come). The Beatles never were a live outfit again! (and even if you say 'but what about the Rooftop concert'... it was hardly a gig of unbridled live brilliance... although that's thoroughly unsurprising for a concert given on a windy, wintery London roof in January)
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 07:29:13 AM by Matt Bielewicz » Logged
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« Reply #483 on: July 01, 2017, 08:20:02 AM »

Jann Wenner was right about one thing -- the BBs weren't much of a live unit in 1967. Listening to the Detroit recordings here, I keep thinking, surely these are just rehearsals -- but no, there's applause at the end.

William; I started seeing the band in 1965, Brooklyn Academy of Music. They were great. Saw them several times 66/67/68.  They were great.  Jann Wenner, in my opinion, at that time was in the "The Beach Boys are irrelevant; they are not The Beatles " San Francisco camp.  I am not sure if this is his quote but it sums up that period :" I would rather "Get Back" with The Beatles than "Do it Again" with The Beach Boys "

I disagree wholeheartedly with Jann Wenner circa late 60's !

Count me in with you, Ray. Jann Wenner did a great deal of damage to the BBs in late 1967 with his misguided condescension and obtusely arrogant pronouncements. It stayed in play over the next 4-5 years, making it incredibly difficult for the band to be recognized for its ongoing evolution. Fortunalely ol' Yawn stopped writing record reviews rather quickly, and he left the BBs in the more sympathetic (and much more knowledgable) hands of Arthur Schmidt and Jim Miller, who gave us much more credible coverage (culminating in Tom Nolan's landmark two-parter in '71). But the damage had already been done--the BBs had to work through this period with the equivalent of one arm and one leg tied behind their back(s).
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« Reply #484 on: July 01, 2017, 08:38:40 AM »

I too am rarely enthused by live recordings. But to take the opportunity to put in a rare good word for Bruce -- he's absolutely right about how great the version of Aren't You Glad on the Live in London album is, which he was quoted on somewhere up thread. I heard this before the studio version, because it's on The Capitol Years boxed set that was my first major BBs purchase, and have always preferred it to the Wild Honey version. The live Aren't You Glad on Sunshine Tomorrow is from around the same period and similar, but not as good.
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« Reply #485 on: July 01, 2017, 09:02:17 AM »

I'm only an occasional visitor here, so forgive me if this is no great revelation to some of you. But I have, sort of coincidentally, just come across this recording of the 1970 Big Sur Folk Festival show, of which I have the live album that includes Wouldn't It Be Nice. It's absolutely terrific for the first 15 minutes, at which point it segues into an inferior quality recording*. Anyway, it's now apparent to me that this is the source of the version of Aren't You Glad on ST.

* The changeover happens as Mike finishes a rather churlish introduction to what surely would have been Cottonfields, but it instead links up with a tinny-sounding Tears in the Morning.
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« Reply #486 on: July 01, 2017, 09:56:21 AM »

Some first impressions here:

Wild Honey has always been one of my favorite albums and now this stereo release vaulted it into the Top Five. I'm generally a purist with music but not so with these Beach Boys stereo mixes. They actually improve the album (Pet Sounds included).

No big reevaluation for me but as Howie points out in the liner notes, this is the last full-on Brian and Mike collaboration in a big album sense. Considering this was 50 years ago, a sobering thought.

Man, they did the right thing in canning ``Lei,d``....its appalling compared to how great the band sound on the Thanksgiving Tour.



I always had a soft spot for the Hawaii material. I first heard all of it maybe over a decade ago, and I listened many, many times. I used to fall asleep to those concerts on headphones hoping to pick out some detail, and I tried to research and write a lot about it that unfortunately never got finished (apart from some long forgotten online postings) due to some life events interrupting. But I think it stands in a very unique and special place in the band's history as the truly, undoubtedly final time that original lineup of musicians who practiced in Hawthorne with rented instruments before recording Surfin actually played as that same unit on the live stage.

We got a few teases on the two-fers, box sets, etc. Yes there are some ragged spots, but such is the nature of live performance with any band who doesn't mime or play to prerecorded tracks on stage. Perfection is not human when it's live music in front of a crowd. It's the experience. Hawaii was an experience and unfortunately the definite end of a special era.

That's what hit me listening last night. Surfer Girl came on, the full mix and the vocals-only. I had tears in my eyes. Stunning, emotional, etc. That was the Beach Boys, for the last time on stage playing together that way. I say "was" deliberately. That specific blend was never heard the same way again. How fortunate it was recorded.

Add in the quirkiness of the Baldwin organ, the looseness, the stripped down element, the setlist...I always thought those shows were a ton of fun to hear and absorb.

The tracks presented on this set from Hawaii...I'm just curious, Ghosty - which of them made you form the opinion you posted? I think the tracks presented each have their own strength, from the Boys revisiting their garage roots on Surfin, to the mid period You're So Good To Me, up to Heroes (which was only a month old when they did it 100% live and in full...), and then going back to pre-Beach Boys Hawthorne with the Freshmen cover, and the gorgeous timeless Surfer Girl...

I will say that one of the great, mythical "unbooted" tracks from days of old, "Hawthorne Blvd" didn't quite take off...in fact it stalled at the starting line...but it is a curio that fans can actually hear now officially.  Maybe reworking Thee Midniters wasn't the best choice to open a show...

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« Reply #487 on: July 01, 2017, 10:11:57 AM »

Jann Wenner was right about one thing -- the BBs weren't much of a live unit in 1967. Listening to the Detroit recordings here, I keep thinking, surely these are just rehearsals -- but no, there's applause at the end.

William; I started seeing the band in 1965, Brooklyn Academy of Music. They were great. Saw them several times 66/67/68.  They were great.  Jann Wenner, in my opinion, at that time was in the "The Beach Boys are irrelevant; they are not The Beatles " San Francisco camp.  I am not sure if this is his quote but it sums up that period :" I would rather "Get Back" with The Beatles than "Do it Again" with The Beach Boys "

I disagree wholeheartedly with Jann Wenner circa late 60's !

Take these comments of mine with a pinch of salt, as I'm not much of a fan of live recordings, as I've often said here. I'm not very taken with the live recordings on ST either, but that's prolly just me. Live tracks have to be truly stellar to get me going... all too often, they just sound to me, at best, like slightly shoddily performed versions of the studio recordings, with mistakes, flubs, out-of-time performances, wonky vocals and irritating interjections by the crowd (er... or the band, shall we say...).

[I did say to take what I say with a pinch of salt... I am quite hard to please when it comes to live recordings].

But here's the thing. You can go and see a band and come away thinking they're great. And then listen to live recordings *from the same concert* and they don't sound half as hot. Actually BEING there live seems to, in my experience, smooth over some of the rough corners in a live performance. When you listen in your house in the cold light of day, the fluffed guitar solo seems to leap out at you more. Or that's what I've always found, anyway. (Brian is far from immune to this effect. When I listened to audience recordings of some of the SMiLE concerts I attended, I couldn't believe I hadn't heard some of the instrumental and vocal flubs on the night... the performances seemed blemishless when I was actually there).

So I actually agree with William and Ray above simultaneously. And I will say this about the Beatles and Jan Wenner: at least the Beach Boys were ANY kind of live outfit in 1967 and beyond (and arguably, had their finest days of live performances still to come). The Beatles never were a live outfit again! (and even if you say 'but what about the Rooftop concert'... it was hardly a gig of unbridled live brilliance... although that's thoroughly unsurprising for a concert given on a windy, wintery London roof in January)

I'm a realist when it comes to this stuff and the BBs surely sounded better in '66 live than the Beatles did.

But totally disagree about the Rooftop concert. The Beatles cooked on that gig, and that gig proves they could have smoked any band touring if they had wanted to.

Jann Wenner had a hangup about the BBs and that sucked. Just like he has his weird Lennon vs. McCartney thing. But "Get Back" *is* a better single than "Do It Again." And Get Back isn't like my favorite late era Beatles track or anything.
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« Reply #488 on: July 01, 2017, 11:36:51 AM »

My mind is so completely blown by listening to this set. Cheers to whoever made the decision to just have the stereo version of the album, as opposed to both the stereo and mono versions, since that leaves more room for extra tracks which we have been gifted with.

I cannot imagine ever wanting to listen to the mono version again.

While I agree 100% with your first comment (everyone has the mono version already) your second comment has me baffled.

Whenever I play PS these days, it's always the mono version. These labour-of-love stereo remixes open up the music wonderfully but at the end of the day the original mono version is definitive.

So I shall certainly want to listen to mine again. :=)

After 50 years of listening to the mono version of PS, definitive or not, I welcomed with open ears the stereo version of the album. Quite honestly, I'd categorize the stereo version as the genuine "definitive" version based on the fact that we get to hear everything that was involved with the recording. Since 1996, my days of listening to the mono version are long gone and it will be the same deal for anything that eventually gets released in the stereo format. For relatively new fans,
don't waste your hard earned cash on buying the mono version. Just throw a thick blanket over your speakers while listening to the stereo version and you'll have the full mono effect.

I disagree; the AP mono sounds great and is more in line with Brian's creative intention at the time of having the instruments blend together to form something new rather than being able to hear every distinct musical element.
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« Reply #489 on: July 01, 2017, 01:33:51 PM »


Listening to track 17 I've been wondering what arrangement Brian had in mind early on for the "I Was Made To Love Her" Vocal Insert.
Maybe something like this?

https://soundcloud.com/ste_xxx/i-was-made-to-love-her-edit/s-tLTkW


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« Reply #490 on: July 01, 2017, 01:53:50 PM »

Jann Wenner was right about one thing -- the BBs weren't much of a live unit in 1967. Listening to the Detroit recordings here, I keep thinking, surely these are just rehearsals -- but no, there's applause at the end.

William; I started seeing the band in 1965, Brooklyn Academy of Music. They were great. Saw them several times 66/67/68.  They were great.  Jann Wenner, in my opinion, at that time was in the "The Beach Boys are irrelevant; they are not The Beatles " San Francisco camp.  I am not sure if this is his quote but it sums up that period :" I would rather "Get Back" with The Beatles than "Do it Again" with The Beach Boys "

I disagree wholeheartedly with Jann Wenner circa late 60's !

Take these comments of mine with a pinch of salt, as I'm not much of a fan of live recordings, as I've often said here. I'm not very taken with the live recordings on ST either, but that's prolly just me. Live tracks have to be truly stellar to get me going... all too often, they just sound to me, at best, like slightly shoddily performed versions of the studio recordings, with mistakes, flubs, out-of-time performances, wonky vocals and irritating interjections by the crowd (er... or the band, shall we say...).

[I did say to take what I say with a pinch of salt... I am quite hard to please when it comes to live recordings].

But here's the thing. You can go and see a band and come away thinking they're great. And then listen to live recordings *from the same concert* and they don't sound half as hot. Actually BEING there live seems to, in my experience, smooth over some of the rough corners in a live performance. When you listen in your house in the cold light of day, the fluffed guitar solo seems to leap out at you more. Or that's what I've always found, anyway. (Brian is far from immune to this effect. When I listened to audience recordings of some of the SMiLE concerts I attended, I couldn't believe I hadn't heard some of the instrumental and vocal flubs on the night... the performances seemed blemishless when I was actually there).

So I actually agree with William and Ray above simultaneously. And I will say this about the Beatles and Jan Wenner: at least the Beach Boys were ANY kind of live outfit in 1967 and beyond (and arguably, had their finest days of live performances still to come). The Beatles never were a live outfit again! (and even if you say 'but what about the Rooftop concert'... it was hardly a gig of unbridled live brilliance... although that's thoroughly unsurprising for a concert given on a windy, wintery London roof in January)

I'm a realist when it comes to this stuff and the BBs surely sounded better in '66 live than the Beatles did.

But totally disagree about the Rooftop concert. The Beatles cooked on that gig, and that gig proves they could have smoked any band touring if they had wanted to.

Jann Wenner had a hangup about the BBs and that sucked. Just like he has his weird Lennon vs. McCartney thing. But "Get Back" *is* a better single than "Do It Again." And Get Back isn't like my favorite late era Beatles track or anything.

I'm actually not the biggest Beatles fan in the world, but I really can think of no time in their concurrent histories as live acts, that the Beatles were not head and shoulders above the BBs.  The Beatles were old pros by the time they made it, the Boys just the opposite.... The Beatles' Shea Stadium concert being a prime example, they rocked hard, played well and sounded very close to their records.   The BBs, bless 'em, never did sound that good in the sixties and when they finally did get their concert mojo going in the seventies it took a cast of thousands to do so.  Ok, not thousands but many sidemen and the officializing of a couple of them into temporary group member status.  I enjoyed this "big band" approach that they took.  But the original quintet never was that hot of a live band.  And I don't think without prime Brian vocally that they were even that hot as a vocal group in concert.  The Rolling Stone assessment of In Concert seems succinct and apt:  "Sloppy good".
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« Reply #491 on: July 01, 2017, 02:00:53 PM »

The TAMI show? Roll Eyes
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And production aside, Id so much rather hear a 14 year old David Marks shred some guitar on Chug-a-lug than hear a 51 year old Mike Love sing about bangin some chick in a swimming pool.-rab2591
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« Reply #492 on: July 01, 2017, 02:54:27 PM »

The 1968 and 1969 shows?
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« Reply #493 on: July 01, 2017, 02:58:13 PM »

Some first impressions here:

Wild Honey has always been one of my favorite albums and now this stereo release vaulted it into the Top Five. I'm generally a purist with music but not so with these Beach Boys stereo mixes. They actually improve the album (Pet Sounds included).

No big reevaluation for me but as Howie points out in the liner notes, this is the last full-on Brian and Mike collaboration in a big album sense. Considering this was 50 years ago, a sobering thought.

Man, they did the right thing in canning ``Lei,d``....its appalling compared to how great the band sound on the Thanksgiving Tour.



I always had a soft spot for the Hawaii material. I first heard all of it maybe over a decade ago, and I listened many, many times. I used to fall asleep to those concerts on headphones hoping to pick out some detail, and I tried to research and write a lot about it that unfortunately never got finished (apart from some long forgotten online postings) due to some life events interrupting. But I think it stands in a very unique and special place in the band's history as the truly, undoubtedly final time that original lineup of musicians who practiced in Hawthorne with rented instruments before recording Surfin actually played as that same unit on the live stage.

We got a few teases on the two-fers, box sets, etc. Yes there are some ragged spots, but such is the nature of live performance with any band who doesn't mime or play to prerecorded tracks on stage. Perfection is not human when it's live music in front of a crowd. It's the experience. Hawaii was an experience and unfortunately the definite end of a special era.

That's what hit me listening last night. Surfer Girl came on, the full mix and the vocals-only. I had tears in my eyes. Stunning, emotional, etc. That was the Beach Boys, for the last time on stage playing together that way. I say "was" deliberately. That specific blend was never heard the same way again. How fortunate it was recorded.

Add in the quirkiness of the Baldwin organ, the looseness, the stripped down element, the setlist...I always thought those shows were a ton of fun to hear and absorb.

The tracks presented on this set from Hawaii...I'm just curious, Ghosty - which of them made you form the opinion you posted? I think the tracks presented each have their own strength, from the Boys revisiting their garage roots on Surfin, to the mid period You're So Good To Me, up to Heroes (which was only a month old when they did it 100% live and in full...), and then going back to pre-Beach Boys Hawthorne with the Freshmen cover, and the gorgeous timeless Surfer Girl...

I will say that one of the great, mythical "unbooted" tracks from days of old, "Hawthorne Blvd" didn't quite take off...in fact it stalled at the starting line...but it is a curio that fans can actually hear now officially.  Maybe reworking Thee Midniters wasn't the best choice to open a show...



I will say the actual Hawaii live recordings (what little we get on this) are way WAY above the Lei'd performances that were to be dubbed over later. I can appreciate the historic nature of the recordings (well, the whole package is like that , really) and while the approach (sort of) works on some of the ballad material ("God Only Knows"), reducing dynamic songs like "California Girls", "Sloop John B", etc to a faint whisper does them a terrible disservice IMO. Good concept, wrong selections. I have to admit, though, I've never cared for the dribs and drabs we started getting from this session beginning with the box set. Maybe if they had waited and done it later the following year with Friends lp material like "Little Bird", "Meant for You" it would've worked better.
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« Reply #494 on: July 01, 2017, 03:28:16 PM »

Was "Help YOU Rhonda" ever actually intended to be a part of the live album or were they just goofing around with the lyrics in the studio?  I've heard the actual Hawaii performances and they don't sing it like that.
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« Reply #495 on: July 01, 2017, 03:55:42 PM »

Jann Wenner was right about one thing -- the BBs weren't much of a live unit in 1967. Listening to the Detroit recordings here, I keep thinking, surely these are just rehearsals -- but no, there's applause at the end.

William; I started seeing the band in 1965, Brooklyn Academy of Music. They were great. Saw them several times 66/67/68.  They were great.  Jann Wenner, in my opinion, at that time was in the "The Beach Boys are irrelevant; they are not The Beatles " San Francisco camp.  I am not sure if this is his quote but it sums up that period :" I would rather "Get Back" with The Beatles than "Do it Again" with The Beach Boys "

I disagree wholeheartedly with Jann Wenner circa late 60's !

Take these comments of mine with a pinch of salt, as I'm not much of a fan of live recordings, as I've often said here. I'm not very taken with the live recordings on ST either, but that's prolly just me. Live tracks have to be truly stellar to get me going... all too often, they just sound to me, at best, like slightly shoddily performed versions of the studio recordings, with mistakes, flubs, out-of-time performances, wonky vocals and irritating interjections by the crowd (er... or the band, shall we say...).

[I did say to take what I say with a pinch of salt... I am quite hard to please when it comes to live recordings].

But here's the thing. You can go and see a band and come away thinking they're great. And then listen to live recordings *from the same concert* and they don't sound half as hot. Actually BEING there live seems to, in my experience, smooth over some of the rough corners in a live performance. When you listen in your house in the cold light of day, the fluffed guitar solo seems to leap out at you more. Or that's what I've always found, anyway. (Brian is far from immune to this effect. When I listened to audience recordings of some of the SMiLE concerts I attended, I couldn't believe I hadn't heard some of the instrumental and vocal flubs on the night... the performances seemed blemishless when I was actually there).

So I actually agree with William and Ray above simultaneously. And I will say this about the Beatles and Jan Wenner: at least the Beach Boys were ANY kind of live outfit in 1967 and beyond (and arguably, had their finest days of live performances still to come). The Beatles never were a live outfit again! (and even if you say 'but what about the Rooftop concert'... it was hardly a gig of unbridled live brilliance... although that's thoroughly unsurprising for a concert given on a windy, wintery London roof in January)

I'm a realist when it comes to this stuff and the BBs surely sounded better in '66 live than the Beatles did.

But totally disagree about the Rooftop concert. The Beatles cooked on that gig, and that gig proves they could have smoked any band touring if they had wanted to.

Jann Wenner had a hangup about the BBs and that sucked. Just like he has his weird Lennon vs. McCartney thing. But "Get Back" *is* a better single than "Do It Again." And Get Back isn't like my favorite late era Beatles track or anything.

I'm actually not the biggest Beatles fan in the world, but I really can think of no time in their concurrent histories as live acts, that the Beatles were not head and shoulders above the BBs.  The Beatles were old pros by the time they made it, the Boys just the opposite.... The Beatles' Shea Stadium concert being a prime example, they rocked hard, played well and sounded very close to their records.   The BBs, bless 'em, never did sound that good in the sixties and when they finally did get their concert mojo going in the seventies it took a cast of thousands to do so.  Ok, not thousands but many sidemen and the officializing of a couple of them into temporary group member status.  I enjoyed this "big band" approach that they took.  But the original quintet never was that hot of a live band.  And I don't think without prime Brian vocally that they were even that hot as a vocal group in concert.  The Rolling Stone assessment of In Concert seems succinct and apt:  "Sloppy good".

The BBs were touring at the same time as the Beatles when they started - CA vs. Germany/UK.  Clearly Brian's arrangements are much more complex to recreate, instrumentally and vocally in a live setting during the time that they were both touring.

Like several other people here, I heard the BBs several times from 64-69 - the period I assume you're referencing.  They were excellent.  

I have no idea what you're talking about.  Do you have any further context for your comments?

BTW - I am also a Beatles fan.  Were you at a number of BBs shows in the 60's?
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 04:00:15 PM by Debbie KL » Logged
HeyJude
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« Reply #496 on: July 01, 2017, 05:40:40 PM »

The TAMI show? Roll Eyes

I'd say the Beatles Sweden '63 shows are hotter, as well as the Washington DC '64 show.

No knock on the Beach Boys. TAMI has a lot of energy. But then watch the BBs kind of plod on "Wendy" on the Sullivan show in '64.

Please know, I'm not trying to make it a weird horse race or anything. I love both bands. As in as hardcore as it gets on both.

As a live concert unit, the Beatles were in most cases just a better band. With good reason. The BBs didn't spend several years slogging through 12 or whatever hours per night in Germany.

The Beach Boys did a stunning job doing as well as they did trying to recreate those records in stage.

And, when the Beatles broke up and only McCartney was doing wonky college shows with Wings in '71-'73 and refusing to do Beatles tunes, the BBs *were* putting on a better show.
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THE BEACH BOYS OPINION PAGE IS ON FACEBOOK!!! http://www.facebook.com/beachboysopinion - Check out the original "BEACH BOYS OPINION PAGE" Blog - http://beachboysopinion.blogspot.com/
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« Reply #497 on: July 01, 2017, 05:44:18 PM »

Really good and reasoned points Jude, the Beatles just had a ton of experience even before 1961. I just made the mistake of feeding the troll.
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And production aside, Id so much rather hear a 14 year old David Marks shred some guitar on Chug-a-lug than hear a 51 year old Mike Love sing about bangin some chick in a swimming pool.-rab2591
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« Reply #498 on: July 01, 2017, 05:50:24 PM »

WOW The Game Of Love what did you guys think of that song! AWESOME Blown that it was never released! and the fullest version possible of Lonely Days! WOW cant believe those songs never got an official release.
Honey Get Home was awesome too! Never heard of that one before, and of course Hawthorne  boulevard is a nice little cover  of another song. Thank You BRI!
« Last Edit: July 01, 2017, 06:21:42 PM by The_Beach » Logged
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« Reply #499 on: July 01, 2017, 05:53:40 PM »

WOW The Game Of Love what did you guys think of that song! AWESOME Blown that it was never released! and the fullest version possible of Lonely Days! WOW cant believe those songs never got an official release

"Game of Love" oozes groovy, sexual tension, and I'm quite okay with it!  Grin
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Do happy happy happy Mission Pak singing sound!

My blog, where I post my original Beach Boys mixes and whatnot:
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