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627202 Posts in 25168 Topics by 3581 Members - Latest Member: drummer_from_mars February 19, 2018, 01:52:56 AM
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 91 
 on: February 17, 2018, 12:47:01 PM 
Started by Reverend Joshua Sloane - Last post by undercover-m
There's also the issue before dealing with mental (un)health, which is asking why we aren't mentally healthy. I came across Johann Hari, who has some interesting things to say about the general lack of fulfillment in our lives that inflames mental health issues. Others discuss it as well, naturally. I think that's even more important, frankly, than treatment, although probably less urgent. (You've got to treat the immediate problems, but at some point we have to ask why we keep having those problems at rates that seem higher than we or anyone has had in the past, as I understand it, anyway.)
Yes, totally! We have no understanding of prevention. It's good to talk about your mental health even if you aren't feeling sad! I think it's also important to note that our society tends to suppress men's emotions, yet they're more likely to be the one wielding the gun.

Our lack of prevention is exactly why people treat symptoms, not the causes. I bet you that everyone who's on high blood pressure/cholesterol/etc., medication, could go off of it if they worked out a few days a week, ate some more vegetables, and drank fewer beers. Big Pharma reaps the benefits of our inability to take care of ourselves. Of course, some conditions are influenced by genetics, but for the most part, I think we're just lazy. I ran into someone recently who immediately went on beta-blockers for hunting-related anxiety/blood pressure problems. I'll get anxious to the point of hitting my head on the wall, but I'm trying hard to avoid relying on medication because I want to avoid feeling like that in first place. Again, I'm not saying that medication can't be the answer, but when it's our go-to solution, we need to re-think our strategy.

Frankly, I think people need to get out in nature more. Breathe some fresh air, exercise has been proven to help mental and physical health. Get off the couch, stop watching the news (whose sole purpose, no matter what network you watch, is to create ratings so they will sensationalize anything to get them). Lay off watching television all the time, crack open a book. Like undercover says: meditate, itís a great way to calm your mind down, and you seriously do feel great afterwards. That hygge practice seems perfectly logical: your home is your nest in this world - why wouldnít you make it as beautiful and comfortable as possible? Lay off the alcohol, itís a depressant and when ingested in copious amounts never leads to anything good - it actually warps your brain chemistry over time if you become dependent on it. Donít rely on anyone else for your happiness - learn a hobby that you can always carry with you no matter who youíre with in life. Play an instrument, learn how to paint. Go birdwatching. I think people spend too much time filling their minds with useless media (via internet, movies, shows, video games) that we lose touch of what the real world is - perhaps thatís why more and more people feel a disconnect with it, and feel anxiety about life. Anyways, Iím rambling.
As an environmentalist, I fully support this. For the most part, we evolved in the wild (that's including the hundreds of thousands of years preceding our first civilizations), so there's a valid reason for why being in the woods comforts us. We're currently not treating the Earth we evolved on very nicely, let alone appreciating it which has enormous mental and physical health benefits...

 92 
 on: February 17, 2018, 12:07:56 PM 
Started by SMiLE Brian - Last post by SMiLE Brian
Its like a new team, I hope Lebron stays in Cleveland now.

 93 
 on: February 17, 2018, 12:06:42 PM 
Started by SMiLE Brian - Last post by SMiLE Brian
Yeah its amazing considering how hard his life had been to that point....

 94 
 on: February 17, 2018, 12:02:26 PM 
Started by Reverend Joshua Sloane - Last post by SMiLE Brian
Great Post Rab! Grin

Anyway, the internet addiction is very real since I know people who spend HOURS at a time on Instagram and facebook. While at the same time never going out much in public.... Undecided

 95 
 on: February 17, 2018, 11:47:04 AM 
Started by Gettin Hungry - Last post by Rocker
Or maybe he could just keep rehashing the Pet Sounds 50th Anniversary!  Grin

By the way, well done in shoehorning Mike into a thread about Record Store day.


Always trying to help  Cool

 96 
 on: February 17, 2018, 11:41:51 AM 
Started by XY - Last post by Rocker
This is cool!


Bobby Figueroa and Carl B. Wilson - Pacific Ocean Blues

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VB6Ir3P7zgc&feature=youtu.be

 97 
 on: February 17, 2018, 10:45:09 AM 
Started by Reverend Joshua Sloane - Last post by rab2591
Great posts by both of you.

I feel like I know way too many people suffering from severe anxiety and panic disorders. I know people from many different walks of life, many different fields, and it just seems to be a common problem. Itís so bad that I sometimes ask ďdid something get put in the water 30 years ago thatís making so many of us more fearful and on edge?Ē (Hearing about the levels of prescription drugs and plastics in our water supply it wouldnít surprise me if that is the reason for the overall changing anxiety issue in the US). I mean my parents generation and my grandparents generation fought two very intense wars, they lived under the severe threat of nuclear annihilation...yet they got through it seemingly fine (thatís not to say no one had anxiety then, but I feel like itís an exponentially bigger problem now than it ever has been).

I sometimes wonder if the chill alcohol atmosphere in the workplace of the 60s (and prior years), the chill view of smoking back then, made anxiety back then seem nonexistent...people were easily able to feel relaxed with a puff or a swig of booze. Nowadays all of that is taboo and weíre to rely on prescription meds to feel better (perhaps for the better, I really donít know)...and yeah, not too many people are willing to get help that way these days.

But yes, whatís initially causing this problem? 1 in 8 Americans is an alcoholic. People are going on these petulant shooting rampages. Heroine epidemics on the rise. 88,000 people dying in America last year from alcohol related incidents...290,000 Americans injured in drunk driving wrecks in 2016. This latest generation seems to be addicted to Snapchat and instagram, the prior generation Facebook - many from both generations seemingly suffering from a serious narcissistic tendencies. Perhaps we want instant gratification, we want happiness without being willing to work hard for it...but where do we find happiness anyways?

Frankly, I think people need to get out in nature more. Breathe some fresh air, exercise has been proven to help mental and physical health. Get off the couch, stop watching the news (whose sole purpose, no matter what network you watch, is to create ratings so they will sensationalize anything to get them). Lay off watching television all the time, crack open a book. Like undercover says: meditate, itís a great way to calm your mind down, and you seriously do feel great afterwards. That hygge practice seems perfectly logical: your home is your nest in this world - why wouldnít you make it as beautiful and comfortable as possible? Lay off the alcohol, itís a depressant and when ingested in copious amounts never leads to anything good - it actually warps your brain chemistry over time if you become dependent on it. Donít rely on anyone else for your happiness - learn a hobby that you can always carry with you no matter who youíre with in life. Play an instrument, learn how to paint. Go birdwatching. I think people spend too much time filling their minds with useless media (via internet, movies, shows, video games) that we lose touch of what the real world is - perhaps thatís why more and more people feel a disconnect with it, and feel anxiety about life. Anyways, Iím rambling.

 98 
 on: February 17, 2018, 10:06:35 AM 
Started by Reverend Joshua Sloane - Last post by the captain
There's also the issue before dealing with mental (un)health, which is asking why we aren't mentally healthy. I came across Johann Hari, who has some interesting things to say about the general lack of fulfillment in our lives that inflames mental health issues. Others discuss it as well, naturally. I think that's even more important, frankly, than treatment, although probably less urgent. (You've got to treat the immediate problems, but at some point we have to ask why we keep having those problems at rates that seem higher than we or anyone has had in the past, as I understand it, anyway.)

 99 
 on: February 17, 2018, 09:30:42 AM 
Started by Juice Brohnston - Last post by KDS
The Beach Boys will be playing the Just For Laughs Festival in Montreal this July. Although confirmed, the date has not been released yet. Seeing as they are playing the Ottawa area on the 21st, one could assume it will be that same weekend, either the 20'th or 21st. Outdoor stage, Free show.

At a comedy festival?  Seems like a strange venue to be playing. I do believe you, and I did google it and found a few articles on it.  But just seems a little odd.

Most curiously, Brian is down as a comedy act at Bensalem PA on May 8th!

http://petsoundsforum.com/thread/2294/new-bw-show?page=1&scrollTo=57133

Maybe thwy've heard Brian's lighter joke. 

 100 
 on: February 17, 2018, 09:13:30 AM 
Started by Reverend Joshua Sloane - Last post by undercover-m
There is also an obvious cultural issue here, and I don't just mean gun ownership, or hunting, or self protection. Call it "mental health" if you want, obviously it's that on some level. People don't shoot people unless they are mentally ill, in my opinion. (Does a sane person decide to shoot someone?) So ... what makes Americans batshit crazy that they disproportionately shoot people? It isn't just the existence of guns. There is something wrong with us. There is something wrong with our minds. Our culture. How we raise children. Something. I don't know what it is.
We're absolute sh*t when it comes to addressing mental health. I struggle with anxiety and low self-esteem. I was never encouraged to "go seek help," although I love my parents they never seemed to really "get" my emotional struggles and often made me feel bad for feeling bad, and I have ended up suppressing thoughts that just end up in more suffering. Like most Americans, I was taught to just suck it up, get over it, and get my confidence back.

Ha. Just like that? Americans are supposed to believe that the inner city kid who's been ostracized their entire like just needs to "get back on his feet?" Or that the workshorse who never gets to see his kids and envies his more successful coworkers and suffers from back pain is supposed to just keep going on? It's no wonder we suffer from mental health problems, from mild depression to people unstable enough to shoot young children without question.

I don't have the answer to gun control. What I do know is that there is resistance, or at least a lack of awareness, for practices such as mindfulness, meditation, even going to therapy. When I told my parents I wanted to see a therapist, their reaction was, "Can't you just talk to us?" and while talking to friends and family can help, people need to know that there is nothing wrong with seeking help. People need to get out of the the mindset that if they turn to these methods, that there isn't anything wrong with them.

Basically, Americans don't know how to deal with their emotional problems. Poor parenting, lack of education (no one is taught how to take care of themselves, both mentally, but also how to eat properly, budget, etc... an unhealthy diet and debt are sure to cause poor mental health), suspicion towards "hocus-pocus" concepts like meditation, and in general, not cultivating a culture of love and acceptance.

While Eastern tradition combat stress with meditation and breathing, over in Denmark they have a practice called hygge (pronounced "hoo-ga"). It roughly translates into "warmth and comfort," and the whole concept is about making yourself as cozy as possible. That means warm lighting (reddish/orange hues), lots and LOTS of candles, taking a warm bath, cooking your favorite meal over the stove, filling your shelves with welcoming decor, books, and art. I don't see to many homes in the States like this, and let's not even get started with the harsh, fluorescent-lit, sterile office cubicles many are forces to work in.

So yes, there is something terribly wrong with the way we live. I think we're slowly opening up to these foreign concepts of making ourselves happy, but until we fundamentally change the way we live, mental health may largely go unaddressed...

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