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Author Topic: Put a Beatle in The BBs + a BB in The Beatles  (Read 2555 times)
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joshferrell
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« Reply #25 on: May 06, 2016, 10:17:00 AM »

Murry for the Beatles (yes with a Beatles hair cut and as the lead singer and producer and sole songwriter) "Do do be do do do do, do be de do Hey Jude! Boppity bop!" and Jimmy Nichols for the Beach Boys..
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Lonely Summer
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« Reply #26 on: May 06, 2016, 01:03:50 PM »

I think Paul is much too controlling in the studio. More than Lennon. Brian would be smothered. In terms of Brian getting by to shine, George is the best option.
Brian and Paul are in some ways too similar.
But I agree with KDS about John.

Yeah, I could see that too. 

My only concern with George joining the BB would be that his talent as a guitarist would be wasted.  When Brian really started to flourish in the mid 60s, the Boys weren't exactly a guitar driven group.  Take away Sgt Pepper / MMT, and the Beatles pretty much remained a guitar driven band. 

Toe be fair though, I don't think George became a really good guitarist until 1969 as The Beatles were falling apart and I would say that he never became a great guitarist. He did have a nice style though that, of course, worked very well with The Beatles.
I think George was a great guitarist in the Carl Perkins/Scotty Moore tradition; if you're looking for speed and all that, no, he's not going to measure up to the Guitar Gods that came along later in the 60's, but like Ringo, he played what was right for the song - and there's nothing wrong with short, concise solos. That's what he grew up listening to - James Burton, Chuck Berry, guys like that. Later on he developed that distinctive slide style - I rate him in my top 5.
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Ram4
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« Reply #27 on: May 10, 2016, 09:50:29 AM »

I think Paul is much too controlling in the studio. More than Lennon. Brian would be smothered. In terms of Brian getting by to shine, George is the best option.
Brian and Paul are in some ways too similar.
But I agree with KDS about John.

Yeah, I could see that too.  

My only concern with George joining the BB would be that his talent as a guitarist would be wasted.  When Brian really started to flourish in the mid 60s, the Boys weren't exactly a guitar driven group.  Take away Sgt Pepper / MMT, and the Beatles pretty much remained a guitar driven band.  
Nah. That's a good point. And your point about John being really experimental right at the same time is good. But he also was not interested in orchestrating. He deferred to Martin on that. So, I'm going with John. He would've been an enthusiastic sounding-board but wouldn't have tried to take the reins.
I think the more realistic thread title would be if one of the members could work with the other band for a track or two, which one would it be?  And in truth - any of The Beatles would work fine that way and vice-versa.  I could totally see Mike or Carl or Brian or anyone being on a track like Back In The USSR or Revolution or co-write something.  Paul and Brian in a long term thing you say would clash - but I say maybe not because Paul and John worked together all those years.  And had Yoko not been adding to the tension (by John insisting she sit there) things might have been more pleasant.  By the way Paul always wanted John's approval (even when John admitted behind the scenes "I can't keep up with this guy."  And one more thing - don't assume John was the experimental one.  Paul was the real experimental one.  He was into avant garde first, getting into John Cage and Stockhausen before John.  He came up with the tape loops on Tomorrow Never Knows.  He was behind the Carnival of Light idea they did in early 1967.  John was at his best doing lyrics.
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Emily
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« Reply #28 on: May 10, 2016, 10:26:08 AM »

I think Paul is much too controlling in the studio. More than Lennon. Brian would be smothered. In terms of Brian getting by to shine, George is the best option.
Brian and Paul are in some ways too similar.
But I agree with KDS about John.

Yeah, I could see that too.  

My only concern with George joining the BB would be that his talent as a guitarist would be wasted.  When Brian really started to flourish in the mid 60s, the Boys weren't exactly a guitar driven group.  Take away Sgt Pepper / MMT, and the Beatles pretty much remained a guitar driven band.  
Nah. That's a good point. And your point about John being really experimental right at the same time is good. But he also was not interested in orchestrating. He deferred to Martin on that. So, I'm going with John. He would've been an enthusiastic sounding-board but wouldn't have tried to take the reins.
I think the more realistic thread title would be if one of the members could work with the other band for a track or two, which one would it be?  And in truth - any of The Beatles would work fine that way and vice-versa.  I could totally see Mike or Carl or Brian or anyone being on a track like Back In The USSR or Revolution or co-write something.  Paul and Brian in a long term thing you say would clash - but I say maybe not because Paul and John worked together all those years.  And had Yoko not been adding to the tension (by John insisting she sit there) things might have been more pleasant.  By the way Paul always wanted John's approval (even when John admitted behind the scenes "I can't keep up with this guy."  And one more thing - don't assume John was the experimental one.  Paul was the real experimental one.  He was into avant garde first, getting into John Cage and Stockhausen before John.  He came up with the tape loops on Tomorrow Never Knows.  He was behind the Carnival of Light idea they did in early 1967.  John was at his best doing lyrics.
Yes, McCartney and Lennon worked well together because they complemented each other in various ways. They didn't want to do the same thing. McCartney could be control freaky without bothering Lennon. But McCartney and Brian Wilson (at that time) were both control freaky so would step on each other's toes.
And I disagree with the latter part of your comment.
« Last Edit: May 10, 2016, 10:31:19 AM by Emily » Logged
petsoundsnola
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« Reply #29 on: May 10, 2016, 11:08:47 AM »

If Carl and George traded places, how different would the guitar parts have sounded on the early records? Listen to the intros of Fun, Fun, Fun versus Roll Over Beethoven.  Similar riffs, but Carl's FFF part sounds a little more fluid and effortless, and George's ROB part sounds a little more clunky. 
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Amy B.
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« Reply #30 on: May 10, 2016, 01:49:36 PM »

Yes, Paul and Brian together in the studios in the 60s would have been a disaster. Brian was in charge, and that wouldn't have sat well with Paul. On the other hand, would Brian have been intimidated by John's personality? I would hope John had enough respect for Brian to step back, but his humor would not have meshed with the cornier humor of the Beach Boys.
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Emily
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« Reply #31 on: May 10, 2016, 01:56:02 PM »

but his humor would not have meshed with the cornier humor of the Beach Boys.
That's true.
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petsoundsnola
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« Reply #32 on: May 10, 2016, 02:19:45 PM »

Yes, Paul and Brian together in the studios in the 60s would have been a disaster. Brian was in charge, and that wouldn't have sat well with Paul. On the other hand, would Brian have been intimidated by John's personality? I would hope John had enough respect for Brian to step back, but his humor would not have meshed with the cornier humor of the Beach Boys.

Completely agree.  Brian was/is a pretty sensitive guy, and John's biting, sarcastic wit would probably have been misunderstood.  I can visualize John telling Brian to "Sod Off" and Brian taking that to heart.
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Lonely Summer
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« Reply #33 on: May 10, 2016, 04:20:50 PM »

If Carl and George traded places, how different would the guitar parts have sounded on the early records? Listen to the intros of Fun, Fun, Fun versus Roll Over Beethoven.  Similar riffs, but Carl's FFF part sounds a little more fluid and effortless, and George's ROB part sounds a little more clunky. 
Too bad they never got together to work on some songs. I think they played similar roles in their respective bands - lead guitar, backup vocals (although Carl got more lead vocals as the years went on), didn't write a lot of songs although both came up with some gems (Here Comes the Sun and Something are the 2 best songs on Abbey Road, and Carl came up with 2 of the best on Surf's Up, Long Promised Road and Feel Flows); and both were very spiritual men (yes, Mike is the one always talking meditation and all that, but Carl was the one that always had that Zen-like calm about him; George had a grumpy side that came out from time to time).
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« Reply #34 on: February 11, 2017, 11:48:35 PM »

I think the more realistic thread title would be if one of the members could work with the other band for a track or two, which one would it be?  And in truth - any of The Beatles would work fine that way and vice-versa.  I could totally see Mike or Carl or Brian or anyone being on a track like Back In The USSR or Revolution or co-write something.  Paul and Brian in a long term thing you say would clash - but I say maybe not because Paul and John worked together all those years.  And had Yoko not been adding to the tension (by John insisting she sit there) things might have been more pleasant.  By the way Paul always wanted John's approval (even when John admitted behind the scenes "I can't keep up with this guy."  And one more thing - don't assume John was the experimental one.  Paul was the real experimental one.  He was into avant garde first, getting into John Cage and Stockhausen before John.  He came up with the tape loops on Tomorrow Never Knows.  He was behind the Carnival of Light idea they did in early 1967.  John was at his best doing lyrics.
Agree about Yoko - she should've been out of the studio - as in go home or sth. John wasn't very nice to let her stay there. It's business, nobody should be allowed *in* besides the Beatles, engineers etc. Just because he's leader doesn't mean he should annoyingly let any interloper. I can't believe that Yoko & other girls sang background vocs. Wish it was just the guys. Not some off-key, can't-sing-at-all unprofessional girl vocals. F.ex. "Birthday", "Bungalow Bill". Business is business, the other stuff is the other stuff. There's place & time for everything. John was being capricious by making Yoko being eyes & ears of the sessions. As if she could add anything useful. No wonder the other 3 were annoyed & frustrated big time.

You're right, Paul was into experiments. People credit John for being the weirdo & Paul traditional but it's just myth, nothing else. What you said about Paul plus his MMT creation shows he could be equally as weird, if not more. John's suit was, by & large, lyrics.
« Last Edit: February 11, 2017, 11:54:29 PM by RangeRoverA1 » Logged

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« Reply #35 on: February 12, 2017, 09:01:41 AM »

Murry for the Beatles (yes with a Beatles hair cut and as the lead singer and producer and sole songwriter) "Do do be do do do do, do be de do Hey Jude! Boppity bop!" and Jimmy Nichols for the Beach Boys..

Best post of this thread.
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