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650702 Posts in 26002 Topics by 3711 Members - Latest Member: JPP4 September 20, 2019, 07:52:42 PM
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Author Topic: "The Fragile Beach Boys Reunion" - Rolling Stone Magazine  (Read 40056 times)
Emdeeh
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« Reply #200 on: June 13, 2012, 06:54:23 PM »

But Carl also played fan requests. I was talking to him at a 1984 show and mentioned that I loved "Heaven" and was delighted that he'd played it (unexpectedly) in an earlier show. He said, "I like it too. I think I'll play it tonight." And he did just exactly that.

In later years, Al seemed to be the most adventurous in wanting some deep cuts setlist-wise. I think Carl was just worn down, caught between being the band's mediator and the whole Landy debacle (which took an enormous toll on him), in the later years. But then again, he was fully vested in the 1993 boxset tour, the last time I heard the BBs play a setlist like they're doing nowadays. That '93 show was one of the best BB shows I've ever seen.


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Autotune
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« Reply #201 on: June 13, 2012, 07:16:41 PM »

Well, but saying "I love that song" to a devoted fan is just the same as playing "meat and potatoes" sets to casual fans. You're giving them what they want to hear in either case.

What we don't know is what Carl actually felt. And people want to give him the benefit of the doubt, which I understand. But the fact is, he had the opportunity to play deep cuts -- it's not like Mike would have seriously begrudged him a couple of obscure tunes -- and didn't do it. He had the opportunity to push for cool new music on record, but he didn't do that either.

At a certain point, it's not what's in our hearts that matters. It's what we do. And Carl didn't follow through. Simple as that.

Agreed. I think the 1985 album was Carl's last attempt at taking artistic chances with the BB in the studio. Whatever our thoughts on the album, it'd be a stretch to call it an artistic or comercial success. Perhaps he decided to withdraw from that role after said album.

But while discussing this, please keep in mind that in the mid 90s there were extra musical aspects. We don't know yet the full extent of the impact Brian's autobio had on Carl.
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"His lyrical ability has never been touched by anyone, except for Mike Love."

-Brian Wilson on Van Dyke Parks (2015)
Sheriff John Stone
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« Reply #202 on: June 13, 2012, 07:23:54 PM »

Well, but saying "I love that song" to a devoted fan is just the same as playing "meat and potatoes" sets to casual fans. You're giving them what they want to hear in either case.

What we don't know is what Carl actually felt. And people want to give him the benefit of the doubt, which I understand. But the fact is, he had the opportunity to play deep cuts -- it's not like Mike would have seriously begrudged him a couple of obscure tunes -- and didn't do it. He had the opportunity to push for cool new music on record, but he didn't do that either.

At a certain point, it's not what's in our hearts that matters. It's what we do. And Carl didn't follow through. Simple as that.

Agreed. I think the 1985 album was Carl's last attempt at taking artistic chances with the BB in the studio. Whatever our thoughts on the album, it'd be a stretch to call it an artistic or comercial success. Perhaps he decided to withdraw from that role after said album.

I agree with both of you.

Oddly enough, the one person who didn't come through "artistically" on the 1985 album was Brian. I remember the hype surrounding that album, and much of it was centered around Brian working with Steve Levine, learning the new technology, writing a lot of new songs, etc. Brian's contributions - "I'm So Lonely", "Male Ego", "It's Just A Matter Of Time", "Crack At Your Love" and "California Calling"  - were throwbacks if anything.
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Jonathan Blum
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« Reply #203 on: June 13, 2012, 07:52:25 PM »

I can't picture Carl, if he'd lived, leaving the Beach Boys to tour with Brian.  Recording the odd solo track together, sure.  Maybe guest appearances at selected shows.  But I can't see him walking out permanently on the band, and I can't see Mike tolerating repeated leaves of absence.

But the one thing I *really* can't imagine... is Carl missing out on the chance to help Brian finish "Smile".  After all, he had form.

Imagine the Royal Festival Hall premiere in that universe.  Imagine Carl's voice on the recording.

Now that's a heartbreaker...

Cheers,
Jon Blum
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