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Author Topic: Scott Wilson's Book  (Read 13492 times)
CenturyDeprived
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« Reply #50 on: April 01, 2015, 08:32:05 PM »

I think I'm going to order the book, but for those that have read it, does it get any deeper than John Stebbon's book, The Real Beach Boy?

I need to re-read The Real Beach Boy (which I've owned for years), but I definitely learned a number of new things from this book, and I think it digs deeper in some ways. This book is a tough read, a lot of really, really sad, and some shocking stuff. I read it cover to cover in one sitting, so if that says anything, it's that the compelling subject matter stands above any of the book's flaws if you are a fan of this band... and you will hear things from a particular person's unique perspective that is entirely, wholly new.
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Mikie
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« Reply #51 on: April 01, 2015, 08:33:59 PM »

I think I'm going to order the book, but for those that have read it, does it get any deeper than John Stebbon's book, The Real Beach Boy?

Easy answer to that: Not even close. Not even in the same ballpark.

Stay tuned for Jon's next book on Dennis and there's another Dennis book standing in the wings.
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I, I love the colorful clothes she wears, and she's already working on my brain. I only looked in her eyes, but I picked up something I just can't explain. I, I bet I know what she’s like, and I can feel how right she’d be for me. It’s weird how she comes in so strong, and I wonder what she’s picking up from me. I hope it’s good, good, good, good vibrations, yeah!!
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« Reply #52 on: April 01, 2015, 08:41:12 PM »

I think I'm going to order the book, but for those that have read it, does it get any deeper than John Stebbon's book, The Real Beach Boy?

I need to re-read The Real Beach Boy (which I've owned for years), but I definitely learned a number of new things from this book, and I think it digs deeper in some ways. This book is a tough read, a lot of really, really sad, and some shocking stuff. I read it cover to cover in one sitting, so if that says anything, it's that the compelling subject matter stands above any of the book's flaws if you are a fan of this band... and you will hear things from a particular person's unique perspective that is entirely, wholly new.

I tried to read it, really. I think maybe you're just a glutton for punishment
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Magic Transistor Radio
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« Reply #53 on: April 01, 2015, 08:52:33 PM »

Well, sounds like there is mixed opinions, so the only sane thing to do is to buy it! I would rather have it and not like it than to not get it and wonder.  Smiley
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"Over the years, I've been accused of not supporting our new music from this era (67-73) and just wanting to play our hits. That's complete b.s......I was also, as the front man, the one promoting these songs onstage and have the scars to show for it."
Mike Love autobiography (pg 242-243)
CenturyDeprived
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« Reply #54 on: April 01, 2015, 09:10:00 PM »

I think I'm going to order the book, but for those that have read it, does it get any deeper than John Stebbon's book, The Real Beach Boy?

I need to re-read The Real Beach Boy (which I've owned for years), but I definitely learned a number of new things from this book, and I think it digs deeper in some ways. This book is a tough read, a lot of really, really sad, and some shocking stuff. I read it cover to cover in one sitting, so if that says anything, it's that the compelling subject matter stands above any of the book's flaws if you are a fan of this band... and you will hear things from a particular person's unique perspective that is entirely, wholly new.

I tried to read it, really. I think maybe you're just a glutton for punishment

In all honesty, it absolutely needed more drafts. It's a rough draft of a book that got published anyway, and it's very clunky. But... I went in expecting to learn what it was like to be Dennis' first son, and by golly I did learn that by the end of the book, and it affected me emotionally... so I have to recommend it! The flaws are just superficial.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2015, 09:11:22 PM by CenturyDeprived » Logged
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« Reply #55 on: April 01, 2015, 09:18:50 PM »


I need to re-read The Real Beach Boy (which I've owned for years), but I definitely learned a number of new things from this book, and I think it digs deeper in some ways. This book is a tough read, a lot of really, really sad, and some shocking stuff. I read it cover to cover in one sitting, so if that says anything, it's that the compelling subject matter stands above any of the book's flaws if you are a fan of this band... and you will hear things from a particular person's unique perspective that is entirely, wholly new.


I need to re-read The Real Beach Boy myself, (and have been meaning to for ages), however, before you do, keep in mind that nobody had written anything extensive about Dennis before Jon's book.  And, while he was coming from a position of great love & respect, he did try to give a balanced view.  He also devoted a great deal of attention to Dennis' music, and it will be great to read what he writes about the Bambu sessions that he was a part of, along with John Hanlon.  Granted, I'm biased, but I wanted you to keep these things in mind when you do read it; I know I will.
 
Cheers, & great meeting you the other night!
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Mikie
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« Reply #56 on: April 01, 2015, 09:59:52 PM »

Jon's book preceded Adam Webb's book on Dennis by a year (Dumb Angel: The Life & Music of Dennis Wilson) which was also very good.
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I, I love the colorful clothes she wears, and she's already working on my brain. I only looked in her eyes, but I picked up something I just can't explain. I, I bet I know what she’s like, and I can feel how right she’d be for me. It’s weird how she comes in so strong, and I wonder what she’s picking up from me. I hope it’s good, good, good, good vibrations, yeah!!
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« Reply #57 on: April 04, 2015, 12:47:05 PM »

Jon's book preceded Adam Webb's book on Dennis by a year (Dumb Angel: The Life & Music of Dennis Wilson) which was also very good.

Yes. I have read that one too! I can't remember any segnificant new info that wasn't in Jon's book, but I haven't read them since the year they came out. Either way, I appreciated both books, and will appreciate Scott's too, I'm sure.
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"Over the years, I've been accused of not supporting our new music from this era (67-73) and just wanting to play our hits. That's complete b.s......I was also, as the front man, the one promoting these songs onstage and have the scars to show for it."
Mike Love autobiography (pg 242-243)
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« Reply #58 on: April 04, 2015, 05:00:57 PM »

And before The Real Beach Boy there was Denny Remembered by Ed Wincensten.  This was he first book on Dennis I believe and had a lot of personal stories and recollections by various people who knew Dennis.
« Last Edit: April 04, 2015, 05:01:58 PM by mikeddonn » Logged
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« Reply #59 on: May 14, 2015, 04:41:38 AM »

Thought I'd bump this as I read it in one sitting yesterday.

I agree with what's already been said regarding the typos and that the stories jump back and forth quite a lot but they really do not take anything away from Scott's story.

The guy has been through Hell-some events are due to his own faults and addictions and some are due to others.

The chapter on finding out that Dennis wasn't his biological dad and his stay at Shimber Beris aged 12 is just shocking.

There are some really nice stories about being with Brian and Carl and their families but the book's worth getting just for the stories with Dennis.

I think Scott summed it up brilliantly when he said, "Dennis was more like a badly behaved older brother than a Dad". I don't think this takes away at all what responsibility Dennis took on when he met Carole and Scott but sums up all the adventures they had.

All in all, it can be a very tough and emotional read but there's enough stories to make you feel at least a little jealous that he had Dennis as his (adopted) Dad.
I definitely recommend it and will be digging out my copy of The Real Beach Boy and POB and having a Denny evening!
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« Reply #60 on: May 14, 2015, 09:50:59 AM »

Have read the book too and it is a hard read on many levels. The typos and all are incidental to Scott's story and shouldn't detract from the power if it. If anything, my opinion of Dennis was lessened. Stills great guy, still the Beach Boy I'd want to be, and a real charismatic person. But as a role model to his adopted son? I'm not so sure. Scott sure had it hard and all strength to him for coming out the other side. And kudos to those family and friends who were there for him. If only Dennis had had the same support network he might not have descended into his own abyss, and Scott might have also not gone through such torment in his wake.
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« Reply #61 on: July 03, 2015, 06:22:57 PM »

Mike Love comes out of the book worse than Dennis does. I think Scott gives a fair analysis of his dad's demons (Murry, a panic attack at 15, "a void that he can't fill," paranoia after the Tate murders). Although much of that is in Stebbins, it's more powerful coming from the son. It also gains power from the son having some similar demons: childhood abuse (though without his parents' knowledge), adoption, drugs (dope from age 11). Father and son sharing the same girls is a little creepy but fits this particular story perfectly.

Unfortunately, however, much of the book is unreadable because there is no structure and the narrative voice seems to belong to an 11-year-old. You have to read it in one sitting because it's too creepy to pick back up after you've got tired of the horrendous style.
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bgas
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« Reply #62 on: July 03, 2015, 06:41:27 PM »

Mike Love comes out of the book worse than Dennis does. I think Scott gives a fair analysis of his dad's demons (Murry, a panic attack at 15, "a void that he can't fill," paranoia after the Tate murders). Although much of that is in Stebbins, it's more powerful coming from the son. It also gains power from the son having some similar demons: childhood abuse (though without his parents' knowledge), adoption, drugs (dope from age 11). Father and son sharing the same girls is a little creepy but fits this particular story perfectly.

Unfortunately, however, much of the book is unreadable because there is no structure and the narrative voice seems to belong to an 11-year-old. You have to read it in one sitting because it's too creepy to pick back up after you've got tired of the horrendous style.

Guess that's why I never went back to finish it. The narrative style and voice ran me off WAY before the halfway point
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« Reply #63 on: July 03, 2015, 07:12:00 PM »

I wish Dennis Was my father 😳😳
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« Reply #64 on: July 03, 2015, 08:07:56 PM »

« Last Edit: July 07, 2015, 12:49:00 AM by zachrwolfe » Logged
PrayForSurf
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« Reply #65 on: September 02, 2016, 06:14:21 PM »

Posted an interview with Scott Wilson's Son of a Beach Boy writing partner:
http://prayforsurfblog.blogspot.com/2016/09/pray-for-surf-interview-phil_1.html?q=interview,
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« Reply #66 on: September 03, 2016, 07:53:18 AM »

Posted an interview with Scott Wilson's Son of a Beach Boy writing partner:
http://prayforsurfblog.blogspot.com/2016/09/pray-for-surf-interview-phil_1.html?q=interview,

Pray for Surf - that was candid and very touching. 

Thanks so much for posting the link!    Wink
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Joel Goldenberg
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« Reply #67 on: May 07, 2018, 07:54:42 AM »

Yes. I read the book too. Cirrhosis of the liver. The book sucks.
From what I remember, I read that, according to Scott, Dennis said he had cancer of the liver.
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Joel Goldenberg
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« Reply #68 on: May 07, 2018, 08:01:04 AM »

Agree about the writing style, but the book was still compelling reading. One of my objections, though, was keeping the co-writer's British-isms, such as using the word "hiring" instead of the American "renting."
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