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Author Topic: So what did we all EAT today? + recipes.  (Read 8702 times)
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undercover-m
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« on: May 09, 2016, 07:09:27 PM »

Inspired by that other thread.

I don't feel like being in my apartment (because sometimes I'm just unsocial + roommates can be frustrating). So instead of cooking in my apartment, I'm sitting in a coffee shop eating this vegan wrap that had tofu and cabbage and pretty decent peanut sauce, plus drinking a latte.

On a regular basis I eat a lot of bread, avocados, omelettes, and stir-fry. I mostly cook for myself because cooking is fun and a good skill to have.
Baking your own bread is fun. I made a really good loaf once and I can kind of do it sometimes, but lately it's been meh. I think I need to let the dough rise more.

Also feel free to post your favorite recipes here. I'll post the bread one that I use.
http://www.kingarthurflour.com/recipes/no-knead-crusty-white-bread-recipe
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2016, 03:12:29 AM »

Nice to see this thread up and running. Good call, u-m.

I don't think I've ever made bread. Lasagna is my speciality. This is lifted from "my" other forum: 


Lasagna alla Giovanni K

Ingredients (for two big eaters)

At least one packet of lasagna (not the green stuff)
5 oz. grated cheese (flakes of parmesan as an alternative)
11 oz. mincemeat
5 oz. chopped bacon
self-raising flour
3 onions chopped small
3 cloves of garlic finely chopped
1 small (thumb-length) tin of tomato paste (they call it puree over here)
wine to fill the empty paste tin
3 or 4 chopped celery stalks
16-24 oz. deep-frozen spinach
milk
margerine (or something resembling it; I never use olive oil for lasagna)
pepper
salt
papripa powder
nutmeg

Instructions

Preheat oven at 180 degrees Celsius.

Grease largish oven dish thoroughly, especially the bottom (inside).

Melt spinach on a very low gas.

Heat margerine in frying pan. Throw in finely chopped garlic and then onions. When fairly brown add mincemeat seasoned with salt, pepper, paprika powder and a dash of nutmeg and fry for 5-10 minutes. Add bacon and chopped celery. Fry for a further 5-10 minutes, stirring as you go. When all this looks good, add tomato paste and wine in paste tin. Stir well and put on low gas.

Heat margerine/whatever in small pan, stirring in flour to thicken and then milk bit by bit. You should make enough sauce to cover three layers in the dish. When almost ready add a knob of butter and a generous sprinkling of nutmeg to taste.

When the frozen spinach is melted and warm, drain thoroughly in a sieve, add to the contents of the frying pan and mix well.

Now, fill up the dish with three sets of alternate horizontal layers of lasagna (break to cover entire surface), the spinach/fried mixture and the sauce (this should be the last layer). If in doubt, cover just the central area of the two lower layers with sauce so as to have enough left to cover the entire top layer.

Sprinkle the cheese over the top and consign to the oven for about 30 minutes or when the cheese is melted and nicely brown.

Enjoy!

Recommended beverage: white wine

I can't be precise about the quantities of milk, margerine and flour, basically because I don't know what they are. This began as a standard recipe and evolved along the way, the way recipes do. So will yours. Good luck!
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Amanda Hart
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« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2016, 09:20:38 AM »

From scratch bread and lasagna? Now you're in my wheelhouse!

I do nearly all my cooking from scratch, including breads and pasta. My whole wheat brioche buns are becoming a weekly thing now, and I've got it consistent and efficient now - for any bread making it just takes a lot of trial and error, getting a feel for the dough, knowing when it's the right amount of wet/sticky. Rise time is a critical part of that, for sure, Undercover. Based on that recipe, I know at least with the humidity in my kitchen, I would need much longer than 90 minutes for the second rise if the dough has been refrigerated. If you have the time and don't need to mi your dough ahead of time, I wouldn't refrigerate it. For my brioche breads, I give them a first rise of about 2 hours some place warm, then shape it into buns, rolls or just in a loaf pan, and let them rise again for just over an hour. Then, egg wash and bake. Another bready recipe I love and that goes over great at parties are garlic knots.

For my lasagna, I make my pasta from a combo of unbleached AP and whole wheat flour. Once you eat fresh lasagna noodles, you'll never go back to the box. I have the pasta roller attachment for my Kitchen Aid and I roll my dough after it's rested as thin as possible and cut it by hand. Then, blanch it, stick it in an ice bath to stop cooking, and rinse it in cold water to wash off the excess starch. It sounds like a lot of work, but it actually goes really fast, plus I think it's fun and rewarding. Then I layer it with my bolognese, and the most important ingredient that I'm shocked isn't in your recipe John K - fresh ricotta. Again, fresh makes a huge difference. I get it hand dipped from a cheese monger, but if you have to get the kind in the tub, do yourself a favor and hang it in a cheese cloth while everything else cook to get the excess moisture out of it. Then, once everything is layered together, it only needs to back for about 15 minutes. So incredibly good.
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« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2016, 12:42:51 PM »

We had lunch at our local, restored to its 1930s glory, municipal airport. Had a bowl of chicken and sausage gumbo with a side salad, while watching the planes and occasional corporate jets take off/land.

Have been watching a cooking program hosted by Annabel Langbein that's quite enjoyable, so was tickled pink to see that her cookbook, Free Range Chef- Simple Pleadures, arrived in the post today. Her recipes look wonderful, healthy, with easy to procure ingredients. Will be trying these out.

We have an Eat Local challenge going on; over the next month participants will try to, as much as possible, eat only what was produced within 200 miles or so. Not too difficult - to be completely faithful, however, would have to not eat most grains except rice and corn, as wheat, oats, rye etc aren't grown around here.
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« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2016, 01:08:12 PM »

For my lasagna, I make my pasta from a combo of unbleached AP and whole wheat flour. Once you eat fresh lasagna noodles, you'll never go back to the box. I have the pasta roller attachment for my Kitchen Aid and I roll my dough after it's rested as thin as possible and cut it by hand. Then, blanch it, stick it in an ice bath to stop cooking, and rinse it in cold water to wash off the excess starch. It sounds like a lot of work, but it actually goes really fast, plus I think it's fun and rewarding. Then I layer it with my bolognese, and the most important ingredient that I'm shocked isn't in your recipe John K - fresh ricotta. Again, fresh makes a huge difference. I get it hand dipped from a cheese monger, but if you have to get the kind in the tub, do yourself a favor and hang it in a cheese cloth while everything else cook to get the excess moisture out of it. Then, once everything is layered together, it only needs to back for about 15 minutes. So incredibly good.

Yours sounds scrumptious, Amanda. Don't be shocked. I get the impression that there are as many recipes for lasagna as there are lasagna cooks. My extended family swears by my lasagna. I'm sure eaters of your lasagna feel the same way. What a dish!
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« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2016, 06:39:07 AM »

Not today, but yesterday: Cauliflower risotto. I'm not low carb or whatever, but I was looking for something different. I got a recipe off the Internet and then modified it.
I sauteed garlic and thyme in olive oil (wish I had shallots too, but I didn't), then added white beans and chicken broth. Then added cauliflower I had chopped and run through the food processor. Added artichoke hearts because I had them. Then I added salt and a bunch of parmesan cheese. Pretty easy, and it tasted good too.
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« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2016, 09:08:41 AM »

Yours sounds scrumptious, Amanda. Don't be shocked. I get the impression that there are as many recipes for lasagna as there are lasagna cooks. My extended family swears by my lasagna. I'm sure eaters of your lasagna feel the same way. What a dish!

You're in the UK, right? That might be the difference - in America I don't think I've ever seen a lasagna without ricotta. For anyone interested in Italian cooking, pick up Marcella Hazan's Essentials of Italian Cooking. It's not just a cookbook - it does have recipes - but there is a lot of valuable information about techniques and food background. One of the things she covers is how different western countries interpret Italian food, and there is a pretty big difference between American Italian food and English Italian food.
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« Reply #7 on: May 11, 2016, 10:17:03 AM »

Yours sounds scrumptious, Amanda. Don't be shocked. I get the impression that there are as many recipes for lasagna as there are lasagna cooks. My extended family swears by my lasagna. I'm sure eaters of your lasagna feel the same way. What a dish!

You're in the UK, right? That might be the difference - in America I don't think I've ever seen a lasagna without ricotta.

I'm a Brit living in the Netherlands. I took a Dutch recipe for lasagna and ran with it, you might say. Not a smidgeon of ricotta in sight... :=)
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« Reply #8 on: May 18, 2016, 08:29:22 PM »

I made some penne arrabiata for dinner. I wish to do more pasta cooking.
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« Reply #9 on: May 19, 2016, 12:30:01 PM »

I've got a pork butt in the crock pot right now that I'll turn into pulled pork sandwiches for dinner tonight
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« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2016, 03:41:58 PM »

My CSA had burdock this week, which I've never prepared or eaten. In fact, while I'd heard of it, I couldn't have told you what it was (beyond "food") until I got the pre-pickup email yesterday. So while I have no idea yet what I'll do with it, I do look forward to figuring something out.

Re the previous discussion about lasagna and ricotta, purists may be amused (or horrified) with this tidbit: in rural Minnesota some 30 years ago, people used cottage cheese where most people would use ricotta. Hamburger, tomato sauce, ricotta cheese, noodles, a little cheese on top, and that's about it. There's something fabulously awful about Midwestern American food from, say, postwar to the past 15 years or so. I've gone through my parents' and grandparents' old church cookbooks, where congregants would submit recipes. Everything was combinations of canned veggies, canned soups, hamburger...that's almost it. Spices? Herbs? Fresh ingredients? Not often.
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« Reply #11 on: May 19, 2016, 04:51:13 PM »

Inspired by the condiments thread, I bought some white bread for the first time in about a decade and had yum a cheddar mayo and tomato sandwich.
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« Reply #12 on: May 19, 2016, 05:35:26 PM »

Well, a fucking great big breakfast (too much) in Cardiff this morning after seeing Brian & Co last night - Great gig and superb munch in the morning  LOL
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« Reply #13 on: May 29, 2016, 04:22:17 AM »

Very simple recipe of egg-free biscuits:

butter - half bricket
sugar (big/tiny) - 3-4 table spoons
rye flour - 3 cups
baking powder/lemon juice-apple vinegar w/soda
cinnamon, vanilla, coconut flakes etc. - optional
Milk - a little, 100 ml

Stir butter, add sugar, mix. Sift flour 1 cup, mix. Then the next. When adding the last cup, it's time for soda w/ vinegar. Mix for 10m. Then pour milk to glue it as before it was kinda dry. If you add much milk, sift a little flour. Beat the dough with rolling pin, make it flat about 1 cm. Take a glass to get round shaped biscuits. Prepare stove. I usually bake in a wonder oven. It's vintage Soviet cooking device: 

paper and stuff isn't required, you just put them. In 30m the 1st batch is ready. Next batch will be in 20-22 etc.

NB: once I filled them with coconut flakes but they weren't as delicious as "Raffaello" at the end. I couldn't spot the flakes. Drat.
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« Reply #14 on: June 23, 2016, 04:05:32 AM »

Chocolate
In the cup mix 100 g of cocoa with sugar powder (2 table sp.). Boil the water (half cup). Add to the mix. Leave in the fridge for hour. Enjoy.

NB: you can replace water with butter/margerine.
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« Reply #15 on: June 23, 2016, 06:13:45 AM »

My CSA had burdock this week, which I've never prepared or eaten. In fact, while I'd heard of it, I couldn't have told you what it was (beyond "food") until I got the pre-pickup email yesterday. So while I have no idea yet what I'll do with it, I do look forward to figuring something out.

When I lived in the UK we had this weird soft drink called Dandelion & Burdock:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandelion_and_burdock

I remember it tasted unspeakably evil.

Anyway, good luck with the recipe. LOL
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« Reply #16 on: June 25, 2016, 12:21:30 AM »

My CSA had burdock this week, which I've never prepared or eaten. In fact, while I'd heard of it, I couldn't have told you what it was (beyond "food") until I got the pre-pickup email yesterday. So while I have no idea yet what I'll do with it, I do look forward to figuring something out.

When I lived in the UK we had this weird soft drink called Dandelion & Burdock:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dandelion_and_burdock

I remember it tasted unspeakably evil.

Anyway, good luck with the recipe. LOL

Now now, John, Dandelion & Burdock is the north's equivalent of Coca Cola. It is to us what Irn Bru is to Scotland, what Coke is to the US, or what Buckfast is to Glasgow! Made properly, fermented with natural ingredients (like dandelion, and burdock) it's a very ancient drink. And it's delicious!
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« Reply #17 on: June 25, 2016, 09:00:17 AM »

Now now, John, Dandelion & Burdock is the north's equivalent of Coca Cola. It is to us what Irn Bru is to Scotland, what Coke is to the US, or what Buckfast is to Glasgow! Made properly, fermented with natural ingredients (like dandelion, and burdock) it's a very ancient drink. And it's delicious!

Ha. I think the key words here may be "made properly"l I remember the stuff I tried was an alternative to Tizer (the appetizer). And this was in the south. Grin

I read all about it (shortly before you posted) and felt a bit foolish. Anyway, next time I'm up north I shall make a point of trying it again.   
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« Reply #18 on: June 30, 2016, 06:46:11 PM »

Having gone to the local Farmer's Market, I decided to make a popular local dish using the ingredients purchased. The dish is called maque choux. This is a dish made with sweet corn (maize) plus other vegetables. Sometimes seafood such as crawfish is added, or perhaps sausage (which is how my sister makes it). However, it does not contain beans, as that would make it another popular American dish, succotash.

This was just for my Mom and myself.  Adjust amounts and ingredients at will!

Shuck 2 ears of corn. Using knife, cut off kernels. With other side of knife press hard while moving down each ear to get out any "milk" in the corn. If corn is old or you are using frozen corn, some broth or cream can be added.
Peel and dice a tomato.
Dice a pepper (I used a sweet banana pepper)
Add chopped onions; I used a heaping handful.
Add some garlic
A bit of black pepper
Teaspoon of sugar
(I didn't add these since my Mom is on a special diet, but can add some salt to taste. Also, a bit of hot sauce is also traditionally used.)

Put a bit of oil in a pan. When heated put in ingredients and stir so that the mixture has coating of oil. Cover and cook on medium to medium low heat for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally. Might have to add a bit of liquid.
Mom loved it, so it was a success.

After this, after reading about succotash, looked at the video for Deee-Lites "Groove is in the Heart" which I haven't seen in over 20 years. Watched it because the word "succotash" is in the lyrics

Those not in the US might not be familiar with the words maque choux or succotash. Do you use sweet corn in this way?

PS: Will be giving a Dandelion and Burdock a try, as it looks to be available here. Must expand my horizons !  Smiley
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« Reply #19 on: July 04, 2016, 07:26:16 AM »

Remembered these very useful links from watching the Learning Station dance vids:

Korean cuisine: https://www.youtube.com/user/Maangchi
South Asian: https://www.youtube.com/user/ShowMeTheCurry
Desserts: https://www.youtube.com/user/CupcakesandCardio  (lots of playlists, incl. "Food impostors" & "Cake decorating")
Cooking & Crafting: https://www.youtube.com/user/CookingAndCrafting
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« Reply #20 on: July 12, 2016, 01:11:07 PM »

I had my first helping of haggis last week. And very tasty it was too.

Another delicious first while in Scotland was Irn Bru, the drink John Manning described as the Scottish Coca-Cola. Far superior to Coke in my opinion. Never found Dandelion & Burdock though. Oh well---another time perhaps. 
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« Reply #21 on: July 12, 2016, 04:30:07 PM »

Hi all, john.

Just googled that food, haggis - the pictures do not look as if it's tasty. Anything with Cola flavor is boring. Imo of course.
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« Reply #22 on: July 12, 2016, 08:16:46 PM »

Ate haggis once, in Scotland. Wasn't nearly as bad as I feared it to be.

Still trying to find the dandelion and burdock cola. Did buy some "Curiosity Cola" from Fentiman's. The taste was - interesting. Definitely different from the colas made in the US.
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« Reply #23 on: July 28, 2016, 06:22:03 PM »

Mom wanted to eat cabbage. I usually don't fix cabbage this time of year (except for cole slaw), usually waiting for Oktoberfest season and beyond.
Anyway, I bought a small cabbage and fixed it tonight. This makes a "one pot" meal.
In a cast iron Dutch oven, sauté a fair amount of diced onions, two diced celery sticks, and 2 chopped carrots.
After a few minutes add small red potatoes (known as "new potatoes") which had been quartered.
Then a container of chicken stock.
Sliced Polish sausage (wanted Bratwurst but store didn't have it). But this sausage worked well, smoked but not particularly spicy (Mom has trouble with really spicy foods)
Finally, shredded cabbage is added. Let it come to a full boil then cover and reduce heat to medium/low. I let it cook for about 45 minutes.
Took care of some chores then relaxed and listened to, of course, "Vege-tables."
Then removed lid from pot, added 1/8 tsp of anise seed (could also use fennel seed). Turn heat up for a few minutes and stir everything making sure the essence of the anise seed permeates everything.
It was delicious as is. Could add pepper if desired, or more salt.
Other times of year might use apples, or add some cream. When I do those the fennel/anise seed isn't added.
I'll be eating cabbage leftovers for the next few days.

On Saturday hope to make blueberry jam with honey and lavender.
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« Reply #24 on: August 02, 2016, 10:48:05 PM »

I started this thread and never really followed up with it Tongue.

I ate a banh mi sandwich today, and it was great. I sort of panini'd it to make it better.
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