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Author Topic: Phil Everly, RIP.  (Read 12704 times)
Mikie
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« Reply #25 on: January 04, 2014, 11:49:41 AM »

The Everly's were one of many influences on the Beatles. If the Everly Bros. weren't around, that doesn't mean the Beatles wouldn't have existed.  Sometimes the Beatles were referred to as the English Everly Brothers. Here's a comparison of their early stuff though - the harmonies:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBJF1jDml6I

Funny your posting this clip, as one of the comments  is a supposed? Lennon quote refuting your post:    

>>Without the Everly Brothers, There would have been no Beatles": John Lennon <<

Lennon was obviously paying tribute to one of their influences. Like he often did with Presley, Berry, Holly, Cochran, Little Richard, Perkins, Dylan, Rory Storm,  and Cliff Richard to name a few off the top.
« Last Edit: January 04, 2014, 11:54:12 AM by Mikie » Logged

I, I love the colorful clothes she wears, and she's already working on my brain. I only looked in her eyes, but I picked up something I just can't explain. I, I bet I know what she’s like, and I can feel how right she’d be for me. It’s weird how she comes in so strong, and I wonder what she’s picking up from me. I hope it’s good, good, good, good vibrations, yeah!!
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« Reply #26 on: January 04, 2014, 11:51:23 AM »

Also no Simon and Garfunkel.

And no Beach Boys.
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I, I love the colorful clothes she wears, and she's already working on my brain. I only looked in her eyes, but I picked up something I just can't explain. I, I bet I know what she’s like, and I can feel how right she’d be for me. It’s weird how she comes in so strong, and I wonder what she’s picking up from me. I hope it’s good, good, good, good vibrations, yeah!!
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« Reply #27 on: January 04, 2014, 12:53:29 PM »

Don Everly released a statement, posted on Billboard. 

"I loved my brother very much. I always thought I'd be the one to go first. I was listening to one of my favorite songs that Phil wrote and had an extreme emotional moment just before I got the news of his passing. I took that as a special spiritual message from Phil saying good-bye. Our love was and will always be deeper than any earthly differences we might have had. The world might be mourning an Everly Brother, but I'm mourning my brother Phil Everly. My wife Adela and I are touched by all the tributes we're seeing for Phil and we thank you for allowing us to grieve in private at this incredibly difficult time."
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Lonely Summer
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« Reply #28 on: January 04, 2014, 01:21:44 PM »

I got to see them in 1984, 87, and 89. The 1987 show was the most special because by then they had recorded a couple albums of new material, and played a few of them in the show. Also had great seats for that one. But the 89 show had some exceptional moments, several standing ovations during the show, including a long one for "All I Have to Do Is Dream". And that was the one and only time I met them - briefly, as they were headed out to the van after the show. They signed my copy of "Some Hearts". I should put it in a frame now. RIP Phil
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« Reply #29 on: January 04, 2014, 01:49:58 PM »

Yes..really sad news about Phil.   He really was one of my heroes (along with his brother Don).

I had a chance to meet them back about 20 years ago, and after all the years in the business and all the fans and all the comments etc...they were still sweet, gracious and very nice to hear what I had to say. 

Lonely Summer mentioned their 1989 album and song (written by Don) called SOME HEARTS....

The lyrics are about a lost love, but also about the hope to love again:

Some hearts will break
Some hearts will mend
Some hearts just take
Some hearts just give
Some hearts will die
Some hearts just live

But some hearts
Fall in love again
Just when the daylight seems dark as the night
Someone will come along and turn on the lights
And let love in, where it's never been before
Some hearts are worth waiting for…..

It's a shame to lose Phil, but a song like this fills me with hope that my heart will mend and life will go on...

As it usually does.

RIP PHIL.

Dogbone
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« Reply #30 on: January 04, 2014, 02:21:10 PM »

Don Everly released a statement, posted on Billboard.  

"I loved my brother very much. I always thought I'd be the one to go first. I was listening to one of my favorite songs that Phil wrote and had an extreme emotional moment just before I got the news of his passing. I took that as a special spiritual message from Phil saying good-bye. Our love was and will always be deeper than any earthly differences we might have had. The world might be mourning an Everly Brother, but I'm mourning my brother Phil Everly. My wife Adela and I are touched by all the tributes we're seeing for Phil and we thank you for allowing us to grieve in private at this incredibly difficult time."


Thanks for posting!
I just saw an interview with Phil from the late 80s and he said something along those lines, too. He said that no matter what differences there might be, the love of two people who sing so close in harmony together is greater than everything.



This comes from A-Ha:

‘SERENDIPITOUSLY INTERTWINED’
…i’ll do my crying in the rain.

the world of music has lost one of its signature voices.
phil everly has passed away.

from the musical legacy of the everly brothers we knew growing up in norway, to the personal encounters with phil and don around the world many years later…

from the beautiful guitars they generously gave us for xmas one year in the late 80s, to ‘crying in the rain’ – the song we recorded as a tribute to them, but which became a hit for us too, thus reminding us with every show we subsequently played…

whilst musical generations apart, the everly brothers and a-ha somehow became serendipitously intertwined.

early on our relationship to the everly brothers was perhaps chiefly that they had been a main source of inspiration for one of our own main sources of inspiration; the beatles.

later on, a much more personal and interesting bond was forged through the relationship the everlys had with terry slater. terry was previously a bassplayer for the everly brothers back in the 60′s, a very close, longstanding friend of phil’s…and then went on to become a-ha’s first manager.

through their close friendship, we were given some early glimpses into a world to come: our first ever visit to the backstage dressing-rooms at the royal albert hall (the everly reunion concert in 1983), our first ride in a limousine after a concert through a crowd of devoted fans outside, and so on…

many a night on a tour bus somewhere, we would sit and listen to terry tell stories about life on the road with the everlys, and i still remember a word of wisdom evidently originating from phil and don’s father, which went something like this: ‘you can break two sticks, one after the other – but hold them together and they cannot be broken.’

now a big branch has fallen, but together or apart each of the everly brothers contributed to a musical oevre which continues to inspire, fascinate and comfort new generations of music lovers around the world.

we were lucky enough in our lives to know phil everly a little bit, and we hope some of his wry sense of humour and generous nature has rubbed off on us all.
his sweet voice will be sorely missed.

our thoughts go to patti, jason, chris, and the rest of the everly family-tree.
r.i.p. phil.

lots of love
from a-ha
« Last Edit: January 04, 2014, 02:27:59 PM by Rocker » Logged

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« Reply #31 on: January 04, 2014, 02:44:30 PM »

RIP Phil Everly. Cry
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« Reply #32 on: January 04, 2014, 04:05:41 PM »

  RIP Phil Everly

 No offense to Don, but Phil was my fave of the two for some reason. Sad he has left us.

 The Bros 1968 LP ROOTS is an unsung masterpiece of Americana. Trust me, you'll like it.
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« Reply #33 on: January 04, 2014, 05:07:16 PM »

July 15th 2000, I attended Pet Sounds Tour Concert inHarrisburg PA.   Few short weeks later, on September15th , I saw the Everly Brothers at a Kentucky homecoming performance following their stint in Las Vegas.  Does not seem to be almost14 years ago.......

Condolences to big brother on.
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« Reply #34 on: January 04, 2014, 07:46:14 PM »

Also no Simon and Garfunkel.

Simon & Garfunkel, Peter & Gordon & The Hollies all acknowledged the influence of The Everly Brothers, and they all recorded cover versions of Everly Brothers hits.
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« Reply #35 on: January 04, 2014, 08:37:45 PM »


[/quote]






Mikie, I was just thinking of those two songs.    You're exactly right.    the comparison is clear and I cant think of another comparison.
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Lonely Summer
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« Reply #36 on: January 05, 2014, 01:07:36 AM »

 RIP Phil Everly

 No offense to Don, but Phil was my fave of the two for some reason. Sad he has left us.

 The Bros 1968 LP ROOTS is an unsung masterpiece of Americana. Trust me, you'll like it.
I feel the same way. I have 4 of Phil's solo albums, only one of Don's. Maybe it's the just feeling that I am hearing a rare treat hearing Phil sing lead for a change. And maybe just that, of the two, he seemed to be the really kind one - a very gentle soul in an often brutal business.
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Smilin Ed H
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« Reply #37 on: January 05, 2014, 03:28:43 AM »

A tribute to Phil Everly:

http://fridaynightboys300.blogspot.co.uk/2014/01/phil-everly-tribute.html
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« Reply #38 on: January 05, 2014, 04:48:48 AM »

I believe some of the last recordings by the Everly Brothers are as part of Don's son's solo album "Songs from bikini atoll". You can listen here: http://www.edaneverly.com/store.html


The time they were touring with Simon & Grafunkel has to be among the last times they were on stage with each other. Does anybody know if there are recordings from later?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Doem-_tfMuY
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To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

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« Reply #39 on: January 05, 2014, 06:46:26 AM »

Phil also had a big hit in England in '82 with Cliff Richard, "She Means Nothing to Me".  My favorite of his solo albums is "Star Spangled Springer".

The Everly Brothers were also where Warren Zevon, another of my favorites that left us too soon, got his start.
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« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2014, 11:35:50 AM »


Pity Bill Medley's voice was shot for that recording of In My Room with Phil and Brian
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Lonely Summer
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« Reply #41 on: January 06, 2014, 01:19:27 AM »

Phil also had a big hit in England in '82 with Cliff Richard, "She Means Nothing to Me".  My favorite of his solo albums is "Star Spangled Springer".

The Everly Brothers were also where Warren Zevon, another of my favorites that left us too soon, got his start.
I just picked up that album Saturday night at my favorite used record store. Looks like the only one of Phil's solo albums I am missing now is from the 80's, I don't think it was even released in the US.
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« Reply #42 on: January 07, 2014, 02:55:55 PM »

One of my favorite Everly songs is "It's all over". It is also one of the only, if not the only lead vocal Phil had (on the bridge) if I'm not mistaken. Anyway here's Don's solo demo recording. I think it's not only beautiful but also so poignant in the days after Phil's passing.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aonocJnMyaY
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a diseased bunch of mo'fos if there ever was one… their beauty is so awesome that listening to them at their best is like being in some vast dream cathedral decorated with a thousand gleaming American pop culture icons.

- Lester Bangs on The Beach Boys


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To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

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« Reply #43 on: January 09, 2014, 03:58:17 AM »

Found this on facebook.

>>>>> PHIL EVERLY'S LAST INTERVIEUW <<<<<
>>>>> WITH PASTE NET - MAGAZINE <<<<
................Published on January 4, 2014

When Billie Joe Armstrong and Norah Jones recorded their own version of the Everly Brothers’ Songs Our Daddy Taught Us, we tracked Phil Everly to talk to him about the album. We couldn’t know that he’d pass away a few weeks later, just shy of his 75th birthday. Here is what we believe to be his last official interview:

With his co-vocalist brother Don, singer Phil Everly helped lay the very foundations for rock’n’roll, which included such surprising left turns as Songs Our Daddy Taught Us, the “American Gothic”-stark sophomore album from 1958 that still continues to stun (and/or haunt) new generations of artists, like Billie Joe Armstrong and Norah Jones, who recreated it, note for note, on “Foreverly.” When I interviewed him last month before his unexpected death yesterday at the age of 74, his life was much less hectic, as he quietly oversaw the Everly Music Company in Southern California. But that didn’t mean he’d stopped making music. “My son and I run a string company, and he has a studio there, and I go down sometimes and we’ll record,” he said. “Like last year, I did some Christmas things, but I just do that for myself. So if I do end up doing something, it’s just because it’ll be fun.” Which is why he was seriously considering tracking his own version of Green Day’s poignant “Wake Me Up When September Ends,” as a way of saying thanks to his new punk rock benefactor Armstrong. “Because that song is very similar to a Boudleaux Bryant song. When you put the harmony to the last line, it just reminds me of that feel—it’s a really good song,” he added, in a rare interview he granted to Paste for the “Foreverly” occasion.

PASTE: Songs Our Daddy Taught Us has almost every dark traditional but “Knoxville Girl,” it seems. It’s just incredible.
PHIL EVERLY: You know your songs. These were the traditional songs that we grew up singing, because we started out in radio with our mom and dad, and those were the songs that we sang. So we knew them—it was just a matter of doing them. And it was kind of strange to have done it. But it was part of our tradition, so we just did it.

PASTE: And The Everly Brothers had already scored all these chart hits. It was quite a creative gamble to put “Songs” out for a second album.
PHIL EVERLY: Well, there was some reason other than that, that eludes me right now. But it was perfectly natural. And you know, it’s all live and it was very easy to do. And I think it was at the transitional period where we had another album to do for [initial imprint] Cadence, and then we were going to go to Warner Brothers. So all of that comes into play. But we didn’t think in those terms back in the old days. Only now, in modern times, is it acceptable for you to keep doing the same thing, over and over and over. But in the beginning of rock and roll, there was always innovation. Artists were always trying to do something new and something different. And I find that [vintage mindset] true for Billie Joe Armstrong—it’s very unusual for him to have done this.

PASTE: Have you heard the entire Foreverly album yet?
PHIL EVERLY: Well, the two pieces that I have heard are just really, really sensational, really good. I heard “That Silver Haired Daddy of Mine” the other day, and they did it a little faster, and it’s really quite interesting. It’s one of my favorite songs, anyway, but it was always hard for me. On the last tour my brother and I did in England, we were doing an acoustic set in the middle of it, and we would do that one. And it’s a real hard song to sing—it just brings up that…that emotional feeling. But Billie Joe and Norah do a great job with it.

PASTE: And they put a funky flamenco topspin on “Kentucky.”
PHIL EVERLY: Well, it had a rhythmic feel to it in the old days, in the original one that we did. The timing on it is very funny. But it’s all very interesting stuff, and an interesting comparison, these two things.

PASTE: Norah said that she’d heard “Barbara Allen” had been sung since nearly medieval times.
PHIL EVERLY: Oh, really? That’s surprising! But that’s the wonderful thing about music. And that’s still a great story, isn’t it?

PASTE: As a kid, was there a point where you went ‘Uh, dad? These songs kinda scare us’?
PHIL EVERLY: That’s an interesting question. But you know, it’s a little like…like gore. When you’re young, you really like gore anyhow, so I think I just found those songs really interesting. And there are other songs, too, like “The Rosewood Casket.” But it was just so traditional for us, when we sang in the family. And we were singing every morning, and you’d sing almost any given thing. So Don and I were doing those songs, plus what for us were very modern things, like The Dell Sisters, some of their things. So there’s also the fact that “Barbara Allen” lasts, the fact that the music itself is so good, it holds up. Especially in harmony—it really lends itself to that.

PASTE: So you and Don truly never consider performing together again?
PHIL EVERLY: No, you couldn’t get me to go travel around and sit in a hotel room again. I have no interest in doing that. So everybody’s happy. I am, at 74. Some people like doing it, but I never was much for that, anyway. It’s a lot of work. So the only thing I miss about all of it is the camaraderie of the tour, but that doesn’t offset the rest of it. So it’s not something that we’re going to do.

PASTE: It’s curious to note your “Songs” lineage. Like the Gene Autry-popularized “Silver Haired Daddy.”
PHIL EVERLY: With Gene Autry, it’s kind of funny. I grew up as a Roy Rogers fan, of course. And in my old age, it’s kind of funny—at night, what I like to do is watch TV when I go to sleep. And what I really like is to put on a Gene Autry film, because he sings really well. So he sings me to sleep. And it’s amazing, how many songs you know that he caused you to know.

PASTE: But you have quite a few of your own.
PHIL EVERLY: Have you heard our Pass the Chicken and Listen album? It’s a strange damn title, but Chet Atkins produced it. So for anybody who’s actually interested in our stuff and wanted to hear something, they ought to listen to that album. It’s a very interesting album. I don’t sit around and listen to our stuff at all—it’s just what I remember. And my favorite song on the thing is called “Lay it Down, Brother.” But whenever people talk about Don and I recording again—which almost everybody usually mentions—I always say ‘Well, there’s plenty of things that you haven’t heard! Plenty of things out there to discover!’

PASTE: Are you bracing yourself for a sudden uptick in Everly Brothers iTunes sales?
PHIL EVERLY: Well, that’s an interesting thing, and it’s a whole new world out there. I don’t keep up on things like that, but I’ve got a young wife, so I’m usually aware of something current. But I don’t know as much about it as probably I should. But this [Foreverly collaboration] has been an interesting thing, because Songs was such a strange album anyway. But it was one of our things that we always liked, and it was so much a part of our life, our heritage. So it’s kind of nice to see somebody who’s brave enough to do the same thing, all over again
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a diseased bunch of mo'fos if there ever was one… their beauty is so awesome that listening to them at their best is like being in some vast dream cathedral decorated with a thousand gleaming American pop culture icons.

- Lester Bangs on The Beach Boys


PRO SHOT BEACH BOYS CONCERTS - LIST


To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

- Jack Rieley
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« Reply #44 on: January 10, 2014, 07:32:28 AM »

My parents introduced me to Phil and Don when they bought Songs Our Daddy Taught Us in 1958.  I was too young to understand the sentiment of such songs as "That Silver-Haired Daddy of Mine," but loved "Bird Dog" and "Problems" - both on a record of singles they put out in 1959.  "Problems" was later done by Chris Hillman (another big fan of the Everly Brothers) and Herb Pedersen in 2002, on their Way Out West album.
By 1960 the folks were fading on the brothers, though mama liked "So Sad" (1960), "Crying in the Rain" (1962), and "Walk Right Back" (1961), I later grew to love those as well, especially "So Sad" as done by Gene Clark.  I guess you had to become an adult to "get" the sad ones.  My favorite early hit was "Cathy's Clown" (1960).
Skip to 1965 and I was reminded of how good they could be.  "The Price of Love" (1965) rocked.  They weren't as big as the hits let on, but their influence was clear.  Many of my favorite artists were playing the songs they made famous.  Then they released Roots (1968), all us Dillards, Poco, Byrds, Gene and Doug, Delaney and Bonnie, Bobbie Gentry and Burritos fans were listening.  It was the first time I remember liking a Merle Haggard song ("Mama Tried").  We checked in on the Summer Variety Show in 1970, but they were lost in the shuffle.  They were trying to get the Supper/Country Club folks back, when they should have been catering to us.  That they did in 1972.  Stories We Could Tell was full of what we had been waiting for.  Then what I consider their masterpiece...1973's Pass The Chicken and Listen.  "Watchin' it Go," "Ladies Love Outlaws," like Phil said in that Paste interview, hardly anybody was paying attention.  Then they were gone.  Others who were listening, Willie and his bunch, got the hits.    
Phil wasn't ready to quit just yet.  In late 1973 he put together a long-player that should have been a hit.  Star Spangled Springer had the goods:  It Pleases me, To Please You, Poisonberry Pie, God Bless Older Ladies, and my personal favorite - Snowflake Bombardier.  Albert Hammond had released an obscure record called "The Air That I Breathe" in 1972.  That's on this record too.  Phil's is my favorite version (and I'm a Hollies fan).  I can't prove it, but I doubt it was Albert's version that they heard.  Another big hit for someone else to take to the top.  I've never read anywhere what Phil thought of that, but he never released another album to compare to it.  His other long-players have some good stuff, but 1973 was his last great year.  I have all of them on vinyl, maybe the only way they are available.
I will continue to listen to Phil, but as it is with Gram you always have it in the back of your mind that they are gone.  
rest in peace, dear Phil
.
.
EDIT:  While researching a Hollies piece in another thread I came across a confirmation of sorts on the "Air That I Breathe" story.  In the Notes of the Look Through Any Window DVD by Ben Fong-Torres, he mentions it was a EMI secretary that heard the Phil version and suggested they give it a listen.  You would think Allan and Tony would have bought that themselves, with their older connection to the Everlys.
« Last Edit: January 16, 2014, 01:29:50 PM by feelsflow » Logged

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« Reply #45 on: January 11, 2014, 02:27:41 PM »

I hope Don is doing okay. I haven't read or heard much about him in recent years. I read an interview with Albert Lee in which he said he'd stayed in touch with Phil, but not so much with Don, even though Don is the person who first used him on his solo work in the early '70s.

I also read that one reason the Everlys stopped touring is that Don refused to lower the keys of their songs, which Phil requested. That might sound insensitive, but I think they would have lost a lot of that magical sound if they did lower the keys. It's not like Don was singing that much lower than Phil, even though his part did tend to be the lowest by a few notes. I read that Don quit smoking back in 1970 and that Phil didn't until well into his 60s, and that may have made the difference in their ability to still hit the notes.
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« Reply #46 on: January 12, 2014, 01:27:33 AM »

I hope Don is doing okay. I haven't read or heard much about him in recent years. I read an interview with Albert Lee in which he said he'd stayed in touch with Phil, but not so much with Don, even though Don is the person who first used him on his solo work in the early '70s.

I also read that one reason the Everlys stopped touring is that Don refused to lower the keys of their songs, which Phil requested. That might sound insensitive, but I think they would have lost a lot of that magical sound if they did lower the keys. It's not like Don was singing that much lower than Phil, even though his part did tend to be the lowest by a few notes. I read that Don quit smoking back in 1970 and that Phil didn't until well into his 60s, and that may have made the difference in their ability to still hit the notes.
They did lower the key on at least one song in the 80's - Crying in the Rain, and it sounded fine. I notice a lot of older artists doing that, and in a lot of cases, it works fine. Burton Cummings has dropped a lot of his Guess Who stuff down a step, no problem. Better to do that than find yourself straining for notes that aren't there anymore. I think the Everlys just got tired of touring. After the 3 albums they did in the 80's, they couldn't come to an agreement on any further recording. Don wanted them to do an album of old country songs, kind of a Songs Our Daddy Taught Us 2. I don't know what Phil wanted, maybe he felt he'd proved himself, didn't have anything left. It's gotta be discouraging when you have tried umpteen times to "come back", and the records only sell modestly or poorly. They didn't do too bad in the 80's, but they were too country for the pop stations, and country stations thought of them as rock 'n' rollers.
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« Reply #47 on: January 12, 2014, 07:38:04 AM »

Phil mentioned in some interviews that he just doesn't want to go on tour. Dunno if there were other reasons as well.

Here's an appearance by Don in 2011 at a Paul Simon show. I haven't seen or heard other recent appearances by him.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1QGjEmo-_c
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a diseased bunch of mo'fos if there ever was one… their beauty is so awesome that listening to them at their best is like being in some vast dream cathedral decorated with a thousand gleaming American pop culture icons.

- Lester Bangs on The Beach Boys


PRO SHOT BEACH BOYS CONCERTS - LIST


To sum it up, they blew it, they blew it consistently, they continue to blow it, it is tragic and this pathological problem caused The Beach Boys' greatest music to be so underrated by the general public.

- Jack Rieley
Ron
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« Reply #48 on: January 13, 2014, 08:27:05 AM »

My favorite song of theirs is Let It Be Me, I like how in the bridges it sounds like one of them is playing acoustic and the other is playing electric.  I'm not sure if that's how they recorded it, just always imagined it that way.  I think it's a very impressive song. 

When I was a kid I really liked "Wake Up Little Susie" too. 

My dad used to tell me this story all the time where he and his girlfriend saw them at a club one night, they went in and didn't even know anybody was going to perform, so they got a table right near the stage, and then the Everly Brothers came out and played.  This would have been in California sometime in the early 80's.  He said they were amazing and he was so thrilled that he got to see them, and be sitting 10 feet from them the whole show.

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KittyKat
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« Reply #49 on: January 13, 2014, 11:58:11 AM »

Phil mentioned in some interviews that he just doesn't want to go on tour. Dunno if there were other reasons as well.

Here's an appearance by Don in 2011 at a Paul Simon show. I haven't seen or heard other recent appearances by him.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I1QGjEmo-_c

Thanks for that clip. Good to see Don looking well. Perhaps Phil was right about lowering the keys, because Don sounds a little strained on the high notes there. It also seems as though both brothers were ready to retire. Nice that they left on a high note. Phil was still active with his son's guitar string company, so he was having a good life himself after retirement.
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