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Author Topic: Rachel and the Revolvers  (Read 4012 times)
c-man
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« on: January 07, 2014, 04:15:18 AM »

How much do we know about Rachel and the Revolvers? It's been said "Rachel" was a session singer from Watts named Betty Willis, and that she was hired specifically by Brian and Gary to do this record...Dennis is listed on the AFM sheet for the session (which, aside from both sides of the Revolvers single, also resulted in "Recreation" and "Number One"), and so is Larry Lennear, a saxman who toured with Little Richard. Is that all there is to the story, or was this an actual group that Brian and Gary stumbled upon and used for this record? Reason I ask is because of the group photo used in the video accompanying the post of the song on youtube below:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V07tXpcZzJQ

Perhaps that's Ms. Willis onstage with Mr. Lennear and some other gentlemen unrelated to the Revolvers, but it would be worth knowing for sure.

Also, was the original "Visions" backing track from the April 16, 1962 BBs/Gary Usher session used for Rachel and the Revolver's recording "Number One", or was it re-recorded completely? To my ears, it sounds exactly the same, with only the vocals re-done.
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c-man
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« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2014, 04:22:22 AM »

I see the video has now been removed by the user...guess I brought some unwanted attention to it!
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Andrew G. Doe
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« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2014, 05:31:21 AM »

Dennis is listed on the AFM sheet for the session (which, aside from both sides of the Revolvers single, also resulted in "Recreation" and "Number One")...

So, the statement on p. 48 of the 1st edition of Our Favorite Recording Sessions, which lists the tracks recorded on 4/16/62 as "Beginning Of The End", "Visions", "My Only Alibi" and "One Way Road To Love", is only partly correct ? Was the session at Western with Chuck engineering, as also stated ? Or are we talking about two different sessions ?

(psst... the B side of the Rachel 45 is "Number One"  Smiley )
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Jim Murphy
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« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2014, 07:14:57 AM »

Thanks for posting this C-Man.  I love all this early stuff and "The Revo-Lution" b/w "Number One" by Rachel and the Revolvers (Dot 16392) is one of the most curious records of Brian's blossoming career. It seems the identity of Rachel has perplexed Beach Boys' writers and historians for nearly as long as the record has been out.

The three names suggested for Rachel over the years are Betty Willis, Betty Everett, and Betty Wright. So, it would seem her first name was certainly Betty!

If I recall correctly, Leaf (1978) and Preiss (1979) are silent on her identity and may not even mention "The Revo-Lution."  Elliot (1981) and Gaines (1986) go with Willis. Gold and Wilson (1991) go with Everett.  White (1994) says Willis, Badman (2004) mentions the record, but does not vote on Rachel's identity. Carlin (2006) doesn't mention her and Lambert (2007), surely in an editorial snafu, hedges his bets (well, not really) and mentions both Betty Willis and Betty Everett on separate pages.  The youtube poster appeared to be quite knowledgeable about Betty Willis and was vehement that she was NOT Rachel.

I think the most reliable source for Rachel's identity comes from Stephen J. McParland who interviewed Gary Usher extensively for his exhaustive five-volume biography. Usher was not immune to the usual complexities of human memory, ravages of time, or that uniquely human need to occasionally revise history to the way one wished it had happened. But Usher told McParland that Rachel was Betty Everett, an R&B singer from central LA. McParland goes into a rather humorous account of Brian and Gary, the poster boys for suburban WASPS, venturing into central LA looking for a black female singer to make a record.

Badman mistakenly notes the record as the first to bear the credit "Produced by Brian Wilson," but that is incorrect as that honor belongs to "The Surfer Moon" by Bob and Sheri.   

The AFM contract for the session, as you mentioned, is rather curious as it only mentions three musicians -- Brian, Dennis, and saxman Larry Lennear.  It would appear the AFM contract may have been started on Friday, August 31, 1962, at the start of the Labor Day holiday weekend, but then postponed until Tuesday, September 4, after the holiday weekend.  According to the AFM contract, the session was held 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at Harmony Recorders at  1479 Vine Street and authorized by Bob Ross, the studio owner. Dore Records was right next door at 1481 Vine Street and Dore owner Lou Bedell would use Harmony to crank out dubs on potential hit records. Bedell, of course, was the cousin of Herb Newman who owned Era Records of Candix 301 fame, but that's another thread!

Usher told McParland that the Revolvers were essentially a fictitious studio group comprised of Brian, Carl, and himself, that provided background vocals, and so named for the alliteration and play on the song title.  Usher further told McParland that "Number One" was indeed, as you noted, a new vocal track over the original instrumental track for "Visions" from the April 1962 demo session. Brian, Gary, and Betty rehearsed both songs in the Crenshaw Park apartment.

I find it curious that, again, according to the AFM contract, Brian also worked on "Humpty Dumpty," the B side to "The Surfer Moon," by Bob and Sheri, at this session. Perhaps, Bob and Sheri also contributed background vocals to "The Revo-Lution." And not much is known about Bob's and Cheryl's "Recreation." Since it did not see digital release last year per EU copyright laws, does that mean it was not recorded, or did it just slip through the cracks?  But it does appear on the AFM contract, clocking in at one minute and fifty-five seconds.

One of the more amazing aspects of the record is that it was released on Dot Records, a large and successful label with an excellent distribution network. That deal was brokered by Russ Regan, the charismatic record promoter still at Buckeye Record Distributors, who knew every record guy in town and was good friends with Randy Wood at Dot. In exchange for placing the record with Dot, Regan was granted the music publishing for "The Revo-Lution" and assigned it to his Algrace Music, with BMI, named in honor of his parents, Al and Grace Rustigian (his real surname).  Usher assigned the music publishing for "Number One" to his newly created Number One Publishing with BMI.

Now to the real mystery.  When was "The Revo-Lution" b/w "Number One" (Dot 16392) released?  Dot Records placed a full-page advertisement that listed seven of their new singles, including "The Revo-Lution," in Billboard dated September 22, 1962.  That issue was on newsstands September 15, 1962, and would have been printed September 12, 1962.  So, if the AFM contract is correct (and that can be a dangerous assumption) and the session was truly held September 4, 1962, then they really hustled to get the record out. It was certainly doable in eight days, but they had to move fast.  The record was pressed at Monarch Records, one of the largest pressing plants in LA that could turn out an initial pressing of 12,000 records in one eight hour shift once the metal works (mothers, stampers) were manufactured. Perhaps Regan had already lined up the deal with Dot as the record labels (and Dot was one of the few record companies to do this) have "8/62" at the lower 6:00 p.m. position, indicating an August 1962 release date. It was the last Dot 45 rpm release to bear an "8/62" release date. Further somewhat complicating matters is the delta number hand-etched into the dead wax of the run-out grooves -- Delta 44701 corresponds very loosely to the first week of October 1962.  But the delta numbering system worked out many years ago by a record collector more obsessive than us, God bless him, is only approximate at best. So, the appearance of Rachel in the Billboard printed September 12, 1962, trumps the delta number. The Dot Records advertisement in Billboard also included the label's next four releases after Rachel, so it would seem "The Revo-Lution" was definitely pressed and available for distribution and sale at the time the ad was placed.

Dot produced white label promotional copies for disc jockeys and radio station program directors, and stock copies with its standard black label. Back in the pre-internet collecting days, and even now to some extent, the record went for considerable money despite being pressed on a major label and, presumably, in large numbers.  I imagine when it failed to chart many copies were returned and recycled.

For my own taste, I try to like "The Revo-lution," but I find the mix rather muddy, rendering some of the lyrics indecipherable, a situation not helped by her singing, and the prolonged "Revvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv - volution" strident and grating.

Brian and Gary were inspired by Carole King's and Gerry Goffin's "The Locomotion" by Little Eva (the couple's babysitter at the time) on Don Kirshner's new Dimension Records.  Of course, King and Goffin were two of the best tunesmiths of the era. So, by setting the bar that high, "The Revo-lution" became a critical step in Brian's evolution as a record producer. An essential record in the study of Brian Wilson and the Beach Boys.
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bgas
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« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2014, 07:45:32 AM »

WOWZERS!!   Thats impressive, Jim. after this post you need to go on sabbatical
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Beach Head
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« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2014, 12:34:57 PM »

Has anybody compared the vocal on the Rachel & The Revolvers 45 to the two tracks by Betty Willis on the Rare Masters 2 album that was released as part of the Phil Spector Wall Of Sound series back in the mid-Seventies? I've got a Mint copy of the latter, but the only place I have the Rachel & The Revolvers track is on a worn-out cassette tape, which doesn't allow for a good comparison.
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Beach Head
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« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2014, 12:46:54 PM »

Fyi, I just looked up the three Betty's on Wikipedia to see what information is listed there.

First, it's very doubtful that Rachel is Betty Wright, as she was born in December 1953 and would have been all of 8 years old when "The Revolution" was recorded.

Second, Betty Everett was a Chicago-based singer and by 1963 had "recorded for various small local Chicago soul labels," so it seems unlikely that Brian and Gary would have found her in Watts.

Third, there's no entry at Wikipedia for Betty Willis, but by process of elimination, she's all we're left with ... unless, of course, Rachel was somebody else entirely, perhaps not even named "Betty."   LOL
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Beach Head
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« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2014, 12:56:09 PM »

One last post on this subject ...

The most information I could find online about Betty Willis is here:

http://www.sirshambling.com/artists_2012/W/betty_willis/

And that's where I found this photo:



C-man, is that the photo that was used for the YouTube video you found?
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Mr. Wilson
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« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2014, 01:08:06 PM »

yes sir it is..
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bgas
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« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2014, 02:09:38 PM »

One last post on this subject ...

The most information I could find online about Betty Willis is here:

http://www.sirshambling.com/artists_2012/W/betty_willis/

And that's where I found this photo:



C-man, is that the photo that was used for the YouTube video you found?

yes sir it is..

You're C-man AND Mr.Wilson ?? 
How do you decide which persona to post under?
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Jim Murphy
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« Reply #10 on: January 08, 2014, 05:07:45 PM »

Thanks Beach Head -- all excellent points.  It really is a bit of an enigma as to who Rachel really was. 

The Gold/Wilson book has been so discredited that one cannot put much stock in "Brian" purportedly recalling it was Betty Everett.  Usher, one would think, would be more reliable, but, as you pointed out, was Everett even in LA by summer 1962?

Betty Willis had recorded for Rendezvous Records, an LA indie label, in 1962, so she would certainly be a candidate.  And to my ears, I could be convinced her other records sound like the voice singing "The Revo-Lution."  But whoever posted her songs on youtube seemed to know a lot about her and vehemently denied she was Rachel ("Betty Willis and Brian Wilson never crossed paths.")

Maybe Brian's forthcoming biography will shed some additional light on her identity. Hope burns eternal.
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Andrew G. Doe
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« Reply #11 on: January 08, 2014, 10:50:12 PM »

Maybe Brian's forthcoming biography will shed some additional light on her identity. Hope burns eternal.

Even allowing that this time the book won't be part of the defence in a court case, and that the author will (hopefully) refrain from putting other people's (published) words into "Brian's" mouth, I honestly cannot see the passage of some 22 years sharpening Brian's recall. That said, his purely musical memory can often astound even those who know him long and well.
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c-man
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« Reply #12 on: January 09, 2014, 03:50:22 AM »

One last post on this subject ...

The most information I could find online about Betty Willis is here:

http://www.sirshambling.com/artists_2012/W/betty_willis/

And that's where I found this photo:



C-man, is that the photo that was used for the YouTube video you found?

Yep, that's the one.
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c-man
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« Reply #13 on: January 09, 2014, 03:52:38 AM »

Thanks, Jim Murphy - great info to have! But wasn't the Bob and Sheri single released in October, thus making Rachel's single indeed the first "Produced by Brian Wilson" record released? Or do you have info otherwise?
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Jim Murphy
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« Reply #14 on: January 09, 2014, 05:33:21 AM »

Andrew

Yeah, I know what you mean. It would seem unlikely Brian's memory on such things would actually would improve with the passage of time. I guess it will depend on how much time he spends with Jason Fine and to what degree he truly opens up. Also, given the scope of fifty years of the life of Brian, Fine may not care to ponder about such things as Rachel's identity. But the record is a critical early release in Brian's young career, so he should at least address its existence.  And you can't  (although Badman did) mention Rachel without the requisite question of "Who was she?" Maybe Fine will visit here and pick up a few of these arcane chestnuts.

C-Man

You're right, of course, that "The Revo-Lution" preceded "The Surfer Moon" by about three or four weeks (based on their delta numbers and adjusting, very approximately, for the amount of time the delta numbering system could sometimes be off).  But while "The Revo-Lution" is Brian's first production outside the group, "The Surfer Moon" is his first credited production outside the group.  That is, his name as producer does not appear on the Rachel record label, but does appear as "Produced by Brian Wilson" (at the lower 6:00 p.m. position) on the Bob and Sheri record label (white label promo and light blue label stock copies).  Splitting hairs slightly, but "The Surfer Moon" is the first public acknowledgement of Brian's work as producer. 

Rachel

Don C. weighed in and raised the excellent point that, perhaps, Betty Everett was visiting LA looking for session work and got steered to Brian and Gary when the word got around they were looking for a singer. 

McParland noted that Usher emphasized that "Rachel" was under contract, presumably to another record label or indie producer, and, therefore, they had to create a fictitious name for the record. So, perhaps it was Betty Willis, but, after years of obfuscation, Usher remembered Betty Everett instead.  "A mystery wrapped in a puzzle surrounded by an enigma." -- Joe Pesci in the film JFK.
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D Cunningham
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« Reply #15 on: January 09, 2014, 08:02:36 AM »

Of course we could come up with scores of scenarios. I was just thinking that B.E.,
at that stage, was likely very energetic, aggressive...and would soon grab the gold ring.
Wouldn't be too unlikely for her to visit LA, with its producers, movers, and shakers.

btw...watch for the snail mail, Jim
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« Reply #16 on: January 09, 2014, 02:49:34 PM »

"A mystery wrapped in a puzzle surrounded by an enigma." -- Joe Pesci in the film JFK.

Originally, Winston Churchill in a radio broadcast, October 1st, 1939: "I cannot forecast to you the action of Russia. It is a riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma: but perhaps there is a key. That key is Russian national interest."
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« Reply #17 on: January 09, 2014, 02:56:51 PM »

Don C. weighed in and raised the excellent point that, perhaps, Betty Everett was visiting LA looking for session work and got steered to Brian and Gary when the word got around they were looking for a singer.  

Just my three bucks worth, but in summer 1962, Wilson & Usher were hardly the go-to writing and producing team. By 8/31/62, they'd released precisely one B side as a writing team (which granted made #76 on Billboard).
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« Reply #18 on: January 09, 2014, 05:26:40 PM »

Just my three bucks worth, but in summer 1962, Wilson & Usher were hardly the go-to writing and producing team. By 8/31/62, they'd released precisely one B side as a writing team (which granted made #76 on Billboard).

At the same time, Betty Everett was no in-demand singer. Outside of Chicago, she was totally unknown. By late summer 1962, she'd released five unsuccessful 45s, all on small Chicago labels (Cobra, C.J. and One-derful). Her only hint of success had been two years before when she sang a guest lead on a minor Chicago-area hit ("Why Did You Have To Go") by an all-male group called the Daylighters, also on the C.J. label. Her first real success with "You're No Good" (#51 in Billboard) was still more than a year away.

With all of her efforts to that point seemingly directed at breaking into the Chicago music scene, there's no reason to think she'd have been moonlighting in L.A.
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« Reply #19 on: January 10, 2014, 02:16:43 AM »

It would seem unlikely Brian's memory on such things would actually would improve with the passage of time. I guess it will depend on how much time he spends with Jason Fine and to what degree he truly opens up. Also, given the scope of fifty years of the life of Brian, Fine may not care to ponder about such things as Rachel's identity. But the record is a critical early release in Brian's young career, so he should at least address its existence.  And you can't  (although Badman did) mention Rachel without the requisite question of "Who was she?"

I'd like to believe that this book will give equal time and space to all periods of Brian's life... but I have a feeling it may well be post-1992 heavy.

Quote
Maybe Fine will visit here and pick up a few of these arcane chestnuts.

If so he would be a very sensible chap.  Grin
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« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2014, 06:50:57 AM »

It would seem unlikely Brian's memory on such things would actually would improve with the passage of time. I guess it will depend on how much time he spends with Jason Fine and to what degree he truly opens up. Also, given the scope of fifty years of the life of Brian, Fine may not care to ponder about such things as Rachel's identity. But the record is a critical early release in Brian's young career, so he should at least address its existence.  And you can't  (although Badman did) mention Rachel without the requisite question of "Who was she?"

I'd like to believe that this book will give equal time and space to all periods of Brian's life... but I have a feeling it may well be post-1992 heavy.

Quote
Maybe Fine will visit here and pick up a few of these arcane chestnuts.

If so he would be a very sensible chap.  Grin

Whilst I think that the book should give equal time and space to all periods of his life, I have to say that post-1992 is almost more of a mystery to me than any other period of his life. It might not be the case for others, but I think I have a better understanding of what Brian was up to, what he liked, who he was with etc from the early days up until the second Landy period, than I do from 1992 onwards. There'd still be about a ten year gap leading up to 1992 that I wouldn't know much about, but I'd love to know more about the last 20 or so years.

I just hope that the book manages to capture what it needs to from Brian and that he opens up about things more than he typically does (preferably a LOT more). I've got doubts about that happening, but you never know.
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Jim Murphy
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« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2014, 06:46:30 PM »

Beach Head

Excellent points -- it certainly would seem likely Betty Everett was focusing her career efforts in Chicago.  Of course, Brian's "recollection" in the Gold book can be easily dismissed. And Gold's source for Betty Everett may have been one of McParland's books in which Usher says it was her.  And after the passage of time, Usher's memory may have been off, since, by then, Everett had had her chart success.


Andrew

Funny how things play out sometimes, but for Christmas I received The Last Lion, the three-volume set on Winston Spencer Churchill by William Manchester. As you may know, it is a massive tome and I look forward to reading about the one of the greatest statesmen of the last century.  So, attributing the "puzzle, riddle, and enigma" to Joe Pesci in JFK only served to reinforce just how desperately I needed this set.

Who knew Oliver Stone plagiarized Sir Winston?  Smiley

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« Reply #22 on: January 10, 2014, 10:17:30 PM »

Usher's memory has come under fire in recent years, most notably for the ridiculous assertion that hearing Curt Becher producing a Lee Mallory 45 jolted Brian so much he stopped "writing little surfing songs"... in about 1965/6.
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« Reply #23 on: January 10, 2014, 10:30:46 PM »

Andrew

Funny how things play out sometimes, but for Christmas I received The Last Lion, the three-volume set on Winston Spencer Churchill by William Manchester. As you may know, it is a massive tome and I look forward to reading about the one of the greatest statesmen of the last century.  So, attributing the "puzzle, riddle, and enigma" to Joe Pesci in JFK only served to reinforce just how desperately I needed this set.

Who knew Oliver Stone plagiarized Sir Winston?  Smiley

Sadly, I've recently discovered that two of my very favorite WSC quotes are very likely spurious... alas.

1 - while weaving his way across the Commons Lobby after a heavy night in the bar, fellow MP Bessie Braddock (not the most facially favored, it must be said) stopped him and observed loudly, "Winston, you are drunk !". He flashed back, "and you, madame, are ugly - but in the morning, I shall be sober !"

2 - a political enemy, Lady Astor, once told him "Winston, if you were my husband I would poison your coffee", which garnered the response "madame, if you were my wife, I would drink it !".
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« Reply #24 on: January 11, 2014, 02:49:11 AM »


Sadly, I've recently discovered that two of my very favorite WSC quotes are very likely spurious... alas.

1 - while weaving his way across the Commons Lobby after a heavy night in the bar, fellow MP Bessie Braddock (not the most facially favored, it must be said) stopped him and observed loudly, "Winston, you are drunk !". He flashed back, "and you, madame, are ugly - but in the morning, I shall be sober !"


Dang… always put that one down to WC Fields
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