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Author Topic: The What Are You Reading? Thread  (Read 121382 times)
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Smilin Ed H
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« Reply #175 on: June 14, 2015, 05:13:25 AM »

This:  http://fridaynightboys300.blogspot.co.uk/2015/06/the-art-of-noir-by-eddie-muller-review.html

Full of superb artwork.

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« Reply #176 on: June 27, 2015, 07:05:24 AM »

I had yesterday off and wandered into a used bookstore. Hopefully I keep up the discipline to work through what I picked up.

Currently reading: aforementioned "Iron Curtain" and "Inerrant the Wind;" then the new "James, the Brother of Jesus," (a secular book of biblical criticism--not a religious study) by Robert Eisenman; and the novel "Then We Came to the End" by Joshua Ferris.

Then I also picked up some Gunter Grass, Hans Fallada, Ivan Goncharov's mid-19th century novel "Oblomov," whom and which I'd never heard of but liked the looks of, and "Policy Paradox: the Art of Political Decision Making," by Deborah Stone.

That should keep me busy this summer.
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« Reply #177 on: July 27, 2015, 04:45:22 AM »

"What are you reading?" The Graveyard School series, author: Tom B. Stone. Current favorite - "Abominable Snow Monster". Back in school, I used to read horror fiction, going to library to pick what's available at once so nobody else gets to read them (rest assured, lotta teens liked scary tales). Wouldn't give them back for very long. That's me. Anyway, was nice to now find the whole series online. Maybe someday I'll download it. Just in case.
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« Reply #178 on: July 27, 2015, 09:01:12 AM »

I had yesterday off and wandered into a used bookstore. Hopefully I keep up the discipline to work through what I picked up.

 the novel "Then We Came to the End" by Joshua Ferris.


It's a great book. Very funny and quite touching in places.

I recently finished Wizard of the Crow by Ngugi wa Thiong'o (possible Nobel laureate), a satire (or accurate depiction?) or Kenyan/African politics, which was superb, and i'm currently reading Mo Yan's Red Sorghum, set in 1930s China, a small village at war with the Japanese. I'll watch the film once i've finished the book.

And i've got Alan Moore's Watchmen lined up next on the bedside table.
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« Reply #179 on: July 29, 2015, 03:27:04 AM »

I'm reading new edition of comics "Calvin & Hobbes". It supersedes "Garfield" in my eyes.
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« Reply #180 on: July 29, 2015, 10:41:58 AM »

Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...
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A band called The Beach Boys are mostly going to be a fun in the sun-themed group. And that has, is, and will always be just as it should. There needs to be ONE classic band that isn't a pack of endless "artistic" moan. All people wanna do is make The Beach Boys into another Beatles they are less tired of.
And, for anyone who has actually experienced them, surfing and cars carry PLENTY of emotion and life experience. They can carry as much metaphor as any Van Dyke Parks clever epistle.
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« Reply #181 on: July 29, 2015, 10:45:53 AM »

Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

I'm not really sure if that's a joke or not! If so, it's a good one.
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« Reply #182 on: July 29, 2015, 02:52:51 PM »

Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

I'm not really sure if that's a joke or not! If so, it's a good one.

It isn't, but I didn't mean to sound arrogant either if that's how you read it. I'll write more thoughts when I finish the book, I'd like to read your thoughts on it meanwhile though.
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A band called The Beach Boys are mostly going to be a fun in the sun-themed group. And that has, is, and will always be just as it should. There needs to be ONE classic band that isn't a pack of endless "artistic" moan. All people wanna do is make The Beach Boys into another Beatles they are less tired of.
And, for anyone who has actually experienced them, surfing and cars carry PLENTY of emotion and life experience. They can carry as much metaphor as any Van Dyke Parks clever epistle.
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« Reply #183 on: July 29, 2015, 03:11:25 PM »

Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.
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« Reply #184 on: July 29, 2015, 03:30:06 PM »

Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

I'm not really sure if that's a joke or not! If so, it's a good one.

It isn't, but I didn't mean to sound arrogant either if that's how you read it. I'll write more thoughts when I finish the book, I'd like to read your thoughts on it meanwhile though.

I haven't actually read The Castle -- I've read The Trial, Metamorphosis, and a few other short stories.

Your comment didn't sound arrogant at all -- it's a completely understandable reaction to reading Kafka. I thought it might be a joke because Kafka always puts his characters into situations that they don't and will never fully understand. There's always something inexplicable. Kafka deprives his readers of this knowledge too. When someone uses the phrase "Kafkaeseque" that tends to be what they mean.

I have the book on my shelf and can't wait to get to it. Let me know your thoughts when you are done.
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« Reply #185 on: July 29, 2015, 03:30:45 PM »

Kafka's The Castle. Not really sure if I get this...

This is my reaction to Faulkner's the Sound and the Fury, which I am submerged in.

This, in my opinion, is one of the greatest novels ever written. Top 5, at least, for me. Would like to hear your thoughts on it.
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« Reply #186 on: August 10, 2015, 03:06:41 PM »

Finished Red Sorghum, by Mo Yan. Very violent in places, but enjoyable and not overly long (330 pages).

I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.

I'm currently reading China Mieville's Kraken. A supernatural tale set in London about a cult kidnapping a giant squid from the Natural History Museum. Anyone else read any Mieville?
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« Reply #187 on: August 22, 2015, 12:46:42 PM »

Transl: Irreplaceable way to fight off boredom anytime any place! International CLUB OF ERUDITES ... . 366 quizes for every day ... . Pt. 1 Bought it yrs ago, then it cost 55 roubles.
Besides, I got to finally read "Shogun" by James Clavell. Well what to say? I liked it. . .just as I did the mini-series with Richard Chamberlain (rmbr this long-forgotten actor?). It used to be my favorite show as a child, me & my grandma would watch it together (I equally liked "Perry Mason" but never read the book(s). some day).
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Short notice: the cat you see to the left is the best. Not counting your indoor cat who might have habit sitting at your left side when you post at SmileySmile.

Gene Tierney is beautiful. She's talented.

"Broiler Brunch" - check in theaters new fam TV series! Better than since Bradys!
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« Reply #188 on: August 25, 2015, 02:09:49 PM »

I saw the Shogun TV series and enjoyed it ("Fare thee well to the Barbary Merchants…"), and I have the book on my shelf but haven't gotten around to reading it yet.

I finished China Mieville's Kraken. A hugely imaginative, and very well written, science fiction novel, expanding on the Cthulhu myth and Tennyson's 'Kraken' sonnet.

I'm now reading Art Spiegelman's graphic novel Maus.
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« Reply #189 on: August 26, 2015, 02:43:14 AM »

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« Reply #190 on: August 26, 2015, 02:55:45 AM »


I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.


If you enjoyed that, check out the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volumes (including "The Black Dossier").  It's set in the broader world of fiction - ie, Moore and artist Kevin O'Neil borrow/steal as many fictional characters as possible (from various genres and mediums), in some cases as main characters, in other cases to pad out the background - and the greatest superhero ever appears in the Century series (no spoilers here).
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« Reply #191 on: August 26, 2015, 07:47:03 AM »

Recently finished Judge Dredd: America.  Now I'm starting on the Case Files, beginning with no. 4.
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« Reply #192 on: August 27, 2015, 08:49:01 AM »


I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.


If you enjoyed that, check out the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volumes (including "The Black Dossier").  It's set in the broader world of fiction - ie, Moore and artist Kevin O'Neil borrow/steal as many fictional characters as possible (from various genres and mediums), in some cases as main characters, in other cases to pad out the background - and the greatest superhero ever appears in the Century series (no spoilers here).


Thanks for the tip, Alan. I had my eye on From Hell too, and I'd be curious to know what AGD thinks of it, if he's read it, being a Ripper scholar. I can imagine, as Alan Moore takes a couple of liberties with his speculation (though apparently it is meticulously researched), that it wouldn't be to Andrew's taste, but, as Al sez, "strange things happen"! Smiley
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« Reply #193 on: September 03, 2015, 02:20:18 AM »

Maus is a powerful and moving book, and highly skilled artistically. Recommended for anyone looking to see how far the "comics" medium can be stretched, to see what comics can do that novels and movies can't.

I'm diving right into MetaMaus, and it's fascinating to hear Spiegelman discuss the artistic process and see rough drafts.
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« Reply #194 on: September 03, 2015, 04:18:32 AM »

William S. Burroughs's Junky.
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A band called The Beach Boys are mostly going to be a fun in the sun-themed group. And that has, is, and will always be just as it should. There needs to be ONE classic band that isn't a pack of endless "artistic" moan. All people wanna do is make The Beach Boys into another Beatles they are less tired of.
And, for anyone who has actually experienced them, surfing and cars carry PLENTY of emotion and life experience. They can carry as much metaphor as any Van Dyke Parks clever epistle.
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« Reply #195 on: September 03, 2015, 05:14:56 AM »

William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?
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« Reply #196 on: September 08, 2015, 06:59:39 AM »

William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?

Nope, nor have I read anything else by Burroughs. But I do enjoy this a whole lot at the moment.
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A band called The Beach Boys are mostly going to be a fun in the sun-themed group. And that has, is, and will always be just as it should. There needs to be ONE classic band that isn't a pack of endless "artistic" moan. All people wanna do is make The Beach Boys into another Beatles they are less tired of.
And, for anyone who has actually experienced them, surfing and cars carry PLENTY of emotion and life experience. They can carry as much metaphor as any Van Dyke Parks clever epistle.
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« Reply #197 on: September 08, 2015, 09:49:37 AM »

William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?

Nope, nor have I read anything else by Burroughs. But I do enjoy this a whole lot at the moment.

I wholly recommend On the Road by Jack Kerouac, as the pinnacle of the Beat movement and writing style. It has an overbearing reputation, but it's a tremendous work. More than the stereotypes usually associated with the book (though it is also hugely fun), it is tender and melancholy at its heart, in a similar way to Junky. A lot of great Beat literature balances this extrovert/introvert aspect. Also maybe check out The Subterraneans and Tristessa by Kerouac. Burroughs actually features as a character in all 3, but most heavily in Tristessa.
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« Reply #198 on: September 08, 2015, 10:04:50 AM »

William S. Burroughs's Junky.

I enjoyed that one. Burroughs was such a good writer of conventional narratives that it's a shame he spent so much time and effort on stuff i consider unreadable like The Ticket That Exploded, when the avant garde became 'avant garde a clue', to borrow from George Harrison. Naked Lunch was good as well, but i think it's at the tipping point of what i can stand from him.

Have you read many Beat writers?

Nope, nor have I read anything else by Burroughs. But I do enjoy this a whole lot at the moment.

I wholly recommend On the Road by Jack Kerouac, as the pinnacle of the Beat movement and writing style. It has an overbearing reputation, but it's a tremendous work. More than the stereotypes usually associated with the book (though it is also hugely fun), it is tender and melancholy at its heart, in a similar way to Junky. A lot of great Beat literature balances this extrovert/introvert aspect. Also maybe check out The Subterraneans and Tristessa by Kerouac. Burroughs actually features as a character in all 3, but most heavily in Tristessa.

Thanks for the description. What other good Beat writers are there?
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A band called The Beach Boys are mostly going to be a fun in the sun-themed group. And that has, is, and will always be just as it should. There needs to be ONE classic band that isn't a pack of endless "artistic" moan. All people wanna do is make The Beach Boys into another Beatles they are less tired of.
And, for anyone who has actually experienced them, surfing and cars carry PLENTY of emotion and life experience. They can carry as much metaphor as any Van Dyke Parks clever epistle.
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« Reply #199 on: September 09, 2015, 03:38:24 AM »


I also just finished, for the first time, Watchmen, by Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons. I haven't read much in the way of graphic novels, but this was superb. An in-depth take on the (alternative) reality of costumed superheroes, and I was impressed by how much narrative detail was packed into the pictures. The Incredibles owes a big debt to it.


If you enjoyed that, check out the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen Volumes (including "The Black Dossier").  It's set in the broader world of fiction - ie, Moore and artist Kevin O'Neil borrow/steal as many fictional characters as possible (from various genres and mediums), in some cases as main characters, in other cases to pad out the background - and the greatest superhero ever appears in the Century series (no spoilers here).


Thanks for the tip, Alan. I had my eye on From Hell too, and I'd be curious to know what AGD thinks of it, if he's read it, being a Ripper scholar. I can imagine, as Alan Moore takes a couple of liberties with his speculation (though apparently it is meticulously researched), that it wouldn't be to Andrew's taste, but, as Al sez, "strange things happen"! Smiley

Can't help you, Sundance. I read very, very little fiction, and no Ripper fiction at all. The truth is fascinating enough...
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