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Author Topic: Who in your opinion could better have been a one-hit wonder?  (Read 3490 times)
KDS
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« Reply #50 on: October 14, 2015, 08:22:36 AM »

The Beastie Boys.  Now, there's a great nominee for should-be one hit wonders. 

Fight for Your Right to Party was an alright song (I probably prefer because because it strays a little more on the rock side).  But, I can take or leave just about everything else they ever released. 
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« Reply #51 on: October 14, 2015, 08:42:37 AM »

Given that hip-hop is the genre I've listened to the most this year I can't relate to the attitudes in this thread at all. To each their own I guess, but from my experience usually the people who say they flat-out hate hip-hop are the same who don't consider it music or an art form. And believe all rappers have no talent whatsoever. It's the same people who've probably never sat down with a hip-hop album from start to finish in their lives. I honestly don't think I've ever read somebody say "hey, I respect hip-hop as a genre, it's just not my thing at all" in the same way one would say if they disliked jazz or prog rock (not comparing these genres in any way). It's always looked down upon and I feel a bit of that attitude present in this thread as well, though I could be wrong. I used to share it to an extent, but then discovered what people like GZA or Rakim could do with words or Dr. Dre and RZA with a beat. I would definitely say it's a genre essential to my life. I don't expect to convince anybody, of course, you like what you like, but this is just to put things in perspective - hip-hop means a lot to many people.
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« Reply #52 on: October 14, 2015, 08:50:32 AM »

Given that hip-hop is the genre I've listened to the most this year I can't relate to the attitudes in this thread at all. To each their own I guess, but from my experience usually the people who say they flat-out hate hip-hop are the same who don't consider it music or an art form. And believe all rappers have no talent whatsoever. It's the same people who've probably never sat down with a hip-hop album from start to finish in their lives. I honestly don't think I've ever read somebody say "hey, I respect hip-hop as a genre, it's just not my thing at all" in the same way one would say if they disliked jazz or prog rock (not comparing these genres in any way). It's always looked down upon and I feel a bit of that attitude present in this thread as well, though I could be wrong. I used to share it to an extent, but then discovered what people like GZA or Rakim could do with words or Dr. Dre and RZA with a beat. I would definitely say it's a genre essential to my life. I don't expect to convince anybody, of course, you like what you like, but this is just to put things in perspective - hip-hop means a lot to many people.

I said earlier in this thread that rap's not my thing.  While I'll acknowledge that it's an art form on some level, it holds almost zero appeal to me.

I just don't get it.  And I know I never will.  I don't have nearly as much time to listen to music as I used to, so there's really no reason for me to sit down and listen to a full rap album from start to finish. 

I can kinda relate to your feelings as a big fan of the most critically disrespected genre in popular music - hard rock/heavy metal 
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« Reply #53 on: October 14, 2015, 09:02:44 AM »


I said earlier in this thread that rap's not my thing.  While I'll acknowledge that it's an art form on some level, it holds almost zero appeal to me.

I just don't get it.  And I know I never will.  I don't have nearly as much time to listen to music as I used to, so there's really no reason for me to sit down and listen to a full rap album from start to finish. 

I can kinda relate to your feelings as a big fan of the most critically disrespected genre in popular music - hard rock/heavy metal 

Did you at least listen to the songs I posted?

The reason why you should try listening to an album is because I feel your opinion is based on what you heard on the radio over the years and based on the reputation the genre has among certain groups of music fans. Sort of like one only hearing Kokomo and Surfin' USA and never sitting down to give Pet Sounds a listen.

I would say hip-hop is at least acknowledged if not liked by anybody with an interest in contemporary music (many even consider its glory days have passed), but it's the rock fans that generally have a problem with it.
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« Reply #54 on: October 14, 2015, 09:49:27 AM »


I said earlier in this thread that rap's not my thing.  While I'll acknowledge that it's an art form on some level, it holds almost zero appeal to me.

I just don't get it.  And I know I never will.  I don't have nearly as much time to listen to music as I used to, so there's really no reason for me to sit down and listen to a full rap album from start to finish. 

I can kinda relate to your feelings as a big fan of the most critically disrespected genre in popular music - hard rock/heavy metal 

Did you at least listen to the songs I posted?

The reason why you should try listening to an album is because I feel your opinion is based on what you heard on the radio over the years and based on the reputation the genre has among certain groups of music fans. Sort of like one only hearing Kokomo and Surfin' USA and never sitting down to give Pet Sounds a listen.

I would say hip-hop is at least acknowledged if not liked by anybody with an interest in contemporary music (many even consider its glory days have passed), but it's the rock fans that generally have a problem with it.

Honestly, I didn't give the songs a listen.  I've heard enough rap in my life to know that I don't like it.  So, I see no reason to spend an hour of my time listening to a rap album, when that time could be much better spent getting acquainted to the new Iron Maiden album.  Or listening to a Moody Blues album I haven't heard in a long time.  Or, since Halloween is getting near, pulling out my copy of Alice Cooper's Welcome to My Nightmare. 

And just as Surfin USA and Kokomo steered me towards Pet Sounds and Sunflower, the rap I've heard on the radio, in bars, or at friends' houses lets me know that there's no need to explore that genre further. 
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« Reply #55 on: October 14, 2015, 10:31:31 AM »

I see where both Ovi and KDS are coming from. I do think a lot of people who say they don't like rappers or hip hop in general are somewhere between uninformed, dismissive, oddly hostile, and even racist. But I don't think any of that is coming from KDS. Like him (I think "him" anyway, not sure of gender), I find genres (and artists) that frankly just don't appeal to me. I could spend more time and energy on them and possibly change my tune...but I probably won't. Life is short and there's a lot I'm more likely to enjoy in the pop, rock, country and rap worlds for me to dig into EDM, however rewarding that could end up.

As long as people don't act superior/inflated about their opinions, it's fine by me what they don't get in to. John K broke my heart stopping with 2 Of Montreal albums, but such is life!

Beastie Boys stopping as 1-hit wonder would've bummed me out btw: Pauls Boutique, a classic, would have been denied me.
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« Reply #56 on: October 14, 2015, 10:46:49 AM »

Captain,

Yes, I'm a male.  Some of my past references to the music of Rush and Ronnie James Dio might have been a clue.   Smiley

I appreciate you're assumption that my dislike of rap is not from being uniformed, dismissive, or racist.  Rap, like EDM, jazz, modern Top 40, or ska just don't move me the same way that rock music does.  The only shame is that, like you said, life is short, and it's harder for me these days to find the time to devote to listening to music like I used to. 
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« Reply #57 on: October 14, 2015, 11:04:35 AM »

Yeah, fair enough. I do hope to get into EDM more someday - I love Daft Punk, but don't know much else.
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« Reply #58 on: October 14, 2015, 11:15:38 AM »

Since I've thrown some jabs at rap, here's one thrown towards the rock world. 

One band that I was thinking would make a good one hit wonder is Supertramp.  I hear these guys on classic rock radio all the time, and I just don't get the fascination.  Which song?  I dunno - The Logical Song. 
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« Reply #59 on: October 14, 2015, 12:29:47 PM »

Funny, the worst CD I ever got as a gift was  a best of Supertramp compilation.  Their best never did a thing for me either.
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« Reply #60 on: October 14, 2015, 12:38:25 PM »

Ovi, I do have Fear of a Black Planet and I have played it a few times (but not recently). Although I liked what I heard, particularly what was going on behind the rapping, generally I only got as far as the end of the original side one as i found it exhausting to listen to!

However, my main problem with rap is simple----when the lyrics become more important than the music, I'm out of there. Same goes for protest stuff and a lot of ballads. So it's not just rap... 
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« Reply #61 on: October 14, 2015, 01:05:21 PM »

Maybe a less controversial variation could be: which no-hit artists could/should have had one freak hit? Preferably not artists so obscure no-one else reading the board will have heard of them, just artists who never translated to the pop charts (maybe never even bothered releasing singles). And crucially, what could/should have been the song to do it.

e.g. Daniel Johnston, "Speeding Motorcycle".
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« Reply #62 on: October 14, 2015, 03:53:32 PM »

Captain,

Yes, I'm a male.  Some of my past references to the music of Rush and Ronnie James Dio might have been a clue.   Smiley

I appreciate you're assumption that my dislike of rap is not from being uniformed, dismissive, or racist.  Rap, like EDM, jazz, modern Top 40, or ska just don't move me the same way that rock music does.  The only shame is that, like you said, life is short, and it's harder for me these days to find the time to devote to listening to music like I used to. 


I just didn't want to make assumptions!

But yeah, I totally see where you're coming from.
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« Reply #63 on: October 14, 2015, 04:03:38 PM »

Maybe a less controversial variation could be: which no-hit artists could/should have had one freak hit? Preferably not artists so obscure no-one else reading the board will have heard of them, just artists who never translated to the pop charts (maybe never even bothered releasing singles). And crucially, what could/should have been the song to do it.

e.g. Daniel Johnston, "Speeding Motorcycle".

My pick for this would be Herman Dune's "I Wish That I Could See You Soon," from one of my favorite (and criminally unknown) albums, Giant (2007).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eYmLNVxjZc

Or if not that, maybe something off Cotton Mather's brilliant 1997 gem, Kontiki.

"Homefront Cameo": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LlSTNH95WaY
"My Before and After": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoRU9nXzUV4

Or if not those, maybe (Cotton Mather frontman Robert Harrison's newer band) Future Clouds and Radar, with "Build Havana" (2007).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ko3axNT9hk



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« Reply #64 on: October 15, 2015, 09:24:42 AM »

However, my main problem with rap is simple----when the lyrics become more important than the music, I'm out of there. Same goes for protest stuff and a lot of ballads. So it's not just rap... 

I do understand this, but not all rappers concentrate on the lyrics. Ol' Dirty Bastard from the Wu-Tang Clan is among my very favorites and his words are literally non sequiturs and even gibberish at times. With him, it's all about how he delivers them, with a unique style that combines rapping, singing, grunting, screaming and whatnot in the most crazy way you can imagine. You really have to hear it to believe it. I once compared his rapping style to Keith Moon's drumming in a review. Rakim is the father of modern rapping and MC-ing and his words aren't really that interesting either, it's more about the unstoppable flow, the crazy rhyme schemes and the laid-back tone. Snoop Dogg is more about style than content too in my opinion, at least in his early stuff that I'm familiar with. With Dr. Dre's solo albums, I force myself to ignore the idiotic lyrics in order to enjoy the brilliant beats and the atmosphere he creates with them. So it depends for me.
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« Reply #65 on: October 15, 2015, 11:55:25 AM »

Thanks for causing me to find a video clip in which Al says 'vegetables'....
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« Reply #66 on: October 15, 2015, 12:47:46 PM »

However, my main problem with rap is simple----when the lyrics become more important than the music, I'm out of there. Same goes for protest stuff and a lot of ballads. So it's not just rap... 

I do understand this, but not all rappers concentrate on the lyrics. Ol' Dirty Bastard from the Wu-Tang Clan is among my very favorites and his words are literally non sequiturs and even gibberish at times. With him, it's all about how he delivers them, with a unique style that combines rapping, singing, grunting, screaming and whatnot in the most crazy way you can imagine. You really have to hear it to believe it. I once compared his rapping style to Keith Moon's drumming in a review. Rakim is the father of modern rapping and MC-ing and his words aren't really that interesting either, it's more about the unstoppable flow, the crazy rhyme schemes and the laid-back tone. Snoop Dogg is more about style than content too in my opinion, at least in his early stuff that I'm familiar with. With Dr. Dre's solo albums, I force myself to ignore the idiotic lyrics in order to enjoy the brilliant beats and the atmosphere he creates with them. So it depends for me.

Forgot about Snoop Dogg. I have a comp of stuff from his album DoggyStyle. The musical aspect is very strong----but I must confess to enjoying the words (and the humour) as well.

I'll give ODB a listen, and Eric B. & Rakim (whom I'm sure I must have heard at one time). Maybe you have some recommendations...
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« Reply #67 on: October 16, 2015, 12:39:59 AM »

I'm a huge Wu-Tang Clan fan so I would say each member is worth listening to both within the band and for his solo stuff. With ODB, his best work is his earliest released since later he would lose it because of the drugs, the scandals and the fact that he was shot twice. Here's the Wu song with what I consider to be his greatest verse and one of the most entertaining ones of all-time. It's taken from their debut and ODB comes on at minute 1:40 (and you can hear him crooning along with the chorus right before that):

https://youtu.be/YsiAsTa0oEI

And here's his most famous and recognizable solo song, from his solo debut:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2zgB93KANE

If you like those I can recommend more.

Eric B. & Rakim work better when viewed as a singles band so I would recommend pretty much every single from their first 2 albums as a start - I posted Microphone Fiend in this thread, but Follow the Leader, I Ain't No Joke, Paid in Full or I Know You Got Soul as just as good.

https://youtu.be/95gP3m-uBHA

https://youtu.be/2TN-kDEKxF0
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« Reply #68 on: October 16, 2015, 03:24:06 PM »

Thanks, Ovi. I'll give them a listen in due course and get back to you...
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« Reply #69 on: October 31, 2015, 03:02:18 PM »

I'm a huge Wu-Tang Clan fan so I would say each member is worth listening to both within the band and for his solo stuff. With ODB, his best work is his earliest released since later he would lose it because of the drugs, the scandals and the fact that he was shot twice. Here's the Wu song with what I consider to be his greatest verse and one of the most entertaining ones of all-time. It's taken from their debut and ODB comes on at minute 1:40 (and you can hear him crooning along with the chorus right before that):

https://youtu.be/YsiAsTa0oEI

And here's his most famous and recognizable solo song, from his solo debut:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2zgB93KANE

If you like those I can recommend more.

Eric B. & Rakim work better when viewed as a singles band so I would recommend pretty much every single from their first 2 albums as a start - I posted Microphone Fiend in this thread, but Follow the Leader, I Ain't No Joke, Paid in Full or I Know You Got Soul as just as good.

https://youtu.be/95gP3m-uBHA

https://youtu.be/2TN-kDEKxF0

Let's see... Which did I like the most of the tracks you linked in your three posts? Public Enemy, the first two Wu Tangs (not the solo ODB----too weird even for me) and the Eric B. & Rakim tracks, particularly Eric B's scratching! I've never liked "Rapper's Delight" (give me Chic's "Good Times" instead)...

What struck me about many of the tracks is that they're over a quarter of a century old! So these guys were pioneers----you can still feel the excitement of breaking new ground in this early stuff. 

Thanks for taking the trouble, Ovi. Whether I'll ever be a complete convert is another matter----whatever else, it's widened my musical horizons. :=) 
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« Reply #70 on: May 22, 2016, 04:42:15 PM »

Sly & Family Stone. Imo they didn't top "Everyday People" goodness. Tbc
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« Reply #71 on: May 23, 2016, 12:45:38 AM »

Sly & Family Stone. Imo they didn't top "Everyday People" goodness. Tbc

I'd say "EP" is one of the greatest pop singles ever recorded. If ever less were more...

But pretty well all their singles are unmissable in different ways----except perhaps "M'Lady" ("DTTM" pt. 2) and "Que Sera, Sera"... Grin

Here's another, darker Sly example of less is more:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a8Uzikag7Xo
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« Reply #72 on: March 19, 2017, 02:35:52 AM »

Culture Club "Church of the Poison Mind" - the single song I liked by this band after hearing its catchy intro. Pretty cool. I can describe the lead singer's voice as "stylish". I don't even mind the gospel/ soul female backing vocs which usually annoy.
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« Reply #73 on: March 19, 2017, 04:06:55 PM »

Culture Club "Church of the Poison Mind" - the single song I liked by this band after hearing its catchy intro. Pretty cool. I can describe the lead singer's voice as "stylish". I don't even mind the gospel/ soul female backing vocs which usually annoy.

Check out the first two albums by Culture Club. They are both superb. (At least I think so.)
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