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Author Topic: So what did we all EAT today? + recipes.  (Read 8704 times)
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undercover-m
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« Reply #75 on: November 16, 2016, 02:06:38 PM »

who else here is a fan of eggplant, and how do you like to cook it.

(I've only made it in eggplant parm and stir-frys.)
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« Reply #76 on: November 16, 2016, 02:53:12 PM »

Buffalo Wings and fries

buffalo sauce recipe i think i got off a back of a bottle of A1

-Half stick of butter or margarine
-1 cup of hot sauce (red hot)
-Half cup Catalina dressing
-Half package of dry Italian dressing
-Half a cup BBQ sauce
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« Reply #77 on: November 16, 2016, 03:06:02 PM »

who else here is a fan of eggplant, and how do you like to cook it.

(I've only made it in eggplant parm and stir-frys.)

I love it. And--sound like a familiar theme for me?--I get quite a bit through my CSA. Various types, too.

I've done eggplant lasagna, at different times with the eggplant in the role of both the filling.meat, and in the role of the noodles (just thin-slicing eggplants lengthwise).

I've made the Indian dish baingan bharta.

I've made the dip babaganoush.

I've done some eggplant curries.

I've sliced eggplants crosswise so they are discs and grilled them like hamburgers, seasoned with salt, pepper, cumin, garlic, and olive oil. You can also top it with cheese if you like. Far better burger replacement for vegetarians than fake meat, in my opinion. (I am REALLY not a fan of fake meat either in theory or practice.)

A week or two ago, as part of a vaguely Middle Eastern feeling dinner, I did another dip of eggplant, onion, garlic, chilis, and pomegranate syrup cooked and pureed, with coriander, clove, cinnamon, a little cumin, and lemon juice to finish. It was like babaganoush but not quite. It was also fantastic! We had it with raw sliced vegetables and warm pitas, and also had some homemade tzatziki as a second dip.
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« Reply #78 on: November 20, 2016, 05:12:44 PM »

who else here is a fan of eggplant, and how do you like to cook it.

(I've only made it in eggplant parm and stir-frys.)

I love it. And--sound like a familiar theme for me?--I get quite a bit through my CSA. Various types, too.

I've done eggplant lasagna, at different times with the eggplant in the role of both the filling.meat, and in the role of the noodles (just thin-slicing eggplants lengthwise).

I've made the Indian dish baingan bharta.

I've made the dip babaganoush.

I've done some eggplant curries.

I've sliced eggplants crosswise so they are discs and grilled them like hamburgers, seasoned with salt, pepper, cumin, garlic, and olive oil. You can also top it with cheese if you like. Far better burger replacement for vegetarians than fake meat, in my opinion. (I am REALLY not a fan of fake meat either in theory or practice.)

A week or two ago, as part of a vaguely Middle Eastern feeling dinner, I did another dip of eggplant, onion, garlic, chilis, and pomegranate syrup cooked and pureed, with coriander, clove, cinnamon, a little cumin, and lemon juice to finish. It was like babaganoush but not quite. It was also fantastic! We had it with raw sliced vegetables and warm pitas, and also had some homemade tzatziki as a second dip.
All of those sound pretty tasty. I've had Trader Joe's eggplant hummus, and yesterday I ordered pizza with eggplant in it.

The burger replacement idea sounds ideal as well.
There aren't a lot of great fake meats out there, although I'd like to hear your reasoning for why you don't like them in theory or practice.
I enjoy Field Roast's link sausages. They're a local company and soy-free, which is nice. Smiley
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« Reply #79 on: November 21, 2016, 04:42:35 PM »

I've been tasked with a vegetable side for Thanksgiving. This is a thankless task, as nobody in my family particularly enjoys the non-tan/white portions of Thanksgiving. (Lots of fans of turkey, potatoes, gravy, and even the basic stuffings, but that's about all anyone seems particularly interested in.) Plus, most of my family is very conservative when it comes to recipes and ingredients, making my contributions traditionally picked-at at best. The main goal will be landing on something that we'll enjoy taking back home with us after nobody else tried it.

(Aw, it's just sour grapes.)

The plan will be to bring both a veg dish and a sweet potato dish, as there doesn't seem to be one of the latter on the menu. And that's just nonsense!
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« Reply #80 on: November 22, 2016, 04:31:34 AM »

I've been tasked with a vegetable side for Thanksgiving. This is a thankless task, as nobody in my family particularly enjoys the non-tan/white portions of Thanksgiving. (Lots of fans of turkey, potatoes, gravy, and even the basic stuffings, but that's about all anyone seems particularly interested in.) Plus, most of my family is very conservative when it comes to recipes and ingredients, making my contributions traditionally picked-at at best. The main goal will be landing on something that we'll enjoy taking back home with us after nobody else tried it.

(Aw, it's just sour grapes.)

The plan will be to bring both a veg dish and a sweet potato dish, as there doesn't seem to be one of the latter on the menu. And that's just nonsense!

Surely vegetables are an essential part of a turkey meal, otherwise it's so one-sided. At Christmas we eat swede, parsnips and Brussels sprouts as well as baked potatoes----Christmas dinner isn't Christmas dinner without 'em!

Good luck with the "task". ;=)   
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« Reply #81 on: November 22, 2016, 05:29:57 AM »


Surely vegetables are an essential part of a turkey meal, otherwise it's so one-sided. At Christmas we eat swede, parsnips and Brussels sprouts as well as baked potatoes----Christmas dinner isn't Christmas dinner without 'em!

It's fun reading about what people eat in other parts of the world for holidays.
Also finding out different names for foods - didn't know what "swede" was so looked it up. Over in these parts it's known as "rutabaga".
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« Reply #82 on: November 22, 2016, 05:36:46 AM »


Surely vegetables are an essential part of a turkey meal, otherwise it's so one-sided. At Christmas we eat swede, parsnips and Brussels sprouts as well as baked potatoes----Christmas dinner isn't Christmas dinner without 'em!

It's fun reading about what people eat in other parts of the world for holidays.
Also finding out different names for foods - didn't know what "swede" was so looked it up. Over in these parts it's known as "rutabaga".

Now I understand what the Mothers are singing about (here at 1:04)!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cuSD7Q_hArs
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« Reply #83 on: November 22, 2016, 09:17:42 AM »

I've been tasked with a vegetable side for Thanksgiving. This is a thankless task, as nobody in my family particularly enjoys the non-tan/white portions of Thanksgiving. (Lots of fans of turkey, potatoes, gravy, and even the basic stuffings, but that's about all anyone seems particularly interested in.) Plus, most of my family is very conservative when it comes to recipes and ingredients, making my contributions traditionally picked-at at best. The main goal will be landing on something that we'll enjoy taking back home with us after nobody else tried it.

(Aw, it's just sour grapes.)

The plan will be to bring both a veg dish and a sweet potato dish, as there doesn't seem to be one of the latter on the menu. And that's just nonsense!

Surely vegetables are an essential part of a turkey meal, otherwise it's so one-sided. At Christmas we eat swede, parsnips and Brussels sprouts as well as baked potatoes----Christmas dinner isn't Christmas dinner without 'em!

Good luck with the "task". ;=)   

I'd expand that to mean veggies are an essential part of every meal--or ought to be! Alas, at least with my family, veggies' presence doesn't equal popularity!

Big fan of rutabaga/swede, parsnips, and Brussels sprouts, myself.

I'm thinking of sliced root veg (carrots, parsnips and onions) sautéed with tart apples with ginger and cinnamon.
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« Reply #84 on: November 22, 2016, 09:38:53 AM »

Quote
I'm thinking of sliced root veg (carrots, parsnips and onions) sautéed with tart apples with ginger and cinnamon.

Mmmm, this would be amazing with roasted beets too! And super festive  Smiley
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« Reply #85 on: November 22, 2016, 11:46:44 AM »

I've got beets on hand...
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« Reply #86 on: November 24, 2016, 07:53:43 PM »

Long day but it went well.

Was able to pace myself since my sister took the responsibility for cooking the turkey. She did a wonderful job - it was very juicy.
She stuffed the turkey with apples and onions.
I made Dutch apple pie and a pecan pie. Then made stuffed mirlitons with crabmeat.
A broccoli casserole. Also made cranberry sauce.
My sister also brought a sweet potato dish.
There were 7 of us and we were thoroughly stuffed. Plenty of leftovers for the next few days.

Afterwards talked about different food cuisines. One of my nephews is in the Peace Corps in Vanuatu. He and others stationed over there celebrated Thanksgiving by eating the national dish of Vanuatu, "laplap." Taro or some other starch is made into a dough and cooked with coconut cream and some form of meat.
Then somehow the conversation then turned to "whoopie pies" which are popular in the northeastern US.

Worn out but happy.
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« Reply #87 on: November 25, 2016, 05:38:50 AM »

I was at my parents' for Thanksgiving, as is typical for my family. My contribution ended up as sauteed sliced carrots, tossed at the last minute with a previously made pomegranate syrup (infused with ginger, cloves, and cardamom), cranberries, pecans, and thyme. I thought it was pretty good.

Otherwise? Turkey, mashed potatoes, a very basic (bread, onion, celery, etc.) stuffing, a corn/corn bread dish, a cranberry-raspberry relish, gravy, raw vegetable trays (pickles, green and black olives, carrots, grape tomatoes), and a pumpkin dessert. All was fine.

The highlight for me is coming out of it, though: my brother was pheasant hunting in South Dakota and gave me a smoked pheasant. I plan to make a sort of hunter's stew using it. I'd never tried pheasant before, smoked or otherwise, but it's quite good.
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« Reply #88 on: November 26, 2016, 07:32:34 AM »

The highlight for me is coming out of it, though: my brother was pheasant hunting in South Dakota and gave me a smoked pheasant. I plan to make a sort of hunter's stew using it. I'd never tried pheasant before, smoked or otherwise, but it's quite good.

This is in the works: smoked pheasant and some beef, with onions, celery, carrots, parsnips, beets, mushrooms, tomatoes, a few diced, dried sour cherries, and garlic, with half chicken and half vegetable stock (I had a couple cups of each in the freezer from previously made batches), with rosemary and thyme and a splash of red wine.
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« Reply #89 on: November 27, 2016, 07:46:28 PM »

My mom knows I'm vegetarian, but she still made my favorite Thanksgiving dish (stuffing) with chicken sausage in it. I mostly ate potatoes and pie instead. Which isn't terrible, but not what I was hoping for.

For that reason, amongst others, it's been a disappointing Thanksgiving weekend...
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« Reply #90 on: November 27, 2016, 08:32:53 PM »

I'm not vegetarian (but would like to be).
One of my sisters is vegetarian. Like you, my Mom just doesn't seem to "get it." I do my best to have vegan and vegetarian options available when she visits, but Mom is basically of the opinion "why do I have to accommodate her crazy ideas?"
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« Reply #91 on: November 28, 2016, 06:53:05 AM »

Around 2000, a friend of mine from the same rural Minnesota area as me (but by then living in Minneapolis, also like me) became a vegetarian. His parents asked if he was gay...

Awareness is better but in rural areas here you're still likely to get strange looks and questions like "so do you just eat lettuce/salad, then?"
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« Reply #92 on: December 06, 2016, 08:23:58 AM »

Saturday night I had a dish that blew me away, one of my favorites in years. And it was wholly unexpected, a backup choice ordered only because the restaurant was out of my first choice, a seemingly mundane combination of ingredients.

Yigantes, a bean dish ordered at a Greek restaurant. Basically, it was a large, broad bean (they call them "Greek beans," and specified on their website that they aren't lima beans, aren't fava beans, etc.) braised in a veggie stock with onions, carrots, celery, tomato (paste, I think), and herbs. It was served with a chunk of feta. There was a lot of garlic and I identified oregano and cinnamon in there to flavor it.

Anyone else had or like this dish? Anyone ever made it? Now I want to make it (assuming I can find the beans), and wonder if there's some secret. I found some online recipes and they all seem so white-bread, I can't imagine how it turns out so fantastic.
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« Reply #93 on: December 06, 2016, 03:25:02 PM »

I ordered two 14 oz. bags of dried "Greek" beans, which to the best of my knowledge seem to be called the same thing as the dish--yigantes, gigantes, or some variation--from Amazon. Two so the first effort can be improved upon with the second. If I don't feel good about it by then, I'll assume I lack the magic/secret and will continue to turn over my hard-earned pay to the aforementioned restaurant for their voodoo version.
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« Reply #94 on: December 11, 2016, 07:07:33 AM »

Yesterday--in which the snow that began and has yet to stop, some 15 hours later--I made some soup. What else to do on a cold, snowy day? It's mushroom, wild rice, and dumplings, with root vegetables (carrots, parsnips, and turnips).
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« Reply #95 on: December 11, 2016, 09:34:14 AM »

Yesterday--in which the snow that began and has yet to stop, some 15 hours later--I made some soup. What else to do on a cold, snowy day? It's mushroom, wild rice, and dumplings, with root vegetables (carrots, parsnips, and turnips).
That sounds amazing.
Homemade Chinese restaurant style sesame chicken. Easier than expected and super yummy but chock-full of oil.
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« Reply #96 on: December 11, 2016, 03:18:51 PM »

It's been a while since I've had wild rice. (@the captain, your soups always sound so good...)

I just consumed a (very late in the day) breakfast sandwich: toasted sourdough buns, scrambled eggs with green onion sauteed in butter, some guac, and seasonings.

Banana bread might be made in the near future as well.  Wink
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« Reply #97 on: December 13, 2016, 06:01:12 PM »

For what it's worth, the soup was surprisingly bland. OK, but nothing special.
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« Reply #98 on: December 18, 2016, 06:19:24 AM »

As noted elsewhere, Minnesota is in a serious cold spell: -23F right now. The high today is supposed to be somewhere around -10, I believe. (This doesn't account for wind chill, with which we're in the -30s right now.) This means one thing, one obvious thing for those who follow this thread: soup.

Yesterday I did a day-long beef stew. I put it on the stovetop around 9:30 or 10, and ate around 7 pm. It was rich and deep of flavor. I trimmed fat and cubed a rump roast, salting and browning it on all sides in an old, large, heavy stainless steel soup pot I love to use for soups and stews. Deglazed the pan with maybe a shot or two of burgundy and added onion, shallot, carrot, and celery. After a few minutes I stirred in mushrooms, about a tablespoon or so of tomato paste, plus some dried spices and herbs (coriander, a tiny bit of cumin, paprika, black pepper, a tiny bit of cinnamon, and a dried herbs du provence blend), followed by chopped tomatoes and a cup or more of the aforementioned burgundy. After a few minutes, I added some fresh rosemary and thyme and some bay leaves, and some homemade beef stock. I let that simmer for hours. Eventually I added diced parsnips, potatoes, and turnips. A few more hours, a little reseasoning as necessary. This with a crusty garlic bread (garlic cloves baked into the crusty white bread, from a great bakery here)...this is a winter meal!

Today I am going to use some leftover marinated chicken wings to do a lighter, vaguely Asian-flavored soup. The chicken had been marinated and then baked in a sauce of soy sauce, oil, garlic, ginger, orange juice, and chili peppers. I'll use that (the chicken, which is still on the bone, and thus will help flavor the broth), plus the remaining marinade, with onions, carrots, celery, mushrooms, and udon noodles.
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« Reply #99 on: December 27, 2016, 10:14:47 AM »

Making chili. Red, yellow, poblano, and jalapenos; mushrooms; onions; garlic; kidney, black, and pinto beans; diced tomatoes; tomato sauce; veggie stock; a shot of burgundy; an herb and spice blend of smoked paprika, cumin, coriander, garlic powder, oregano, basil, and a little cinnamon. (And salt and pepper.) I absolutely love chili, and the gf has taken a shine to my veggie version (which I never really made prior to her presence, being a meat-loving omnivore, myself). I must admit, the veg version lacks nothing. I absolutely love it too. So there will be eight or 10 frozen servings soon.
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