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Buckethead
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« Reply #550 on: July 20, 2018, 07:57:51 PM »

SmileBrian - BR was quite a cultural icon in his day, a real role model.

The Captain - Were you raised Missouri Synod? This denomination of Lutheranism seems very conservative compared to the more mainstream ELCA the other group that merged  with them in the not-too-distant  past. I know a Lutheran couple who traveled to Kansas and stopped in a Missouri Synod church on a Sunday morning. An usher came to them after they were seated and asked them if they were MSL. When they said no, but Lutheran, he told them that they were welcome but would not be permitted to take communion.

RRA1 - I agree that it would be nice for there to be more programs for adults at libraries. I suppose the reasoning behind the focus on children is that they want to get them "hooked" on reading as early and as long as possible, whereas adults are as engaged with reading, for better or worse, as they ever will be. I am a reading specialist who struggles daily with many kids who read well below their grade level. They typically were not read to when young, were not taken to the library and encouraged to read, etc.
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« Reply #551 on: July 20, 2018, 08:22:38 PM »

That BR may be cultural icon in the U.S. but not internationally. F.ex. here that name isn't known at all. Definitely not household name.

Buckethead, do you publish any articles to local newspaper, write columns to give school kids advices? Maybe books?
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« Reply #552 on: July 21, 2018, 04:52:07 AM »

RRA1 - Brooks Robinson was a famous baseball player from the late 1950s through the mid-70s. Baseball was more important to Americans then than even football. Do I publish anything? No. I doubt that I have anything to say that anyone would want to read! Instead, I read just about anything I can. BTW, what is your hometown?
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« Reply #553 on: July 21, 2018, 05:13:20 AM »

The Captain - Were you raised Missouri Synod? This denomination of Lutheranism seems very conservative compared to the more mainstream ELCA the other group that merged  with them in the not-too-distant  past. I know a Lutheran couple who traveled to Kansas and stopped in a Missouri Synod church on a Sunday morning. An usher came to them after they were seated and asked them if they were MSL. When they said no, but Lutheran, he told them that they were welcome but would not be permitted to take communion.

I was. But the amazing part is that's only because that was the closest thing to ELS in my (small, rural) hometown, which is out of which one side of my family came (and was quite prominent, actually, in the ministry and synodic leadership). And ELS makes Missouri look like ELCA. The positive side is, the experience has given me a lot of insight into conservative culture, an insight a lot of my friends never got.
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« Reply #554 on: July 21, 2018, 05:45:14 AM »

2Buckethead: Yes, I read baseball is popular there but, I took the word "icon" to be used when talking about household name, world-famous celebrity, smb. really important to be known everywhere. Looks like it isn't correct? I arrived in the village, raised in "settlement of urban type", now live in the city with boring name. These 3 places reside in Siberia. I read that famous street food in the U.S., esp. New York/ Jersey/ Massachusets is falafel (sp?). Did you taste it? Describe it.
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« Reply #555 on: July 21, 2018, 01:21:20 PM »

RRA1 -
I see. I meant "icon" in the USA, should have been more specific. I guess it can be taken in terms of the world or within a nation/culture.  You are certainly making me more globally conscious!

I've never met a Siberian, although I talk to many other Russian college students who work in my favorite ocean-side resort in the state of New Jersey. How long do you have cold winter weather?

Falafel is actually a Middle Eastern food (I think originally Egyptian?) that is popular wherever there are larger settlements of Middle Easterners in the US. Essentially, it consists of fava beans or chick peas fried up as a patty and served on pita bread or they may be made into little balls and eaten alone as a snack or starter or put on salads, other vegetables, etc. Often, they are accompanied with sauces that may be spicy or not. Falafel is also popular with vegetarians because it is a tasty, inexpensive source of high quality protein. The flavor itself is pretty bland, but is enhanced from frying in oil and the sauces. I enjoy falafel as long as it is not spicy.
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« Reply #556 on: July 21, 2018, 03:58:26 PM »

Siberia itself covers pretty big territory. It isn't super-cold thru & thru. Weather in winter ranges between 20 C-60 C (sorry, not used to Fahrenheit degrees). Summer differs as well. In Siberia side I live, winter's about 30-40 C. Summer's usually cold, in June now & then it's snowing, hailing. In July it's kinda warm. August back to cold, preparation to fall. What's weather in where you live, to compare?
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« Reply #557 on: July 21, 2018, 04:44:22 PM »

Forgive my ignorance  -  my conversion charts show your winters at 30-40 C would be are 86 to 104 F?  That's  tropical temperatures. We have pretty distinct seasons where I live.  Winter averages  30-45 F (-1 to 5 C), although it can be as cold as 10-20 F, typically with 30 or so inches of snow . Summers  average  64 -87 F ( 18-31C), although it can get as hot as 99 F or so, and spring and autumn, of course, in between.
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« Reply #558 on: July 21, 2018, 05:07:54 PM »

Oopsie daisy, forgot to add minus to those digits.
I'd like winter like that, -1 to 5 C. Lucky you!
It means you can go without headgear?
To get this back to topic - when you didn't buy car, travelling by train, as well as underground, did you read sitting there? I think people musn't read in public transport.
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« Reply #559 on: July 22, 2018, 10:22:49 AM »

We can go without headgear often in the winter, depending on how long we are outdoors. Our worst winter days are probably like your more pleasant ones in Siberia.

I have actually rarely traveled by train (three or four times), bus (same), or underground (twice). Most Americans who do not live in cities have less access to these forms of transportation to get around on a regular basis, most use cars. Besides, reading on some trains/buses/subways is not always safe - people have to be aware of surroundings, depending on where they are. In cities, trains/buses/underground are used a lot more, although many use cars, exclusively. The USA has never had the well-developed, highly accessible modes of public transportation seen in Europe or Russia. My British cousin flew here with his son to visit a university two states away from mine. I picked him up at the Philadelphia airport and we visited. The next morning, he asked where the train station was, thinking that it would have a train that would take his son to the university. In reality, the local train would would go to the Philadelphia's main station, which would have a train taking him to a city far away, where he would get on a train to take him to a city in the other state, where he could get on a train stopping a few miles from his destination. I did read on my long plane trips to/from Europe. The first time I finished several Agatha Christie mysteries!   
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« Reply #560 on: July 23, 2018, 05:47:06 AM »

Thanks, very useful info.
Will you tell the 1st book you read & liked?
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« Reply #561 on: July 23, 2018, 05:42:48 PM »

The first book I read by myself and liked was something like Going to the Beach. It was just about a little girls whose family takes her to the beach. It described all of the things she saw, heard, and felt, and in the end she was sad that she had to leave. I could so very much identify with her! The first book I read was Dick and Jane, part of a series of what we call readers. They were created to teach kids how to read in first grade. I hated the book, first of all, because I could already read and it said things like,"Oh Dick. See Jane run. Oh, oh, oh!" Second, in my little mind, dick was a bad word for penis. Finally, I never met anyone who said, "Oh, oh, oh!" A few years ago, I found a book in a store that made fun of Dick and Jane, had a vampire stalking them or something.
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« Reply #562 on: July 24, 2018, 08:35:58 PM »

Which classic literature is favorite to you? Many Americans, going by Internet surveys, like the works by James Joyce & Ernest Heminhway. Do you too? List writers & works.
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« Reply #563 on: July 25, 2018, 12:47:30 PM »

So funny about "Dick and Jane."

 The first serious book I read was Little Women. As a kid I also read Oliver Twist, Tom Sawyer, and Huckleberry Finn. There was also a series of books I read about the Bobbsey Twins.

The first nonfiction book I remember reading was Robert Massie's classic, Nicholas and Alexandra, which started my fascination with all things Russian. I probably should read that book again, as it's the 100th anniversary of their demise. However you feel about Nicholas, why kill his children? It was a crazy time back then.
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« Reply #564 on: July 25, 2018, 04:18:21 PM »

I didn't find the "Dick And Jane" bit funny. Maybe I missed sth.?

"Tom Sawyer" & "Huckleberry Finn" books are very popular with Soviet/ Russian kids. Films were made, TV mini-series etc. I read them at 10. Finn is better than Tom.

Many people, natives/ foreigners, got misguided view about Nikolai II. He wasn't bad, as per numerous historians, professors' research & statements. Killing children as revenge to the killing of Lenin's brother isn't right, goes without saying.

You seem to be with poetic nature - do you read any poetry, NOLA BBF? Robert Burns, Byron, smb. else?
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« Reply #565 on: July 25, 2018, 06:22:48 PM »

Those Dick and Jane books were pretty lame. I saw them in passing but thank goodness our school didn't use them.

Poetry? I'm trying to get back into it. When I was in college my favorite poems were William Blake's Poems of Innocence and Experience.
For the "Experience" the most famous poem is The Tyger (Tiger)

Tyger Tyger, burning bright, in the forests of the night,
What immortal hand or eye, could frame thy fearful symmetry?
Etc....

For the Songs of Innocence, my English Professor brought tears to my eyes when he read the poem The Chimney Sweeper:
When my mother died I was very young, and my father sold me while yet my tongue
Could scarcely cry 'weep! 'weep! 'weep! 'weep!
So your chimneys I sweep & in soot I sleep.
Etc....

These poems are classics and should be easy for you to see online.

I have a soft spot in my heart for The Road Not Taken, by Robert Frost., with the classic ending:
Two roads diverged in a wood , and I -
I took the one less traveled by,
And that has made all the difference.

There was a funny poem about a monk who wasn't happy about his situation:
Soliloquy of the Spanish Cloister, by Robert Browning. It might take you a bit to get through it as it has a few Latin words in it. The ending makes me laugh out loud:

 "St, there's Vespers! Plena Gratia
Ave Virgo! Gr-r-r you swine!

Another one by Browning, quite macabre - Porphyria's Lover.

I better stop now. Planning on getting into TS Eliot's later poetry (The Waste Land; Four Quartets)
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« Reply #566 on: July 25, 2018, 08:25:59 PM »

Stupid books, yes. But, it's difficult to skip lame things. Flowers lame, TV lame, ice cream lame, books lame, dates lame, weddings lame, gadgets lame etc.

Reading these poetry bits I realize again it's really not my cup of (expired) tea.

Can you do "Best 3 books" list? Or best 5 you read?
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« Reply #567 on: July 26, 2018, 05:02:42 AM »

I'll get back to you about my 3 favorite books. Do you want fiction books or could they be non fiction?

I got a bit carried away with the poetry. For a number of years I was "meh" about it but recently I've had renewed interest
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« Reply #568 on: July 26, 2018, 08:10:30 AM »

It's 2 separate categories - make best 3 fiction & best 3 real.
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« Reply #569 on: July 26, 2018, 04:13:46 PM »

NOLA BB Fan and lRRA1:

I think that you really had to "be there" to find humor in the Dick and Jane discussion. As for favorite authors and books, I don't have any. I just like to read, period. I like Husk Finn and Tom Sawyer. There were some school districts in America that actually banned them as racist. The funny thing is, they were just the opposite and served as my introduction to the concept of racism and its ugliness. I think that some people saw the "n" word and missed Twain's true intention.   

Nicholas and Alexandra! Yes! I first read it in 1990, while on bed rest with pregnancy. I have read maybe a dozen books related to Russian history, but none recently until I  discovered a website called the Alexander Palace Time Machine. I has many resources, with a separate  discussion area, related to all things Romanov. I especially enjoy exploring their relationships with the extended family and the other royal families of Europe within the context of so much intermarriage over the years. (Romanov brides were usually German princesses., but there were other unions with the Danish and Brits, as well.)  One example involves Victoria Melita, who was Albert and Victoria's son Alfred's daughter; her mother was the Tsar's aunt, Marie.  VM married Alexandra's brother, Ernst, Duke of Hesse. They divorced, then she married her other first cousin (also Nicholas' first cousin), Grand Duke Kyrill. VM and Kyrill were exiled for that until the First World War. Goodness. It truly boggles the mind, who was whom and who liked/disliked whom for what reasons.

RRA!, is there a general opinion in Russia of Nicholas II ?  I was under the impression that he underwent a rehabilitation, of sorts, after the remains of the family were discovered.
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« Reply #570 on: July 26, 2018, 06:26:11 PM »

"Finn" & "Sawyer" books racist merely due to n-word? Is it joke? Come on, that's not serious.

There's no general opinion about Nikolai II (I hate Nicholas, the English name, prefer to use original Russian names for Russians). They either say he's brought terror, one of the worst Romanovs, or they say they don't much care, it's done deal, he's been & gone, he's dead. But various studies by historians in documentaries show that he wasn't as bad as people paint him. He did NOT want to rule the country. He wanted to lead nice quiet living style. He's basically family man. But due to father to son custom to innherit the throne, he's got zero choice to be who he liked to.

I bet many people still view him as bad figure in Russian history, various documentaries that state the opposite can't change people who believe what they choose.
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« Reply #571 on: July 26, 2018, 06:46:03 PM »

That is pretty much the impression I had about why people wanted the books banned. The word is emotionally loaded, and understandably so.

I have the same impression of NII, as well. Certainly, he was a loving husband and father. Witnesses also state that he was quite even-tempered and treated even regular people with respect  and kindness.. I've read that he wept when his father died, telling a Grand Duke that he was not ready to rule. Still, he did seem quite obstinate about his God-given obligation to maintain the throne as it had been,, essentially sharing no real power by creating a constitutional monarchy along the lines of those that survived WWI. He also seemed tone-deaf in terms of the living conditions of the majority of the populace, just felt unconditionally worshiped and adored by the masses.. One would be hard put to identify any famous figure (or regular person) who might qualify as all good or all bad.
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« Reply #572 on: July 28, 2018, 01:45:57 PM »

In this case, it's not what I'm reading but what I found to read, and where. This week we were in northern Wisconsin on along the southern shore of Lake Superior. While wandering around the area we stopped in an unassuming storefront in Washburn, WI, for a used bookstore--the sort of thing we enjoy checking out as a curiosity.

Chequamegon Books, for anyone passing through the area, is heaven. The main room has maybe 10 shelves along the two exterior walls (25 yards or so deep?), with maybe four or five aisles standing eight or nine shelves tall. There's a back room, and an upstairs in the back room that overlooks the lake. The proprietors clearly use some taste in acquiring books: an entire wall was dedicated to history (half of it to military history), far more than the largest Barnes & Noble I've ever seen. The fiction section was spotty in what it had, but what it had! Maybe 10 or 12 Willa Cather books, just as many Nelson Algren books, a depth even our local library system doesn't match. (Conversely, there were authors entirely absent. Such is life.) I almost giggled at the section dedicated to far leftist politics, a section bigger than a chain bookstore's section for all politics ... even politics + history (and maybe autobiography too). Then back to the music theory section, where I scanned Schoenberg's book on harmony. And to reiterate, the second-floor of the back room has lake views. Eden.

I picked up an early 80s pamphlet by Sen. Hatch about the ERA; a 19th century book linking pre-Exilic Judaism to zodiac cults; a study of the Reformation; some Schleiermacher; a comedic critique of G-Dub Bush; a 1960s analysis of the political change in America in the first half of the 19th century; and a book on the Dead Sea Scrolls. Some books seemed slightly overpriced, but others were almost laughably cheap.

Their bookmark claims 80,000 books. It felt like 80 million. Chequamegon Books, Washburn, Wisconsin.
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« Reply #573 on: July 28, 2018, 04:43:03 PM »

Used bookstores are heaven, I am a big history buff (American, military, etc....)
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« Reply #574 on: July 30, 2018, 03:03:05 PM »

2Buckethead: Can you explain to me why/ how n-word is "emotionally loaded"? I, to be frank, don't get it. Isn't there state Nigeria in Africa anyway? Similar to "n*****". Re: Nikolai II, in previous post I brought just few things that historians said in the documentary. They said many-many revelations in it, "family guy" is tiniest bit of info in the 5-hour documentary. It used to be in Youtube with English subs, you would see it with your eyes what they say about his reign etc. When I find it, will link it.

2tc: typically indifferent about views but big choice in bookstores is luxury here. Cool. Btw, didn't know Wiskonsin borders with state. I knew about SD being neighbor.
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