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Author Topic: R.I.P. Scotty Moore  (Read 2905 times)
the professor
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« Reply #25 on: July 08, 2016, 02:22:54 PM »

Thanks Rocker! Just got the Kindle--looks like great summer reading. Is that author the guy I see playing with Scotty on some youtube videos in honor of elvis?


For example I don't think DJ is on Mystery Train.


Yes, there is no drummer on that song. When it comes to the Sun recordings, the only tracks with drums (Johnny Bernero iirc) are "I forgot to remember to forget" and "I'm left, you're right, she's gone".

Bill and Elvis split when the latter got inducted to the army. After that, Bill had a lot of succes with his Bill Black Combo.
Scotty and D.J. played on almost everything until 1968, except for those movie soundtracks on which Elvis just overdubbed his voice ("Paradise Hawaiian Style", "Clambake" and one or two more I believe). On everything else Scotty and D.J. where there, Scotty listed as band leader iirc. Try to get Ernst Jörgensen's "A life in music":

https://www.amazon.com/Elvis-Presley-Complete-Recording-Sessions/dp/0312185723












EDIT:


Just saw this on the FECC forum:



**Fri 01 Jul 16**
R.I.P. SCOTTY MOORE - A REVERED ROCKFATHER.
Direct link

Scotty Moore



Sad to hear of the passing of one of the very first guitar heroes, Scotty Moore. All of us who play rock guitar, whether we’re aware of it or not, have a little bit of Scotty Moore in us. His playing was actually quite sensitive - not all the brash clang which the recognised character of much of early Rock and Roll guitar playing (which was also essential !) - but massively brave and new at the time. You can hear in his playing the excitement of that transition from the 40s to the 50s … the advent of the Day of the Young.

Scotty cited Chet Atkins as an influence - a deeply polished Country style electric guitar picker - and, like Chet, he used the kind of fingerpick which clips around your thumb - not very common today. You can hear that Scotty’s style on record was a mixture of melodic and two-part harmony stuff, and jazz chords, and the beginnings of string bending … his strings were too thick to bend very far, but he used the bend to make blue notes, squeezed up just a semitone and making it sound like a strain - which it actually must have been … ! This technique, absorbed from black blues players, by Scotty and a few of his contemporaries, ushered in the guitar as a voice in rock music - rather than just an accompanying instrument. Scotty was modest about the influence he’d had, saying that his manner of playing was common among his mates …. but really he was very innovative IMHO !! Scotty preferred a deep-bodied Gibson electric guitar, but his opposite numbers, Steve Cropper notably on Green Onions with Booker T and the MG’s) and James Burton (stupendously notably on the solo for Hello Mary Lou by Ricky Nelson), favoured the more metallic twang of the Fender Telecaster. So in comparison, Scotty sounds quite warm on record. Burton and Cropper pushed those strings across the fingerboard a little further, expanding the electric guitar vocabulary even more. But Scotty had his own territory carved out, and he had the greatest and most passionate white singer of his generation to play off … Elvis. He just might be regarded as the inventor of the power-chord riff (prior to the epic Kinks riffs) - for his fabulous slide-up motif which is the core of the verses of Elvis’s Jailhouse Rock. That’s an inimitable classic (I know for sure it’s inimitable - I’ve tried … we used to play it, but a little differently, as Queen).

I had the pleasure of working with Scotty briefly when the Sun Record Tribute was being put together a few years ago. I joined Scotty and DJ Fontana in Abbey Road studios to record 'No Teasin' Around’ - a little known song by Bill ‘The Kid’ Emerson which I’d found in a Sun Records catalogue. I was really taken by the song, and kinda hoped we’d make it popular. But the powers that be at Sun Records evidently didn’t share that feeling. They left it off the compilation. It only surfaced as a bonus track on the Japanese version of the album. Consequently it’s remained ‘little-known’. But I love it !

It’s here actually, I just noticed … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOumwngMl1c Of course EVERYTHING is on the Internet now !

Well, tell me what you think. I don’t know if there are any photos of that session in existence … if it were today we’d all be tweetin’ it around the world.

I performed this song only once live, I think, at the Montreux Jazz Festival around …erm … 2005 ? [Ed: 2001] backing vocals by my daughter Emily, Joe Botross, the first husband of my daughter Louisa, and my lady Anita !

But I digress. I was never in touch with Scotty after that, and of course I now regret that. But he was a lovely relaxed and modest man - it was such a pleasure and privilege to have that chance to play with him. Like I said, we all have a little piece of Scotty Moore in us.

RIP Scotty Moore, one of the founding fathers of Rock.

Bri


http://www.brianmay.com









I guess he's talking about this Ahmet Ertegun produced record (soundtrack to the dosumentary of the same name):


https://www.amazon.com/Good-Rockin-Tonight-Legacy-Records/dp/B00005NZX7
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« Reply #26 on: July 09, 2016, 03:02:51 AM »

Thanks Rocker! Just got the Kindle--looks like great summer reading. Is that author the guy I see playing with Scotty on some youtube videos in honor of elvis?


For example I don't think DJ is on Mystery Train.


Yes, there is no drummer on that song. When it comes to the Sun recordings, the only tracks with drums (Johnny Bernero iirc) are "I forgot to remember to forget" and "I'm left, you're right, she's gone".

Bill and Elvis split when the latter got inducted to the army. After that, Bill had a lot of succes with his Bill Black Combo.
Scotty and D.J. played on almost everything until 1968, except for those movie soundtracks on which Elvis just overdubbed his voice ("Paradise Hawaiian Style", "Clambake" and one or two more I believe). On everything else Scotty and D.J. where there, Scotty listed as band leader iirc. Try to get Ernst Jörgensen's "A life in music":

https://www.amazon.com/Elvis-Presley-Complete-Recording-Sessions/dp/0312185723












EDIT:


Just saw this on the FECC forum:



**Fri 01 Jul 16**
R.I.P. SCOTTY MOORE - A REVERED ROCKFATHER.
Direct link

Scotty Moore



Sad to hear of the passing of one of the very first guitar heroes, Scotty Moore. All of us who play rock guitar, whether we’re aware of it or not, have a little bit of Scotty Moore in us. His playing was actually quite sensitive - not all the brash clang which the recognised character of much of early Rock and Roll guitar playing (which was also essential !) - but massively brave and new at the time. You can hear in his playing the excitement of that transition from the 40s to the 50s … the advent of the Day of the Young.

Scotty cited Chet Atkins as an influence - a deeply polished Country style electric guitar picker - and, like Chet, he used the kind of fingerpick which clips around your thumb - not very common today. You can hear that Scotty’s style on record was a mixture of melodic and two-part harmony stuff, and jazz chords, and the beginnings of string bending … his strings were too thick to bend very far, but he used the bend to make blue notes, squeezed up just a semitone and making it sound like a strain - which it actually must have been … ! This technique, absorbed from black blues players, by Scotty and a few of his contemporaries, ushered in the guitar as a voice in rock music - rather than just an accompanying instrument. Scotty was modest about the influence he’d had, saying that his manner of playing was common among his mates …. but really he was very innovative IMHO !! Scotty preferred a deep-bodied Gibson electric guitar, but his opposite numbers, Steve Cropper notably on Green Onions with Booker T and the MG’s) and James Burton (stupendously notably on the solo for Hello Mary Lou by Ricky Nelson), favoured the more metallic twang of the Fender Telecaster. So in comparison, Scotty sounds quite warm on record. Burton and Cropper pushed those strings across the fingerboard a little further, expanding the electric guitar vocabulary even more. But Scotty had his own territory carved out, and he had the greatest and most passionate white singer of his generation to play off … Elvis. He just might be regarded as the inventor of the power-chord riff (prior to the epic Kinks riffs) - for his fabulous slide-up motif which is the core of the verses of Elvis’s Jailhouse Rock. That’s an inimitable classic (I know for sure it’s inimitable - I’ve tried … we used to play it, but a little differently, as Queen).

I had the pleasure of working with Scotty briefly when the Sun Record Tribute was being put together a few years ago. I joined Scotty and DJ Fontana in Abbey Road studios to record 'No Teasin' Around’ - a little known song by Bill ‘The Kid’ Emerson which I’d found in a Sun Records catalogue. I was really taken by the song, and kinda hoped we’d make it popular. But the powers that be at Sun Records evidently didn’t share that feeling. They left it off the compilation. It only surfaced as a bonus track on the Japanese version of the album. Consequently it’s remained ‘little-known’. But I love it !

It’s here actually, I just noticed … https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oOumwngMl1c Of course EVERYTHING is on the Internet now !

Well, tell me what you think. I don’t know if there are any photos of that session in existence … if it were today we’d all be tweetin’ it around the world.

I performed this song only once live, I think, at the Montreux Jazz Festival around …erm … 2005 ? [Ed: 2001] backing vocals by my daughter Emily, Joe Botross, the first husband of my daughter Louisa, and my lady Anita !

But I digress. I was never in touch with Scotty after that, and of course I now regret that. But he was a lovely relaxed and modest man - it was such a pleasure and privilege to have that chance to play with him. Like I said, we all have a little piece of Scotty Moore in us.

RIP Scotty Moore, one of the founding fathers of Rock.

Bri


http://www.brianmay.com









I guess he's talking about this Ahmet Ertegun produced record (soundtrack to the dosumentary of the same name):


https://www.amazon.com/Good-Rockin-Tonight-Legacy-Records/dp/B00005NZX7


I don't think so. Ernst Jörgensen is the head of Sony's (or BMG's?) Presley departement since the early 90s and has to be credited for some very great releases and projects, including the Follow That Dream collectors label. Here's some more info and an interview:

http://www.elvis.com.au/presley/video-interview-with-ernst-jorgensen.shtml


The book is a great read. Hope you'll enjoy it. A couple of session datas or release infos may now be corrected since the book is already a couple of years old. But definitely one of the must have's and essential when it comes to Elvis' recording career.
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« Reply #27 on: July 10, 2016, 10:50:00 AM »

Jorma Kääriäinen. . . . .that's the Elvis fanatic I see playing with Scotty: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qprOV3lyANU

Pardon my abysmal conflation of unfamiliar Northern European sounding names. . . .

Thanks Rocker: all the Bill, Scotty, Elvis, DJ stuff is gold. . . .
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« Reply #28 on: July 15, 2016, 09:17:22 AM »

Scotty Moore: 1931-2016

by Peter Guralnick

http://www.peterguralnick.com/post/147450620061/scotty-moore-1931-2016
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a diseased bunch of mo'fos if there ever was one… their beauty is so awesome that listening to them at their best is like being in some vast dream cathedral decorated with a thousand gleaming American pop culture icons.

- Lester Bangs on The Beach Boys


PRO SHOT BEACH BOYS CONCERTS - LIST


To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

- Jack Rieley
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« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2016, 09:00:13 AM »

Paul remembers Scotty Moore

https://www.paulmccartney.com/news-blogs/news/paul-remembers-scotty-moore



"Dear Scotty Moore died this week. When we were growing up in Liverpool the sound of Scotty’s guitar on early Elvis records was nothing short of miraculous. It sounded to us like nothing we’d ever heard before and the gods in Valhalla couldn't have made a better sound. His technical skills, mixed with his sometime wild abandon, set the perfect tone for Elvis’s vocals.

"I was lucky enough to record with him and D.J. Fontana for a Sun Records tribute record that Ahmet Ertegun put together and Scotty’s quiet manner and subtle sense of humour made the occasion very special for a fan like me. I saw him a few more times and spoke to him on the phone and he never ceased to be the hero he had been in my youth.

"Rest in peace Scotty, one of the great gods of the guitar."

- Paul
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a diseased bunch of mo'fos if there ever was one… their beauty is so awesome that listening to them at their best is like being in some vast dream cathedral decorated with a thousand gleaming American pop culture icons.

- Lester Bangs on The Beach Boys


PRO SHOT BEACH BOYS CONCERTS - LIST


To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

- Jack Rieley
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« Reply #30 on: July 28, 2016, 08:58:40 AM »

Keith Richards on Scotty Moore: 'He Was My Hero'
Elvis' iconic Fifties guitarist is remembered by one of his greatest fans


http://www.rollingstone.com/music/features/keith-richards-on-scotty-moore-he-was-my-hero-w431015
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a diseased bunch of mo'fos if there ever was one… their beauty is so awesome that listening to them at their best is like being in some vast dream cathedral decorated with a thousand gleaming American pop culture icons.

- Lester Bangs on The Beach Boys


PRO SHOT BEACH BOYS CONCERTS - LIST


To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

- Jack Rieley
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