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676487 Posts in 27293 Topics by 4033 Members - Latest Member: Then He Kissed Me August 15, 2022, 02:48:52 PM
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1  Non Smiley Smile Stuff / General Music Discussion / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Published on: August 13, 2022, 02:00:35 PM



Batman
Jan Berry’s Authentic Original Music Score
Used by the Wrecking Crew to Record the Original Song (and for live performances).
Arranged by Jan Berry
Transcribed by Mark A. Moore

Size: 11″ x 17″
Length: 78 pages

Contents: Cover Page, Introductory Text, Full Score Studio Recording Arrangement (with Full Vocal Arrangement and Individual Charts), Full Score Alternate Brass and Woodwind Arrangement (with Individual Charts), and End Page.

Studio Recording Arrangement (18 parts): Alto Sax, Tenor Sax, Baritone Sax; Trumpet 1-3, French Horn, Trombone 1-3, Tuba; Guitar 1-3, Bass; Timpani, Drums; Piano

Vocal Arrangement (5 parts): Lead, Falsetto, Alto, Tenor, and Bass

Alternate Brass and Woodwind Arrangement (live performances) (11 parts): Alto Sax, Tenor Sax, Baritone Sax; Trumpet 1-3, French Horn, Trombone 1-3, Tuba.

Distributed by: ArrangeMe and the Hal Leonard Corporation.
Licensed from: EMI Music Publishing.
Available from: Sheet Music Direct, Hal Leonard’s premier outlet for digital sheet music.
Published: August 13, 2022 (Fiji Printing #3).

https://www.sheetmusicdirect.com/en-US/se/ID_No/1189842/Product.aspx

https://jananddean-janberry.com/jan-berrys-authentic-original-music-scores/

2  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: I recreate Help Me, Rhonda on: July 29, 2022, 07:26:46 PM

Excellent !!  Love this.

3  Non Smiley Smile Stuff / General Music Discussion / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Published on: July 27, 2022, 01:58:12 PM


The Anaheim, Azusa & Cucamonga Sewing Circle, Book Review and Timing Association
Jan Berry’s Authentic Original Music Score
Used by the Wrecking Crew to Record the Original Song (and for live performances).
Arranged by Jan Berry
Transcribed by Mark A. Moore

Size: 11″ x 17″
Length: 71 pages
Contents: Cover Page, Introductory Text, Full Score Studio Recording Arrangement (with Full Vocal Arrangement and Individual Charts), Full Score Alternate Brass and Woodwind Arrangement (with Individual Charts), and End Page.

Studio Recording Arrangement (20 parts): Oboe, Bassoon, Trumpet, French Horn; Guitar 1-3, Bass 1-2; Glockenspiel, Timpani, Percussion, Drums 1-2; Harpsichord, Piano; Vocals (lead, falsetto, alto, tenor, and bass).

Alternate Brass and Woodwind Arrangement (live performances) (11 parts): Alto Sax 1-2, Tenor Sax 1-2, Baritone Sax; Trumpet 1-3, Trombone 1-3.

Distributed by: ArrangeMe and the Hal Leonard Corporation.
Licensed from: Universal Music Careers.
Available from: Sheet Music Direct, Hal Leonard’s premier outlet for digital sheet music.
Published: July 27, 2022 (Fiji Printing #2).

https://www.sheetmusicdirect.com/en-US/se/ID_No/1161003/Product.aspx

https://jananddean-janberry.com/jan-berrys-authentic-original-music-scores/

4  Non Smiley Smile Stuff / General Music Discussion / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Published on: July 27, 2022, 01:56:12 PM


Dead Man’s Curve
Jan Berry’s Authentic Original Music Score
Used by the Wrecking Crew to Record the Original Song (and for live performances).
Arranged by Jan Berry
Transcribed by Mark A. Moore

Size: 10″ x 14″
Length: 48 pages
Contents: Cover Page; Introductory Text; Full Score; Individual Charts; and End Page.
18 Parts: Alto Sax 1-2; Tenor Sax 1-2; Baritone Sax; Trumpet 1-3; Trombone 1-3; Bass; Guitars 1-3; Timpani; Drums; and Piano (classic “big band” lineup for jazz ensembles).

Distributed by: ArrangeMe and the Hal Leonard Corporation.
Licensed from: Screen Gems-EMI Music, Inc.
Available from: Sheet Music Direct, Hal Leonard’s premier outlet for digital sheet music.
Published: May 17, 2022 (Fiji Printing #1).

https://www.sheetmusicdirect.com/en-US/se/ID_No/1132222/Product.aspx

https://jananddean-janberry.com/jan-berrys-authentic-original-music-scores/

5  Non Smiley Smile Stuff / General Music Discussion / Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Published on: July 27, 2022, 01:54:01 PM
For those who are interested, I'm in the process of publishing some of Jan Berry's original music scores from the 1960s. I'm transcribing them from the original documents used by the Wrecking Crew to record the original Jan & Dean songs.

I'll post information for each title as they become available.

The series began with publication of the transcription for "Dead Man's Curve."

6  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Being Published on: June 03, 2022, 02:34:18 PM
Mark, can you clarify what exactly went down in terms of tracking between the first version of DMC and the later version?

Did Jan have the score as you've published it worked up for the initial version with plans to overdub from the get-go?  Or did he re-arrange the horns and produce new scores for the overdub session?

I can't quite tell -- did the additional horn overdub replace the horns from the basic session, or supplement them?  Since that track only mix from "All the Hits" was able to be produced, I'm assuming the original horn track was never taped over, at least.

Thanks -- I'm curious how Jan went about developing the arrangement.


Well, it’s interesting. I’ve never seen any horn parts for the first version of “Dead Man’s Curve.” They aren’t in Jan’s archive. Lost? Stolen? Thrown away? Who knows?

The take we hear on All the Hits was from the November 14, 1963, session. And the few horn parts were played live with the rhythm section.

The “Taps” motif at the end is on the first version, which we also hear on the second version.

It’s possible Jan had the few horns playing live on the first version to provide a foundation for the overdubs (done on December 4, 1963, after the LP version was released). But I think the horns on the first version were sparse enough that Jan could have buried them with the overdubs for the second version. (Some of the parts on the first version are slightly different than parts in the final arrangement).

However, there would have been multiple takes at that November 14 session. Different parts of different takes could have been used. You’ll notice on the take on All the Hits that the drummers hit their bass drum/crash cymbal (loudly) on the downbeat during the recitation section. But that is missing on both the final LP version and the hit single.

I think the first version, with the subpar lead vocal, was a rush job to fill out the Drag City LP. The album’s official release date was November 27, 1963. Jan did the horn overdubs for the single version a week later, on December 4. He clearly had bigger plans for the song.
7  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Being Published on: June 02, 2022, 03:56:52 PM
A few questions, Mark -

I can't afford to buy the score as of now, but I was wondering, is the written piano part on Dead Man's Curve identical to what Brian plays on the recording? I've always been curious to know if it's something Jan made him play note-for-note, or if Brian deviated from the sheet music a bit. Since Brian had a hand in writing the song, and had his own unique way of playing, it would surprise me if he just read the part without throwing in his own ideas.

And speaking of "It's As Easy as 1, 2, 3", there isn't a piano on that, is there? Same question for Rockin' Little Roadster - did Brian get called in that day just to play on "Barons"?


There were four songs on the November 14, 1963, session: “Dead Man’s Curve”; “Hot Stocker”; “Surf Route 101”; and “Drag Strip Girl”

Three keyboardists were present—Leon Russell, Al DeLory, and Brian Wilson—but all three may not have played on every track during the session (though that's possible). The division of labor is not entirely clear. We know Jan refers to Leon's playing during the recording of "Dead Man's Curve." Maybe Brian sat in on "Surf Route 101." He's credited as a co-writer of "Surf Route 101" on the Drag City album packaging but not in the copyright filing for the song. Maybe Brian was present as a consultant. Hard to say for sure.

The piano chart for "Dead Man's Curve" shows the chords, with slash notation in the treble clef. The bass clef (left hand) is pitch notation that doubles the bass line. Jan often did that for his piano charts. Sometimes they kept it, and sometimes they crossed it out. An arpeggio sweep is notated across bass and treble clefs leading to the recitation.

In general, the keyboard players would have played in their own way, based on the piano charts. They worked so much with Jan they knew what he liked and wanted. Jan often provided specific notation for certain piano parts (like when he wanted the whole ensemble to play the same rhythmic pattern). Otherwise, the pros did their thing. If Jan didn't like something, he'd stop them and they'd work it out.

Obviously, Jan's arrangements are not three-chord ditties. Depending on the song, you'll see 6th, 7th, minor 7th, 9th, diminished, augmented, etc.

"It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" and "Rockin' Little Roadster" do have piano parts (with Leon Russell and Brian Wilson listed on that session). Jan's arrangements always had a keyboard part. For "It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" it's a chord chart with no slash or pitch notation. For "Rockin' Little Roadster," it's a combination of chords and slash notation, with specific pitch notation in certain parts. ("Rockin' Little Roadster" is part of my publishing project).

"Barons, West L.A." is interesting because Jan assigned specific players to parts (in the score and consequently on the charts). He assigned the piano part to Brian Wilson and the organ part to Leon Russell. And Brian was listed on the session—so, strong documentary evidence that Brian played keys on "Barons, West L.A."

Two other items of note . . .

For "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Surfin' Wild," Jan wrote "Brian Wilson Left Hand" on the piano part, on the bass clef (score and chart)—a style instruction for the keyboard player on the sessions.



Thanks for the response, Mark! Really valuable stuff. So if Brian was playing anything on that date, it wasn't Dead Man's Curve? You're right, Surf Route 101 seems most likely, since he co-wrote the song (By the way, like Dead Man's Curve, Brian's name wasn't on the initial copyright filing, but amendments were made to include his name).

Surf City also intrigues me. Have you heard that basic tracking session? Was the piano played live, or overdubbed? If it was live, is there a chance Brian played it? And, interesting on that last remark. Makes sense that Jan would notate that left hand part, since those are both songs they wrote together - he must've really liked the way Brian played them, and wanted to be sure they retained the same feeling in the studio!


I think Leon Russell is on "Surf City," though he's not on the AFM contract (no keyboard player is listed). The piano becomes evident on the ending, with glissandos, etc. Not really Brian's style. Not really Jan's playing style, either.

8  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Being Published on: June 02, 2022, 02:09:57 PM
A few questions, Mark -

I can't afford to buy the score as of now, but I was wondering, is the written piano part on Dead Man's Curve identical to what Brian plays on the recording? I've always been curious to know if it's something Jan made him play note-for-note, or if Brian deviated from the sheet music a bit. Since Brian had a hand in writing the song, and had his own unique way of playing, it would surprise me if he just read the part without throwing in his own ideas.

And speaking of "It's As Easy as 1, 2, 3", there isn't a piano on that, is there? Same question for Rockin' Little Roadster - did Brian get called in that day just to play on "Barons"?


There were four songs on the November 14, 1963, session: “Dead Man’s Curve”; “Hot Stocker”; “Surf Route 101”; and “Drag Strip Girl”

Three keyboardists were present—Leon Russell, Al DeLory, and Brian Wilson—but all three may not have played on every track during the session (though that's possible). The division of labor is not entirely clear. We know Jan refers to Leon's playing during the recording of "Dead Man's Curve." Maybe Brian sat in on "Surf Route 101." He's credited as a co-writer of "Surf Route 101" on the Drag City album packaging but not in the copyright filing for the song. Maybe Brian was present as a consultant. Hard to say for sure.

The piano chart for "Dead Man's Curve" shows the chords, with slash notation in the treble clef. The bass clef (left hand) is pitch notation that doubles the bass line. Jan often did that for his piano charts. Sometimes they kept it, and sometimes they crossed it out. An arpeggio sweep is notated across bass and treble clefs leading to the recitation.

In general, the keyboard players would have played in their own way, based on the piano charts. They worked so much with Jan they knew what he liked and wanted. Jan often provided specific notation for certain piano parts (like when he wanted the whole ensemble to play the same rhythmic pattern). Otherwise, the pros did their thing. If Jan didn't like something, he'd stop them and they'd work it out.

Obviously, Jan's arrangements are not three-chord ditties. Depending on the song, you'll see 6th, 7th, minor 7th, 9th, diminished, augmented, etc.

"It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" and "Rockin' Little Roadster" do have piano parts (with Leon Russell and Brian Wilson listed on that session). Jan's arrangements always had a keyboard part. For "It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3" it's a chord chart with no slash or pitch notation. For "Rockin' Little Roadster," it's a combination of chords and slash notation, with specific pitch notation in certain parts. ("Rockin' Little Roadster" is part of my publishing project).

"Barons, West L.A." is interesting because Jan assigned specific players to parts (in the score and consequently on the charts). He assigned the piano part to Brian Wilson and the organ part to Leon Russell. And Brian was listed on the session—so, strong documentary evidence that Brian played keys on "Barons, West L.A."

Two other items of note . . .

For "Ride the Wild Surf" and "Surfin' Wild," Jan wrote "Brian Wilson Left Hand" on the piano part, on the bass clef (score and chart)—a style instruction for the keyboard player on the sessions.

9  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Being Published on: June 02, 2022, 09:33:34 AM
Really cool.  "Anaheim, Azusa" is a crazy ride of a song.  While more obscure than something like Dead Man's Curve, I would think "It's As Easy As 1,2,3" and "Hawaii" would be interesting scores to see. 

Shane, we're definitely doing "It's As Easy As 1, 2, 3."

"Batman" is on deck after "Anaheim, Azusa."
10  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Being Published on: May 19, 2022, 04:03:17 PM
While outside of my realm of expertise, congratulations, Mark! Definitely a worthwhile endeavour!

Thanks Mitchell. "Anaheim, Azusa" is on deck.
11  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Being Published on: May 18, 2022, 04:41:56 PM

Joshilyn,

Yes, it would be a good avenue for you. You have complete control over your project while Hal Leonard handles the licensing and distribution. You can set your own price, too (at least to a degree).

They have loads of Brian Wilson's compositions in their system. You search for the song you want to do a custom arrangement for, and they give the specific copyright statement that must appear at the bottom of your piece.

Obviously, in my case, Jan is the arranger, and I'm just the transcriber, and the packaging reflects that. But I got the okay on it because I have permission from Jan's widow. I originally priced "Dead Man's Curve" at $199.99, because it's on par with what a school might pay for music. The instrumentation is the classic "big band" lineup, which is perfect for high school and college jazz ensembles. But Hal Leonard sets a minimum price of $49.99 for this kind of arrangement, so I just went ahead and re-set the price to the minimum. That way, anyone who is interested can have access at the lowest possible cost.

Hal Leonard has rights to some of Jan's compositions that weren't in the system, so I gave them the titles and they added them for me. It's a cool system and service.

On the down side, it's like any other publishing outlet, in that they make the most money on sales. But that's just the nature of the publishing business.



12  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Jan Berry's Original Music Scores Being Published on: May 17, 2022, 10:12:08 PM
Apologies for the semi-off-topic post but there's a Brian Wilson connection here.

For the benefit of musicians who can read music and might be interested:

AUTHENTIC SHEET MUSIC — Fifty-six years after the car accident that changed his life forever, Jan Berry’s original music scores and charts from the 1960s still exist—the actual documents used by the Wrecking Crew to record the original songs. These fascinating manuscripts open an important window on Jan’s body of work for Jan & Dean and other artists.

In association with Jan’s estate, author Mark A. Moore has begun to transcribe and publish some of Jan’s best arrangements, to shed more light on him as a songwriter and arranger, and to invite further study of the music.

These transcribed scores will interest musicians, music educators, school ensembles, bands, and any musician/aficionado of the West Coast Sound and the Hollywood studio system of the 1960s.

First up is the classic “Dead Man’s Curve” . . . and more will soon follow:

Dead Man’s Curve
Jan Berry’s Authentic Original Music Score
Used by the Wrecking Crew to Record the Original Song (and for live performances).
Arranged by Jan Berry
Transcribed by Mark A. Moore

Size: 10″ x 14″
Length: 48 pages
Contents: Cover Page; Introductory Text; Full Score; Individual Charts; and End Page.
18 Parts: Alto Sax 1-2; Tenor Sax 1-2; Baritone Sax; Trumpet 1-3; Trombone 1-3; Bass; Guitars 1-3; Timpani; Drums; and Piano.

Distributed by: ArrangeMe and the Hal Leonard Corporation.
Licensed from: Screen Gems-EMI Music, Inc.
Available from: Sheet Music Direct, Hal Leonard’s premier outlet for digital sheet music.
Published: May 17, 2022.

BUY NOW






13  Non Smiley Smile Stuff / General Music Discussion / Re: Dead Man's Curve: The Rock 'n' Roll Life of Jan Berry on: April 16, 2022, 01:09:47 PM
Also a new two-hour audio interview, available online:

https://jananddean-janberry.com/media-dead-mans-curve-the-rock-n-roll-life-of-jan-berry/
14  Non Smiley Smile Stuff / General Music Discussion / Dead Man's Curve: The Rock 'n' Roll Life of Jan Berry on: March 30, 2022, 09:50:49 AM

For those who may be interested . . .

Here's an in-depth three-part interview I did for my book Dead Man's Curve: The Rock 'n' Roll Life of Jan Berry.

Pray for Surf

Part 1 — Background.

Part 2 — Jan Berry’s profile as a singer, songwriter, music arranger, and record producer, among other topics.

Part 3 — The long and often troubled relationship between Jan Berry and Dean Torrence.

15  Non Smiley Smile Stuff / General Music Discussion / Re: Michael Nesmith dies at 78 on: December 10, 2021, 11:59:49 PM
I always liked the Monkees. When I was in grade school in the mid-1970s, there was a new thing called Cablevision and TBS out of Atlanta. All kinds of vintage shows were airing in syndication, including The Monkees, which I watched every day after school. At the same time, I bought the LP More of the Monkees for 50 cents at a yard sale on our street in 1975. Fun days.
16  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Billy Hinsche 1951-2021 on: November 21, 2021, 11:57:31 AM
I was sorry to hear of Billy's passing. Glad I got to meet him and see him perform live, including a solo set. Great musician.
17  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Jan & Dean's Version of 'Norwegian Wood' on: July 22, 2021, 01:16:37 PM
Joshilyn . . . Tried to send a private message, but this site returned an error twice. Did not go through.
18  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Jan & Dean's Version of 'Norwegian Wood' on: July 21, 2021, 05:19:18 PM
Some of the AFM documentation for Jan & Dean’s version of “Norwegian Wood” appears to be missing or misplaced. I could not find the contracts for the initial sessions in December 1965. But I do have them for the March 1966 sessions. Jan tinkered a lot with this track, working on different versions.

Musicians and engineers listed on the contracts include: Jan Berry (leader); Hal Blaine (double scale); Chuck Britz; Glen Campbell; Gary Coleman; Henry Lewy; Don Peake (2 Doubles); Ray Pohlman (1 Double); Julius Wechter (1 Double)

The instrumentation featured Guitars 1–2, Bass Guitar [Danelectro 6-string], Bass, Drums, Percussion [Vibraphone, Marimba, Chimes, Tambourine], and Horns [Trumpet, Trombone, Saxophone].

That's Don Peake playing the signature riff with an electric 12-string.

The guitar chart specified two electric 12-string guitars assigned to “Tom” and “Don” (Tommy Tedesco and Don Peake).
19  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Remembering Dennis? on: January 01, 2021, 08:40:35 PM
Yes, Carl was at the Fayetteville show.
20  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Remembering Dennis? on: January 01, 2021, 12:19:02 AM
I was in high school—17 years old (almost 18)—when Dennis died in 1983.

My interest in Jan & Dean had led me to the Beach Boys in 1978. With my meager pocket money, I bought a Capitol Special Markets compilation LP called Beach Boys Super Hits—complete with an ad for the Ronco Record Vacuum on the back cover. I still have it—yellow disc label with an illustration of the Capitol Records tower. This album introduced me to some of the most recognizable early material, plus the later “Barbara Ann.”

I tore off the wrap and put the LP on my turntable. Rather than letting it play through, I manually dropped the needle on individual tracks. After Side1, I flipped to Side 2 and went for “Do You Wanna Dance.” But I missed the leader and caught the tail end of the previous track. Hearing that, I thought, “Wait, Wait . . . Wait just a minute, here. That’s ‘Sidewalk Surfin’’ by Jan & Dean.” But lo and behold, it was “Catch a Wave.”

My next acquisition (in 1979) was Live in London—a revelation. To my young mind, the sound of the band playing live across the pond in the late '60s made it seem like eons had passed between their early incarnation and this different sound. But it was only about seven years, and that still resonates with me.

This was the album that got me interested in Dennis Wilson as a drummer.

From there, I found the Endless Summer compilation . . . which led to everything else.

Having seen Jan & Dean perform live in 1981, I saw the Beach Boys in concert in Fayetteville, N.C., in 1982. My oldest sister bought the tickets, and we went together. I remember Al Jardine singing their current hit, a cover of “Come Go with Me.” They also performed two Jan & Dean hits: “Surf City” and “The Little Old Lady (from Pasadena).”

I would later learn that it was a dark time for the band. Neither Brian Wilson nor Dennis Wilson was present for the Fayetteville performance. That fact was obvious, but I did not know why at the time. As it turned out, both were experiencing some of the lowest points in their lives.

Brian would claw his way back, but Dennis died the following year. This was long before the Internet and 24-hour cable news coverage. But when Dennis drowned in Marina Del Rey, his death earned a brief mention on the national television news.

I now know that the year 1978 marked the beginning of Dennis’s end. His sad decline—much of it public—is easily traced from there.

Looking back on that era, I always gravitate to my memories of hearing Live in London for the first time in 1979, and how I later came to appreciate that album as one of the best examples of Dennis’s live drumming.

As I got older, Dennis’s evolution as a songwriter amazed me.

21  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Best Brian Wilson collaborator on: May 21, 2020, 01:06:48 AM
In my opinion, Brian Wilson’s best collaborators were Beach Boys related—Mike Love, Roger Christian, Tony Asher, and Van Dyke Parks.

The only outside chart success Brian Wilson ever achieved as a songwriter, in a collaborative relationship, was his work with Jan Berry for Jan & Dean.

Between 1962 and 1965 Brian wrote, arranged, and produced music for Bob & Sheri, the Honeys, Sharon Marie, the Survivors, the Castells, Paul Petersen, and Glen Campbell.  Most of this material was released on major labels—Capitol and Warner Bros.—when Brian was at the height of his powers. Yet not only were those releases not hits, they did not chart at all. Not one of them.

Brian wanted to surpass Phil Spector. But in my opinion, that was a false and misguided quest. Brian’s work with the Beach Boys alone—songwriting, arranging, producing, and recordings—far exceeded Spector’s output.
22  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Danelectro 6 on BBs records - a video introduction on: May 16, 2020, 12:46:38 PM
Also, who played Bellzouki on Anaheim?

Looking at the session contract, we can narrow it down.

Bass — Jimmy Bond, Lyle Ritz

Keyboards — Leon Russell (tack piano, and later harpsichord)

Drums — Earl Palmer, Hal Blaine (playing in tandem, in unison)

Guitars — Glen Campbell, Billy Strange, Tommy Tedesco, Bill Pitman


Looking at the guitar players . . .

Bill Pitman played Dano . . . reading Guitar III.

Glen Campbell could not read music, so he likely played chords, looking at Guitar I . . . That's not to say Campbell could not rip a lead solo with the best of them. He could. But these parts were specific.

That leaves Billy Strange and Tommy Tedesco. It's been a while since I listened to the session tape, but both of these guys were capable of doing it. It was one of these two, reading Guitar II. And the one who did not play Bellzouki would have read from either Guitar I or Guitar !!, as both charts had the chord progressions.


Just adding a bit onto this regarding Glen and what he played in general, it ties in to the description of this session for a lot of what Glen played overall in the 60's.

Glen could read the basics, it's not that he was musically illiterate as some descriptions from the past may lead non-musicians to believe, but his skill was not reading notes on the staff. Amazingly a lot of well-known session guitarists self-admit that reading traditional notation for guitar was their weakness, while other guys were specialists at it.

Glen had the innate ability to come up with a hook or a key riff in his head and deliver it on the spot during a session. That was his calling card, and besides having an amazing touch and feel for the guitar, that was why he was so in demand. A lot of the hooks and solos he played were not written or created before he sat down at the session to play the song, and a lot of them could not have been written by a traditional arranger unless it was a skeleton of an idea that Glen would flesh out.

The more I read and heard his fellow players talk about what Glen could do, the more respect I had for him. I think it was Jimmy Bond who said "Glen could do things no one else could do", and that about summed it up.

So Glen would and could read a chord or form chart, with appropriate rhythmic "hits" and rests the whole band would need to hit together, and if needed he would add solo fills or add a hook even, besides playing the chords. And if it were a specific part, all Glen would need to do is hear it, and he'd be able to play it without having to read ledger lines and all that b.s. lol

The way Jan had the guitars organized above is pretty much how those guys did sessions across the board. Players like Tommy, Bob Bain, Neil LeVang Billy Pitman, Carol Kaye, etc were "readers" for specific parts...which is why they also got very busy working in the film industry which was mostly reading specific notation. The other group was the musicians who played more by ear...who knew the theory and all the chords, but whose strengths were more creating and developing parts on the fly versus specifically notated parts.

Glen was the guy who could read through charts but not read what they called "fly sh*t" back in the day. I know some other guitarists would get calls for a date, and depending on who the arranger or composer was booking the date, they'd say if it's a date reading "fly sh*t", call Tommy.  Grin  So Glen and the others were all called to fill specific roles, in the case of Jan who notated everything he needed a "reader" like Tommy and he also needed a guy like Glen who could add a hot lick or fill or solo if needed...parts that the arrangers/composers themselves perhaps could not have envisioned or written.

And Glen had his magical capo too...which allowed him to do things no one else was doing.  Smiley


One studio story which I'm sure Mark has heard, as told by Glen, and worth repeating. I think it's even on video somewhere. Paraphrased:

Glen and Tommy were doing a Jan Berry date. Jan walked around placing all the musicians' parts on the music stands. They go to run down the song, and Tommy starts playing this awful sounding part, totally wrong in the song. Jan comes over and asks what's wrong, Tommy says to Jan: I played exactly what you gave me. Jan looks at the chart on the stand...and sees he had put Tommy's chart on the stand upside down. And Tommy played it anyway, backwards and upside down! Glen eventually asked Tommy if what he just did was all bullshit, reading and playing the part upside down. Tommy then proceeded to repeat exactly what he did with the chart upside down, the same way he had played it the first time as part of his joke on Jan.

Now that's *scary*.... LOL

Glen was a great guitarist. No doubt about it.
23  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Danelectro 6 on BBs records - a video introduction on: May 16, 2020, 12:45:50 PM
Is it possible the harmonica solo there is two harmonica players (or one overdubbed?). There's a spot at the end of the phrases where it sounds like one of the harmonicas is not quite bending to the same pitch as the other one -- Maybe Tommy (a chromatic player) and somebody else playing diatonic doubled the line???

I've been transcribing Help Me Ronda, which has me thinking hard about harmonicas, which is why I'm so interested in this at the moment.

Mark, does a written part exist for the harmonica solo?

For the studio version, the harmonica part is not in the score or charts. There was originally another vocal verse there, instead of an instrumental break. That alternate version still exists, and then Jan changed it to the harmonica break.

In their live version, the Beach Boys did the extra verse.

If there was ever a chart for the harmonica parts, I’ve never seen it. Could have been lost or stolen, if it ever existed. It’s possible the parts could have been doubled.

The horn parts for the studio version are tenor sax, trumpet, flugelhorn, and French horn.

In Jan’s arrangement for the live version, the instrumental break is played by horns.
24  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Danelectro 6 on BBs records - a video introduction on: May 16, 2020, 07:02:28 AM
Mark - another question while you are here:

Any indication from the contracts who played harmonica on Little Old Lady?  Believe it or not, it's pretty important information to me!

The assumption is Tommy Morgan but I've never seen it officially documented.

Yeah, I've never seen it documented, but some of the musicians remember it being Tommy. I can document him playing on the instrumental "Skateboarding."
25  Smiley Smile Stuff / General On Topic Discussions / Re: Danelectro 6 on BBs records - a video introduction on: May 16, 2020, 01:04:29 AM
Also, who played Bellzouki on Anaheim?

Looking at the session contract, we can narrow it down.

Bass — Jimmy Bond, Lyle Ritz

Keyboards — Leon Russell (tack piano, and later harpsichord)

Drums — Earl Palmer, Hal Blaine (playing in tandem, in unison)

Guitars — Glen Campbell, Billy Strange, Tommy Tedesco, Bill Pitman


Looking at the guitar players . . .

Bill Pitman played Dano . . . reading Guitar III.

Glen Campbell could not read music, so he likely played chords, looking at Guitar I . . . That's not to say Campbell could not rip a lead solo with the best of them. He could. But these parts were specific.

That leaves Billy Strange and Tommy Tedesco. It's been a while since I listened to the session tape, but both of these guys were capable of doing it. It was one of these two, reading Guitar II. And the one who did not play Bellzouki would have read from either Guitar I or Guitar !!, as both charts had the chord progressions.

Great, thank you.  It's really helpful to get outside the Brian Wilson session routine.  It's also extraordinarily useful that you have the parts and the scores for this stuff.  Wish Brian used a copyist and kept his charts...

Mark (or anybody else), have you ever heard of any other caches of preserved scores, charts, and parts from the LA pop music scene?  That kind of thing would be...of inestimable value to my research.

I’m not a Beach Boys expert, but I’m not sure the kinds of music scores and charts Jan created existed for the Beach Boys. It wasn’t just a matter of having a copyist.

In Jan’s case, he wrote the music scores himself—a large master document featuring bar-by-bar chords and parts for all instruments, stacked on top of one another. And then a copyist would take that score, and all of its instructions, and generate the individual charts for the musicians.

Sometimes Jan hired the best copyists in the Hollywood studio system, but sometimes he served as his own copyist. And when he did the latter, he got paid for it through the union. Just as he was paid separately though the union for his music arrangements alone (notes on paper).

And not everything was specific. The musicians often added their own tweaks just from the chord progressions.

Obviously, if a Beach Boys session featured, strings, etc., there were charts for those. But who created them, and what was the source? String parts were three-fold: violin, viola, and cello. Who conceived the individual lines and wrote them out?

I would love to learn more about Brian Wilson’s dynamic with the Wrecking Crew, beyond chord charts. For example, how much did he dictate to the musicians in terms of specific parts, and how much came from the musicians themselves?

I’ve heard the session tape of the opening to “California Girls” (for example). What are the musicians looking at during that opening?

Endlessly fascinating.
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